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					                                       Workforce Investment Act
                                        Local Plan Modification
                                         Program Year 2011-12




           Local Workforce Investment Area (local area):

                               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa
           Name of Local Area: County

           Submitted on:                            June 30, 2011

           Contact Person:                          Stephen Baiter

           Contact Person’s Phone Number:                                                     925        602 - 6800
                                                                                         AREA CODE           PHONE NUMBER




EDD is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Special requests for
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         FWSD10-15A                                                    Page 1 of 1                                                          5/11
               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                  Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
1.     Identify the workforce investment needs of businesses and job seekers in your local area. [WIA Section
       118(b)(1)(a] Despite the lagging economic conditions of the past couple of years, business is always seeking
       those with technology skills and the desire to make a difference.

According to the Small Businesses administration (SBA) more than half of Americans either own or work for a small
business. The figures also show they create 60-90 percent of new jobs in the country. The same report noted small
businesses drive innovation, create 21st Century jobs and increase U.S. competitiveness.

In response to the lagging economic conditions; and in an effort to enhance economic vitality and support job
development, last year the Workforce Development Board conducted a focus group with local economic development
professionals and chambers of commerce. This focus group was designed to learn more about the business retention
and sustainability needs of the small business sector. The focus group resulted in the following intelligence:

          •    Businesses need access to capital.
          •    Businesses need to be educated through business training, consulting/coaching and mentoring.
          •    Businesses need help creating more jobs.

The following measures were put in place to address the needs of the business community:

          •    Hired Business Services Representatives to focus on business outreach, engagement, assessment and
               referral.
          •    Collaborated with the Community College District Economic Development and Contract Education
               Department to deliver small business training workshops.

Upon initial review and assessment, Business Services Representatives report the following business needs trends
among the small business community:

          •    Financial Strategies
          •    Business Model Analysis
          •    Marketing Strategies
          •    Business Growth and Expansion
          •    Business Start-up Assistance
          •    Hiring Strategies

Business training workshops were established to address the needs of the small business community:

          •    Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century
          •    Tips for Running a Home-Based Business
          •    Marketing to Get Real Results
          •    Cross-Cultural Market Expansion in the American Economy

Our countywide Business Services Representative has developed strong relationships with the city Economic
Development directors. Regular meetings are convened regionally to discuss and share business retention strategies
among the cities. Every effort is made on the part of the WDB to support those strategies by providing information,
making connections and creating resources. We are currently in the process of creating a Business Resources
Toolkit which can be marketed by the Business Services Representatives to individual businesses and/or Economic
Developers.

Additionally, we have strengthened our partnership with our local Small Business Development Center. As a result of
the outreach done by the BSRs, referrals for business advising increased dramatically. As mentioned, accessing
capital was one of the primary needs of Contra Costa businesses, as indicated by the Economic Development
agencies participating in our focus group. To meet that need, the SBDC created a Resource Guide for Accessing
Capital and has provided workshops on that topic in various communities, as well.

Both large and small businesses need access to compliance information in order to stay out of trouble legally. The
WDB has established a partnership with the local Employer Advisory Council which hosts seminars on an array of
relevant topics. Membership in this organization also provides businesses with no cost access to a management hot-

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                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
line staffed by an Employment Law attorney.

The workforce development needs of job seekers have been addressed by our One-Stop Career Centers through
cohort-based training programs and stronger community partnerships, including contracting for additional services in
under-resourced communities in Contra Costa County. Cohort-based training programs were developed for job
seekers as a way to offer job training to more job seekers in more efficient ways than have happened in the past.
Building stronger community partnerships between the One-Stop Career Centers the adult schools and community
colleges to leverage resources and offer more dispersed trainings and assessments helped us meet the workforce
investment needs of job seekers in our local area.

Because computer skills proficiency is needed for a wide variety of jobs, the Contra Costa Local Workforce
Investment Area (LWIA) and its One-Stop Career Centers participated in the statewide implementation of Elevate
America, a self directed computer skills class to job seekers with minimal computer skills and those with intermediate
and advanced skills. We issued 2,668 vouchers to Universal and WIA job seekers so they had the opportunity to get
computer skills that would help them as job seekers. This initiative complimented our investment in classroom-based
instruction in basic computer applications for adults and dislocated workers needing additional training to update
their skills to compete in the current labor market.

2.       What are the current and projected employment opportunities in your local area? [WIA Section 118(b)(1)(B) and
         California Unemployment Insurance Code (CUIC) Section 14221(a)]

An analysis of industry employment trends in Contra Costa and Alameda County over the past five years indicates that
almost all industries have suffered job reductions since 2007, particularly the Construction and Trade, Transportation, &
Utilities categories, which have each lost over 25,000 positions. The exception to this downward trend is the Health
Services industry, which has added 10,800 jobs.

According to the California Employment Development Department’s growth projections for 2008 – 2018 for Alameda
and Contra Costa Counties, Home Health Aides and Physician Assistants are among the fastest growing occupations in
the local health industry, posting 50 percent and 41 percent growth respectively.

A 2010 environmental scan of allied health occupations in the greater Bay Area by the Center of Excellence San
Francisco Bay Area indicates that health care employers expect to have more than 4,000 job openings over the next year
in ten specific occupations. Employers identified Medical Assistants, Pharmacy Technicians, and Medical Laboratory
Technicians as among those occupations that will have the most openings.

                          OAKLAND-FREMONT-HAYWARD METROPOLITAN DIVISION (MD)
                                 (ALAMEDA AND CONTRA COSTA COUNTIES)
                                  Most major industries trimmed jobs over the year

The unemployment rate in the Oakland-Fremont-Hayward MD was 10.4 percent in April 2011, down from a revised
11.0 percent in March 2011, and below the year-ago estimate of 11.2 percent. This compares with an unadjusted
unemployment rate of 11.7 percent for California and 8.7 percent for the nation during the same period. The
unemployment rate was 10.3 percent in Alameda County, and 10.5 percent in Contra Costa County.

Between March 2011 and April 2011, the total number of jobs located in the East Bay counties of Alameda and
Contra Costa increased by 5,500 jobs to total 945,300.

     •     Trade, transportation, and utilities increased by 2,400 jobs. Wholesale trade (up 1,400 jobs) accounted for
           a majority of the increase.

     •     Leisure and hospitality gained 2,000 jobs. Food services and drinking places increased by 1,200 jobs, while
           arts, entertainment, and recreation added 700 jobs.

     •     Private educational and health services rose by 900 jobs.

     •     Construction netted an increase of 700 jobs, in line with the average increase of 700 jobs between March
           and April over the prior 21 years. Gains in specialty trade contractors (up 900 jobs) more than offset losses
           in construction of buildings (down 300 jobs).

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                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
     •     On the down side, industries with month-over job losses included: manufacturing and other services (down
           300 jobs each), and information (down 200 jobs).

Between April 2010 and April 2011, the total number of jobs in the East Bay decreased by 5,300 jobs or 0.6
percent.

     •     Government registered a net loss of 3,700 jobs, with just under two-thirds of the decrease occurring in
           public schools (down 2,400 jobs).

     •     Construction decreased by 3,500 jobs from last April. Specialty trade contractors (down 2,900 jobs)
           accounted for most of the decline.

     •     Other industries with job losses of at least 1,000 included: manufacturing and information (down 1,100 jobs
           each), and financial activities (down 1,000 jobs).

     •     Meanwhile, private educational and health services had a year-over gain of 2,100 jobs. Health care and
           social assistance (up 1,100 jobs) accounted for just over half of the increase. Private education payrolls also
           expanded (up 1,000 jobs).

Beyond the data provided above through EDD, the East Bay labor market has generally had a sluggish and uneven
recovery. Some economists have projected that as many as three out of four job openings between now and 2020
are going to be through replacement jobs, with only one quarter emerging as a result of job growth/expansion.

3.       Describe any significant changes in your local area resulting from the current economic downturn and any
         differences in the way services are being delivered. [Title 20 Code of Federal Regulations (Title 20 CFR) Part
         661.355]

Layoff and closure data for Contra Costa from May 2010 to present appears below. It is projected that there was
a total of 2,586 layoffs or closures.

Closures:
    • Retail Trade 125
    • Finance & Insurance 134

Layoffs:
    • Finance & Insurance: 258
    • Professional, Scientific, Technical Services: 150
    • Information: 513
    • Healthcare: 61
    • Manufacturing: 300
    • Real Estate - Rental- Leasing: 949
    • Public Administration: 68
    • Educational Services: 28

Grant funding and cohort based funding have changed the way the One-Stop Career Centers have offered services
to job seekers. Some of this was the result of American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding and the
recession-based layoffs at firms such as New United Motors Manufacturing, Inc. (NUMMI), AT&T, Bank of America,
and others. We have increased the number and types of workshops to support some of these workers, as well as
enhancing our collaboration with EDD and other partners to offer more services to a larger pool of people seeking
help with employment issues. Cohort-based trainings offered through the One-Stop Career Centers helped job
seekers impacted by the layoffs from health care, finance, insurance, and real estate sectors.

4.       How is your local area serving Unemployment Insurance claimants? How is your local area supporting workers
         receiving benefits under the Trade Adjustment Assistance program? [WIA Section 121(b)(1)(B)(xii)]

Our local One-Stop Career Centers have seen a substantial increase in the number of Unemployment Insurance (UI)

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               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                  Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
claimants due to the recession and through the EDD Initial Assistance Workshop (IAW), Job Service 4 UI (PJSA) and
Reemployment Assistance (REA) workshops. For some time now – going back to even the pre-recession days, our One-
Stop partners have worked together to provide workshops by coordinating information so that every customer
coming into our site either through the UI channel or through the One-Stop Services orientation receive the same
information regarding all services available on-site. This has worked well for our sites and the customers we serve.
This was also one of the first steps we took towards a more integrated service model (although we are not technically
an integrated services site). Every customer who comes on-site has access to a large smorgasbord of partner services,
workshops, re-employment services, training opportunities and more.

