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					            SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
                     Graduate Study in Theology and Religious Studies
                    Goals and Assessments of Student Learning Outcomes


The School of Theology and Religious Studies (STRS) at The Catholic University of America,
constituted in its current form in 2003, takes as its twin goals ―to promote excellence in teaching,
research, and publication in the area of theology and religious studies, and to provide the
professional training of lay and clerical leaders who will serve the Roman Catholic community in
the United States and throughout the world.‖ The School ―places emphasis on an
interdisciplinary approach and collaboration with other schools of the university, on the
ecumenical and inter-religious dimensions of all theological studies, on the exploration of
relations between religion and culture, and on the promotion of informed efforts to work for
justice and peace, both within the Church and in the world.‖

STRS is one of the largest theological faculties in the United States and sustains a
correspondingly large number of graduate programs, offering ecclesiastical, civil and pastoral
degrees in theology and religious studies including collaborative degree and graduate certificate
programs. The School’s programs encompass the following:

   Ecclesiastical degrees: Graduate degrees in theology recognized as having canonical effects
    in virtue of the School’s status as a pontifical faculty that the Holy See accredits. Of these
    graduate degrees – Bachelor of Sacred Theology (S.T.B.), Licentiate in Sacred Theology
    (S.T.L.) and Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.) – the School offers the latter two with
    specializations in the fields of biblical theology, liturgical studies/sacramental theology,
    moral theology, historical theology, and systematic theology.
   Civil degrees: The Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in the fields of biblical studies,
    church history, historical theology, liturgical studies/sacramental theology, moral
    theology/ethics, religious education/catechetics, religion and culture, spirituality, and
    systematic theology; and two collaborative Master of Arts degrees—an M.A. in the history of
    religions (especially Hinduism) in conjunction with the Washington Consortium of
    Universities; and an M.A./M.S. in Library Science run jointly with the School of Library and
    Information Science.
   Pastoral degrees and graduate certificates: Graduate degrees in the fields of religious
    education/catechetics (Master of Religions Education), Catholic theology (Master of
    Divinity) and Hispanic ministry (Master of Divinity in Hispanic Ministry), and adult spiritual
    formation, liturgical studies/sacramental theology, and pastoral care and counseling (Doctor
    of Ministry); and short, non-degree programs to supplement ecclesiastical or civil degrees
    with an emphasis on pastoral studies (Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Studies) and Hispanic
    pastoral leadership (Graduate Certificate in Hispanic Pastoral Leadership).

STRS is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada
(ATS), a membership organization of more than 250 graduate schools that conduct post-
baccalaureate professional and academic degree programs to educate persons for the practice of
ministry and for teaching and research in the theological disciplines. STRS underwent a
successful accreditation process with ATS in 2007 and used that opportunity to assess many of

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its practices and programs.

                       ECCLESIASTICAL DEGREE PROGRAMS
Since 1931, uniform norms that Catholic faculties and universities throughout the world observe
have regulated the sequence of the Baccalaureate (S.T.B.), Licentiate (S.T.L.), and Doctorate in
Sacred Theology (S.T.D.). In 1979, Pope John Paul II promulgated an apostolic Constitution,
Sapientia Christiana, which currently governs the granting of ecclesiastical degrees, and the
Norms of Application issued by the Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education set broad
standards for the structuring of ecclesiastical degrees for Faculties around the world. The
ecclesiastical degrees provide a theological education focused on research. For many years
recipients of these degrees were almost exclusively men preparing for the reception of Holy
Orders in the Roman Catholic Church or wishing to acquire further theological competency after
ordination. For several decades, however, the program has welcomed all qualified men and
women to prepare themselves for a wide variety of roles and ministries in the Church and world
through these academic degrees in theology.

                              Bachelor of Sacred Theology (S.T.B.)

                                     I. Program Description

The S.T.B. degree provides familiarity with the wide variety of subject matter and disciplines
that constitute the Christian theological tradition. It is one of several degrees within the School
(with the M.Div. and M.A.) that may be combined with studies for ordination, and is generally
categorizable as a master’s degree.

Because it is necessary that ecclesiastical degrees be ―transferrable‖ to other ecclesiastical
programs around the world, it is important that there be considerable structural continuity to such
programs the world over. Accordingly, the fields of instruction, number of years to degree, and
other broad parameters for such programs are set out in the Norms of Application set by the
Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education. Further details, including the quantity of courses
or credit hours in each subject, course syllabi, and reading lists are determined by individual
Faculties.

Applicants to the program have a bachelor’s degree, including a broad foundation in philosophy
and religious studies; a reading knowledge of Latin and an academic record providing evidence
of superior achievement and the ability to pursue graduate work, as reflected in strong grades and
standardized test scores (usually on the GRE). The School’s Ecclesiastical Degrees Committee
reaches the decisions on suitability for admission to this program.

For the degree, students successfully complete a minimum of 69 semester hours of course work,
including 21 credits of foundational courses (e.g. TRS 660: History and Method in Theology,
TRS 650A: Introduction to Christian Spirituality, TRS 630A: Foundations of Christian Moral
Life), 15 credits of systematic theology, six credits of liturgical studies, nine credits of moral
theology, 15 credits of scripture, and three credits of church history. They must also complete
several pro-seminars introducing graduate students to academic writing style and research

                                                  2
methodologies. Students who are candidates for priesthood in the Roman Catholic Church must
take at least one course in a non-Roman Catholic ecclesial tradition during the course of studies.

Graduates of the program frequently proceed to ordination, a process independent of their
academic studies. Students who have received at GPA of at least 3.0 are qualified to advance to
the Licentiate in Sacred Theology program.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Bachelor of Sacred Theology will:

1. Demonstrate an introductory and foundational knowledge of each of the major disciplines
   that constitute the Christian theological tradition, including scripture, liturgy and sacraments,
   moral theology, systematic theology, spirituality, and canon law;
2. Exhibit the theological knowledge and pastoral skills necessary for professional ministry in
   the Roman Catholic Church; and
3. Demonstrate the level of theological knowledge and academic skills necessary to pursue a
   more advanced degree in theological studies, normally the S.T.L.
4. Display a reading knowledge of Latin.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants have a bachelor’s degree, including a broad foundation in philosophy
   and religious studies; some reading knowledge of Latin and an academic record providing
   evidence of superior achievement and the ability to pursue graduate work in theological
   studies. There is no minimum GPA or GRE requirement, although these measures form part
   of the basis for a judgment about the student’s aptitude for theological studies.
2. Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate a reading knowledge of Latin by the
   end of the first semester by passing a timed exam drafted and evaluated by qualified faculty
   members in TRS or the Greek and Latin department.
3. GPA: Students must maintain a G.P.A. of at least 2.75.
4. Advising: S.T.B. students are assigned academic advisors, who meet with them regularly to
   consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Advisors generally maintain tracking sheets
   to oversee student progress toward the degree. Problems involving students are addressed by
   the area director or advisor and, when necessary, are referred to the Associate Dean for
   Seminary and Ministerial Studies (ADSMS).
5. Pro-seminar: S.T.B. students take a pro-seminar in theological sources and research
   methodology during their first semester.
6. Comprehensive examination: Students must pass a comprehensive exam consisting of either
   a three-hour written examination or a one-hour oral examination before three members of the
   faculty, with the format chosen by the student. To pass the comprehensive exam, a student
   must receive an average grade of 2.5 (on a scale of 0 to 4.0) on the exam. The subject matter
   of the examination is material covered in the courses in systematic and sacramental theology,
   moral theology, and Scripture. Past exam questions and a list of themes and readings for
   review are available for students to review. A candidate for the S.T.B. degree may not

                                                 3
   continue candidacy after two failures in the comprehensive examination.


                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning


1. Because the S.T.B. is an ecclesiastical degree governed by international norms, its structure
   admits of only limited local variations. Faculty assignments may be revised in response to
   suggestions and criticisms expressed in course evaluations; the character and number of
   courses in individual subjects may be and have been adjusted in light of the changing profiles
   of students (e.g. the degree of philosophical and theological knowledge with which they
   arrive, as reflected in undergraduate transcripts and class performance at CUA); and
   language requirements and examining methods may also be adjusted as the faculty deems
   necessary.
2. The Ecclesiastical Degrees Committee within STRS makes designations regarding how
   specific courses meet the degree requirements, and must therefore approve curricular
   modifications of the sort described above.
3. Individual faculty members are responsible for adjusting the content of their courses in
   response to formal and informal feedback from students and colleagues in their academic
   areas.

                                              *****

                             Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.)

                                     I. Program Description

The S.T.L. degree involves developing student mastery of appropriate methods of scientific
investigation in theology and entails specialization in one of the following areas of theological
concentration: biblical theology, liturgical studies/sacramental theology, moral theology,
historical theology, and systematic theology.

Because it is necessary that ecclesiastical degrees be ―transferrable‖ to other ecclesiastical
programs around the world, it is important that there be considerable structural continuity to such
programs the world over. Accordingly, the fields of instruction, number of years to degree, and
other broad parameters for such programs are set out in the Norms of Application set by the
Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education. Further details, including the quantity of courses
or credit hours in each subject, course syllabi, and reading lists are determined by individual
Faculties.

Applicants must have completed a previous academic program calculated to engender a basic
familiarity with the long history of Christian theological endeavors – usually the S.T.B. or,
alternatively, a Master of Arts or Master of Divinity with course work equivalent to that for the
S.T.B. at CUA and theological proficiency in Latin. The STRS Ecclesiastical Degrees
Committee assesses the qualifications of applicants and makes decisions regarding prerequisites.



                                                 4
The S.T.L. requires a minimum of 24 credit hours of course work on the 700 or 800 levels, and
students must demonstrate research proficiency in Biblical Greek and a modern language,
usually either French or German. Students with a specialization in biblical theology must satisfy
additional requirements in Greek and Hebrew. S.T.L. students must also complete a thesis.

S.T.L. graduates are qualified to teach in a major seminary or equivalent school. Graduates of
CUA’s S.T.L. program teach in seminaries around the country.

                                  II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Licentiate in Sacred Theology will:

1. Demonstrate a specialized knowledge, meeting international standards, of one of the
   following major areas: biblical theology, liturgical studies/sacramental theology, moral
   theology, historical theology, or systematic theology;
2. Exhibit, by successfully completing an S.T.L. thesis, a grasp of methods of scientific
   investigation in his or her field sufficient to advance to the pursuit of a doctoral degree in that
   area;
3. Demonstrate the level of theological knowledge and academic skills necessary to teach in a
   major seminary or school of theology; and
4. Possess the ability to use, for purposes of research, theological Latin, biblical Greek, and
   either French or theological German.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants must have completed a previous graduate-level academic program
   calculated to engender a basic familiarity with the long history of Christian theological
   endeavors – usually the S.T.B. or a Master of Arts or Master of Divinity with course work
   equivalent to that for the S.T.B. at CUA and research proficiency in Latin.
2. Foreign language requirements: Students must pass language proficiency exams in Latin,
   Biblical Greek, and a modern language, usually through a one-hour written translation
   evaluated by qualified faculty members. In the case of Latin and the modern language a
   theological facility with the language must be demonstrated. These requirements may in
   some cases be met by passing a specialized course (e.g. TRS 504: Theological German) or
   by carrying out a ―language project‖ involving the translation of an article in the students
   area of study followed by an oral exam. Students specializing in biblical theology must
   satisfy additional requirements in intermediate Greek and Hebrew.
3. GPA: Students must maintain a cumulative GPA, derived from the combined average of
   course work, thesis and comprehensive examination, of 3.0 or higher.
4. Advising: S.T.L. students are assigned academic advisors, who meet with them regularly to
   consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Advisors generally maintain tracking sheets
   to oversee student progress toward the degree. Problems involving students are addressed by
   the area director or advisor and, when necessary, are referred to the Associate Dean for
   Seminary and Ministerial Studies (ADSMS).
5. Pro-Seminars: S.T.L. students must participate in four workshops conveying information

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    about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and thesis procedures. Attendance
    at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic checklist.
6. Research Guidance: Beginning in the second semester, S.T.L. students register for research
    guidance for three successive semesters, during which they are guided by a faculty member
    in readings within the area in which they propose to write a thesis.
7. Admission to Candidacy: Upon completion of all course requirements, including pro-
    seminars, and language requirements, students apply for admission to candidacy. The area
    director ascertains that all requirements have been met, and area faculty vote to admit to
    candidacy based on their judgment of whether the student’s prior work displays the ability to
    write an acceptable thesis.
8. Licentiate reading list: S.T.L. reading lists are developed within individual academic areas
    and serve as the basis for comprehensive examinations. They are periodically updated by
    area faculty and approved by the Ecclesiastical Degrees committee.
9. Thesis proposal: Each student must write a thesis of 75 to 100 pages (approximately 25,000
    to 35,000 words), which demonstrates the ability to proceed further in scientific theological
    research. This requires drafting and seeking approval for a thesis proposal drafted in
    collaboration with the thesis director and following a format for theses and dissertations
    standardized at the university level. The thesis proposal undergoes an intensive vetting
    process in which it must be approved by the director and a reader named by the academic
    area director; the faculty of the student’s academic area; and the Ecclesiastical Degrees
    Committee.
10. Thesis: The thesis should give evidence of the student’s training in research and make a
    contribution to theological knowledge involving a limited, yet significant, problem of
    investigation. It must prove familiarity with basic research methods and techniques, technical
    mastery of the limited subject matter and ability to exercise sound theological judgment and
    formulate accurate conclusions. The director and reader must approve the completed thesis
    before credit is granted (six semester hours). At that point the student becomes eligible to
    take comprehensive exams.
11. Comprehensive examinations: Each student must successfully complete written and oral
    comprehensive examinations requiring mastery of the chosen concentration. To qualify for
    these comprehensive examinations, the student must have maintained at least a 3.0
    cumulative grade point average. A candidate for the S.T.L. degree may not continue
    candidacy after two failures in the comprehensive examinations. The written examination is
    based on a fixed list of books in the student’s area of concentration; it is four hours in
    duration. The director and reader of the thesis plus one additional faculty member assigned
    by the academic area director read and grade the exam separately; their assessments are then
    tabulated by the academic area director. Students must receive a passing grade of at least 3.0
    to proceed to the oral comprehensives. The oral examination is also based on a student’s
    reading list. One hour in duration, it takes place before the same examiners who previously
    graded the written comprehensives. The panel also grades this exam on a 0 to 4 scale. The
    final result is the average of the scores given by each of the three examiners in a secret vote.
    Students must earn a 3.0 average score to pass the oral. Students who fail any part of the
    comprehensive exams must sit for the entire exams again and must wait at least one month
    before retaking the exams. A candidate for the S.T.L. degree may not continue candidacy
    after two failures in the comprehensive examinations.



                                                 6
                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Because the S.T.L. is an ecclesiastical degree governed by international norms, its structure
   admits of only limited local variations. Faculty assignments may be revised in response to
   suggestions and criticisms expressed in course evaluations; the character and number of
   courses in individual subjects may be and have been adjusted; reading lists for
   comprehensive exams are periodically updated; and language requirements and examining
   methods may also be adjusted as the faculty deems necessary.
2. The Ecclesiastical Degrees Committee within STRS makes designations regarding how
   specific courses meet the degree requirements, and must therefore approve curricular
   modifications of the sort described above.
3. Individual faculty members are responsible for adjusting the content of their courses in
   response to formal (i.e. course evaluations) and informal feedback from students and
   colleagues in their academic areas.

                                              *****

                              Doctor of Sacred Theology (S.T.D.)

