Eminent Domain by ghkgkyyt

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 5

									                                    Eminent Domain 
                                             By 
                                        Nathan Ovans 
                                          10­27­06 

In the recent case of Kelo verses the City of New London, the U.S. Supreme Court issued 

a controversial opinion on the subject of eminent domain, or condemnation.  The 

Supreme Court found that, under certain circumstances, a local government has the 

power to condemn private property for the sole purpose of economic development. 

While in the past state courts, like Michigan’s Supreme Court, have agreed with the U.S. 

Supreme Court’s recent ruling, the current opinion of Michigan’s courts and legislature 

has swung in favor of private property rights. 


In the case Kelo verses the City of New London, the city of New London, Connecticut, 

approved of a development plan that would create 1,000 new jobs, increase tax revenue, 

and rejuvenate the economy of the distressed city.  The plan included replacing a 

neighborhood, which was not blighted, with new office space, a conference hotel, a 

riverwalk, and new residential homes.  The project was to be managed by private 

developers, and was intended to maximize the benefit for the city from a new research 

center built by Pfizer Inc.  In acquiring the land needed for the project, the city’s agent 

purchased the properties from willing sellers; however, some sellers were not willing to 

sell their property.  The city then took action to condemn the remaining properties so that 

the city could acquire them.  The property owners then took suit against the city, claiming 

that the condemnation of their properties violated the Fifth Amendment’s “public use” 

requirement.  The Supreme Court of Connecticut upheld the city’s right to condemn the 

properties.  The property owners then appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.  In a 5­4
decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the city’s condemnation of property for private 

development and use, according to its approved plan, was within the requirement of 

“public use.” 


Never before had courts had to examine the constitutional limits of government’s power 

of eminent domain in a context such as the Kelo case.  In the U.S. Supreme Court’s 

ruling, the Supreme Court redefined the term and interpretation of “public use.”  Justice 

John Paul Stevens wrote, in the majority opinion, that the term “public use” in the Fifth 

Amendment should not be read literally, and that the court “has embraced the broader 

and more natural interpretation of public use as ‘public purpose.’”  In the Kelo ruling, the 

court found that since promoting economic development is a long accepted function of 

government, the condemnations were for a “public purpose” and met the “public use” 

requirement.  There was strong disagreement from the four dissenting justices.  As noted 

by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, who wrote the principle dissent, “any property may 

now be taken for the benefit of another private party, but the fallout from this decision 

will not be random.  The beneficiaries are likely to be those citizens with disproportionate 

influence and power in the political process, including large corporations and 

development firms.”  Many states have reacted to the Kelo case by passing new statutes, 

most siding with the dissenting opinion of the Supreme Court. 


Historically, Michigan’s attitude towards eminent domain has been in favor of the local 

government and developers.  In the infamous Poletown case, the Michigan Supreme 

Court decided in favor of the city.  In the case, the city of Detroit seized residential 

homes, businesses, and churches so that General Motors could build a new plant in the
area.  The city claimed that the new jobs and tax revenue that would be created met the 

qualification of “public use.”  While the court sided with the city, many people 

throughout Michigan starkly disagreed with the court’s ruling. 

         What began as a power to seize property on which to build courthouses and 
         police stations was extended to seizing and redistributing property to alleviate 
         “blight” and then extended again to seizing and redistributing property to 
                                                               1 
         improve the economy and the government’s tax base. 

It was not until recently that Michigan’s courts would reflect the opinion of the public. 


In July of 2004, the Michigan Supreme Court overturned the Poletown case.  In Wayne 

County verses Hathcock, the county condemned private property to give to a private 

developer, with the outlook of improving the economy.  The court held that the use of 

eminent domain under the Poletown circumstances violated the “public use” doctrine 

under the Michigan Constitution.  Thus the court overturned the Poletown case and ruled 

against the county, because the ultimate title to the property would be held privately. 


In the wake of the Wayne County verses Hathcock case, Michigan has continued to lean 

towards private property rights.  Like many other states, Michigan’s legislature has 

introduced a number of bills in response to the Kelo case.  In fact, for this election year of 

2006, a proposed constitutional amendment, to prohibit government from taking private 

property by eminent domain for certain private purposes, is on Michigan’s ballot.  This 

amendment would help to define what “public use” is, one thing that Michigan’s 

Supreme Court currently differs in opinion from the U.S. Supreme Court.
                                      Notes 
      1 
      Jacob G. Hornberger, “The Bill of Rights: Eminent Domain,” Freedom Daily 
December 2004.
                                     References 

Hornberger, Jacob G. “The Bill of Rights: Eminent Domain.” Freedom Daily December 
      2004. 

Preston, Meredith. “States pass laws to limit eminent domain: Locals fight to retain 
       power for redevelopment.” American City & County v. 121 no4 (April 2006): 8, 
       10. 

Dearth, Richard C., and J. Russell Hardin. “Kelo v. the City of New London: what does it 
       really mean?.” Real Estate Issues 30.2 (Winter 2005): 21(6). 

Snyder, David B. “Eminent Domain after Kelo.”  Mortgage Banking 66 no5 (Fall 2006): 
       66­7, 69­70.

								
To top