The response we have provided to the NUMMI closure has been our biggest Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) effort to
date. We have co-enrolled laid off NUMMI workers with EDD, which has provided us with a larger pool of
participants and enhanced the number of services available. During the California budget impasse and due to our
receipt of the NEG and bridge TAA monies for NUMMI we co-enrolled NUMMI workers and provided training
dollars to TAA eligible clients. We continue to provide training support and supportive services where needed based
on the NUMMI workers assessment, training and supportive service needs in conjunction with EDD.

The Workforce Development Board intends to develop policy to address the needs of incumbent workers and the use
of Department of Labor funds to provide incumbent worker training opportunities. Incumbent worker training is an
effective business resource for training existing workers, upgrading their skills and positioning the business for
sustainability or growth. Additionally, incumbent worker training offers workers a platform for career advancement
support and positions the region with a strong supply of relevant talent.

5.     What programs and funding streams support service delivery through the One-Stop Career Center (One-Stop)
       system? If applicable, what are the anticipated changes to those programs or funding streams? [WIA Section
       121(b)(1)(B)]

Service delivery through our local One-Stop Career Center system is supported through a variety of funding sources,
including Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title I funds, Wagner-Peyser funds, Temporary Assistance to Needy
Families (TANF), Carl Perkins, Workforce Investment Act Title II funds, Community Service Block Grant (CSBG) funds,
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, Vocational Rehabilitation funds, as well as non-federal,
leveraged funds.

6.     Are each of the required WIA partners included in your One-Stop delivery system? If a required partner is not
       involved, explain the reason. [WIA Section 117(b)(2)(A)]

Each of the WIA mandated partners is participating in the One Stop system. The only required WIA partner that is
not presently included in our One-Stop delivery system is Job Corps, as they do not provide services in our local
area.

7.     Describe how your local area’s WIA funds are used to leverage other federal, state, local, and private resources.
       How do these coordinated resources lead to a more effective local system that expands the involvement of
       business, employers and individuals? [WIA Section 112(b)(10) and 121(c)(2)(A)(ii)]

We typically leverage resources including staff and direct service delivery to achieve economies of scale and
greater efficiencies. We have worked with our neighboring WIBs in the East Bay to achieve cost savings, worked
together to ensure maximum use of funds and resources in provision of direct services and in staff training. Many of
these efforts have resulted in new business processes, better regional alignment, a broader array of training
offerings, and overall cost savings. In addition, we make it a business practice to leverage our federal funds and
service delivery in support of other relevant and connected workforce system building in support of business and job
seekers. Some partners have included specific business sectors such as the hospitals, manufacturing and refinery
partners, our colleges and other education and economic development partners. We have worked closely with the
community colleges when they receive grant funding to leverage our resources to support outreach and recruitment,
assessment, career search, job readiness, case management, job development, placement, and follow-up services.
Most recently we provided these services in support of the Community College’s Clean Energy Workforce Training
Program (CEWTP). We are presently engaged in joint planning for implementation of the colleges’ Career
Advancement Academy (CAA) project, an initiative funded through the California Community College Chancellor’s
Office. Within the One-Stop Career Centers, partner resources are routinely leveraged with WIA resource as front
line staff coordinates core service delivery for all customers within our centers.

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               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                  Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
8.     Describe and assess how the services provided by each of the One-Stop partners are coordinated and made
       available in your local One-Stop system. [WIA Section 118(b)(2) and Section 121 (c)(2) and CUIC Section
       14221 (a) and (b)]

Working as a workforce system both within Contra Costa County and within the two-county East Bay region (including
Alameda County), we have a coordinated an easily navigable system for both job seekers and businesses. We utilize
one software system, one process for entry, a common brand, one job seeker number and one employer number.
Within the One-Stop Career Centers that specifically serve Contra Costa County, mandated partners meet monthly
as an Operator Consortium. This regular communication helps the agencies strengthen their partnership in a way that
builds on the unique strengths of each partner.

Our cohort based training sessions over the past 14 month, including Green Technology Training (GTEC), Microsoft
Office Specialist (MOS), Project Management Professional (PMP®) Certification, Phlebotomy and the Certified
Medical Assistant (CMA) training provided a total of 525 people with job training. Individuals served in these
programs included both recent and long-term unemployed individuals, with different eligibility parameters as
outlined under WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker funding streams. The One-Stop Consortium leveraged its strengths
by having the One-Stop Career Centers recruit and qualify participants and other consortium partners provided the
services. Those partners included Mount Diablo Adult Education, all of the Community Colleges, Office of Education
(ROP). These trainings were used by people from far East Contra Costa County to far West Contra Costa County.

Participation within the four One-Stop Career Centers of various mandated partners and other entities facilitate the
delivery of direct services and specialized workshops. At the Concord One-Stop Career Center, the following
mandated partners and others provide additional resources and services: Department of Rehabilitation (rotating
counselors), Diablo Valley College (rotating career advisors), Employment Development Department (a host of
services and a co-located Employment Service office), Adult Education, Temporary Assistance to Needy
Families/CalWORKs, and others.

Mt. Diablo Adult Education assists in the provision of career assessment and testing activities, Contra Costa County
Office of Education provides in-school youth resources twice a month, Henkels-McCoy provides full-time out-of school
youth case management services, the contracted Title V Older Worker Program has on-site staff, and a NUMMI NEG
Project peer counselor is on site and the EDD sponsored Experience Unlimited (EU) program uses space at this facility.
At the Antioch One-Stop, the following participate: Title V Older Worker Program (staff on site), EDD staff, a
workshop facilitator from the Pittsburg Adult Education Center, an in-school youth counselor from the County
Department of Education twice a week and a full-time out of school youth counselor from Henkels & McCoy. At the
Brentwood One-Stop are an in-school youth counselor once a week from the Contra Costa County Office of
Education, a counselor from the California Human Development Corporation (CHDC) providing services to the
agricultural community through the WIA 167 program, a counselor once a week from the Department of
Rehabilitation and on-going support from the Liberty Adult School, on whose campus this facility is located.
Participation at the San Pablo One-Stop includes EDD, Title V Senior Employment program staff, representatives from
Contra Costa County CalWORKs program several days a week, two out of school youth counselors from Henkels &
McCoy and a rotating counselor from the Department of Rehabilitation.

9.     Local boards are required to review and assess the eligibility of One-Stop operations annually. What criteria does
       your local board use to review One-Stop operator agreements in your local area? Include a copy of your local
       policy as an attachment to this document. [CUIC Section 14206(d)]

In our LWIA, the Operator for our four (4) One-Stop Career Centers is a consortium comprised of the mandated
partners offering services in our local area known as the Contra Costa One-Stop Operator Consortium (OSOC). The
Consortium meets bimonthly to strategize and problem-solve issues related to the operation and delivery of services
through the One-Stop Career Centers including maximizing the leveraging of staff and resources. The Board has
recently updated its master MOU with the mandated partners which is attached to this document. The oversight
responsibility of our One-Stop Career Centers is provided by the Policy, Performance, and Program Committee of
the Board, which reviews performance quarterly.

10.    Describe and assess how your local board ensures continuous improvement of eligible providers of services through
       the One-Stop system. How does your local board ensure that such providers meet the employment needs of local
       employers and participants? [WIA Section 118(b)(2)(A)]



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                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
The EASTBAY Works system administers periodic customer satisfaction surveys to job seekers as well as employers,
asking questions specific to effectiveness, access, ease of use, and perceived benefit. Once results are compiled, staff
members from our LWIA and One-Stop delivery system review these results in order to address any deficiencies that
could be addressed in better delivery of services. This system allows us to benchmark against previous years and
compare within the 14 site system of the East Bay one stop locations.

The need to continually train the existing workforce is not new. However, as the economy tightens, there are
increased demands on businesses to be competitive. Nationally, there is an increased focus on the need for
public/private partnerships that address the continually changing demand for high-skilled workers. For workforce
boards, this translates into partnering with business to meet their training needs through customized training.

Our Board recently took action to partner with private sector employers to provide customized training. At present,
the Board has developed criteria for rating customized training proposals; however, our board is aware of the need
to update and refine this policy in a way that directs our organization to respond and actively pursue these
partnerships. Establishing an updated policy will guide the establishment of strategic alliances, maximize the use of
board resources, strengthen the economic vitality of our region, and continue to strengthen the local workforce system.

Enacting a customized training policy will result in an expanded and focused strategy for better addressing the
needs of the business customer. This policy addresses the board’s efforts to expand workforce development
opportunities to employed workers and responds to the need of business in upgrading and retooling its existing
workforce.

11.     The State has been granted eight waivers through June 30, 2011, which directly affect how local areas may serve
        adults, dislocated workers, and incumbent workers. List each of the waivers your local area is currently using and
        describe how each waiver used has impacted the services provided to these customer groups. Indicate which
        waivers will be used in your local area in the future and how each will be utilized. [WIA Section 189(i)(4)(B) and
        WSD10-10]

There are a total of eight (8) waivers granted to the State as listed below.

•     ITAs- for older youth and out of school: Older youth who access ITA's for training are able to gain valuable
      technical skills to enter the workforce and begin a career. These youth, 18 years and older, are of the age
      where they are adults under the law with the same responsibilities to work and support themselves. With our one
      stop career centers open to universal customers, this includes older youth, who can benefit in the way that other
      adults can, from training. We budget a sufficient amount of money to serve older youth with ITA's throughout the
      county. These ITA's are in occupations in demand, and the criteria for selection is the same as for other adults.