                                     I. Program Description

The Doctor of Sacred Theology is an academic degree conferred only after a candidate with a
basic, tested theological foundation and proven competence in one area of specialization (as
evinced at the S.T.L. level) has shown ability for advanced achievement in scholarly research
and publication. The S.T.D. is a two-year program focused on the writing of a doctoral
dissertation.

Because it is necessary that ecclesiastical degrees be ―transferrable‖ to other ecclesiastical
programs around the world, it is important that there be considerable structural continuity to such
programs the world over. Accordingly, the fields of instruction, number of years to degree, and
other broad parameters for such programs are set out in the Norms of Application set by the
Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education. Further details, including the quantity of courses
or credit hours in each subject, course syllabi, and reading lists are determined by individual
Faculties.

Applicants to the S.T.D. program must possess an S.T.L. from CUA or its equivalent, as assessed
by the Ecclesiastical Degree Committee, and have attained a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.3 or better
in previous graduate work. Students whose preparation (S.T.L. or equivalent) is in an area of
concentration differing from that proposed for the S.T.D. are as a rule required to take additional
courses and/or pass the licentiate comprehensive examination in the new academic area of study.

S.T.D. students participate in non-credit pro-seminars for doctoral students, take at least 12
semester hours of advanced course work and write and defend a doctoral dissertation. They
register for dissertation guidance beginning in their first semester.



                                                 7
Receipt of the degree qualifies them to serve on the faculty of an ecclesiastical university.
Students who have received the S.T.D. from Catholic University teach at and administer Catholic
universities and seminaries around the world.


                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctorate in Sacred Theology will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of a specialized area of theological studies, in accordance with norms
   established by the Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education;
2. Have made a real contribution to theological knowledge in the form of the dissertation, and
   in so doing have demonstrated the breadth and depth of advanced knowledge and skill in the
   specialty area to produce constructive research and contribute to the life of the academy;
3. Possess research proficiency in Latin, biblical Greek, and two modern languages (e.g.
   French, German, Italian)
4. Be qualified to teach theology in a Catholic university or Ecclesiastical Faculty, and thus to
   provide for the intellectual formation of future faculty at Catholic institutions of higher
   learning.


                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants must possess an S.T.L. from CUA or its equivalent, as assessed by
   the Ecclesiastical Degree Committee, and have attained a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.3 or better
   in previous graduate work. Students who plan to change their area of concentration for the
   S.T.D. usually must meet additional pre-requisites, such as taking additional courses and/or
   passing the licentiate comprehensive examination in the new academic area of study.
2. GPA: Students must maintain at least a 3.0 G.P.A. in their course work.
3. Research papers: Working closely with their instructors, S.T.D. students must produce a
   substantial research paper (ca. 25-30 pages) that aspires to publishable quality in each of their
   four courses.
4. Foreign language requirements: Students must demonstrate proficiency in Latin, Biblical
   Greek, and two modern languages (usually French and German). Students specializing in
   biblical theology must also master biblical Hebrew. The standard for the modern language
   requirements is not simply basic reading knowledge but rather a command of theological
   usage. The means for satisfying these requirements follow the procedures within the
   individual areas, but most often involve a one-hour translation exercise designed and graded
   by School faculty members.
5. Dissertation proposal: Students must propose and complete a doctoral dissertation. The
   dissertation proposal undergoes an intensive vetting process through which the director and
   readers, the faculty of the student’s academic area, the STRS Ph.D. Committee, the Dean of
   STRS, a blind outside reviewer, and finally the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies must
   approve it.
6. Dissertation: In comparison to other institutions offering the S.T.D., STRS places great
   emphasis on producing a sizable and significant doctoral dissertation. Expectations are that it

                                                 8
    will demonstrate the student’s technical mastery of the subject, skill at engaging in scholarly
    research and proficiency in formulating conclusions significant to the academic theological
    community.
7. Comprehensive oral examination (lectio): Prior to defense of the doctoral dissertation, each
    student must pass a comprehensive oral examination (lectio) on the origins, history and
    contemporary status of the entire major area suggested by the topic of the dissertation. In
    consultation with his or her director and readers, a student selects five topics related to but
    not reproducing the dissertation topic, which the academic area director must approve. The
    dissertation director selects one topic for the examination and conveys it to the student 24
    hours in advance of the lectio. The student then prepares and delivers a 25-minute lecture on
    the topic, using a one-page outline as notes, and subsequently responds to 30 minutes of
    questions from the dissertation director and readers. The members of this committee then
    award secret grades according to the following rubric: Excellent (3.75 or above), Outstanding
    (3.50 to 3.75), Superior (3.25 to 3.50), Pass (2.50 to 3.50), which are averaged to produce the
    final grade for the oral exam. A grade below 2.50 is a failure. A student who fails the lectio
    may not proceed to the dissertation defense. A new lectio may be scheduled after one month.
    In the event of a second failure, the student is no longer eligible for the degree.
8. Oral defense: Following approval of the written dissertation and passing the oral
    comprehensive, the student must present a public defense of the dissertation before the
    director and readers. The director organizes the dissertation, which must involve a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS. In
    the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation without notes, describing
    the origins of the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief
    conclusions. There follows an initial round of 15 minutes of questioning from the director
    and each of the readers, followed by a second round of the same length at the conclusion of
    which the Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the
    committee then votes on whether the student has passed the oral defense, assigning grades in
    secret using the scale also used for the lectio (see above). The chief criteria for this
    evaluation are the scope of the student’s knowledge, ability to respond effectively and
    thoroughly to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the ability to expand upon his/her findings and apply them to problems and
    issues beyond the dissertation. The three members of the dissertation committee also grade
    the dissertation itself, using the same grading system as that employed for the lectio. The
    chair of the defense averages the individual grades to provide final grades.
9. Dissertation submission: Once a student has successfully defended the dissertation, s/he must
    revise it to include any changes the examining committee has required and bring it into
    conformity with the formatting requirements set out by the office of the Dean of Graduate
    Studies before it can be deposited.
10. Final grade: The final grade for the S.T.D. degree is calculated as follows: 30% for course
    work; 50%, dissertation; 10%, Lectio and 10%, oral defense.

                         IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Because the S.T.L. is an ecclesiastical degree governed by international norms, its structure
   admits of only limited local variations. Faculty assignments may be revised in response to
   suggestions and criticisms expressed in course evaluations; the character and number of

                                                9
   courses in individual subjects may be and have been adjusted; reading lists for
   comprehensive exams are periodically updated; and language requirements and examining
   methods may also be adjusted as the faculty deems necessary.
2. The Ecclesiastical Degrees Committee within STRS makes designations regarding how
   specific courses meet the degree requirements, and must therefore approve curricular
   modifications of the sort described above.
3. Individual faculty members are responsible for adjusting the content of their courses in
   response to formal (i.e. course evaluations) and informal feedback from students and
   colleagues in their academic areas.

                                              *****

                               CIVIL DEGREE PROGRAMS
The civil degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy have as their purpose the
intellectual formation of students as research scholars, teachers, and professional practitioners of
their chosen disciplines. At present, STRS offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in each of the
following eight academic programs: Biblical Studies (BS), Church History (CH), Historical and
Systematic Theology (HST; at the Ph.D. level, there are distinct programs in Historical Theology
and Systematic Theology), Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology (LS/ST), Moral
Theology/Ethics (MT/E), Religion and Culture (RC), Religious Education/Catechetics (RE/C),
and Spirituality (S). In addition, STRS offers collaborative M.A. degrees in Religious Studies
and Library and Information Science (as an M.A./M.S. in Library Science, awarded jointly with
the School of Library and Information Science), and the History of Religions (through the
Washington Consortium of Universities). The individual programs differ with respect to their
specific requirements, including admissions requirements, language requirements, and the shape
of comprehensive exams. Faculty members associated with the School’s seven academic areas
have primary responsibility for setting and periodically reviewing and adjusting the requirements
for each of these programs. (For administrative reasons the Spirituality and Religious
Education/Catechetics programs are grouped in a single academic area.)

One of the purposes of the reorganization of STRS and the revision of its civil degree programs
in 2003 was to promote an ethos of dialogue, cooperation and cross-disciplinary formation
among the School’s varying academic programs. For this reason, the M.A. and Ph.D. programs
generally require some course work in at least one academic area or discipline outside of the
student’s area of specialization.


                                      Master of Arts (M.A.)

The M.A. degree seeks to promote critical literacy and introduce students to scholarship and
research in a selected area of theology and religious studies. Although the School formally
awards a single M.A. in ―Theology and Religious Studies,‖ in practice there are eight distinct
degree programs corresponding to the academic programs listed above, each of which oversees
the development of its own requirements.


                                                10
Courses for the M.A. are also open to students pursuing M.Div. and S.T.B. degrees. STRS holds
that the interaction of students with different career goals – some intending academic careers,
others pursuing ministerial careers – is beneficial to all. Instead of being held to varying
requirements according to programs, students are expected to meet the same standards in each
course, irrespective of which degree they are pursuing.


                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                    Biblical Studies (BS)

                                     I. Program Description

The Biblical Studies program provides students with a philologically oriented training in
methodologies for engaging in the exegesis of biblical texts. The M.A. program takes as its
primary goal student mastery of biblical languages. It is not designed to produce a terminal
M.A. degree; rather, it is geared specifically to prepare students for the Ph.D. in Biblical Studies.

Successful applicants have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology or
religious studies or an equivalent field, and have shown superior achievement and the ability to
succeed in graduate work, as evidenced by a G.P.A. of at least 3.3. They must have attained
suitable combined scores on the GRE or MAT exams. For foreign students, also requisite are
scores on the TOEFL exam that meet basic University requirements. The director of the
academic area makes recommendations regarding admission and pre-requisites, which the
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves. Students are not expected to have
fulfilled requirements in biblical languages prior to admission.

To earn the M.A., students in the Biblical Studies (BS) concentration complete at least 30 credit
hours of course work at the 600 level and above, a research requirement (normally a master’s
thesis, or, in cases in which a student is unlikely to proceed to the doctoral level, two seminar
papers), and a comprehensive examination. They focus their course work on acquiring advanced
Biblical Greek and advanced Biblical Hebrew skills. In some cases, students at the M.A. level
may also begin to acquire the competency in a Semitic language that is required at the doctoral
level. After satisfying pre-requisites in theology, they must also study biblical exegesis in 800-
level courses, take at least one course in a related academic area (e.g. history, theology,
archeology) and display an ability to work with language texts and biblical commentaries in
either French or German. Master’s students must also participate in several pro-seminar
workshops introducing them to academic writing style and research methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and
who show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at meetings of
professional societies such as the Society for Biblical Literature, the American Academy of
Religion, and the Catholic Biblical Association; and to submit particularly worthy papers for
consideration for publication in journals in the field.




                                                 11
Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Unlike other M.A. programs in the School, the
program in Biblical Studies was not conceived as a terminal degree, but rather expressly serves
to prepare students for doctoral work. As a result, it produces few degree recipients who pursue
jobs outside of the field of biblical studies.


                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with the
concentration in Biblical Studies will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism and draw appropriate and accurate
   conclusions;
3. Have achieved mastery of Biblical Hebrew and Biblical Greek;
4. Have sufficient knowledge of French or German to work with facility with materials in that
   language dealing with biblical languages and texts;
5. Have received an introduction to the skills requisite to engaging in the exegesis of biblical
   texts;
6. Present an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between
   theology and religious studies; and
7. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.


                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Successful applicants have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor,
   in theology or religious studies, and have shown superior achievement and the ability to
   succeed in graduate work, as evidenced by an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.3. They have
   attained suitable combined scores on the GRE or MAT exams. For foreign students, also
   requisite are scores on the TOEFL exam that meet University requirements
2. Advising: The academic area director serves as the advisor for M.A. students and meets with
   them regularly to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if
   they have not cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) As a rule, academic areas also
   engage in an annual review of students at which faculty discusses student progress and airs
   potential problems.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a G.P.A. of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The Associate Dean for
   Graduate Studies ( ADGS) periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to
   maintain the minimum GPA for their program may, after consultation with their advisor, be
   placed on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. The office of the
   ADGS also monitors student milestones, including completion of the M.A. pro-seminars,
   satisfaction of language requirements, and passing of comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops

                                               12
    introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
    academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: Students must demonstrate control of Biblical Hebrew and
    Biblical Greek by completing coursework at an advanced level in each. They must also
    satisfy the area director that they have facility with French or German by passing a
    translation exam or its equivalent.
6. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
    final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements.
    Administered in three parts on two separate days, M.A. comprehensives in BS include three
    hours on Greek, three hours on Hebrew, and three hours on exegesis. The area director
    oversees the formulation of exam questions and assigns faculty members to evaluate the
    exams.
7. Thesis requirement: Following successful completion of comprehensive exams, M.A.
    students who intend to go on to the doctorate in Biblical Studies must write a master’s thesis,
    for which they receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to
    do research by means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but
    significant topic of investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's
    familiarity with basic methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge
    and skill in exercising sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and
    knowledge and skill at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the
    subject matter and the research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but
    ordinarily it should be 75-100 pages. Students complete their M.A. theses in conjunction with
    a director and a reader. The school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics. Area faculty
    members evaluate the thesis on a pass/fail basis.
8. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students who do not perform up to doctoral standards in
    the work or who for other reasons which to stop with a Master’s degree have the option of
    submitting two term papers instead of a thesis in fulfillment of the research requirement.
    These papers should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least
    one of these papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the
    student has been examined.
9. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
10. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
11. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    the Center for Planning and Information Technology beginning next year.


                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Faculty members and administrators in the School routinely use the various findings of the

                                                 13
   Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making adjustments to the individual
   M.A. programs, primarily at the level of the academic area. Academic areas, under the
   leadership of area directors or program liaisons, advise students, instruct and grade students,
   teach and evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive exams. Based on
   these processes, academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices and requirements for
   each degree program. The BS area director is able to access student files, including
   transcripts, electronically and in the physical School files, and also keeps files on area
   students. The academic area faculty members meet monthly to attend to area business. Any
   changes in procedures or policies for students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.
                                                *****

                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                    Church History (CH)

                                     I. Program Description

This program prepares students for careers in education and research, providing both a general
background in the history of the church and a specialization in a particular area of that history.

Applicants for this M.A. have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology
or religious studies, although the program will also accept a B.A. in history; and have evidenced
superior achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in their
undergraduate GPA and their scores on the GRE or MAT exams. TOEFL exams meeting
minimum University requirements are requisite for foreign students. The director of the
academic area makes recommendations regarding admission and pre-requisites, which the
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

To earn the degree with a concentration in Church History, students complete at least 30 credit
hours of course work at the 600 level and above, satisfy a research requirement (either two

                                                 14
article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), and
pass a comprehensive exam. CH mandates that students demonstrate reading knowledge of a
modern foreign language (ordinarily French or German). In addition, depending on their area of
specialization within CH, students might also need a reading knowledge of Greek and/or Latin.
All first year students are required to take a core course, The Writing of Church History (TRS
521). All M.A. students must also participate in several pro-seminar workshops introducing
them to academic writing style and research methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and
who show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in conferences and professional
societies and, in some cases, to develop their work for submission for publication

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Recent M.A. degree recipients in Church History have taken
positions in teaching, publishing, and library science.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Church History will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate and accurate
   conclusions;
3. Demonstrate reading knowledge of a modern foreign language (ordinarily French or
   German) and, if required for their area of specialization within CH, also a reading knowledge
   of Greek and/or Latin;
4. Present an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between
   theology and religious studies; and
5. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.


                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A. students advisors, who meet with them regularly
   to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Academic area directors generally maintain
   tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule, academic areas also
   engage in an annual review of students at which faculty discusses student progress and airs
   potential problems. Problems involving students are addressed by the area director or
   advisor and, when necessary, are referred to the ADGS.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,

                                                15
     and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
     reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum may be placed on
     academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. Advisors and the area director
     may be called upon to assist students on probation in determining how to improve their
     performance. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, including the
     colloquy, completion of coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers,
     fulfillment of language requirements, and comprehensive exams.
4.   Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
     introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
     academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5.   Colloquy: At the beginning of their second semester students meet with a panel of faculty
     members including the area director and two of their instructors from the prior semester. At
     this meeting the students’ future program is discussed. In light of student interests and
     abilities as reflected in their coursework up to that point, a determination is made regarding
     the subfield of church history in which the student will proceed. This determination sets the
     structure of the students’ MA comprehensives and may also result in the assignment of a new
     advisor specific to that subfield.
6.   Foreign language requirements: M.A. students in church history must demonstrate
     competence in French or German in one of three ways: by passing a University course
     geared toward reading and research in the relevant language; by passing the one-hour
     standardized Princeton exam administered at the University’s counseling center; or by
     completing a translation project in which they translate an entire article, summarize it, and
     then submit to an examination on it by a TRS professor. Students working in the patristic,
     medieval, or Renaissance periods must further demonstrate facility with Latin or Greek by
     successfully completing a course or passing an examination administered by the Greek and
     Latin department.
7.   M.A. reading list: In preparation for comprehensive exams, students in Church History use a
     common reading list covering the six subfields in the program (patristics, medieval,
     Renaissance/Reformation, early modern, modern, and American) for all except their own
     period of specialization; for their own subfield, a personalized reading list is created in
     consultation with their advisor. Students also submit suggested topics and general questions
     to their advisor to be consulted in the drafting of comprehensive exams.
8.   Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
     research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level seminars,
     should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least one of these
     papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
     been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are submitted, and a
     brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s file. The area director
     confirms that this requirement has been met before the student may proceed to sit for
     comprehensive exams.
9.   Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
     receive six credits. One benefit to this option is that students may work on the thesis over the
     summer, e.g. at a time when they would not be able to take the courses in which they might
     write the two papers that would otherwise satisfy the research requirement. The thesis itself
     should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by means of a modest contribution to
     knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of investigation. Specifically, the thesis

                                                 16
    should prove the student's familiarity with basic methods of research; mastery of the limited
    subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising sound judgments involving analysis,
    comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill at drawing appropriate and accurate
    conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the research involved primarily govern the
    length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100 pages. Students complete their M.A.
    theses in conjunction with a director and a reader. The school’s M.A. Committee vets
    proposed topics. The director and reader evaluate theses on a pass/fail basis
10. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
    final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements.
    Administered in two parts on separate days, the Church History comprehensive exam
    features a general section on the field as a whole and a second part devoted to the student’s
    area of specialization. At least two and in, in cases of a split decision, three faculty members
    read each part of the exam, evaluating it on a pass/fail basis. Any part of the exam that is
    failed by two faculty members must be retaken if the student is to pass.
11. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
12. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
13. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.


                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Faculty members and administrators in the School routinely use the various findings of the
   Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making adjustments to the individual
   M.A. programs, primarily at the level of the academic area. Academic areas, under the
   leadership of area directors or program liaisons, advise students, instruct and grade students,
   teach and evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive exams. Based on
   these processes, academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices and requirements for
   each degree program. The CH area director is able to access student files, including
   transcripts, electronically and in the physical School files, and also keeps files on area
   students. The academic area faculty members meet monthly to attend to area business, and
   may also on occasion review past enrollment figures to determine shifts in patterns of student
   interests and react accordingly. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are
   posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the

                                                 17
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.


                                              *****

                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                         Historical and Systematic Theology (HST)

                                     I. Program Description

The Masters of Arts in Historical and Systematic Theology (M.A.) is the basic graduate degree
in general Roman Catholic theology. The program provides sound initiation in graduate
theological studies by assisting students in acquiring the ability to "think theologically." The
unique strength of the program lies in the broad and solid grounding in the Roman Catholic
tradition which it affords the candidate. HST offers a general M.A. degree in Roman Catholic
theology; only at the doctoral level do students specialize in historical or systematic theology.

Applicants to the M.A. degree program with a concentration in Historical and Systematic
Theology (HST) have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology or
religious studies, possess basic proficiency in Latin and a grounding in philosophy (normally at
least twelve credits). They evidence superior achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate
work, as reflected in an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 and suitable combined scores on the
GRE (normally a combined verbal and quantitative score of 1200 or above) or MAT exams.
TOEFL exams meeting minimum university standards are requisite for foreign students. The
director of the academic area makes recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites,
which the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

To complete this concentration, students take at least 30 credit hours of course work at the 600
level and above, satisfy a research requirement (either two article-length seminar papers that
aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), and pass a comprehensive exam. They
also demonstrate reading ability in Latin and a modern foreign language (either a Romance
language or German) and use one of these language proficiencies in meeting the research
requirement. HST students take two core courses – History and Method in Theology (TRS 660)
and Introduction to the Study of Religion (TRS 780A) – and nine credits of systematics, three in
Scripture, three in moral theology, and nine in an area of theology or religious studies other than

                                                18
HST. All M.A. students must also participate in several pro-seminar workshops introducing them
to academic writing style and research methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and
who show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at meetings of
professional societies such as the American Academy of Religion or the College Theology
Society; and to submit particularly worthy papers for consideration for publication in journals or
other venues in the field.

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Positions that recent degree recipients in theology have
taken include: associate pastor, teacher, director of religious education, and bishop.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Historical and Systematic Theology will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in historical and systematic theology;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate and accurate
   conclusions;
3. Demonstrate reading ability in Latin and a modern foreign language (either a Romance
   language or German);
4. Show an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between theology
   and religious studies; and
5. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A. students advisors, who meet with them regularly
   to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Academic area directors generally maintain
   tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule, academic areas also
   engage in an annual review of students at which faculty discusses student progress and airs
   potential problems.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
   reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA may be placed
   on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. In such cases the academic
   area director may consult with the student to develop a plan for improving academic
   performance. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the
   completion of coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers, fulfillment

                                                19
    of language requirements, and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
    introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
    academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: M.A. students must demonstrate a basic knowledge of either
    Latin or Greek by: (1) passing either TRS 500A ―Theological Latin‖ or TRS 502 ―Greek for
    Theology‖ or by (2) passing a one-hour reading exam in either Latin or Greek. M.A. students
    must also demonstrate theological reading knowledge of either German or a Romance
    language by passing a timed exam in the language, written and evaluated by STRS faculty
    members. The German requirement may also be fulfilled by passing TRS 504 Theological
    German instead of an exam.
6. M.A. reading list: Students are given a reading list with thirty books subdivided under three
    areas: source books, ten subfields of theology, and collateral areas. This list provides the
    basis for M.A. comprehensive exams in the field.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
    research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level seminars,
    should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least one of these
    papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
    been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are submitted, and a
    brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s file. The area director
    confirms that this requirement has been met before the student may proceed to sit for
    comprehensive exams.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
    receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by
    means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of
    investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's familiarity with basic
    methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising
    sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill
    at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the
    research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100
    pages. Students complete their M.A. theses in conjunction with a director and a reader,
    normally in the last semester of coursework. The school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed
    topics.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
    final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements.
    Administered in two parts on separate days, the HST exam deals in its first half with
    systematic theology and in its second half with various subfields. It is based wholly on the
    M.A. reading list. The area director oversees the formulation of exam questions and then
    assigns faculty members to evaluate the exams. At least two and in some cases three faculty
    members read each part of the exam; they vote as a body on whether or not to pass the
    student on the exam as a whole. The area director tabulates the responses and reports them.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate

                                                 20
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Faculty members and administrators in the School routinely use the various findings of the
   Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making adjustments to the individual
   M.A. programs, primarily at the level of the academic area. Academic areas, under the
   leadership of area directors or program liaisons, advise students, instruct and grade students,
   teach and evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive exams. Based on
   these processes, academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices and requirements for
   each degree program. The HST area director is able to access student files, including
   transcripts, electronically and in the physical School files, and also keeps files on area
   students. The academic area faculty members meet monthly to attend to area business.
   Faculty and students may be consulted in order to gather data relevant to proposed revisions
   of language requirements or guidelines for comprehensive exams. Student criticisms
   involving the quality of courses taken for transfer credit in neighboring institutions may also
   be investigated by the area director. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are
   posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.


                                              *****

                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                     Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology (LS/ST)

                                                21
                                     I. Program Description

The program in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology trains students in the study of liturgy
and the sacraments and prepares them for both academic and pastoral work in that field. Two
concentrations are offered: one in General Research, focused on preparation for doctoral studies,
and one in Pastoral Liturgy, a terminal program geared toward careers in ministry.

Applicants to the M.A. degree program with a concentration in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental
Theology have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology or religious
studies; possess basic proficiency in Latin; and evidence superior achievement and the ability to
succeed in graduate work, as reflected in undergraduate GPA (usually of at least 3.0) and scores
on the GRE (generally at least 1200 combined, but with no set minimum) or MAT exams.
TOEFL exams meeting University standards are requisite for foreign students. The director of
the academic area makes recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites, which the
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

To earn the degree with this concentration, students complete at least 30 credit hours of course
work at the 600 level and above, satisfy a research requirement (either two article-length seminar
papers that aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), and pass a comprehensive
exam. They also demonstrate competence sufficient for theological research in French or
German and Theological Latin. LS/ST requires three core courses for all its M.A. students:
Liturgy and Culture (TRS 741B), Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives (TRS 741A),
and Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology (TRS 744). There are additional required courses
associated with the two concentrations available within the degree: students specializing in
pastoral liturgy must take Liturgical Catechesis (TRS 743A), while those specializing in general
research must take Liturgical Sources (TRS 740). All M.A. students participate in several
required pro-seminar workshops that introduce them to academic writing style and research
methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and
who show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at meetings of
professional societies; and to submit particularly worthy papers for consideration for publication
in journals in the field.

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Positions that recent degree recipients have taken include:
associate pastor, teacher, director of religious education, parish liturgy coordinator, and director
of the catechumenate.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology will:

                                                22
1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate and accurate
   conclusions;
3. Have gained sufficient knowledge of the liturgical tradition to implement and catechize on
   the liturgy in a parish setting;
4. Demonstrate facility for research purposes in French or German and Theological Latin (for
   the General Research concentration only).
5. Possess an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between
   theology and religious studies; and
6. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization (for the general
   research concentration only.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A. students advisors, who meet with them regularly
   to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Academic area directors generally maintain
   tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule, academic areas also
   engage in an annual review of students at which the faculty discusses student progress and
   airs potential problems and solutions.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
   reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA may be placed
   on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. Advisors and the area
   director may assist the student in developing strategies to improve academic performance.
   The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the completion of
   coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers, fulfillment of language
   requirements, and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
   introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
   academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: Students in the General Research Specialization must fulfill
   a Latin requirement (either by the satisfactory completion of Theological Latin [TRS 500A]
   or passing a timed Latin exam administered and graded by faculty) and a French requirement
   (either by the satisfactory completion of the course in "Reading for Comprehension [FREN
   500] or by passing a reading exam administered within STRS.) There is no language
   requirement for students in the Pastoral Liturgy specialization.
6. M.A. reading list: M.A. students receive a four-page reading list of books and articles,
   periodically revised by the faculty, on which the comprehensive exams are based.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level seminars,
   should be 25-35 pages long and are evaluated with respect to criteria including proper use of
   sources, knowledge of the current state of the question, ability to relate various scholarly

                                               23
    opinions to one another, and ability to use research methods in the field. At least one of these
    papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
    been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are submitted, and a
    brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s file. Using tracking
    sheets, the area director confirms that this requirement has been met before the student may
    proceed to sit for comprehensive exams.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
    receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by
    means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of
    investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's familiarity with basic
    methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising
    sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill
    at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the
    research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100
    pages. Students complete their M.A. theses in conjunction with a director and a reader,
    sometimes before the comprehensive exam but normally thereafter. The school’s M.A.
    Committee vets proposed topics. Theses are evaluated on a pass/fail basis.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students in LS/ST usually take their comprehensive
    exams in the final semester of course work, after they have completed all language
    requirements. Administered in two parts on separate days, the LS/ST exam has sections
    devoted to ancient texts, sacraments, the reformation of rites, and theology. The area director
    oversees the formulation of exam questions and then assigns faculty members to evaluate the
    exams. At least two and in some cases three faculty members read each part of the exam and
    evaluate it on a pass/fail basis; and the area director tabulates and records the results.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Faculty members and administrators in the School routinely use the various findings of the
   Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making adjustments to the individual
   M.A. programs, primarily at the level of the academic area. Academic areas, under the
   leadership of area directors or program liaisons, advise students, instruct and grade students,
   teach and evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive exams. Based on
   these processes, academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices and requirements for
   each degree program. The LS/ST area director is able to access student files, including
   transcripts, electronically and in the physical School files, and also keeps files on area

                                                 24
   students. The academic area faculty members meet monthly to attend to area business. Any
   changes in procedures or policies for students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.


                                              *****

                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                               Moral Theology/Ethics (MT/E)

                                     I. Program Description

This program is designed to provide men and women with advanced training in moral theology
and ethics. Moral theology—the branch of Christian theology that focuses on the human
response to the Christian revelation—is studied in conversation with Scripture and tradition, as
well as with other disciplines that address moral questions, such as philosophy, religious studies,
politics, law, medicine, and the social and behavioral sciences.

Applicants to the M.A. degree program with a concentration in Moral Theology/Ethics (MT/E)
have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology or religious studies,
possess some acquaintance with philosophy (at least two courses), and evidence superior
achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in their undergraduate GPA
(usually over 3.5) and the scores on the GRE or MAT exams. TOEFL exams meeting University
standards are requisite for foreign students. MT/E students must also provide a writing sample
displaying an ability to write critically and well on academic topics. The director of the academic
area makes recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean
for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

For the concentration in MT/E, students complete at least 30 credit hours of course work at the
600 level and above, satisfy a research requirement (either two article-length seminar papers that

                                                25
aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), demonstrate research competency in one
modern foreign language and pass a comprehensive exam. They take two required courses:
Foundations of Christian Moral Life (TRS 630A) and either Theological Foundations (TRS
760A) or Introduction to the Study of Religion (TRS 780A). Additional courses must be
distributed between MT/E (at least nine credits) and other STRS academic areas or apposite
disciplines outside the School such as philosophy or political science. All M.A. students must
also participate in several pro-seminar workshops introducing them to academic writing style and
research methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and who
show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at meetings of
professional societies such as the American Academy of Religion, and the Society of Christian
Ethics; and to submit particularly worthy papers for consideration for publication in journals in
the field

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Positions that recent degree recipients have taken include:
teacher, director of religious education, and pastor.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Moral Theology/Ethics will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate and accurate
   conclusions;
3. Demonstrate research competency in one modern foreign language;
4. Possess an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between moral
   theology and other approaches to the study of morality;
5. Possess an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between
   theology and religious studies; and
6. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A. students advisors, who meet with them regularly
   to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Academic area directors generally maintain
   tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule, academic areas also
   engage in an annual review of students at which faculty discusses student progress and airs
   potential problems.