•     Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL): While primarily a state issue – this waiver does represent a direct benefit to
      the local LWIA (operating throughout the East Bay Works collaborative, with Oakland Private Industry Council as
      the joint     agent for the four WIB’s represented) in that not having to develop and process “subsequent
      eligibility” paperwork and documentation for the multitude of ETPL providers that EBW’s is responsible for is a
      significant savings of time and effort.

•     Common measures:       This waiver assists in co-enrollment across programs such as WIA and TAA.

•     DOL funds for incumbent worker training: The Business and Economic Development Committee of the Workforce
      Development Board is preparing to review the parameters of this waiver and how best to maximize the
      flexibility and opportunities it will afford us in meeting local employer needs to support economic recovery.

•     Customized training Enacting a customized training policy will result in an expanded and focused strategy for
      better addressing the needs of the business customer. This policy addresses the board’s efforts to expand
      workforce development opportunities to employed workers and responds to the need of business in upgrading
      and retooling its existing workforce. This topic will be further discussed through the Business and Economic
      Development Committee of the Board.

•     Transfer of up to 50% funds between DW and adult to adjust to local need. Our local area has transferred funds
      between Dislocated and Adult funding streams in past years to better meet the dynamic needs of our local
      economy and the job seekers who are competing to get back to work. We anticipate utilizing this transfer
      capability during FY 2011-2012, although probably not at the 50% threshold.
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               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                  Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses

•     Employer reimbursement for OJT:       While this waiver allows for the reimbursement of training wages at up
      to a 90% leve, we are currently reimbursing these rates at 50%. Despite not having increased the local OJT
      reimbursement rate, the number and types of OJTs in our area has steadily grown over the past two years. The
      Business and Economic Development Committee will be reviewing the viability of any change.

•     Use of Rapid Response to Conduct Incumbent worker training. The Business and Economic Development Committee
      will be considering and discussing the potential use of Rapid Response to conduct incumbent worker training as
      above in looking at how to most effectively meet needs of local employers for a skilled workforce.

12.     How does your local area administer Individual Training Accounts (ITA)? [WIA Section 134(d)(4)(G)] Include
        any limitations you impose on ITAs established in your area. If your local board is providing training services that
        are made as exceptions to the ITA process, describe the process you used to procure and justify these exceptions.
        In addition, include your local board’s policy addressing the amount and duration of ITAs based on market rate
        for local training programs. [CUIC Section 14206(h)]

It is the policy of the Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County (WDB) that it will review training
vendors costs yearly to determine if any specific vendor is charging a rate that exceeds the regional average
(market rate) for that specific type and duration of training. It is expected that training will be in demand occupations
as defined by review of labor market data that indicates there are available jobs in the occupation being
considered.

The Board has adopted a sector-based strategy in working with local businesses that we are now re-reviewing in the
wake of the nascent economic recovery. Future discussions may include the consideration of targeting some training
funding to support high wage, high grown and demand occupations within our region. However, at this time, the
Board has not set up additional factors for consideration in making a final decision on individual training accounts.
Rather, the Board has empowered the One-Stop Operator Consortium staff to review labor market demand with our
job seeker customers and review individual career goals in making the final decision to allocate training funds.

13.     Sector strategies are state policies that promote regional partnerships of employers, educators, workforce
        developers, and other stakeholders that address the skills needs of critical industries in a region. The California
        Workforce Investment Board has adopted a sector strategies approach to assist local areas in developing their
        workforce solutions. Describe and assess your efforts to plan/implement sector strategies, develop regional
        partnerships, or target industries that are important in the local area or region. Describe what changes may be
        necessary to improve these regional strategies and partnerships. [CUIC Section 15001(a)(6)]

Prior to the adoption of sector strategies by the State, the Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa began
working with business utilizing a sector-based approach. This has helped us better target scare resources and focus
our energies on the stated needs of business. In the past we have utilized data to identify the economic drivers in our
LWIA – Manufacturing, Construction, Health and Bioscience, and Retail. To date, we have made great strides in two
of these areas: Manufacturing and Healthcare. In the case of the former, the most notable outcome of our work has
been around the (now institutionalized) Process Technology (PTEC) Program at Los Medanos College. This program
has also helped support the establishment of the Electrical and Engineering (ETEC) program, both of which have put
hundreds of local residents to work at local petrochemical plants and other facilities used in heavy industry.

Our initial focus in healthcare was through working with key employers and education providers to address the
nursing shortage. We then partnered with employers and education to address the changing dynamics and
requirements in the industry: changes in certification in allied health (phlebotomy); incorporation of technology in
Health Information Technology (HIT) with Kaiser; pipeline shifts responding to the aging workforce, and other issues
specific to the healthcare field. In addition, work to support and prepare the healthcare career pipeline through
various entry level training (Certified Nurse Assistant, Medical Assistant, Medical Lab Technician) is ongoing.

More recently, in partnership with our community colleges, we have address training needs specific to the Green
Economy - Construction specific to green building, certification for weatherization, HVAC, hybrid auto, photovoltaic,
and BPI for contractors.

Changes that may be necessary to our sector strategies include capacity development – understanding our capacity
to participate and deliver resources and services and as well as that of our partners. Gaining a deeper
understanding of the resources, roles and responsibilities of the various partners at the outset of a sector strategy
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               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                  Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
allow us to include in the planning the technical assistance necessary to build, implement and sustain the sector
strategy.

In addition, changes toward developing long term sustainability strategies, with both non-traditional partners and
more creative regional configurations. This longer term view will require funding that supports a vision of time rather
than project based results. A good example of this work can be seen through the Regional Industry Cluster of
Opportunity Grant (RICOG) that the WDB was awarded by the California Workforce Investment Board (CWIB).
Alongside our traditional sector strategy partners, we are building partnerships with the national labs and
universities, existing and emerging business and industry, and economic development. The expanded vision of this
strategy has great potential to create strong hubs of creativity, new manufacturing opportunities, and value chain
jobs for the future.

14.    Describe how your local board utilizes the principles of sector strategies to identify employer needs and guide
       training efforts to meet those needs. [CUIC Section 15001(a)(6)]

Our local board understands the basic principles of sector strategies as: 1. Convening Partnerships, 2. Research and
Analysis, 3. Program Design, and 4. Establishing a Strong Workforce Intermediary.

The Workforce Development Board initiated its sector approach by having staff participate in sector strategies
training facilitated by the Oakland-based Insight Center for Community Economic Development (Insight CCED).
Through training staff were given the tools needed to frame a demand-driven workforce development sector
approach to doing business.

Our board initiates its sector strategies by engaging with representatives of local business, economic development,
education and training. Understanding that data is the key for decision-making, we review and analyze data from
the outset of initiating any particular sector-specific strategy. Data offered by local economists, the Employment
Development Department (EDD), Adult Schools, Community Colleges, CSU’s, and EASTBAY Works One-Stop Career
Centers provide us with historical as well as projected industry trends, business churn and workforce analysis (entry-
level, middle-skilled as well as career path), employment, education & training trends.

Periodic review of data ensures that we have identified those industry sectors that are the strongest economic drivers
in our region and county. Once secondary data is evaluated, we seek primary data by engaging key leadership
among employers and other stakeholders, e.g., education, economic development, and public stakeholders (local and
state level) to dialogue about present need, future predicted need, and existing gaps that are presently and will in
the future prevent the availability of job ready and skilled-up workers to meet these needs. Engagement of the
employer community is the driver for this strategy. This partnership building will result in better leveraging of existing
resources, attraction of new resources, identification of key employer leadership, potential private/public funding
opportunities, and crafting targeted tactics that will meet the goals identified in the gap analysis.

In addition to economic data, we typically analyze the workforce development system’s capacity to meet service
demands. Basic services include: outreach, recruitment and screening, training and education, support services, hiring,
retention & advancement, business services, and systems change leverage points. As this is determined, we then work
with our partners we weave together a package of direct services designed to support sector strategy participants.
Included in the service package are: outreach and recruitment of participants, pre-screening and assessment,
training, support services, placement, retention and advancement, and business services.

Although our Board’s initial role is community convener, we understand the importance of collaboration within a sector
strategy, and as such the Workforce Development Board also serves as the intermediary – bringing together key
partners to achieve industry-wide impact. As work plans are developed and implemented, Board staff provides
necessary staff support; as direct services are delivered, the Board serves as one of the “investors”, leveraging local
funding in support of the strategy. Examples of this work include PTEC (Process Technology Training) now
institutionalized at Los Medanos College, the Regional Alliance of Healthcare, and most recently, the Diablo
Innovation Alliance, which is a new initiative focused on clean energy and water.

Our local board utilizes data periodically ensure that we have identified those industry sectors that are the strongest
economic drivers in our region and county. Once secondary data is evaluated, we seek primary data by engaging
key leadership among employers and including other stakeholders- education, economic development, and public
stakeholders- local and state level- to dialogue about present need, future predicted need, and existing gaps that
are presently and will in future prevent the availability of job ready and skilled-up workers to meet these needs.

Page 8 of 13
               Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                  Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
Engagement of the employer community is the driver for our sector strategies. Our Board’s initial role is community
convener. The development of industry partnerships helps us to better leveraging existing resources and attract new
ones, uncover potential private/public funding opportunities, and craft targeted approaches that meet the goals
identified in gap analyses. As work plans are developed and implemented, Board staff provides necessary staff
support; as direct services are delivered, the Board serves as one of the “investors”, leveraging local funding in
support of the strategy. Examples of this work include PTEC (Process Technology Training) now institutionalized at Los
Medanos College, the Regional Alliance of Healthcare, and most recently, the Diablo Innovation Alliance, an initiative
focused on clean energy and water technology.

15.    California’s Green Collar Jobs Act of 2008 was passed to address the State’s green economy and the increasing
       demand for a highly skilled and well-trained green collar workforce. How does your local area recognize
       opportunities to prepare workers for “green jobs” related to other sources of federal funding? [CUIC Section
       15000]

Our LWIA has responded to the “green jobs” movement in several ways. We have been partnering with the Contra
Costa Community College District on their Clean Energy Workforce Training Program (CEWTP) grant by recruiting
appropriate candidates for college training offerings, providing case management and supportive services, and also
assisting with placements for graduates. We funded Building Performance Institute (BPI) certification training for
building contractors to ready them for requirements that must be met in green building. In partnership with Main
Street Power and Contra Costa County, we are designated as the single point of contact for hiring local solar
installers to mount solar panels on county buildings. We convened the partnership that successfully competed for the
State RICOG funding and have just completed a three-county regional action plan. We are aggressively engaged in
finding additional funding to assist us with the first stages of implementation. To date, it is our experience that the
demand has yet to catch up with the supply, particularly in entry-level positions. The economic downturn has had a
severe impact on construction in general, and the push to green the economy has not realized the growth that many
have anticipated.

16.    What Rapid Response assistance is available to dislocate workers and employers? Who provides this assistance?
       {WIA Section 118(b)(4) and (5)]

Rapid response assistance for dislocated workers includes the following services:
• Presentations on resources and services, including WIA training, connections to grant-funded training
    opportunities and OJT, available through the One Stop Career Center System to help dislocated workers
    transition to new positions in the labor force.
• Information on community assistance and resources to help support individuals and families during the transition.
• Information on Health Benefits and Retirement (in partnership with DOL)
• Information on Unemployment Insurance benefits, Trade Adjustment Act, California Training Benefit, Labor
    Market Information and Veteran's Benefits. (in partnership with EDD)

Rapid Response services for employers include the following:
• Potential for averting or decreasing lay-offs through alternatives such as incumbent worker training, the
    WorkShare program (EDD), connection to public and private economic development entities/business retention
    programs, including local economic development organizations, Chambers of Commerce, and the Contra Costa
    Small Business Development Center (SBDC).
• Assistance with planning layoff schedule
• Information on WARN Act, Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA – in partnership with EDD), health benefits and
    Retirement (in partnership with DOL)

The aforementioned services are provided by a team of staff from the LWIA and local EDD staff.

17.    Layoff aversion activities are a critical component of rapid response. Please describe the layoff aversion activities
       your local board provides to businesses. [WIA Section 118(b)(4) and (5)]

Our LWIA has responded in several ways to assist in the process of averting a layoff. Through our relationships with
local Economic Development professionals and Chambers of Commerce, we are apprised of increased as well as
decreased business activity. We have used a variety of database and mapping tools to identify businesses that are
at risk of closing.

Page 9 of 13
                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
We have partnered with the Contra Costa Small Business Development Center (SBDC), who is hosted by our LWIA, to
assess and advise struggling businesses on business operations, marketing and finance matters. The Contra Costa
SBDC has recently been offering a workshop called Access to Capital, giving businesses access to information on
business funding opportunities. Our expanded toolbox includes a myriad of business services providers, e.g., the
Employment Development Department’s Employer Advisory Council advises businesses on human resources matters.

We rely on our One-Stop Career Centers as a safety-net, should the business find no other alternative than to
downsize or close. The Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County provides customized, confidential and
convenient outplacement services to businesses in transition through its Rapid Response Team. These no cost services
are provided to affected employees through the EASTBAY Works One Stop Career Center partners. Through on-site
presentations, information is provided to employees about re-employment and transition services available at the
One Stop Career Centers, and from other agencies and organizations in the community.

18.    Describe your area’s eligible youth population and needs in general. Describe the partnerships and collaborations
       that provide services to the youth in your local area. What youth activities are available in your local area?
       Identify successful providers of such activities. [WIA Section 118(b)(6) and CUIC Section 14221(g)]

Our LWIA’s Youth Council has adopted the “All Youth, One System” framework to address youth services and the
connections youth need to be successful. The numbers of youth in Contra Costa County who meet eligibility
requirements far outweigh our capacity and funding to serve them. Most youth enrolled in our program are basic
skills deficient, and more than 25% of the youth we serve are in the foster care system and/or are CalWORKs
participants or family members. The majority of older youth do not have a diploma or GED, and transportation
provides an additional barrier to youth accessing the services they need.

Within the spirit of All Youth, One System, we partner and collaborate with a number of local agencies and services
to provide comprehensive services to youth. In many cases, the collaborations we have are different from area to
area to meet the unique needs of the community. Our links include juvenile justice, community and faith-based
organizations, recreation groups, entities serving foster youth, K-12 education, community colleges, employers, and
social services agencies. We have had two consecutive years of a very successful summer youth employment
program that put more than 1,600 youth into paid summer jobs during the summers of 2009 and 2010. The stimulus
of ARRA funding has propelled our linkage with employers in the community which has resulted in regular placements
beyond summer. With the support of our board, we continue to find ways to sustain the strongest elements of this
program.

Our partnership with community colleges is strong and is perhaps most recognized for our investment in the “Career
Pathways” program at Los Medanos College. This partnership and program has helped to create other opportunities
for linkage and partnership throughout the community college system. Foster youth are a significant part of our
participants, and we link with foster youth serving agencies, and have developed a partnership with the Independent
Living Skills Program (ILSP), where we house a case manager at their office to link emancipating foster youth to WIA
services.

We have strong presence in two very geographically isolated and challenged areas of the county. In some
communities, the official unemployment rate is above 20%; crime in these communities is often very high. We
participate with the Housing Authority, community services, and social services to offer services to youth. Older youth
case managers are housed at each of our four One-Stop Career Centers to provide that critical link to our career
center system. Youth meet with a case manager at the local one stop where they are integrated into career center
services with the cultural competence of meeting youth where they are in their own personal and professional
development. In all these partnerships we enjoy great success with linking to those areas of the county and issues of
youth to meet the challenges youth face in achieving academic and career success.

19.    Describe and assess your local area’s delivery of services to people with disabilities. What partnerships and
       collaborations exist to provide services to this population? What training services and employment opportunities
       are available to this population in your local area? [WIA Section 112(b)(17)(A)(iv) and Section 409]

The California Department of Rehabilitation is one of our mandated partners and provides access to their services in
our One-Stop Career Centers. Our partnership with the State Department of Rehabilitation ensures a level of staff
expertise to best address those with significant disabilities. In addition, our One-Stop Career Centers are also
equipped with accessibility equipment and tools to ensure resources are available to individuals needing

Page 10 of 13
                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
accommodations and access to other supporting resources.

The One-Stop Centers comply with applicable accessibility requirements and provide equipment and resources to
ensure reasonable access to all core services for individuals with disabilities, while the facilities themselves are fully
compliant with requirements under the Americans with Disabilities (ADA). In addition, partnerships with other entities
and additional funding sources will be continued and developed to ensure provision of appropriate services and
effective referrals for those with less severe disabilities.

In our Concord center, we have Dragon Naturally Speaking speech recognition software on a computer, Jaws, Hands
on Video Relay (HOVS) along with a web cam in the One Stop Center. We have WYNN for those with learning
disabilities, and CCTV that enlarges print size of any printed document. We have TTY in an interview room, and two
computers have accessibility features. In two other centers we have assistive listening devices, CCTV, closed caption
ASP Readiness services, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Jaws, TDD phone, and webcams.


20.    If your local area received funds to operate Project New Start to provide parolees support in seeking, securing
       and maintaining employment as they transition from prison to their home communities, describe and assess your
       service delivery and partnerships in serving this population group. Describe what changes in your local area may
       be necessary to improve the level of service. [WIA Section 134(d)(4)(G)(iv)(II, and IV) and Section 188(a)(5)]

Although our LWIA has not implemented programs under Project New Start, our LWIA has participated in the
development of a strategic plan to support Contra Costa County’s Reentry Initiative., about which more information is
available at http://www.cocoreentry.org/. This initiative recognizes employment as an important element of
reintegration for individuals coming out of incarceration and has been supported by the Contra Costa County Board
of Supervisors. We currently ensure One-Stop staff participation at Parole and Community Team (PACT) meetings
where information about the resources available at our One-Stop is highlighted. We continue to seek funding
opportunities to support this effort. Our One-Stop staff provides case management and job placement assistance to
individuals recently released from incarceration. We also partner with several community based organizations to
serve this population.

21.    Local areas must incorporate priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses in accordance with the provisions
       of Training and Employment Notice 15-10 (11/10/10). This requires veterans and eligible spouses to receive
       service priority over recipients of public assistance and low-income individuals. Describe what programs and
       processes your local area is using to achieve these goals. [WIA Section 112(b)(17)(B), WIA Section
       121(b)(1)(B)(1)]

The WDB has issued a local priority of service policy for veterans and their eligible spouses and is implementing
elements of this policy to ensure that access to programs and services are prioritized accordingly. This includes the
strategic and timely use of data to expedite referrals to appropriate resources for individuals who identify
themselves as a veteran or eligible spouse. As soon as One-Stop staff members become aware of the status of these
individuals, they are directed to resources that are most appropriate to help them further their career goals.

This includes the strategic and timely use of data to expedite referrals to appropriate resources for individuals who
identify themselves as a Veteran or Eligible Spouse." Our EASTBAY Works Online Internet-based database system
provides a vast array of reports that staff are using to track Veterans and individuals with potential eligibility for
Veteran Benefits. This includes a monthly report that identifies veterans and provides contact information for outreach
purposes. In addition, EASTBAY Works Online provides an extensive list of veteran services and programs, including
a Network of Care for Veterans, a Veterans Toolkit, Resource Advisor, employment resources, benefits, issues and
organizations for veterans, amongst numerous other offerings.