                                               26
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
   reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA may be placed
   on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. In such cases the advisor
   and/or area director may work together with the student to formulate a plan to improve
   student performance. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: completion
   of coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research requirement; foreign language
   requirements; and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
   introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
   academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: M.A. students in MT/E must demonstrate reading facility
   and proficiency for use in theological research in one modern language, normally French or
   German. Students may meet this requirement by passing an advanced language course, for
   example, Theological German (TRS 501); by sitting for a one-hour translation exam drafted
   and graded by STRS faculty members; or by completing a translation project in which they
   translate an entire article, summarize it, and then submit to an examination on it by a
   professor.
6. M.A. reading list: A reading list for the M.A. program is available for students once they
   have entered the program. Students are expected to have a grasp of the central arguments of
   each text before they sit for their comprehensive exams.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level seminars,
   should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least one of these
   papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
   been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are submitted, and a
   brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s file. The area director
   confirms that this requirement has been met before the student may proceed to sit for
   comprehensive exams.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
   receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by
   means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of
   investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's familiarity with basic
   methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising
   sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill
   at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the
   research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100
   pages. Students complete their M.A. theses in conjunction with a director and a reader. The
   school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics. Theses are evaluated by the director and
   reader on a pass/fail basis.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
   final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements. M.A.
   comprehensive exams are administered in two parts on separate days, addressing respectively
   the area core and each student’s area of specialization. The exams take both the general
   M.A. reading list and the student’s coursework into account. Area directors oversee the
   formulation of exam questions and then assign faculty members to evaluate the exams. At

                                                27
    least two and in some cases three faculty members evaluate each part of the exam on a
    pass/fail basis.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Meeting as a committee of the whole, the MT/E faculty routinely uses the various findings of
   the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making adjustments to the M.A.
   program. MT/E professors, under the leadership of the area director, advise students, instruct
   and grade students, evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive exams.
   Based on these processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates the practices and
   requirements for each degree program. Course offerings for the academic area are
   determined collectively each year through a process that includes a review of student
   enrollment and performance in past semesters. Any changes in procedures or policies for
   students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.

                                              *****

                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies

                                                28
                                   Religion and Culture (RC)

                                     I. Program Description

The Religion and Culture academic area emphasizes analysis of the ways that religious
expressions have transformed cultures and have been transformed by them. The area’s programs
utilize the methods of the social sciences and humanities in the study of religion, emphasizing
the human and cultural dimensions of religious life. Students in the past have pursued research
on, for example, religion and science, interreligious dialogue, religion and literature, comparative
religious philosophies, American religious experience, and Latino Catholic studies.

Applicants to the M.A. program with a concentration in Religion and Culture (RC) have a
bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology, religious studies or one of a
number of related disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Successful applicants
evidence superior achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate studies, normally as
reflected in an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.5. They also have acceptable scores on the GRE
(normally above 1200 for quantitative and verbal combined) or MAT exams. TOEFL exams
fulfilling University standards are requisite for foreign students. Applicants’ statements of
purpose should reflect an ability to write clearly, a coherent set of research interests, and career
goals for which the M.A. would be relevant. The director of the academic area makes
recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean for Graduate
Studies reviews and approves.

To complete the RC concentration, students take at least 30 credit hours of course work at the
600 level and above, satisfy a research requirement (either two article-length seminar papers that
aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), demonstrate research competency in one
modern foreign language and pass a comprehensive exam. RC requires two courses: Introduction
to the Study of Religion (TRS 780A) and either History and Method in Theology (TRS 660) or
Theological Foundations (TRS 760A). Additional courses must be distributed between RC (at
least nine credits) and other STRS academic areas or apposite disciplines outside the School
related to the Catholic theological tradition. All M.A. students must also participate in several
pro-seminar workshops introducing them to academic writing style and research methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and
who show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at local and
national meetings of professional societies such as the American Academy of Religion; and to
submit particularly worthy papers for consideration for publication in journals in the field.

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Although most students in the program advance to the
doctoral level, recent students taking a terminal M.A. have taken up positions including priest,
minister/pastor, and policy analyst.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning


                                                 29
Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Religion and Culture will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis of specific religious traditions or phenomena, comparison and/or criticism;
   and to draw appropriate and accurate conclusions;
3. Demonstrate research knowledge of one modern foreign language.
4. Be able to carry out research and to present findings in clearly-written form;
5. Present an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between
   theology and religious studies; and
6. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See description of admissions criteria in program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area director advises all M.A. students. He or she meets with them
   regularly to consult on program design and course selection. (Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) The
   academic area director uses tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
   The academic area also engages in an annual review of students at which the faculty
   discusses student progress and airs potential problems. If problems arise, the academic area
   director discusses the matter with the student; for more serious matters, the area director
   consults with the ADGS or the Dean before taking action. The area director notifies students
   by letter when each milestone (admission, completion of language requirements, completion
   of coursework, including pro-seminars and research papers or thesis, passage of
   comprehensive exams; see below) is passed, with a copy sent to each student’s official file.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
   reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA may be placed
   on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. The area director may meet
   with the student in some cases to work out a plan of action, but this is not required. The
   office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the completion of coursework
   including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers, fulfillment of language requirements,
   and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
   introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
   academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: In Religion and Culture, proficiency in one foreign language
   is required. Normally this language is either French or German, but because of the flexibility
   of the program, students may elect to be examined on another language more suited to their
   program of study (e.g., Arabic or Spanish). The requirement may be satisfied by passing an
   appropriate graduate-level course in the language of choice, or by successfully completing a
   one-hour translation test. Generally, TRS faculty members evaluate student work on
   language exams. The academic area director approves the choice of language, and must
   exercise flexibility in arranging for evaluations when the language is not one taught at the

                                               30
    university (recent examples include Russian and Osage).
6. M.A. reading list: In preparation for M.A. comprehensive examinations, students obtain a
    standard reading list. The first part of the list contains a set of readings for the first day of the
    examination on basic issues in Religion and Culture and the Catholic Theological Tradition.
    The second part of the list contains several sub-lists divided by discipline and subject (e.g.,
    hermeneutics, anthropology of religion, psychology of religion, sociology of religion,
    women’s studies and religion, etc.) Of these, the student selects three areas in which to be
    examined and reads the selections from those lists.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
    research requirement. These papers should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of
    publishable quality. Professors therefore evaluate them differently from a normal term paper,
    assessing their potential for publication in a journal or presentation at a conference. At least
    one of these papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the
    student has been examined. These papers are evaluated by the professors in whose courses or
    under whose independent supervision the papers were written.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
    receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by
    means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of
    investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's familiarity with basic
    methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising
    sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill
    at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the
    research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100
    pages. Students complete their M.A. theses in conjunction with a director and a reader. The
    school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics. The student writes the thesis during the last
    two semesters in residence, concurrently with remaining coursework and/or comprehensive
    examinations. Many details of these procedures for guidance and evaluation remain purely
    theoretical, since no students in recent memory have written a thesis.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
    final semester of course work, after they have completed all pro-seminar and language
    requirements but concurrently with remaining coursework. The faculty structures the exams
    around the standard reading list, taking into consideration the student’s specific coursework.
    Area directors oversee the formulation of exam questions and then assign faculty members to
    evaluate the exams. Two readers evaluate each examination, and a third reader will be asked
    to read the exams in case of a tie. The readers use their own experience and professional
    judgment in recommending that a student either pass or fail and examination. The final
    determination is made by the Religion and Culture faculty as a whole. After reviewing the
    readers’ comments and some discussion, the faculty votes to pass or fail the student.
    Students who fail the exam may retake it once, after one month at the earliest.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.

                                                   31
12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the Religion and Culture area, functioning as a committee of the
   whole, uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis
   for making adjustments to the M.A. program, primarily at the level of the academic area.
   Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area director, advise students, instruct and
   grade students, teach and evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive
   exams. Based on these processes, the academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices
   and requirements for each degree program. For example, the M.A. reading lists are
   periodically reviewed and updated to include the most recent scholarship. Recently, the area
   director has begun collecting data on alumni in order to frame a discussion about how best to
   serve the needs of future students. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are
   posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning. Recent
   initiatives include the creation of common spaces with computer terminals for student use in
   Caldwell Hall, and the establishment of a webpage making available frequently used forms
   and the Graduate Student Handbook online.

                                              *****

                  Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                         Religious Education/Catechetics (RE/C)

                                    I. Program Description

The Graduate Program in Religious Education/Catechetics is designed to prepare students for a
broad range of educational, diocesan and parish ministries through the study of foundations,

                                                32
history and theories of Christian education and the dynamics of faith and moral development
with a special emphasis on the liturgical life of the Church. Although the RE/C program is part
of a larger academic area overseen by an area director, it functions in many respects as a self-
contained unit, and many of the day-to-day affairs involving the program are managed by a
program coordinator.

Applicants to the M.A. degree program with a concentration in Religious Education/Catechetics
(RE/C) have a bachelor’s degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology or religious studies
or education, and at least nine credits in philosophy. They evidence superior achievement and the
ability to succeed in graduate work as reflected in undergraduate GPA and combined scores on
the GRE or MAT exams. TOEFL scores meeting university standards are requisite for foreign
students. The director of the academic area, working with the program coordinator, makes
recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean for Graduate
Studies reviews and approves.

To earn this degree, students complete at least 30 credit hours of course work at the 700 level
and above (with few exceptions), satisfy a research requirement (either two article-length
seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), demonstrate reading
competency in one modern foreign language, and pass a comprehensive exam. RE/C requires
three courses: Foundations of Religious Education/Catechetics (TRS 751F), Liturgical
Catechesis (TRS 743A), and History and Theory of Catechetics (TRS 751B). Additional courses
must be distributed between RE/C (at least six credits) and other STRS academic areas or
relevant disciplines outside the School such as psychology and sociology. All M.A. students
must also participate in several pro-seminar workshops introducing them to academic writing
style and research methodologies.

The ADGS may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and who show
promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research assistantships.
Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at meetings of professional
societies such as the Religious Education Association and the American Academy of Religion;
and to submit particularly worthy papers for consideration for publication in journals in the field.

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Positions that recent degree recipients have taken include:
associate pastor, high school religion teacher, and director of religious education.

                                  II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Religious Education/Catechetics will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization;
2. Exhibit critical literacy in writing and research in their field, including the ability to exercise
   sound judgments involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate
   and accurate conclusions;
3. Demonstrate reading competency in one modern foreign language.
                                                  33
4. Present an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between
   theology and religious studies; and
5. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A. students advisors, who meet with them regularly
   to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have not
   cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Academic area directors or program
   coordinators generally maintain tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the
   degree. As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which
   faculty discusses student progress and airs potential problems.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
   reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA may be placed
   on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. Advisors and the program
   coordinator may help a student devise strategies to improve academic performance. The
   office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the completion of coursework
   including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers, fulfillment of language requirements,
   and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
   introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
   academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: M.A. students in RE/C must demonstrate competence in
   reading one modern foreign language, normally French, German or Spanish, for the purpose
   of research. They may do this by passing an approved language course or passing a language
   examination administered and evaluated by area faculty.
6. M.A. reading list: A reading list that serves as part of the basis for the comprehensive exams
   is available to M.A. students. The list is periodically updated by area faculty.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level seminars,
   should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least one of these
   papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
   been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are submitted, and a
   brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s file. The area director
   confirms that this requirement has been met before the student may proceed to sit for
   comprehensive exams.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
   receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by
   means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of
   investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's familiarity with basic
   methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising
   sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill
   at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the
   research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100

                                                34
    pages. Students complete their M.A. thesis in conjunction with a director and a reader, who
    evaluate the thesis on a pass/fail basis. The school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
    final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements. The tests
    are administered in two parts on separate days, and each academic area fixes the structure of
    its own exams. In RE/C, the faculty structures these exams around an approved reading list
    that they have developed, and also considers the specific course work that students have
    completed. Area directors oversee the formulation of exam questions and then assign faculty
    members to evaluate the exams. Three faculty members read each part of the exam; they vote
    as a body on whether or not to pass the student on the exam as a whole.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the RE/C program, functioning as a committee of the whole,
   uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for
   making adjustments to the M.A. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the
   area director and program coordinator, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and
   evaluate language skills, create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate
   theses. Based on these processes, the academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices
   and requirements for each degree program. For example, the M.A. reading lists are
   periodically reviewed and updated to include the most recent scholarship.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or

                                               35
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning. Recent
   initiatives include the creation of common spaces with computer terminals for student use in
   Caldwell Hall, and the establishment of a webpage making available frequently used forms
   and the Graduate Student Handbook online.


                                               *****

                   Master of Arts (M.A.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                      Spirituality (S)

                                     I. Program Description

In dialogue with the Catholic theological tradition, the program in Spirituality also draws on the
methods of philosophy, biblical studies, psychology, sociology, and the history of religions to
analyze religious experience as expressed in worship, contemplation, doctrine, catechesis, and
the spiritual classics. Although the Spirituality program is part of a larger academic area
overseen by an area director, it functions in many respects as a self-contained unit, and many of
the day-to-day affairs involving the program are managed by a program coordinator.

Applicants to the M.A. degree program with a concentration in Spirituality (S) have a bachelor’s
degree with a major, or at least a minor, in theology or religious studies or education, and at least
nine credits in philosophy. They evidence superior achievement and the ability to succeed in
graduate work as reflected in undergraduate GPA and combined scores on the GRE or MAT
exams. TOEFL scores meeting university standards are requisite for foreign students. The
program coordinator makes recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites, which the
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

For the concentration in Spirituality, students complete at least 30 credit hours of course work at
the 600 level and above, satisfy a research requirement (either two article-length seminar papers
that aspire to be of publishable quality or a master’s thesis), demonstrate reading competency in
one modern foreign language and pass a comprehensive exam. Spirituality requires four courses:
Introduction to the History of Christian Spirituality (TRS 650A), Theological Foundations (TRS
760A), Introduction to the Study of Religion (TRS 780A), and Classics in Christian Spirituality I
or II (TRS 750A or 750B). Students must also take three credits of Catholic theology and three
of biblical studies. They devote their remaining credits to their specialized interests in the field.
All M.A. students must also participate in several pro-seminar workshops introducing them to
academic writing style and research methodologies.

The Associate Dean may consider students, who clearly intend to go on to doctoral work and
who show promise of succeeding at that level, for scholarships and/or teaching or research
assistantships. Students are also encouraged to participate in and present papers at meetings of
professional societies such as the American Academy of Religion; and to submit particularly
worthy papers for consideration for publication in journals in the field.




                                                 36
Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in their
academic area with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal degree
may proceed to a variety of careers. Positions that recent degree recipients have taken include:
associate pastor, teacher, and director of religious education.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious Studies with a
concentration in Spirituality will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological issues in the area of Spirituality
2. Exhibit critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise sound judgments
   involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate and accurate
   conclusions;
3. Demonstrate reading competency in one modern foreign language.
4. Show an understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue between theology
   and religious studies; and
5. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See description of admissions criteria in program description above.
2. Advising: The program coordinator advises all M.A. students. He or she meets with them
   regularly to consult on program design and course selection and uses tracking sheets to
   oversee student progress toward the degree. (Students may be prevented from registering, if
   they have not cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) The program coordinator
   notifies students by letter when each milestone (admission, completion of language
   requirements, completion of coursework, including pro-seminars and research papers or
   thesis, passage of comprehensive exams; see below) is passed, with a copy sent to each
   student’s official file.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing,
   and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS periodically
   reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA may be placed
   on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. The program coordinator
   may meet with the student in some cases to work out a plan of action, but this is not required.
   The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the completion of
   coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers, fulfillment of language
   requirements, and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
   introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
   academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: In S, proficiency in one foreign language is required.
   Normally this language is either French or German. The requirement may be satisfied by
   passing an appropriate graduate-level course in the language of choice, or by successfully
   completing a one-hour translation test. Generally, TRS faculty members evaluate student
   work on language exams. The program coordinator approves the choice of language.