22.    What role do Veterans Workforce Specialists and Veteran Employment Service Specialists have in the local One-
       Stop system? How do you ensure adherence to the legislative requirements for veterans’ staff? [Title 38 United
       States Code Part III, Chapter 41 and Title 20 CFR Part 1001.120]

EDD is currently piloting a redesign of its Veterans’ programs to address the efficiency of how services are delivered
to veteran customers. This model will be fully rolled out July 1, 2011. With this comes a new process that includes the
Veterans Services Navigator who assists the veteran customer to better understand and utilize EDD, partner and other
veteran services. The primary goal of EDD Veteran Services staff will be employment and referrals to assist the
veteran customer in overcoming any barriers they may have in meeting their employment goals.
Page 11 of 13
                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
EDD provides priority of services to all veterans who are enrolled in CalJOBS (state job search system), to those
referred by other service organizations, CBO’s and for veterans who come into the One-Stop Career Centers. One
Stop staff refer all veterans who enter the site to EDD Veteran Services staff. EDD has LVER and/or DVOP plus
Operation Welcome Home staff located in all four of the One-Stop sites. Based on a series of questions and further
assessment, veterans are referred to local service providers including WIA for assistance to remove barriers to
employment or the local EDD Veteran staff (LVER/DVOP) to be enrolled in the Vet Program for intensive services to
obtain employment or remove barriers to meet their employment goals.

EDD’s LVER provides outreach to the One Stop partners, CBO’s, local vet organizations and local service clubs to
educate them regarding: Veteran’s Priority of Service, the Veteran Program, current challenges for the veteran
community, changes to the DOL and CA Veteran Program and assists in making the connection with service providers
for veterans that have barriers and are in need of partner or other service providers assistance. EDD then shares this
information with our EDD Vet staff and One Stop partners. The LVER is also responsible for contacting employers,
employer groups and federal contractors to establish relationships so job openings are shared as they become
available. Additionally EDD helps other local veteran staff when job developing and/or referring qualified and
trained veterans for employment opportunities.

In an on-going effort to provide quality services to veterans, EDD is now working to establish a Veterans Employment
Council (VEC) in Contra Costa County and is working with other VEC’s in the area to garner ideas, best practices and
knowledge, and speak to the employer community about the potential benefits. Once established, EDD will work in
coordination with the council on activities to provide education to the employer community and assists as needed.
Finally, there is concerted effort and time spent on sharing all of this information with partner staff. EDD also
participates on a monthly basis with other veteran organizations and the East Bay Collaborative, which is an
organization of veteran service providers and CBO’s to gather information on services available for the veterans we
serve. As part of this assignment staff provides information on EDD Veterans Services and what is happening in our
One Stop centers.

23.    Describe and assess how you provide Wagner-Peyser Act services to the agricultural community. Specifically, how
       do you provide outreach, assessment and other services to migrant and seasonal farm workers, and services to
       employers? How do you provide appropriate services to this population in the One-Stop system? [Title 20 CFR
       662.200(b)(1)(vi)].

The California Human Development Corporation has staff located part-time at the Brentwood One-Stop Career
Center. This organization operates the WIA 167 program and dislocated agriculture programs. Some individuals are
co-enrolled in WIA at that center and appropriate clientele are referred from both Antioch. Referrals come in from
the community and there is outreach provided at health fairs and other agencies including Head Start, EDD, and the
adult schools through their English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. Our One-Stop is co-located with the adult
school so this is a strong referral. Working with CHDC and other agencies in Far East Contra Costa County, migrant
and season farm workers have access to workshops offered in Spanish, ESL, rental assistance, translation services, and
utilities payment services. Other one-stop services are offered including referral to vocational education in a variety
of areas such as welding, truck driving, building maintenance, and forklift training among others. EDD offers all
services all Wagner-Peyser services through the local One-Stop Career Centers, including the Brentwood One-Stop.
WIA Youth services are also available through the Brentwood One-Stop Career Center.

24.    Local areas may decide locally, based on their prior years’ experiences that they will need to change their
       strategies in order to meet their performance goals. Discuss any strategic changes in your local area to meet
       performance goals. [Title 20 CFR Part 661.355]

Given fewer resources, limited capacity, and continued high demand, we are always actively seeking leverage points
for funding as well as service delivery. We are considering focused training than may better align and support our
sector strategies. Targeted courses that result in industry recognized credentials will continue to be a focus.
Strengthening new partnerships and developing new ones with community-based organizations and our hosted Small
Business Development Center (SBDC) will result in new opportunities and possibilities. We will continue working
regionally and aligning based on common goals and needs in a potentially more broadly defined geographic region
and will look at opportunities to partner and leverage with state and public agency initiatives to maximize the
mutually beneficial outcomes for our job seekers and communities.



Page 12 of 13
                Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                   Local Modification Plan – Narrative Responses
25.    Discuss any applicable changes to the local board structure (do not include changes to specific individuals on the
       board). Please attach a copy of your local bylaws that reflect these changes. [Title 20 CFR Part 661.355 and
       CUIC Section 14202]

The most recent changes we have made to the structure of our local board results from the fact that one of the
mandated partners under WIA, Job Corps, does not provide direct services in our LWIA. Therefore this seat has been
eliminated from our Board. The corresponding number of board seats needed for a business majority- ( 50% +1), is
essentially reduced by two seats, and the required 15% of labor seats is then reduced by one. Overall, this results in
the Board size being reduced from 45 seats to 41 seats. Other specific changes are reflected in the attached bylaw
changes.




Page 13 of 13
      WIA Local Plan Modification PY 2011–12                          Local Area
      Modification #                                                         Date:                          05/19/11


TITLE IB BUDGET PLAN SUMMARY¹ (Adult or Dislocated Worker)
WIA 118; 20 CFR 661.350(a)(13)

PROGRAM TYPE for PY 2011, beginning 07/01/11 through 06/30/12
   Grant Code 201/202/203/204 WIA IB-Adult
   Grant Code 501/502/503/504 WIA IB-Dislocated Worker

FUNDING IDENTIFICATION                                                       K178XX Subgrant                      K272XXX Subgrant
 1. Year of Appropriation                                                         2010                                 2011
 2. Formula Allocation                                                                  1,841,145                           1,744,748
 3. Allocation Adjustment - Plus or Minus
 4. Transfers - Plus or Minus
 5. TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE (Lines 2 thru 4)                                                     1,841,145                         1,744,748

TOTAL ALLOCATION COST CATEGORY PLAN
 6. Program Services (sum of Lines 6.A thru 6.E)                                               1,657,031                         1,570,273
    A. Core Self Services                                                                        164,858                           156,227
    B. Core Registered Services                                                                  340,585                           322,753
    C. Intensive Services                                                                        613,363                           581,249
    D. Training Services                                                                         390,470                           370,026
    E. Other                                                                                     147,755                           140,018
 7. Administration (Line 5 minus 6)                                                              184,115                           174,475
 8. TOTAL (Line 6 plus 7)                                                                      1,841,145                         1,744,748

QUARTERLY TOTAL EXPENDITURE PLAN (cumulative from July 1, 2010 and July 1, 2011 respectively)
 9. September 2010
10. December 2010                                                      710,648
11. March 2011                                                       1,158,373
12. June 2011                                                        1,666,568
13. September 2011                                                   1,841,145                                                     673,441
14. December 2011                                                    1,841,145                                                   1,097,724
15. March 2012                                                       1,841,145                                                   1,579,312
16. June 2012                                                        1,841,145                                                   1,744,748
17. September 2012                                                                                                               1,744,748
18. December 2012                                                                                                                1,744,748
19. March 2013                                                                                                                   1,744,748
20. June 2013                                                                                                                    1,744,748

COST COMPLIANCE PLAN (maximum 10%)
21. % for Administration Expenditures (Line 7/Line 5)                                                 10%                             10%


Rhonda Scott, ASA                                 925-313-1706                                                                   5/19/2011
Contact Person, Title                             Telephone Number                                           Date Prepared

Comments:




1 Refer to 20 CFR Part 667.160 and WIA Directive WIAD01-10 for guidance and information regarding local area obligation rates,
  and recapture and reallocation policies and procedures.

   FWSD10-15B                                                   Page 1 of 1                                                         5/11
      WIA Local Plan Modification PY 2011–12                          Local Area
      Modification #                                                         Date:                          05/19/11


TITLE IB BUDGET PLAN SUMMARY¹ (Adult or Dislocated Worker)
WIA 118; 20 CFR 661.350(a)(13)

PROGRAM TYPE for PY 2011, beginning 07/01/11 through 06/30/12
   Grant Code 201/202/203/204 WIA IB-Adult
   Grant Code 501/502/503/504 WIA IB-Dislocated Worker

FUNDING IDENTIFICATION                                                       K178XX Subgrant                      K272XXX Subgrant
 1. Year of Appropriation                                                         2010                                 2011
 2. Formula Allocation                                                                  2,601,701                           2,464,988
 3. Allocation Adjustment - Plus or Minus
 4. Transfers - Plus or Minus
 5. TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE (Lines 2 thru 4)                                                     2,601,701                         2,464,988

TOTAL ALLOCATION COST CATEGORY PLAN
 6. Program Services (sum of Lines 6.A thru 6.E)                                               2,341,534                         2,218,489
    A. Core Self Services                                                                        164,858                           220,718
    B. Core Registered Services                                                                  340,586                           455,987
    C. Intensive Services                                                                        613,363                           821,190
    D. Training Services                                                                         390,470                           522,775
    E. Other                                                                                     147,754                           197,819
 7. Administration (Line 5 minus 6)                                                              260,167                           246,499
 8. TOTAL (Line 6 plus 7)                                                                      2,601,701                         2,464,988

QUARTERLY TOTAL EXPENDITURE PLAN (cumulative from July 1, 2010 and July 1, 2011 respectively)
 9. September 2010
10. December 2010
11. March 2011                                                       1,004,209
12. June 2011                                                        1,636,883
13. September 2011                                                   2,355,009                                                     351,783
14. December 2011                                                    2,601,701                                                     983,213
15. March 2012                                                       2,601,701                                                   1,614,644
16. June 2012                                                        2,601,701                                                   2,246,075
17. September 2012                                                                                                               2,464,988
18. December 2012                                                                                                                2,464,988
19. March 2013                                                                                                                   2,464,988
20. June 2013                                                                                                                    2,464,988

COST COMPLIANCE PLAN (maximum 10%)
21. % for Administration Expenditures (Line 7/Line 5)                                                 10%                             10%


Rhonda Scott, ASA                                 925 313-1706                                                                   5/19/2011
Contact Person, Title                             Telephone Number                                           Date Prepared

Comments:




1 Refer to 20 CFR Part 667.160 and WIA Directive WIAD01-10 for guidance and information regarding local area obligation rates,
  and recapture and reallocation policies and procedures.

   FWSD10-15B                                                   Page 1 of 1                                                         5/11
      WIA Local Plan Modification PY 2011–12                     Local Area:
      Modification #                                                     Date:                           05/19/11


TITLE IB BUDGET PLAN SUMMARY¹ (Youth)
WIA 118; 20 CFR 661.350(a)(13)

PROGRAM TYPE for PY 2011, beginning 04/01/11 through 06/30/12
   Grant Code 301/302/303/304 WIA IB-Youth

FUNDING IDENTIFICATION                                                        K178XX Subgrant                   K272XXX Subgrant
 1. Year of Appropriation                                                          2010                              2011
 2. Formula Allocation                                                                  1,883,329                         1,782,911
 3. Allocation Adjustment - Plus or Minus
 4. TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE (Line 2 plus 3)                                                     1,883,329                          1,782,911

TOTAL ALLOCATION COST CATEGORY PLAN
 5. Program Services (sum of Lines 5A and 5B)                                                 1,694,996                          1,604,620
    A. In School                                                                                983,098                            930,680
    B. Out-of-School (30%)                                                                      711,898                            673,940
 6. Administration (Line 4 minus 5)                                                             188,333                            178,291
 7. TOTAL (Line 5 plus 6)                                                                     1,883,329                          1,782,911

QUARTERLY TOTAL EXPENDITURE PLAN (cumulative from April 1, 2010 and April 1, 2011 respectively)
 8. June 2010
 9. September 2010
10. December 2010
11. March 2011                                                          179821
12. June 2011                                                           932902
13. September 2011                                                    1372812
14. December 2011                                                     1883329                                                      104,413
15. March 2012                                                        1883329                                                      534,393
16. June 2012                                                         1883329                                                    1,068,787
17. September 2012                                                                                                               1,603,180
18. December 2012                                                                                                                1,782,911
19. March 2013                                                                                                                   1,782,911
20. June 2013                                                                                                                    1,782,911

COST COMPLIANCE PLAN
21. % for Administration Expenditures (Line 6/Line 4)                                                10%                              10%


Rhonda Scott, ASA                                  925 313-1706                                            5/19/2011
Contact Person, Title                              Telephone Number                                        Date Prepared


Comments:




1 Refer to 20 CFR Part 667.160 and WIA Directive WIAD01-10 for guidance and information regarding local area obligation rates,
  and recapture and reallocation policies and procedures.

  FWSD10-15C                                                   Page 1 of 1                                                           5/11
                            Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
                                          Between
                           Contra Costa County (CCC) on behalf of its
     Employment & Human Services Department (EHSD) Workforce Development Board (WDB)
                                            And
           The Contra Costa One-Stop Operator Consortium (OSOC) Partner Agencies


I.        BACKGROUND:

The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), Sec. 117, establishes a local workforce investment
board (WIB), which, in partnership with the chief elected official, is responsible for setting policy
and overseeing workforce investment programs for a local workforce investment area (LWIA). The
Contra Costa LWIA includes the entire county, exclusive of the City of Richmond, and the local
WIB is formally named the Workforce Development Board (WDB) of Contra Costa County. The
"chief elected official" for the WDB is the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors. The County’s
Board of Supervisors appoints members of the WDB, which per the WIA must be comprised of a
private sector majority while also including a cross section of required public agencies, and
organized labor. The WDB has also established a few additional member seats for education,
economic development, and community-based organizations.

The establishment of a One-Stop delivery system for workforce development services is a
cornerstone of WIA (Sec. 134(c)), and is the primary charge of the WDB (Sec. 117(d), Sec.
118(b)). The WIA specifies that the WIA funded Adult and Dislocated Worker programs must be
provided through the One-Stop delivery system (Sec. 134(d)), and further specifies the specific
services that must be provided (Sec. 134(c) and (d)), and the partners that must participate in the
operation of the system and the delivery of these services (Sec. 121(b)).

The agreement between the WDB and OSOC partners regarding the operation of the local
One-Stop system in Contra Costa County is to be documented in a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU). The MOU must contain the provisions required by WIA Section 121(c)(2).
These provisions cover services to be provided through the One-Stop delivery system; the
funding of the services and operating costs of the system; and methods for referring individuals
between required One-Stop partners. The MOU's provisions also must determine the duration
and procedures for amending the MOU, and may contain any other provisions that are
consistent with WIA Title I, the accompanying regulations, and agreed to by the parties (WIA
Sec. 121(c)).

The local One-Stop delivery system is a network of One-Stop Career Centers that operate under
the brand of EASTBAY Works, within which are entities responsible for administering separate
workforce investment, educational, and other human services programs and funding streams.
Additionally, the local organizations representing the required partners that are named in the
WIA have collectively come together as the OSOC partners to provide operational oversight and
build the capacity of the local One-Stop career center system. In so doing, the OSOC has helped
to support the WDB’s vision to create a seamless system of service delivery designed to further
leverage public resources, enhance access to WIA and other related services, and improve long-
term employment outcomes for individuals using these services, further enhancing the productivity
of the local workforce and the competitiveness of the local and regional economy.




CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                     Page 1 of 10
II.       PURPOSE

The purpose of this MOU is to document an agreement between the WDB and the One-Stop
Operator Consortium (OSOC) partner agencies for the operation of the local One-Stop delivery
system, consistent with local policies and the WIA, Sec. 121(c).

III.      GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE:

          A.        The Chief Local Elected Official (CLEO): The Contra Costa County Board of
                    Supervisors (BOS) is the chief elected official for the Contra Costa Local
                    Workforce Investment Area.

          B.        The Workforce Development Board (WDB) of Contra Costa County: The WDB is
                    a business-led body whose members are appointed by the County Board of
                    Supervisors and is comprised of representatives of business, education providers,
                    labor organizations, community-based organizations, economic development
                    agencies, One-Stop Partners and additional members. The WDB is responsible for
                    oversight authority and accountability of the One-Stop Service Delivery System
                    including (but not limited to) policy development, distribution of WIA funding,
                    formation of the Local Workforce Investment Area (LWIA) Strategic Five-Year
                    Local Plans, approval of One-Stop Partners and additional members. The WDB’s
                    oversight of the One-Stop delivery system occurs through a designated WDB
                    committee, which in consultation with the One-Stop Operator Consortium, includes
                    the following responsibilities:

                    1. Development of performance measures in compliance with federal and state
                       requirements and local priorities.
                    2. System capacity building, including development and integration of system
                       services.
                    3. Receive and review reports from the OSOC and move forward appropriate
                       elements to the full board.
                    4. Reviews annual compliance monitoring report.
                    5. Provides guidance to staff to conduct bi-annual review of each partner’s
                       role and contribution to the One-Stop System, and reviews report for
                       recommendations.

          C.        Contra Costa One Stop System Operator Consortium (OSOC): The OSOC is
                    composed of organizations with local oversight of WIA required partner
                    programs. The OSOC and One-Stop operational staff shall:

                    a. Ensure core, intensive, ancillary, and training services are being provided as
                       set forth in this MOU.
                    b. Work in coordination with the WDB and WDB staff to implement the WDB
                       Strategic Plan.
                    c. Manage day-to-day operations of the system and define roles and duties of
                       one-stop coordination and service delivery staff.
                    d. Promote the vision, values, and operating principles and services of the One-
                       Stop System.



CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                        Page 2 of 10
                    e. Coordinate meetings of OSOC partner agencies and other workforce
                       development partners to build capacity for the local workforce system.
                    f. Provides report(s) to the WDB and/or designated WDB committee(s).

IV.       PARTIES:

All parties to this MOU are required One-Stop partners as specified in WIA, Section 121(b)(1).
The parties to this MOU and the services they commit to provide under their authorizing statutes
and applicable regulations include, but are not limited to:

                           Partner                                           WIA Required Program/Service
     Adult Education                                                 Adult education and literacy activities under
                                                                       WIA Title II
                                                                      Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied
                                                                       Technology Education Act
     California Department of Rehabilitation                         Vocational rehabilitation programs
     California Employment Development                               Programs authorized under the Wagner-
      Department                                                       Peyser Act
                                                                      Trade Adjustment Assistance
                                                                      Unemployment Compensation
                                                                      Veterans Programs
     California Human Development Corporation                        Migrant and seasonal farm worker programs
     Contra Costa Community College District                         Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied
                                                                       Technology Education Act
     Contra Costa County Employment & Human                          WIA Title I
      Services Department                                             Welfare-to-Work programs
                                                                      Community Service Block Grant (CSBG)
                                                                       employment & training programs
                                                                      Senior community service employment
                                                                       activities authorized under Title V of the
                                                                       Older Americans Act of 1965
     Contra Costa County Department of                               Employment and training activities carried
      Conservation and Development                                     out by the Department of Housing and
                                                                       Urban Development

The commitment of funding and nature of these programs are subject to change based upon
the funding authorization levels and policy directives of those bodies governing the operations
of each partner.