                                               37
6. M.A. reading list: In preparation for M.A. comprehensive examinations, students obtain a
    standard reading list. The reading list, which is periodically updated by the Spirituality
    faculty, serves as the basis for the M.A. comprehensive exams.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of the
    research requirement. These papers should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of
    publishable quality. Professors therefore evaluate them differently from a normal term paper,
    assessing their potential for publication in a journal or presentation at a conference. At least
    one of these papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the
    student has been examined. These papers are evaluated by the professors in whose courses or
    under whose independent supervision the papers were written.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
    receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do research by
    means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of
    investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's familiarity with basic
    methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; knowledge and skill in exercising
    sound judgments involving analysis, comparison, and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill
    at drawing appropriate and accurate conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the
    research involved primarily govern the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100
    pages. Students complete their M.A. theses in conjunction with a director and a reader. The
    school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics. The student writes the thesis during the last
    two semesters in residence, concurrently with remaining coursework and/or comprehensive
    examinations. Many details of these procedures for guidance and evaluation remain purely
    theoretical, since no students in recent memory have written a thesis.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in the
    final semester of course work, after they have completed all pro-seminar and language
    requirements but concurrently with remaining coursework. The faculty structures the exams
    around the standard reading list, taking into consideration the student’s specific coursework.
    Area directors oversee the formulation of exam questions and then assign faculty members to
    evaluate the exams. Two readers evaluate each examination, and a third reader will be asked
    to read the exams in case of a tie. The readers use their own experience and professional
    judgment in recommending that a student either pass or fail and examination. The program
    coordinator tabulates and records results. Students who fail the exam may retake it once,
    after one month at the earliest.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

                                                 38
1. When needed, the faculty of the S program, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses
   the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the M.A. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area
   director and program coordinator, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and
   evaluate language skills, create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate
   theses. Based on these processes, the academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices
   and requirements for each degree program. For example, the M.A. reading lists are
   periodically reviewed and updated to include the most recent scholarship.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning. Recent
   initiatives include the creation of common spaces with computer terminals for student use in
   Caldwell Hall, and the establishment of a webpage making available frequently used forms
   and the Graduate Student Handbook online.


                                             *****

          Master of Arts in Religious Studies/Master of Science in Library Science
                                    (M.A./M.S. in L.S.)

                                    I. Program Description

The joint M.A in Religious Studies/M.S. in L.S. provides students with the opportunity to
combine work in both disciplines in order to acquire competence in specialized areas in which
library and information science and theology and religious studies overlap. The program allows
students to obtain the two graduate degrees sooner than they could acquire each independently.
The student specializes in either Religious Studies and Archival Management or General
Librarianship and Religious Studies; however, the religious studies component may be tailored
to any of several areas, depending on the student’s interests. Some oversight and standardization
in this process is exercised by the School’s M.A. Committee.




                                               39
Applicants for the joint degree must submit complete and separate applications (including the
application fee and all required supporting documents) to both degree-granting units of the
university. Applicants to the M.A. degree program in Theology and Religious Studies are
expected to have attained a bachelor’s degree with a major or at least a minor in theology,
religious studies, or a cognate field. Successful applicants evidence superior achievement and
the ability to succeed in graduate studies, normally as reflected in an undergraduate GPA of at
least 3.5. They also have acceptable scores on the GRE (normally above 1200 for quantitative
and verbal combined) or MAT exams. TOEFL exams fulfilling University standards are requisite
for foreign students. Applicants’ statements of purpose should reflect an ability to write clearly,
a coherent set of research interests, and career goals for which the M.A. would be relevant. The
director of the academic area makes recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites,
which the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

The M.A./M.S. in L.S., with specializations in either Religious Studies and Archival
Management or General Librarianship and Religious Studies, requires 27 or 24 credits in
Theology and Religious Studies, as a rule at the 600 level and above, with the distribution of
credits roughly conforming to the requirements of the academic area within STRS in which the
student is accepted. Six of these hours must be devoted to satisfying a research requirement in
the form of either (1) two article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality or
(2) a master’s thesis. Master’s students must also participate in several pro-seminar workshops
introducing them to academic writing style and research methodologies. All STRS M.A.
programs require at least one research language and administer comprehensive exams. The
Library Science component of the degree requires four core courses (CLSC/LSC 551, 553, 555,
and 557) and a comprehensive exam.

The M.A./M.S. in L.S. is normally a terminal degree, although students who have completed the
program are eligible to apply for advancement to the doctoral degree program in the academic
area or program in which they have specialized. Students who take the degree as a terminal
degree may proceed to a variety of careers. Recent participants in the program have targeted
jobs as archivist for a religious order, cataloguer of rare books collections, and librarian for
religious studies.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with an M.A./M.S. in L.S. will:

   1. Have knowledge of basic methodological issues in their area of specialization in religious
      studies and in library science;

   2. Have attained a degree of critical literacy in their field, including the ability to exercise
      sound judgments involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw
      appropriate and accurate conclusions;

   3. Possess competence in basic computer applications;

   4. Have research competence in one modern language;

                                                 40
5. Have developed understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue
   between theology and religious studies; and

6. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                     III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A./M.S. in L.S. students advisors, who meet with
   them regularly to consult on course selection and oversee the Religious Studies
   component of their programs. (Students may be prevented from registering, if they have
   not cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.) Academic area directors or program
   coordinators generally maintain tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the
   degree. As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which
   faculty discusses student progress and airs potential problems.
3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good
   standing, and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS
   periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA
   may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. Advisors
   and the program coordinator may help a student devise strategies to improve academic
   performance. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the
   completion of coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers,
   fulfillment of language requirements, and comprehensive exams.
4. Pro-Seminars: M.A./M.S. in L.S. students are required to participate during their first
   year in workshops introducing them to the University’s library system, to research
   methodologies, and to academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: M.A./M.S. in L.S. students must demonstrate
   competence in reading one modern foreign language, normally French, German or
   Spanish, for the purpose of research. They may do this by passing an approved language
   course or passing a language examination administered and evaluated by faculty in the
   area in which they have concentrated their studies.
6. M.A. reading list: A reading list that serves as part of the basis for the comprehensive
   exams is available to M.A. students in STRS. The list is periodically updated by area
   faculty.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of
   the research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level
   seminars, should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least one
   of these papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the
   student has been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are
   submitted, and a brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s
   file. The director of the area with which the student is affiliated confirms that this
   requirement has been met before the student may proceed to sit for comprehensive
   exams.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
   receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do

                                            41
       research by means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but
       significant topic of investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's
       familiarity with basic methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter;
       knowledge and skill in exercising sound judgments involving analysis, comparison,
       and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill at drawing appropriate and accurate
       conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the research involved primarily govern
       the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100 pages. Students complete their
       M.A. thesis in conjunction with a director and a reader, who evaluate the thesis on a
       pass/fail basis. The school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics.
   9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in
       the final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements.
       The tests are administered in two parts on separate days, and each academic area fixes the
       structure of its own exams. Area directors oversee the formulation of exam questions and
       then assign faculty members to evaluate the exams. Three faculty members read each part
       of the exam; they vote as a body on whether or not to pass the student on the exam as a
       whole. M.A./M.S. in L.S. students must also write comprehensive exams in Library
       Science, and in doing so are able to take advantage of a website detailing the structure of
       the exam and making available sample exam questions.
   10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that
       they are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the
       evaluations for their benefit.
   11. Informal student feedback: The Dean of STRS meets periodically with members of the
       STRS Student Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any
       interested graduate students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing
       developments within the school and have the opportunity to bring their questions and
       concerns to the School administrators.
   12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the
       present year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School
       regarding placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function
       will migrate to CPIT beginning next year.


                      IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Meeting as a committee of the whole, STRS area faculty routinely uses the various findings
   of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making adjustments to the
   School’s various M.A. programs. STRS professors, under the leadership of area directors and
   program coordinators, advise students, instruct and grade students, evaluate language skills,
   and create and assess comprehensive exams. Through the advising process in particular,
   M.A./M.S. in L.S. students are able to weigh in with comments on how well the individual
   areas with which they have affiliated themselves serve the joint degree undertaking. Based
   on these processes, the academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices and
   requirements for each degree program. Where needed, STRS faculty and administrators
   consult with colleagues form the School of Library and Information Science to coordinate the
   degree program.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic

                                               42
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.

                                           *****


                       Master of Arts (M.A.) in the History of Religions

                                     I. Program Description

The M.A. in the History of Religions is a degree offered jointly with other schools in the
Consortium of Universities in the Washington Metropolitan Area (specifically, George
Washington University, Georgetown University, and American University). Its purpose is to
provide students with language competency and historical knowledge of a particular religious
tradition—normally Hinduism—and, for comparative purposes, an acquaintance with a second
tradition (e.g. Catholicism or Islam). Students are based at one school, but may take courses for
the program through other Consortium schools. Within STRS, the program is administered by
the Religion and Culture area. Although the program has received applications in recent years, it
has not matriculated students.

Applicants to the M.A. degree program are expected to have attained a bachelor’s degree with a
major or at least a minor in theology or religious studies, to possess some acquaintance with
philosophy, and to provide evidence of superior achievement and the ability to succeed in
graduate work. Suitable scores on the GRE or MAT exams, and, for foreign students, on the
TOEFL exam are required. Recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites are made
by the directors of each academic area and approved by the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies.

The STRS M.A. in the History of Religions program requires 30 credit hours of coursework (not
including languages), as a rule at the 600 level and above. Six of these hours must be devoted to
satisfying a research requirement in the form of either (1) two article-length seminar papers that
aspire to be of publishable quality or (2) a master’s thesis. Master’s students must also
participate in several pro-seminar workshops introducing them to academic writing style and

                                                43
research methodologies. The program requires at least one research language and administers
comprehensive exams. The M.A. in the History of Religions combines course work on a
primary tradition (e.g., Hinduism) with work on a relevant language (e.g. Sanskrit), as well as an
introduction to the methods of the history of religions and a second religious tradition (e.g. Islam
or Christianity).

Students who have completed the M.A. may be advanced to the doctoral degree program in
Religion and Culture with the approval of area faculty. Students who take the M.A. as a terminal
degree may proceed to a variety of careers, including with non-profits and government agencies.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with an M.A. in the History of Religions will:

   1. Have knowledge of methodological issues in the study of the history of religions, and
      have attained a degree of critical literacy in the field, including the ability to exercise
      sound judgments involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw
      appropriate and accurate conclusions;
   2. Have a base of knowledge of a primary religious tradition, usually in the field of
      Hinduism or Indian studies, and enough acquaintance with a second tradition to be able
      to mount meaningful comparisons;
   3. Have research competence in a relevant language (e.g. Sanskrit or Hindi);
   4. Have training in field research techniques;
   5. Have developed understanding of and insight into the complexities of the dialogue
      between theology and religious studies; and
   6. Be prepared to continue on to doctoral work in their area of specialization.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

   1. Admission: See program description above.
   2. Advising: The academic area assigns M.A. in the History of Religions students advisors,
      who meet with them regularly to consult on course selection. (Students may be prevented
      from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with the advisor.)
      Academic area directors or program coordinators generally maintain tracking sheets to
      oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule, academic areas also engage in an
      annual review of students at which faculty discusses student progress and airs potential
      problems.
   3. Course work/GPA: M.A. students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to remain in good
      standing, and a GPA of 3.3 to qualify for advancement to the doctoral level. The ADGS
      periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA
      may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester, dismissed. Advisors
      and the program coordinator may help a student devise strategies to improve academic
      performance. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones, such as the
      completion of coursework including the M.A. pro-seminars and research papers,
      fulfillment of language requirements, and comprehensive exams.
   4. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in

                                                 44
    workshops introducing them to the University’s library system, to research
    methodologies, and to academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
5. Foreign language requirements: M.A. in the History of Religions students must
    demonstrate research competence in a language related to their field of study, usually
    Hindi or Sanskrit. They may do this by passing an approved language course or passing a
    language examination administered and evaluated by faculty in the area in which they
    have concentrated their studies. Normally this requirement presupposes a level equivalent
    to two years of language instruction.
6. M.A. reading list: A reading list that serves as part of the basis for the comprehensive
    exams is drafted by the area director, taking both the student’s coursework and approved
    texts in Religion and Culture into account.
7. Non-thesis option seminar papers: Students must submit two term papers in fulfillment of
    the research requirement. These papers, normally written in the context of 800-level
    seminars, should be 25-35 pages long and aspire to be of publishable quality. At least one
    of these papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the
    student has been examined. The papers are evaluated by the professor to whom they are
    submitted, and a brief evaluation and/or copy of each paper is deposited in the student’s
    file. The director of the area with which the student is affiliated confirms that this
    requirement has been met before the student may proceed to sit for comprehensive
    exams.
8. Thesis option: Alternatively, students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which they
    receive six credits. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student’s ability to do
    research by means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but
    significant topic of investigation. Specifically, the thesis should prove the student's
    familiarity with basic methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter;
    knowledge and skill in exercising sound judgments involving analysis, comparison,
    and/or criticism; and knowledge and skill at drawing appropriate and accurate
    conclusions. The nature of the subject matter and the research involved primarily govern
    the length of the thesis, but ordinarily it should be 75-100 pages. Students complete their
    M.A. thesis in conjunction with a director and a reader, who evaluate the thesis on a
    pass/fail basis. The school’s M.A. Committee vets proposed topics.
9. M.A. comprehensive examinations: Students usually take their comprehensive exams in
    the final semester of course work, after they have completed all language requirements.
    The tests are administered in two parts on separate days, and each academic area fixes the
    structure of its own exams. For the M.A. in the History of Religions, the faculty
    structures these exams around an approved reading list that it has developed, and also
    considers the specific course work those students have completed. The Religion and
    Culture area director oversees the formulation of exam questions and then assigns faculty
    members to evaluate the exams. Three faculty members read each part of the exam; they
    vote as a body on whether or not to pass the student on the exam as a whole.
10. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that
    they are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the
    evaluations for their benefit.
11. Informal student feedback: The Dean of STRS meets periodically with members of the
    STRS Student Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any
    interested graduate students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing

                                            45
       developments within the school and have the opportunity to bring their questions and
       concerns to the School administrators.
   12. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the
       present year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School
       regarding placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function
       will migrate to CPIT beginning next year.


                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. Meeting as a committee of the whole, Religion and Culture area faculty routinely uses the
   various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to its M.A. programs. RC professors, under the leadership of the area director,
   advise students, instruct and grade students, evaluate language skills, and create and assess
   comprehensive exams. Through the advising process in particular, M.A. in the History of
   Religions students are able to weigh in with comments on how well the academic area serves
   the joint degree undertaking. Based on these processes, the academic area periodically re-
   calibrates the practices and requirements for the degree program. Where needed, STRS
   faculty and administrators consult with colleagues form the other Consortium schools that
   participate in the degree program.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full School faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. Faculty members administer and have access to teaching evaluations, and adjust their courses
   accordingly. In addition, they have ready access to training and technical support from CPIT
   for the use of course management software and other technological aids, should they deem it
   desirable, in light of responses from students and colleagues, to include them in their
   teaching.
4. The Dean exercises oversight over graduate studies in various respects. The Dean may draw
   on the contributions of ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with graduate students to improve the
   procedures dealing with the graduate curriculum, or engage in an independent review of
   faculty syllabi and course evaluations, or review enrollment figures and adjust course
   offerings in order to ensure that common standards of quality are being met across the
   School.

                                              *****

                                 Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Ph.D. marks the attainment of a thorough understanding of a particular field of studies and a
developed capacity to make significant contributions to knowledge in that field through
disciplined research. Although the School formally offers a single Ph.D. in ―Theology and
Religious Studies,‖ in practice there are distinct degree programs each of which oversees the

                                                46
development of its own requirements. Described in separate sections below, they are: Biblical
Studies, Church History, Historical Theology, Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology, Moral
Theology/Ethics, Religion and Culture, Religious Education/Catechetics, Spirituality, and
Systematic Theology. (The academic area of Historical and Systematic Theology, which offers a
combined program at the M.A. level, diverges into two programs at the Ph.D. level.)
Nonetheless, STRS expects that all graduates will be acquainted with the diversity of theological
and other disciplines brought to bear in the study of religion.

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                      Biblical Studies

                                     I. Program Description

The Biblical Studies program provides students with a philologically oriented training in
methodologies for engaging in the exegesis of biblical texts. The Ph.D. level of the program is
designed to provide students with the training necessary for effective teaching, research, and
publication in the biblical field. Since the biblical text is the product of religious thought and
culture that evolved over many centuries, students will also be directed to advanced work in
theological areas related to the critical study of the Bible.

Applicants to the Ph.D. in BS have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or
religious studies, a minimum four courses in philosophy and evidence of superior achievement
and the ability to succeed in graduate work (a minimum GPA of 3.3 at the master’s level), as
well as acceptable combined scores on the GRE or MAT exams. Foreign students must present
scores on the TOEFL exam that meet the University minimum. Applicants in Biblical Studies
must also demonstrate mastery of biblical Greek, Hebrew, and one other Semitic language, or be
prepared to acquire these skills as prerequisites. The director of the academic area makes
recommendations regarding admission and pre-requisites, which the Associate Dean for
Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

To earn the Ph.D., students in the Biblical Studies concentration generally complete at least 30
credit hours of course work at the 700 or 800 level (for Biblical Studies courses, at the 800 level
only), 15 hours of which involve satisfying a research requirement (five article-length seminar
papers that aspire to be of publishable quality and are written in an 800-level research seminar);
demonstrate research-level reading knowledge of both French and German in addition to the
biblical languages; pass comprehensive exams and write and defend a dissertation. The BS
curriculum builds on the language skills students acquired at the M.A. level (in biblical Greek
and Hebrew) and focuses on exegesis. Mastery of a Semitic language must also be demonstrated
as a prerequisite for the doctoral courses. A mixture of Old Testament and New Testament
exegesis seminars make up half of the required coursework; the rest is devoted to acquisition of a
second Semitic language (e.g. Aramaic, Syriac, Ugaritic, Akkadian, Ethiopic) and work in
theology or another cognate discipline (for example, history or archeology). All Ph.D. students
must participate in a series of pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research

                                                 47
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world. Recent BS
graduates hold faculty positions at Xavier University (OH), University of Dallas (TX), Sogang
University (South Korea), LeMoyne College (NY), Benedictine College (KS), Spring Hill
College (AL), Scranton University (PA), and University of Portland (OR).

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Biblical Studies will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of methods and knowledge in biblical studies, including exegetical
   methodology;
2. Possess training in the responsible exegesis of biblical texts;
3. Be able to apply philological knowledge to textual criticism;
4. Display a sophisticated understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious
   studies;
5. Demonstrate research-level reading proficiency in French and German.
6. Have a thorough knowledge of biblical Greek and Hebrew and at least one other Semitic
   language;
7. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
   academy; and
8. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce constructive research and
   contribute to the life of the academy.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or
   religious studies, a minimum four courses in philosophy, a minimum GPA of 3.3 at the
   master’s level, and suitable combined scores on the GRE or MAT exams. Foreign students
   present scores on the TOEFL exam that meet minimum University requirements.
2. Advising: Ph.D. students are assigned advisors by the area director; they meet with the
   students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Advisors may be reassigned
   accordingly after students begin participating in exegetical seminars, and again once they

                                                48
    have found a dissertation director. Students may be prevented from registering if they have
    not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. Area directors generally maintain
    tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
    The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
    minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
    dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
    coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
    comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
    defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
    about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
    Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
    checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
    School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
    from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit at least five seminar papers in fulfillment
    of the research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality.
    At least one of the papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in
    which the student has been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with
    a view to exploring prospective dissertation topics. In BS, these papers are evaluated by the
    faculty members specializing in exegesis. This requirement is tracked by the area director.
7. Foreign language requirement: BS students must demonstrate research-reading level
    competence in both French and German in addition to mastery of biblical Greek and biblical
    Hebrew and control of at least one other Semitic language. The protocols for satisfying these
    language requirements are tailored to each individual case by the area director, but generally
    revolve around success in advanced language classes offered by University faculty members.
8. Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the exegetical sections of the comprehensive
    exam. The Old and New Testament sections of the exam each draw on a reading list with
    roughly fifty works, compiled by area faculty members.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements, as verified by the area
    director. Administered in three parts on separate days, exams are structured in part around the
    academic area reading lists. The area director oversees the formulation of exam questions by
    faculty members, and then assigns faculty members to evaluate the answers. At least two,
    and in some cases three, faculty members read each part of each exam, and comprehensive
    exam committee members or area faculty members as a body vote on whether or not to pass
    the student on the exam as a whole. Exams are evaluated on a pass/fail basis. If a student
    fails a comprehensive examination, s/he may repeat it only once, typically in the following
    semester at the earliest. A second failure automatically terminates a student's enrollment in
    the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    While students who have reached this point are normally admitted, the area reserves the right

                                                49
    not to deny candidacy to students who have proved only marginal in their abilities. If
    approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process. The proposal may be sent back to
    the student for revision at any one of these stages.
12. Dissertation: The procedure for dissertation direction in BS requires that the dissertation
    director serve as liaison between student and readers. Only after a proposal or chapter has
    been approved by the director is it sent to the readers for comment; and their comments are
    relayed in turn by the director back to the student. The dissertation is only eligible for
    defense when the director and readers have signified their approval by signature. Ph.D.
    dissertations are not graded.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction‖. In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction, which applies not to the dissertation itself, but
    rather to the defense only. Following the defense, members of the examining committee
    frequently provide the student with written comments and corrections for the dissertation.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate

                                                 50
    students. The purpose of these meetings is to inform graduate students of new developments
    in the School and to provide them with an opportunity to raise their own questions and
    concerns.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to recently graduated students and reported its findings to the School
    regarding placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will
    migrate to CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the BS area, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses the
   various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area
   director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language skills,
   create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based on these
   processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates the practices and requirements for
   each degree program. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are posted on the
   School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                             *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                      Church History

                                    I. Program Description

The program prepares students for a career in education and scholarship, providing them with
thorough knowledge of specific areas of specialization, experience in research and teaching, and
original contribution to historical research.



                                               51
Applicants have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or religious studies
or education, have taken at least four courses in philosophy and have evidenced superior
achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in a GPA of 3.3 at the
master’s level as well as suitable scores on the GRE or MAT exams. TOEFL exams meeting
minimum University requirements are requisite for foreign students. The director of the
academic area makes recommendations regarding admission and pre-requisites, which the
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

Ph.D. students in Church History generally complete at least 36 credit hours of course work at
the 700 and 800 levels, 12 hours of which involve satisfying a research requirement (four article-
length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality and are usually written either in an
800-level course or as an individual directed research project); pass comprehensive exams and
write and defend a dissertation. All first year students are required to take a core course, The
Writing of Church History (TRS 521). CH students must demonstrate research competence in
two modern foreign languages (usually French and German) but, depending on a student’s
research interest, this might expand to include four semesters beyond the bachelor’s level in any
other languages that the student needs for research. All Ph.D. students must participate in a series
of pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world. Recent
graduates have accepted academic positions at, for example, Belmont Abbey (NC), Conception
Seminary College (MO), Mount St. Mary Seminary (MD), University of St. Mary of the Lake
(IL).

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Church History will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of methods and knowledge in their field of specialization;
2. Display a comprehensive grasp of issues within their chosen discipline and a sophisticated

                                                52
     understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious studies;
3.   Demonstrate a research-reading level proficiency in two modern foreign languages (usually
     French and German) and the ability to translate original texts in any other languages (e.g.
     Greek or Latin for students in patristics) that the student needs for research.
4.   Have developed professional relationships with other scholars in their field through
     professional societies and like media;
5.   Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
     academy; and
6.   Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce and present constructive research
     and contribute to the life of the academy.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: Academic area directors assign academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet
   with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. Area
   directors generally maintain tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
   As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss
   student progress and air potential problems. Once a student has a dissertation director, s/he
   becomes that student’s advisor.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
   The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
   minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
   dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the colloquy, the
   completion of coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language
   requirements, comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation
   proposal, and defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
   about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
   Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
   checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
   School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
   from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Colloquy: At the beginning of their second semester students meet with a panel of faculty
   members including the area director and two of their instructors from the prior semester. At
   this meeting the students’ future program is discussed. In light of student interests and
   abilities as reflected in their coursework up to that point, a determination is made regarding
   the subfield of church history in which the student will proceed. This determination sets the
   structure of the students’ Ph.D. comprehensive exams and may also result in the assignment
   of a new advisor specific to that subfield.
7. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. These
   papers are normally written in the context of an 800-level research seminar. At least one of
   the papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student

                                                 53
    has been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a view to
    exploring prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructor to whom
    they are submitted, and evaluations and/or copies of the research papers are placed in the
    students’ files.
14. Foreign language requirement: Doctoral students in CH must demonstrate competence in
    French and German, in one of three ways: by passing a University course geared toward
    reading and research in the relevant language; by passing the one-hour standardized
    Princeton exam administered at the University’s counseling center; or by completing a
    translation project in which they translate an entire article, summarize it, and then submit to
    an examination on it by a TRS professor. Students working in the patristic, medieval, or
    Renaissance periods must further demonstrate the ability to translate original texts in Latin or
    Greek by successfully completing a course or passing an examination administered by the
    Greek and Latin department. In addition, students in Latin patristics must display facility
    with Greek, and students in Greek patristics must display facility with Latin.
8. Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the comprehensive exam in CH. Drafted by
    and for each student individually in the student’s major area, area of concentration, and
    minor area, these lists are approved by a faculty committee. Reading lists take a student’s
    course materials into account, and they also include additional titles judged to represent
    significant topics not covered by the student’s course work.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
    parts on four separate days (two days on the major area, one on the area of concentration, and
    one on the minor area), the CH exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The area
    director oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then assigns
    faculty members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three, faculty
    members read each part of each exam, evaluating it on a pass/fail basis. If a student fails a
    comprehensive examination, s/he may repeat it only once, typically in the following semester
    at the earliest. A second failure automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D.
    program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    In cases in which the student’s performance to that point has been marginal, candidacy may
    be denied. If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of
    the comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to
    complete and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process. If at any point the proposal is
    returned, it is revised and resubmitted by the student.

                                                54
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    CH, all chapters are submitted throughout the writing process to readers as well as the
    director, all of whom respond directly to the student with comments and criticisms. The
    dissertation is eligible for defense only when the director and readers have signified their
    approval by signature. Ph.D. dissertations are not graded.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. The committee votes to determine
    whether the student passes or fails. There is no grade or numerical score. A vote to pass
    may be contingent on the completion of revisions stipulated by one or more of the director
    and readers. Following a particularly impressive defense, a member of the committee – but
    not the director – may propose that the student pass ―with distinction‖. In this case, the
    committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be unanimously in favor to confer the
    distinction.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to just-graduated students and reported its findings to the School
    regarding placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will
    migrate to CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the CH area, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses the
   various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program, primarily at the level of the academic area. Area faculty
   members, under the leadership of the area director, advise students, instruct and grade
   students, teach and evaluate language skills, and create and assess comprehensive exams.

                                                55
   Based on these processes, the academic areas periodically re-calibrate the practices and
   requirements for each degree program. As needed, and based on a review of past enrollment
   and other data, the academic area may entertain significant restructuring measures in order to
   respond to shifting patterns of student interest. Any changes in procedures or policies for
   students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                               *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                    Historical Theology

                                     I. Program Description

The Ph.D. program in historical theology studies the development of Eastern and Western
Christian theology from the earliest Christian communities to the present.

Applicants to the Ph.D. degree program with a concentration in Historical Theology have a
master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or religious studies, basic proficiency
in Latin and a minimum of four courses in philosophy. They evidence superior achievement and
the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in a GPA of at least 3.3 at the master’s level
and suitable combined scores on the GRE (normally a combined verbal and quantitative score of
1200 or above) or MAT exams. TOEFL exams meeting minimum university standards are
requisite for foreign students. The director of the academic area makes recommendations
regarding admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews
and approves.

Students in the Historical Theology concentration usually complete at least 36 credit hours of
course work at the 700 and 800 levels for the Ph.D., 12 hours of which involve satisfying a
research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality
and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual directed research

                                                 56
project); qualify in four research languages (Latin, Greek, German and a Romance language);
pass comprehensive exams and write and defend a dissertation. Historical Theology has a single
core course, Theological Foundations (TRS 760A); it requires that half of a student’s course
work be in historical theology with the other half devoted to electives (12 credits) and a minor
field of study (6 credits) within another academic area (e.g. church history or moral
theology/ethics) or outside of the School (e.g. philosophy). All Ph.D. students must participate
in a series of pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world. Recent
posts for graduates in this program include the University of Notre Dame and the University of
Scranton.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Historical Theology will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of theology and mastery of methods in the study of
   historical theology;
2. Display a comprehensive grasp of issues within historical theology and a sophisticated
   understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious studies;
3. Possess a deep grounding in a particular historical subfield (patristic, medieval, or modern)
   and a particular subfield of theology (e.g. Christology, ecclesiology, etc.);
4. Demonstrate research proficiency in Latin, Greek, German and a Romance language.
5. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
   academy; and
6. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce constructive research and
   contribute to the life of the academy.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures



                                                57
1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area director assigns academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet
   with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. The area
   director maintains tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule,
   academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss student
   progress and air potential problems. Once a student has a dissertation director, s/he becomes
   that student’s advisor.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
   The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
   minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
   dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
   coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
   comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
   defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
   about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
   Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
   checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
   School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
   from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. The
   papers are developed in conjunction with 800-level research seminars. At least one of the
   papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
   been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a view to exploring
   prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructors of the research
   seminars in which they are assigned.
7. Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate research competence in Latin, Greek,
   German and a major Romance language (either French, Spanish, or Italian). Students fulfill
   the Latin requirement either by the satisfactory completion of Theological Latin (TRS 500A)
   or by passing a timed Latin exam administered and graded by faculty; the Greek requirement
   either by passing a similar Greek exam or by passing either Greek for Theology or Biblical
   Greek; the German requirement by passing either TRS 504: Theological German or an exam
   administered by STRS faculty; and the Romance language requirement by passing a reading
   exam administered within STRS.
8. Ph.D. reading list: A reading list consisting of approximately fifty substantive titles serves as
   the basis for the comprehensive exam. The list is drafted by the student in collaboration with
   a committee of three faculty members drawn from the areas in which the student is to be
   examined. Reading lists take a student’s course materials into account, and also include
   additional titles judged to represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course
   work. The reading list in historical theology includes fifteen books from the student’s major
   historical period, ten books in each of the other two historical periods, and fifteen books in
   the student’s area of theological specialization. Students are responsible for knowing the
   main propositions of each work on their list and for being able to relate those propositions to

                                                58
    others in the field.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
    parts on separate days, exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The
    comprehensive exam in Historical Theology has three parts devoted respectively to the
    student’s major historical periods, minor historical periods, and theological specialization.
    The area director oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then
    assigns faculty members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three,
    faculty members read each part of each exam and evaluate it on a pass/fail basis, and the area
    director tabulates and records the results. If a student fails a comprehensive examination,
    s/he may repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest. A second
    failure automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process.
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    Historical Theology, readers determine individually at which points in the drafting process
    they will review individual chapters. The dissertation is eligible for defense only when the
    director and readers have signified their approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to

                                                59
    pass or fail the dissertation and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated
    orally and in writing to students following the defense.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the HST area, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses the
   various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area
   director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language skills,
   create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based on these
   processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates its practices and requirements for each
   degree program, including language requirements, course offerings, and procedures for
   documenting student progress. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are posted
   on the School website.