V.        ONE-STOP SYSTEM GOALS

The WIA provides that its required partners are responsible for administering or funding
separate programs related to workforce development that are intended to enhance and expand
customer access to services through the local One-Stop delivery system. The primary goal of the
One-Stop system, as a core component of the larger workforce development system within
Contra Costa County, is to advance the economic well-being of the county's workforce service
delivery area by developing and maintaining a quality workforce and by serving as the primary



CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                                     Page 3 of 10
venue for delivering all local and regional workforce development services. This will be achieved
through the delivery of high quality and integrated workforce training, employment and
education services for businesses, job seekers, and incumbent workers.

In entering into this MOU, each of the partner agencies named in this agreement commit to
adhere to the provisions of the WIA and to the greatest extent possible the following guiding
vision and principles for California's One-Stop delivery system, that services will be:

          1) Integrated (offering as many employment, training, and education services as possible
             for employers and individuals seeking jobs or wishing to enhance their skills) and
             affording universal access to the system overall;
          2) Comprehensive (offering a large array of useful information with wide and easy
             access to needed services);
          3) Customer-Focused (providing the means for customers to judge the quality of
             services and make informed choices); and
          4) Performance-Based (based on clear outcomes to be achieved; mutually negotiated
             outcomes and methods for measurements; and the means toward measuring and
             attaining customer satisfaction).

Additionally, the OSOC partner agencies, as parties to this MOU agree, as appropriate and
authorized by applicable law and policies, to:

              Promote and engage in knowledge sharing and coordination of workforce
               development activities to ensure a high performance One-Stop system;
              Coordinate program resources and streamline services for a more efficient and
               effective use of workforce development resources.
              Work with business and job seeker customers to help facilitate meeting and expediting
               employers’ hiring needs.
              Actively engage in efforts to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Career Center
               system in alignment with the goals and strategic priorities of the WDB.

VI.       ONE-STOP SERVICES

WIA funds allocated to local areas for Adult and Dislocated Worker services must be
utilized to establish a One Stop delivery system and provide WIA specified core, intensive
and training services (Sec. 134 (d)(1)). Each physical comprehensive EASTBAY Works One-
Stop Career Center location designated by the WDB within the Contra Costa LWIA is
required to provide the full range of core services, and to make the intensive and training
services available to eligible individuals, to the extent they are warranted and available in
the context of the local funding and program design for each local One Stop.

      A. Core Services Sec. 134(d)(2)):
         1. Determinations of whether individuals seeking service are eligible to receive
            assistance under WIA, Title I;
         2. Outreach, intake (which may include worker profiling), and orientation to the
            information and other services available through the One Stop delivery system;
         3. Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes, abilities, and supportive service needs;



CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                     Page 4 of 10
          4. Job search and placement assistance, and where appropriate, career counseling;
          5. Provision of employment statistics information, including the provision of accurate
              information relating to local, regional, and national labor market areas,
              including;
               i.   Job vacancy listings in such labor market areas;
              ii.   Information on job skills necessary to obtain the jobs described in clause (a);
                    and
             iii.   Information relating to local occupations in demand and the earnings and skill
                    requirements for such occupations; and
          6. Provision of program specific performance information and program cost
              information on eligible providers of training services for adults and dislocated
              workers, and eligible providers of youth activities;
          7. Provision of information regarding how the local area is performing on the
              local performance measures and any additional performance information with
              respect to the one-stop delivery system in the local area;
          8. Provision of accurate information relating to the availability of supportive services,
              including child care and transportation, available in the local area, and referral
              to such services, as appropriate;
          9. Provision of information regarding filing claims for unemployment compensation;
          10. Assistance in establishing eligibility for
               i.   Welfare-to-work activities authorized under Section 403(a)(5) of the Social
                    Security Act (as added by Section 5001 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997)
                    available in the local area; and
              ii.   Programs of financial aid assistance for training and education programs
                    that are not funded under WIA and are available in the local area; and
          11. Follow-up services, including counseling regarding the workplace, for participants
              in workforce investment activities authorized under this subtitle who are placed in
              unsubsidized employment, for not less than 12 months after the first day of the
              employment, as appropriate.

     B. Intensive Services (Sec. 134(d)(3)):
        1. Comprehensive and specialized assessments of the skill levels and service needs
            of adults and dislocated workers, which may include;
             i.   diagnostic testing and use of other assessment tools; and
            ii.   In-depth interviewing and evaluation to identify employment barriers and
                  appropriate employment goals.
        2. Development of an individual employment plan, to identify the employment goals,
            appropriate achievement objectives, and appropriate combination of services for
            the participant to achieve the employment goals.
        3. Group counseling.
        4. Individual counseling and career planning.
        5. Case management for participants seeking training services.
        6. Short-term prevocational services, including development of learning skills,
            communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills,
            and professional conduct, to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or
            training.

     C. Training Services (Sec. 134(d)(4):
        1. Occupational skills training, including training for nontraditional employment;




CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                    Page 5 of 10
            2. On-the-job training;
            3. Programs that combine workplace training with related instruction, which may include
               cooperative education programs;
            4. Training programs operated by the private sector;
            5. Skill upgrading and retraining;
            6. Entrepreneurial training;
            7. Job readiness training;
            8. Adult education and literacy activities provided in combination with the above
               training services; and
            9. Customized training conducted with a commitment by an employer or group of
               employers to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

       D. Employer Services:
          1. Preliminary screening of workforce referrals;
          2. Job description development;
          3. Interviewing facilities;
          4. Customized training;
          5. Tax credit information;
          6. Information and referral to assist employers in reducing, planning for or averting
             layoffs;
          7. Custom design of information sessions to prepare employees for a layoff, to enroll in
             unemployment, re-employment and/or training services;
          8. Delivery of information that is useful to employers and their effected employees in
             responding to a layoff, accesses re-training and job services.

In addition, the WDB and the OSOC partner agencies agree to collaborate in supporting local
and regional workforce development initiatives and efforts as set forth in the WDB strategic plan.

VII.        REFERRAL SYSTEM:

The OSOC member agencies agree to jointly develop and implement processes for referral
between the respective agencies and to modify such processes as necessary. The intake process
shall include information to direct applicants to the appropriate One-Stop Career Center
resources for the receipt of needed services and appropriate processes for the referral of
applicants to training and employers.

VIII.       CONFIDENTIALITY:

Parties to this MOU agree to comply with the provisions of the WIA and applicable sections of
the Welfare and Institutions code, the California Education Code, the Rehabilitation Act, and/or
any other appropriate statute or requirement to assure that:
       A.      All applications and individual records related to services provided under this MOU,
               including eligibility for services, enrollment, and referral, shall be confidential and
               shall not be open to examination for any purpose not directly connected with the
               delivery of such services.
       B.      No person will publish, disclose, use, or permit, or cause to be published/disclosed or
               used, any confidential information pertaining to One-Stop applicants, participants, or
               customers overall unless a specific release is voluntarily signed by the participant or



CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                         Page 6 of 10
               customer. This release will be necessary for featuring individuals in advertisements or
               other public relations efforts.
       C.      Additionally, each partner will agree to abide by the current confidentiality provisions
               of respective statutes and shall share information necessary for the administration of
               the program. Therefore, all parties agree to share client information necessary for
               provision of services under the WIA (and other’s applicable government codes), i.e.:
               assessment, universal intake program or training referral, job development or
               placement activities, and other services as needed for employment or program
               support purposes.

IX.         RESOURCE SHARING AGREEMENTS AND COST ALLOCATION:

Parties to this MOU recognize that this is a non-financial agreement but agree to adhere to the
expectations described in this document. Allocation of resources, in-kind and/or payment of the
operating costs of the One-Stop Center, attributable to a Partner, if any, will be addressed in
separate Resource Sharing Agreements (RSAs) with the WDB. One-Stop system costs shall be
allocated in accordance with these separate cost-sharing agreements and shall be reviewed
annually by the WDB and the parties to these agreements. The parties assume full responsibility
for their respective costs associated with their performance of the terms of this MOU.

X.          GENERAL PROVISIONS:

Each party understands and agrees that it will fulfill its respective responsibilities under this MOU
in accordance with the laws and regulations that govern its activities. Nothing in this MOU is
intended to overrule, negate or otherwise render ineffective any such provisions or operating
procedures that govern any party's activities and service responsibilities. If at any time any party
is unable to perform its functions under this MOU consistent with such party's statutory and
regulatory mandates, the affected party shall immediately provide written notice to all other
parties that are a party to this MOU to establish a date for mutual resolution of the conflict.

XI.         AUDITS:

This MOU brings together the resources of separate funding sources and programs. While the
MOU is non-financial, related contractual or cost sharing agreements are subject to generally
accepted accounting principles and to the audit provisions of the respective funding sources as
appropriate. Each party is responsible for the arrangement for, and payment of costs
associated with, any audits applicable to its own programs, whether or not they are
delineated under the WIA as a required partner.

XII.        DISPUTES:

Parties shall continue with the responsibilities under this MOU during any dispute. Any dispute shall
be resolved in a timely manner, directly involving the parties to the dispute. Any dispute related
to this MOU shall be resolved, to the extent possible, by the OSOC partners. Disputes not
resolved at this level will be referred to the WDB Chair by the OSOC partners involved in said
dispute(s). This dispute will be placed on a special or regular meeting of the WDB Executive
Committee and/or full membership of the WDB. If said efforts toward resolution are unsuccessful,
the WDB Executive Committee may engage the services of a mediator. If mediation is
unsuccessful, the WDB Executive Committee may, with the concurrence of those parties subject to



CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                        Page 7 of 10
the dispute, appoint an arbitrator approved by the American Arbitration Association. The
arbitrator so appointed may schedule and hold an arbitration hearing. The decision of the
arbitrator shall be the final administrative decision.

XIII.     EFFECTIVE TERM:

This MOU is effective when executed and will continue in effect until such time as it is revised,
extended or terminated, as provided herein. The MOU will be reviewed by the WDB as part of
the required LWIA annual planning process, with additional reviews conducted by the WDB as
needed during the time that this MOU remains in effect.

XIV.      MODIFICATION TO THE MOU:

Any party to the MOU may request modification of its terms by letter addressed to the Executive
Director of the WDB that sets forth a) the purpose of the proposed modification, b) its impact on
other signatories to the MOU, and c) the language of the modification. Proposed modifications to
the MOU must be agreed to in writing by all parties to the MOU. Written approval of the
request by all parties will constitute the revision in question.

XV.       WITHDRAWAL OF A PARTY:

Notices of termination by a party to this MOU shall be submitted in writing to the Executive
Director of the WDB. Any party may terminate its participation in the MOU at any time for
cause, or may terminate without cause on a thirty (30) day written notice to the Executive Director
of the WDB. Should any One-Stop partner withdraw from the MOU, it shall remain in effect with
respect to the remaining parties. The WDB Executive Committee shall review any impact to the
terms and conditions of the MOU on all remaining parties to the MOU within sixty (60) days of
any party's withdrawal.

XVI.      NONDISCRIMINATION CLAUSE:

Parties to this MOU shall not unlawfully discriminate, harass, or allow harassment against any
employee or applicant, or applicant for employment due to gender, race, color, ancestry, religion,
national origin, physical disability, mental disability, medical conditions, age, or marital status.
Parties shall comply with applicable Federal, State, and local laws, regulations, and policies.

XVII. UNIVERSAL ACCESS:

The WDB will ensure that policies and procedures that it establishes and programs and services
provided by the One-Stop centers are in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990 (ADA).

XVIII. INDEMNIFICATION:

Partners shall indemnify, defend, save and protect and hold the Workforce Development Board
of Contra Costa County harmless from all claims, cost, loss, liability, expense, damage (including
consequential damages) or other injury, claim, action or proceeding, including without limitation,
attorneys fees and expenses, to the fullest extent not prohibited by applicable law, arising out of
or connected with this Agreement or the parties' action pursuant to this Agreement, including any




CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                    Page 8 of 10
action to attack, set aside, void, abrogate, rescind, or annul this Agreement.

The Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County shall indemnify, defend, save and
protect and hold the Partners harmless from all claims, cost, loss, liability, expense, damage
(including consequential damages) or other injury, claim, action or proceeding, including without
limitation, attorneys fees and expenses, to the fullest extent not prohibited by applicable law,
arising out of or connected with this Agreement or the parties' action pursuant to this Agreement,
including any action to attack, set aside, void, abrogate, rescind, or annul this Agreement.

XIX.      APPROVAL:

In WITNESS THEREOF, the parties to this MOU hereby agree to the terms and execute this
agreement. This MOU, once signed, also becomes part of the Contra Costa LWIA Local
Modification Plan, as approved by the WDB and the Chief Local Elected Official.

 Contra Costa County on behalf of its Employment & Human Services Department (EHSD)
 Workforce Development Board (WDB)


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                       Date



 California Department of Rehabilitation


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                       Date



 California Employment Development Department


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                       Date



 California Human Development Corporation




CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding                    Page 9 of 10
                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                  Date



 Contra Costa Adult & Community Education


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                  Date



 Contra Costa Community College District


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                  Date



 Contra Costa County Employment & Human Services Department


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                  Date



 Contra Costa County Department of Conservation & Development


                                        Name and Title of Authorized Officer


                                         Signature                                  Date




CCC and One-Stop Operator Consortium Memorandum of Understanding               Page 10 of 10
       WIA Local Plan Modification PY 2011–12               Local Area:     Workforce Development Board of
                                                                                 Contra Costa County
       Modification #                                            Date:                   07/01/11



TITLE IB PARTICIPANT PLAN SUMMARY
WIA 118; 20 CFR 661.350(a)(13); TEGL 17-05

Plan the number of individuals that are in each category.

Totals for PY 2010 (07/01/11 through 06/30/12)                               ADULT          DW          YOUTH
  1. Registered Participants Carried in from PY 2010                             220          350           380
  2. New Registered Participants for PY 2011                                     250          300           220
  3. Total Registered Participants for PY 2011 (Line 1 plus 2)                   470          650           600
  4. Exiters for PY 2011                                                         270          350           350
  5. Registered Participants Carried Out to PY 2012 (Line 3 minus 4)             200          300           250

PROGRAM SERVICES
 6. Core Self Services                                                           3,375       4,125
 7. Core Registered Services                                                       250         300
 8. Intensive Services                                                             225         250
 9. Training Services                                                              200         200

YOUTH MEASURES
 10. Attainment of a Literacy and/or Numeracy Gain                                                          140
 11. Attainment of a High School Diploma, GED, or Certificate                                               228

EXIT STATUS
  12. Entered Employment                                                          151          245
 12A. Training-related                                                            121          196
  13. Remained with Layoff Employer                                                             10
  14. Entered Military Service                                                                                15
  15. Entered Advanced Training                                                                               15
  16. Entered Postsecondary Education                                                                         15
  17. Entered Apprenticeship Program                                                                          15
  18. Returned to Secondary School                                                                            15
  19. Exited for Other Reasons                                                    119          105            48


Stephen Baiter, Executive Director                                        925-602-6800                   6/8/2011
Contact Person, Title                                                     Telephone #               Date Prepared


Comments:




FWSD10-15D                                         Page 1 of 1                                               5/11
                                                                                   Workforce Development Board of Contra
         WIA Local Plan Modification PY 2011–12                 Local Area:       Costa County
          Modification #                                                 Date:                             07/01/2011




                                      WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT TITLE IB


                                     STATE NEGOTIATED LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE1
                                                                                PY                  PY                  PY
                        WIA Requirement at Section 136(b)²
                                                                              2009-10             2010–11             2011–12
               Adults
               Entered Employment Rate                                          56%                 56%
               Employment Retention Rate                                        81%                 81%
               Average Earnings                                               $13,000             $13,000
               Dislocated Workers
               Entered Employment Rate                                          68%                 70%
               Employment Retention Rate                                        83%                 83%
               Average Earnings                                               $15,900             $15,900
               Youth (ages 14-21)
               Placement in Employment or Education                              69%                 65%
               Attainment of a Degree or Certificate                             65%                 61%
               Literacy and Numeracy Gains                                       40%                 40%




                                     LOCAL NEGOTIATED LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE¹
                                                                                PY                  PY                  PY
                        WIA Requirement at Section 136(c)²
                                                                              2009-10             2010–11             2011–12
               Adults
               Entered Employment Rate                                          56%                 56%                 56%
               Employment Retention Rate                                        81%                 81%                 81%
               Average Earnings                                               $13,000             $13,000              $13,000
               Dislocated Workers
               Entered Employment Rate                                          68%                 70%                 70%
               Employment Retention Rate                                        83%                 83%                 83%
               Average Earnings                                               $15,900             $15,900              $15,900
               Youth (ages 14-21)
               Placement in Employment or Education                              69%                65%                 65%
               Attainment of a Degree or Certificate                             65%                61%                 61%
               Literacy and Numeracy Gains                                       40%                40%                 40%




1 Guidance on state and local performance can be found on the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Employment and Training Administration Web site.
  Specific Training and Employment Guidance Letters (TEGL) include, but are not limited to 8-99, 11-01, and 17-05. For additional guidance, see
  Workforce Services Directives WSD08-6 and WSD10-11.

2 The DOL Employment and Training Administration approved California’s waiver request to move from the statutory performance measures specified
  in WIA Section 136 to the common performance measures defined in TEGL 17-05. This waiver was initially approved for
  Program Year (PY) 2007-08 and was extended for PYs 2008-09, 2009-10, and 2010-11.

FWSD10-15E                                                         Page 1 of 1                                                               5/11
                              Budget, Participation, and Performance Forms
                                         STATE of CALIFORNIA
                               LOCAL AREA GRANT RECIPIENT LISTING
                                    [WIA Sections 117(d)(3)(B)(i) and 118(b)(8)]

                           Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County
                                    (Name of Local Workforce Investment Area)

                                                                                                   TELEPHONE,
                                                CONTACT                  MAILING ADDRESS              FAX,
  ENTITY            ORGANIZATION              (NAME/TITLE)               (STREET, CITY, ZIP)         E-MAIL

Grant          Board of Supervisors, Joe Valentine, Director 40 Douglas Drive, Martinez
                                     Employment and Human 94553                         925-3134-1579
Recipient (or Contra Costa County
                                     Services Dept.                                     jvalentine@ehsd.
Subrecipient
                                                                                        cccounty.us
if applicable)

Fiscal Agent     CCC Employment and Joe Valentine, Director 40 Douglas Drive, Martinez, 925-3134-1579
                                      Employment and Human Ca 94553                     jvalentine@ehsd.
                 Human Services Dept.
                                      Services Dept.                                    cccounty.us



                                                                                    rd
              Workforce Development Stephen Baiter, Executive 300 Ellinwood, #300, 3 fl.         925-602-6820
Local Area
Administrator Board of Contra Costa Director                  Pleasant Hill, CA. 94523           sbaiter@ehsd.ccc
                                                                                                 ounty.us
              County




Signature:     ______________________________________________________              _____________________________
                              Chief Elected Official                                          Date

If a Local Grant Subrecipient has been designated, please submit a copy of the agreement between the Chief Elected


FWSDD-16H                                             Page 1 of 1                                             8/08
Official and the Subrecipient. The agreement should delineate roles and responsibilities of each, including signature
authority.




FWSDD-16H                                             Page 1 of 1                                               8/08

				
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