2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).

3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.

4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or

                                               60
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                              *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                          Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology

                                     I. Program Description

The Ph.D. program in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology is devoted to the scholarly study
of the Christian liturgical and sacramental tradition.

Applicants have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or religious studies,
research proficiency in Latin, a minimum of four courses in philosophy and evidence of superior
achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in a minimum GPA of 3.3
at the master’s level and suitable combined scores on the GRE or MAT exams. Foreign students
meet University standards for scores on the TOEFL exam. The director of the academic area
makes recommendations regarding admission and pre-requisites, which the Associate Dean for
Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

To earn the Ph.D. with a concentration in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology, students
typically complete at least 36 credit hours of course work at the 700 and 800 levels, 12 hours of
which involve satisfying a research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to
be of publishable quality and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual
directed research project); qualify in Latin and Greek and two modern languages (usually
German and French); pass comprehensive exams and write and defend a dissertation. LS/ST
requires that half of a student’s course work be in liturgical studies and sacramental theology,
with the other half devoted to electives (12 credits) and a minor field of study within another
academic area or outside of STRS (6 credits). All Ph.D. students must participate in a series of
pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college

                                                61
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world. Students in
the LS/ST program have taken positions at Providence College (RI), Gonzaga University (WA),
and Loyola Marymount University (CA).

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of methods and knowledge in their field of specialization;
2. Display a comprehensive grasp of issues within their chosen discipline and a sophisticated
   understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious studies;
3. Demonstrate research competence in Latin, Greek and two modern languages (usually
   French and German);
4. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
   academy; and
5. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce constructive research and
   contribute to the life of the academy.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: Academic area directors assign academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet
   with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. Area
   directors generally maintain tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
   As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss
   student progress and air potential problems. Once a student’s dissertation proposal has been
   approved, the dissertation director becomes that student’s advisor.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
   The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
   minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
   dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
   coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
   comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
   defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
   about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
   Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
   checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
   School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
   from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. At

                                                62
    least one of the papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which
    the student has been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a
    view to exploring prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructors of
    the research seminars in which they are assigned.
7. Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate research competence in Latin, Greek
    and two modern languages (generally German and either French or Italian). Students fulfill
    the Latin requirement either by the satisfactory completion of Theological Latin (TRS 500A)
    or by passing a timed Latin exam administered and graded by faculty; the Greek requirement
    either by passing a similar Greek exam or by passing either Greek for Theology or Biblical
    Greek; and the modern language requirements either by the satisfactory completion of a
    course in "Reading for Comprehension‖ or by passing a reading exam administered within
    STRS.
8. Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the comprehensive exam. The lists are
    drafted by and for each student individually and then approved by a faculty committee.
    Reading lists take a student’s course materials into account, and they also include additional
    titles judged to represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course work.
    Students are responsible for knowing the main propositions of each work on their list and for
    being able to relate those propositions to others in the field.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
    parts on separate days, exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The area director
    oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then assigns faculty
    members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three, faculty members
    read each part of each exam and evaluate it on a pass/fail basis, and the area director
    tabulates and records the results. If a student fails a comprehensive examination, s/he may
    repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest. A second failure
    automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process.
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    LS/ST, students submit chapters that have been corrected by the dissertation director to
    readers, who send comments directly to the student, with copies to the dissertation director. .
    The dissertation is eligible for defense only when the director and readers have signified their

                                                63
    approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to
    pass or fail the dissertation and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated
    orally and in writing to students following the defense.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the LS/ST area, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses
   the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area
   director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language skills,
   create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based on these
   processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates its practices and requirements for each
   degree program, including language requirements and advising procedures. Any changes in
   procedures or policies for students are posted on the School website.

2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic

                                                64
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).

3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.

4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                              *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                  Moral Theology/Ethics

                                     I. Program Description

This program is designed to provide men and women with advanced training in moral theology
and ethics. Moral theology—the branch of Christian theology that focuses on the human
response to the Christian revelation—is studied in conversation with Scripture and tradition, as
well as with other disciplines that address moral questions, such as philosophy, religious studies,
politics, law, medicine, and the social and behavioral sciences.

Applicants have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or religious studies,
research proficiency in Latin, a minimum of four courses in philosophy and evidence of superior
achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in a minimum GPA of 3.3
at the master’s level and suitable combined scores on the GRE or MAT exams. Foreign students
meet University standards for scores on the TOEFL exam. The director of the academic area
makes recommendations regarding admission and pre-requisites, which the Associate Dean for
Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

Students concentrating in Moral Theology/Ethics generally complete at least 36 credit hours of
course work at the 700 and 800 levels to earn the Ph.D., 12 hours of which involve satisfying a
research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality
and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual directed research
project); qualify with reading proficiency in two modern foreign languages and either Latin or
Greek; pass comprehensive exams and write and defend a dissertation. MT/E has a cycle of four
core courses: TRS 737A, Ethics and Action; TRS 737B, The Virtues; TRS 737C, Law in Moral

                                                65
Theology, and TRS 737D, Twentieth Century Theological Ethics. Students must also take two
additional courses in moral theology or ethics, two electives, and two devoted to each of two
minor areas. All Ph.D. students must participate in a series of pro-seminars introducing them to
doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning around
the world. Recent graduates have taken academic positions at Fordham University and in China.
Others accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Moral Theology/Ethics will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of methods and knowledge in moral theology and ethics;
2. Display a sophisticated understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious
   studies;
3. Demonstrate reading proficiency in two modern foreign language and either Latin or Greek;
4. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
   academy; and
5. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce constructive research and
   contribute to the life of the academy.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area director assigns academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet
   with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. Area
   directors generally maintain tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
   As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss
   student progress and air potential problems. Once a student’s dissertation proposal has been

                                                66
    approved, the dissertation director becomes that student’s advisor.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
    The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
    minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
    dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
    coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
    comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
    defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
    about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
    Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
    checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
    School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
    from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
    research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. At
    least one of the papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which
    the student has been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a
    view to exploring prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructors of
    the research seminars in which they are assigned.
7. Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate research competence in Latin or Greek
    and two modern languages (generally German and either French or Italian). Students may
    fulfill the Latin requirement either by the satisfactory completion of Theological Latin (TRS
    500A) or by passing a timed Latin exam administered and graded by faculty; or the Greek
    requirement either by passing a similar Greek exam or by passing either Greek for Theology
    or Biblical Greek. They may satisfy each of the modern language requirements either by the
    satisfactory completion of a course in "Reading for Comprehension‖ or by passing a reading
    exam administered within STRS.
8. Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the comprehensive exam. The lists are
    drafted by and for each student individually in conjunction with a faculty committee.
    Reading lists take a student’s course materials into account, and they also include additional
    titles judged to represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course work.
    Students are responsible for knowing the main propositions of each work on their list and for
    being able to relate those propositions to others in the field.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
    parts on separate days, exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The area director
    oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then assigns faculty
    members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three, faculty members
    read each part of each exam and evaluate it on a pass/fail basis, and the area director
    tabulates and records the results. If a student fails a comprehensive examination, s/he may
    repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest. A second failure
    automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research

                                               67
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process.
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    MT/E, readers determine individually at which points in the drafting process they will review
    individual chapters. The dissertation is eligible for defense only when the director and
    readers have signified their approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to
    pass or fail the dissertation and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated
    orally and in writing to students following the defense.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present

                                                68
   year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
   placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
   CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the MT/E area, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses
   the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area
   director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language skills,
   create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based on these
   processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates its practices and requirements for each
   degree program. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are posted on the School
   website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                              *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                   Religion and Culture

                                    I. Program Description

The Religion and Culture academic area emphasizes analysis of the ways that religious
expressions have transformed cultures and have been transformed by them. The area’s
programs utilize the methods of the social sciences and humanities in the study of
religion, emphasizing the human and cultural dimensions of religious life. These methods
may include anthropology, sociology, psychology, literary theory, history,
phenomenology, ritual studies, and others. All students in this program take required
courses in religious studies methodology, hermeneutics, and the Catholic theological
tradition. Otherwise, students are free to design their own programs in collaboration with

                                                69
their adviser. Students in the past have pursued research on topics including religion and
science, interreligious dialogue, Confucianism in the modern Vietnamese novel, medieval
Islamic philosophy in comparison with western philosophy, the American religious
experience, Hindu thought and practice, the practices of modern Latino parishes, and
religion in film.

Applicants to the program have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or
religious studies or in any of a number of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences,
provided that they have had some exposure to the study of theology and/or religious studies. RC
applicants must also have evidenced superior achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate
work (a minimum GPA of 3.3 at the master’s level), and have posted acceptable scores on the
GRE (normally 1200 combined verbal and quantitative) or MAT exams. Foreign students must
present scores on the TOEFL exam that meet minimum University requirements. Applicants’
statements of purpose should reflect an ability to write clearly, a coherent set of research
interests, and career goals for which the Ph.D. would be relevant. The director of the academic
area makes recommendations regarding admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean
for Graduate Studies reviews and approves.

Students concentrating in Religion and Culture for their Ph.D. generally complete at least 36
credit hours of course work at the 700 and 800 levels, 12 hours of which involve satisfying a
research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality
and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual directed research
project); qualify in two modern foreign languages; pass comprehensive exams and write and
defend a dissertation. RC has three core course requirements: TRS 780A, Introduction to the
Study of Religion; a course in Theological Foundations (either TRS 760A or TRS 660), and a
course in Hermeneutics (either TRS 760B or TRS 780B). In all, students should earn 21 credits
in religion and culture, nine in the Catholic theological tradition, and six in an allied area within
or outside the School such as church history, sociology, or anthropology. All Ph.D. students must
participate in a series of pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world. Recent

                                                 70
graduates of the Religion and Culture program have received posts as professors at Emmanuel
School of Religion (TN), Uludag University (Turkey), Cabrini College (PA), University of
Missouri at Kansas City, Eastern Mennonite University (VA), Our Lady of the Lake University
(TX), Xavier University (OH), and St. John’s University (NY).

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Religion and Culture will:

1. Demonstrate a foundation of knowledge and an acquaintance with basic methodological issues
in their area of specialization, meaning that the student achieves a knowledge of several specific
crucial thinkers and texts in the field from several disciplines, knows the outlines of their
theories, and knows when the application of a particular approach is suitable for research;

2. Display a sophisticated understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious
studies;

3. Demonstrate sufficient proficiency in two modern foreign languages to read secondary
literature in their field for research purposes;

4. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
academy; and;

5. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce constructive research and
contribute to the life of the academy.


                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See admissions criteria above.
2. Advising: The academic area director serves as the advisor for new doctoral students. Once a
   student has a dissertation director, s/he becomes that student’s advisor. Advisors meet with
   Ph.D. students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. The area
   director maintains tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. The
   academic area also engages in an annual review of students at which faculty members discuss
   student progress and air potential problems. Such problems are referred to the area director
   for follow-up.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
   The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
   minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
   dismissed. The academic area director will work with a student on probation to devise a plan
   to improve student performance. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones:
   completion of coursework, including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers; language
   requirements; comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, acceptance of the dissertation

                                                71
     proposal, and completion, defense, and deposit of the dissertation.
4.   Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
     about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
     Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
     checklist.
5.   Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
     School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
     from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6.   Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four major research papers (three if the
     student completed the master’s degree in the STRS) in fulfillment of the research
     requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. Thus, the
     criteria for evaluation will be stricter than those applied to a regular term paper; the professor
     will evaluate the paper based on its suitability for publication in an academic journal or
     presentation at a professional conference. At least one of the papers must demonstrate facility
     with one of the foreign languages in which the student has been examined. Some, but not all,
     of the papers may be composed with a view to exploring prospective dissertation topics. The
     papers are initially graded by the professor under whose supervision it was written. Later,
     when the faculty votes on doctoral candidacy, the Religion and Culture faculty as a whole
     will review the papers and evaluations as a guide to the student’s ability to write a
     dissertation. The academic area director certifies that all three or four papers have been
     completed before the student can proceed to comprehensive examinations.
7.   Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate proficiency in two modern foreign
     languages. There are three ways in which Religion and Culture students may demonstrate
     competence in a foreign language.
     a. In areas in which a general standard of reading proficiency suffices, passing an approved
     language course may meet the requirement.
     b. Students may also sit for a one-hour translation exam developed and evaluated by a
     member of the faculty with competence in that language.
     c. Or they may opt for a translation project in which they translate an entire article,
     summarize it, and then submit to an examination on it by a professor.
     Generally, TRS faculty members evaluate student work on language exams. In Religion and
     Culture, the ―defaults‖ are French and German, but because of the flexibility of the program,
     students may elect to be examined on another language more suited to their program of study
     (e.g., Arabic or Spanish). The academic area director approves the choice of languages based
     on their suitability for the student’s dissertation research, and must exercise flexibility in
     arranging for evaluations when the language is not one taught at the university (recent
     examples include Russian and Osage).
8.   Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the comprehensive exam. Drafted by and for
     each student individually, these lists are approved by a faculty committee. Reading lists take
     a student’s course materials into account, and they also include additional titles judged to
     represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course work. The list must be
     completed one semester prior to sitting for comprehensive exams. The items included on the
     list constitute ―fair game‖ for the formulation of questions, and the student should strive to
     grasp the main ideas and arguments of the items and be able to use them in exam essays.
9.   Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
     completion of all required course work, pro-seminars, and language requirements.

                                                  72
    Administered in three parts on separate days in one or two semesters, exams are structured
    around students’ reading lists. The area director oversees the formulation of exam questions
    by faculty members, and then assigns faculty members to evaluate the answers. Two faculty
    members read each part of each exam, and a third reader reads them in case of a tie. Exam
    readers apply their own professional judgment to recommend whether the student passes or
    fails each examination. After all exams are completed, the Religion and Culture faculty meet
    and review the readers’ comments and recommendations, discuss the examinations, and vote
    whether to pass or fail the student on all exams. If a student fails a comprehensive
    examination, s/he may repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest.
    A second failure automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy, but the two steps are distinct milestones.
    Students’ performance on exams, research papers, and course work are the grounds on which
    the academic area decides on candidacy. If approved, candidacy begins in the semester
    following successful completion of the comprehensive exams. Students have five years from
    the beginning of candidacy to complete and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct a student’s dissertation, the
    area director, in consultation with the dissertation director appoints a dissertation committee
    that includes, at a minimum, the director and two readers in. This committee then works with
    the student to refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format
    approved by the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the
    student forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process. Each evaluator or evaluating body
    applies its own professional judgment, and may request changes. If this happens, the proposal
    is remanded to the student who, in consultation with his or her advisor, either makes the
    changes or presents reasons not to. Once this is done, the proposal proceeds to the next
    evaluator.
12. Dissertation: : Individual dissertation directors vary with respect to their practices for
    dissertation guidance. Most directors will review chapters as they are completed and meet
    with the student upon request, but some might share chapters with the other readers as they
    come in, while others will send only the completed dissertation to readers as it nears defense-
    readiness. The dissertation is eligible for defense only when the director and readers have
    signified their approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to

                                                73
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. The committee votes to determine
    whether the student passes or fails. There is no grade or numerical score. A vote to pass
    may be contingent on the completion of revisions stipulated by one or more of the director
    and readers. Following a particularly impressive defense, a member of the committee – but
    not the director – may propose that the student pass ―with distinction‖. In this case, the
    committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be unanimously in favor to confer the
    distinction.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
18. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. The purpose of these meetings is to inform graduate students of new developments
    in the School and to provide them with an opportunity to raise their own questions and
    concerns.
16. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to students who graduated in the previous year, and reported its findings
    to the School regarding placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This
    function will migrate to CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the Religion and Culture area, functioning as a committee of the
   whole, uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis
   for making adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of
   the area director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language
   skills, create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based
   on these processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates the practices and
   requirements for each of its degree programs. For example, instruments such as tracking
   sheets are periodically reviewed and updated. Any changes in procedures or policies for
   students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in

                                               74
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                               *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                              Religious Education/Catechetics

                                     I. Program Description

The Graduate Program in Religious Education/Catechetics is designed to prepare students for a
broad range of educational, diocesan and parish ministries through the study of foundations,
history and theories of Christian education and the dynamics of faith and moral development
with a special emphasis on the liturgical life of the Church.

Applicants to the program have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or
religious studies or in education, provided that they have had some exposure to the study of
theology and/or religious studies. RE/C applicants must also have evidenced superior
achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work (a minimum GPA of 3.3 at the master’s
level), and have posted acceptable scores on the GRE (normally 1200 combined verbal and
quantitative) or MAT exams. Foreign students must present scores on the TOEFL exam that
meet minimum University requirements. Applicants’ statements of purpose should reflect an
ability to write clearly, a coherent set of research interests, and career goals for which the Ph.D.
would be relevant. The director of the academic area makes recommendations regarding
admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and
approves.

To earn the Ph.D., students in the Religious Education/Catechetics concentration generally
complete at least 36 credit hours of course work at the 700 and 800 levels, 12 hours of which
involve satisfying a research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of
publishable quality and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual
directed research project); qualify with reading proficiency in two languages selected from
French, Spanish, and German; pass comprehensive exams and write and defend a dissertation.
RE/C has three core course requirements: TRS 751F, Foundations of Religious Education/
Catechesis; TRS 743A, Liturgical Catechesis and TRS 751B, History and Theory of Catechetics.
Students take an additional three courses in the academic area and two courses in an allied field;
the remaining four courses are electives. All Ph.D. students must participate in a series of pro-
seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute

                                                 75
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Religious Education/Catechetics will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of methods and knowledge in their field of specialization;
2. Display a comprehensive grasp of issues within their chosen discipline and a sophisticated
   understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious studies;
3. Demonstrate reading proficiency in two languages selected from French, Spanish, and
   German;
4. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
   academy; and
5. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce constructive research and
   contribute to the life of the academy.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See the program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area director assigns academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet
   with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. Area
   directors generally maintain tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
   As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss
   student progress and air potential problems. Once a student’s dissertation proposal has been
   approved, the dissertation director becomes that student’s advisor.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
   The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
   minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
   dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
   coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
   comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
   defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information

                                                76
    about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
    Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
    checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
    School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
    from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
    research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. At
    least one of the papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which
    the student has been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a
    view to exploring prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructors of
    the research seminars in which they are assigned.
7. Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate research competence in two modern
    languages (selected from German, French and Spanish). They may satisfy each of the
    modern language requirements either by the satisfactory completion of a course in "Reading
    for Comprehension‖ or by passing a reading exam administered within STRS.
8. Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the comprehensive exam. The lists are
    drafted by and for each student individually in conjunction with a faculty committee.
    Reading lists take a student’s course materials into account, and they also include additional
    titles judged to represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course work.
    Students are responsible for knowing the main propositions of each work on their list and for
    being able to relate those propositions to others in the field.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
    parts on separate days, exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The area director
    oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then assigns faculty
    members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three, faculty members
    read each part of each exam and evaluate it on a pass/fail basis, and the area director
    tabulates and records the results. If a student fails a comprehensive examination, s/he may
    repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest. A second failure
    automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process.

                                               77
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    RE/C, readers, in consultation with the director, determine individually at which points in the
    drafting process they will review individual chapters. The dissertation is eligible for defense
    only when the director and readers have signified their approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to
    pass or fail the dissertation and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated
    orally and in writing to students following the defense.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the RE/C program, functioning as a committee of the whole,
   uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for
   making adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the
   area director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language skills,
   create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based on these
   processes, the program periodically re-calibrates its practices and requirements for the
   doctoral degree program. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are posted on

                                                78
   the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                               *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                        Spirituality

                                     I. Program Description

In dialogue with the Catholic theological tradition, the program in Spirituality also draws on the
methods of philosophy, biblical studies, psychology, sociology, and the history of religions to
analyze religious experience as expressed in worship, contemplation, doctrine, catechesis, and
the spiritual classics. Although the Spirituality program is part of a larger academic area
overseen by an area director, it functions in many respects as a self-contained unit, and many of
the day-to-day affairs involving the program are managed by a program coordinator.

Applicants to the program have a master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or
religious studies or in education, provided that they have had some exposure to the study of
theology and/or religious studies. Spirituality applicants must also have evidenced superior
achievement and the ability to succeed in graduate work (a minimum GPA of 3.3 at the master’s
level), and have posted acceptable scores on the GRE (normally 1200 combined verbal and
quantitative) or MAT exams. Foreign students must present scores on the TOEFL exam that
meet minimum University requirements. Applicants’ statements of purpose should reflect an
ability to write clearly, a coherent set of research interests, and career goals for which the Ph.D.
would be relevant. The director of the academic area makes recommendations regarding
admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews and
approves.

Students earning the Ph.D. with a concentration in Spirituality generally complete at least 36
credit hours of course work at the 700 and 800 levels, 12 hours of which involve satisfying a

                                                 79
research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality
and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual directed research
project); demonstrate reading proficiency in two modern languages with competency in Latin
also recommended; pass comprehensive exams and write and defend a dissertation. Spirituality
has two core courses: TRS 750A and TRS 750B (Classics in Christian Spirituality I and II), and
an additional 12 credits should be in this academic area. Students take two additional courses
within a cognate area, usually in another area of STRS, and of the four remaining electives, three
should be in historical and/or systematic theology. All Ph.D. students must participate in a series
of pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Spirituality will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of methods and knowledge in the field of Spirituality;
2. Display a comprehensive grasp of issues within their chosen subfield and a sophisticated
   understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious studies;
3. Demonstrate reading proficiency in two modern languages (with competency in Latin also
   recommended);
4. Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
   academy; and
5. Possess a demonstrated ability to produce constructive research and contribute to the life of
   the academy.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area director assigns academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet

                                                80
     with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
     from registering if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. The
     program coordinator maintains tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree.
     As a rule, academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss
     student progress and air potential problems. Once a student’s dissertation proposal has been
     approved, the dissertation director becomes that student’s advisor.
3.   Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
     The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
     minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
     dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
     coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
     comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
     defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4.   Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
     about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
     Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
     checklist.
5.   Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
     School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
     from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6.   Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
     research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. At
     least one of the papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which
     the student has been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a
     view to exploring prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructors of
     the research seminars in which they are assigned.
7.   Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate research competence in two modern
     languages (generally German and French, Spanish, or Italian). They may satisfy each of the
     modern language requirements either by the satisfactory completion of a course in "Reading
     for Comprehension‖ or by passing a reading exam administered within STRS. Proficiency in
     Latin is also recommended.
8.   Ph.D. reading list: Reading lists are the basis for the comprehensive exam. The lists are
     drafted by and for each student individually in conjunction with a faculty committee.
     Reading lists take a student’s course materials into account, and they also include additional
     titles judged to represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course work.
     Students are responsible for knowing the main propositions of each work on their list and for
     being able to relate those propositions to others in the field.
9.   Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
     completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
     parts on separate days, exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The area director
     oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then assigns faculty
     members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three, faculty members
     read each part of each exam and evaluate it on a pass/fail basis, and the area director
     tabulates and records the results. If a student fails a comprehensive examination, s/he may
     repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest. A second failure
     automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.

                                                 81
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process.
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    Spirituality, readers determine individually at which points in the drafting process they will
    review individual chapters. The dissertation is eligible for defense only when the director and
    readers have signified their approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to
    pass or fail the dissertation and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated
    orally and in writing to students following the defense.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the

                                                82
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the S program, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses
   the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Program faculty members, under the leadership of the
   program coordinator and area director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and
   evaluate language skills, create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate
   dissertations. Based on these processes, the program periodically re-calibrates its practices
   and procedures. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are posted on the School
   website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                              *****

               Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Theology and Religious Studies
                                   Systematic Theology

                                    I. Program Description

The program in Systematic Theology undertakes the task of a comprehensive and synthetic
understanding of the Christian faith as mediated through the Scriptures and the Catholic
Tradition and as interpreted by the conciliar and papal magisterium. Building on courses that
explore the history of this effort, the program reflects on questions of hermeneutics and method,
especially about the relationship among theology, philosophy, history, and the modern sciences.



                                                83
Applicants to the Ph.D. degree program with a concentration in Systematic Theology have a
master’s degree or the equivalent in a field of theological or religious studies, basic proficiency
in Latin and a minimum of four courses in philosophy. They evidence superior achievement and
the ability to succeed in graduate work, as reflected in a GPA of at least 3.3 at the master’s level
and suitable combined scores on the GRE (normally a combined verbal and quantitative score of
1200 or above) or MAT exams. TOEFL exams meeting minimum university standards are
requisite for foreign students. The director of the academic area makes recommendations
regarding admission and prerequisites, which the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies reviews
and approves.

To earn the Ph.D., students concentrating in Systematic Theology generally complete at least 36
credit hours of course work at the 700 and 800 levels, 12 hours of which involve satisfying a
research requirement (four article-length seminar papers that aspire to be of publishable quality
and are usually written either in an 800-level course or as an individual directed research
project); qualify in Latin, Greek, German, and a Romance language; pass comprehensive exams
and write and defend a dissertation. Systematic Theology has a single core course, Theological
Foundations (TRS 760A). It requires that half of a student’s coursework be in systematic
theology with the other half devoted to electives (12 credits) and a minor field of study within
another academic area or outside of the School (6 credits). All Ph.D. students must participate in
a series of pro-seminars introducing them to doctoral studies.

The Associate Dean may consider students admitted at the doctoral level for scholarships and/or
teaching or research assistantships. The faculty encourages students to present their research
publicly at meetings of professional associations, and in some cases faculty members work
closely with students to assist them in finding publication venues. Students are able to contribute
to academic governance through their teaching evaluations and their representation in faculty
meetings, the School’s student organization (STRSSA), and periodic ―Town Hall‖ meetings with
the Dean of the School. Based in part on student input, STRS has developed a ―Teaching and
Learning‖ Program in recent years aimed at enhancing Ph.D. students’ professional development
by providing teaching opportunities and pedagogical instruction. This is part of a broader effort
to promote their professional development through teaching and job-seeking workshops, faculty
mentoring relationships, sponsorship of paper presentations and travel, and introductions to
professional societies, such as the American Academy of Religion.

STRS’s Ph.D. graduates are qualified for and frequently obtain teaching positions at the college
or university level. A high percentage teaches in Catholic institutions of higher learning. Others
accept positions in foundations, ministries of varying sorts, or the publishing world. Recent
graduates have obtained posts at the University of Dallas (TX), Franciscan University (OH), and
Seton Hall University (NJ).

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies with a concentration in
Systematic Theology will:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of theology and mastery of methods in the study of

                                                 84
     systematic theology;
2.   Display a comprehensive grasp of issues within systematic theology and a sophisticated
     understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious studies;
3.   Possess a deep grounding in a particular subfield of theology (e.g. Christology, ecclesiology,
     etc.) and a very good knowledge of six of the other nine subfields in the area;
4.   Display a sophisticated understanding of the complex relationship of theology and religious
     studies;
5.   Demonstrate theological proficiency in Latin, Greek, German, and a Romance language;
6.   Exhibit the requisite disciplinary foundation and pedagogical training to teach in the broader
     academy; and
7.   Possess a demonstrated ability to produce constructive research and contribute to the life of
     the academy.

                           III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: See program description above.
2. Advising: The academic area director assigns academic advisors to Ph.D. students; they meet
   with the students regularly to consult regarding course selection. Students may be prevented
   from registering, if they have not cleared their proposed courses with their advisor. The area
   director maintains tracking sheets to oversee student progress toward the degree. As a rule,
   academic areas also engage in an annual review of students at which they discuss student
   progress and air potential problems. Once a student has a dissertation director, s/he becomes
   that student’s advisor.
3. Course work/GPA: Ph.D. students must maintain a GPA of 3.3 to remain in good standing.
   The ADGS periodically reviews student GPAs, and students who fail to maintain the
   minimum GPA may be placed on academic probation and then, after one semester,
   dismissed. The office of the ADGS also monitors student milestones: the completion of
   coursework including the Ph.D. pro-seminars and research papers, language requirements,
   comprehensive exams, admission to candidacy, approval of dissertation proposal, and
   defense and deposit of the dissertation.
4. Pro-Seminars: Doctoral students must participate in four workshops conveying information
   about professionalization, learned societies, publications, and dissertation procedures.
   Attendance at these workshops is recorded by the office of the ADGS via an electronic
   checklist.
5. Teaching Assistants: Selected students serve as teaching assistants and participate in the
   School’s teaching and learning program, in which they receive evaluations from students and
   from faculty members. They also benefit from University-level workshops on pedagogy.
6. Research requirement: Ph.D. students must submit four term papers in fulfillment of the
   research requirement, each 25-35 pages long and aspiring to be of publishable quality. The
   papers are developed in conjunction with 800-level research seminars. At least one of the
   papers must demonstrate facility with one of the foreign languages in which the student has
   been examined. Some, but not all, of the papers may be composed with a view to exploring
   prospective dissertation topics. The papers are graded by the instructors of the research
   seminars in which they are assigned.
7. Foreign language requirement: Students demonstrate research competence in Latin, Greek,
   German and a major Romance language (French, Spanish, or Italian). Students fulfill the

                                                 85
    Latin requirement either by the satisfactory completion of Theological Latin (TRS 500A) or
    by passing a timed Latin exam administered and graded by faculty; the Greek requirement
    either by passing a similar Greek exam or by passing either Greek for Theology or Biblical
    Greek; the German requirement by passing either TRS 504: Theological German or an exam
    administered by STRS faculty; and the Romance language requirement by passing a reading
    exam administered within STRS.
8. Ph.D. reading list: A reading list consisting of approximately fifty substantive titles serves as
    the basis for the comprehensive exam. The list is drafted by the student in collaboration with
    a committee of three faculty members drawn from the areas in which the student is to be
    examined. Reading lists take a student’s course materials into account, and also include
    additional titles judged to represent significant topics not covered by the student’s course
    work. The reading list in systematic theology includes twenty books from the student’s area
    of concentration and five books from each of six collateral theological subfields. Students
    are responsible for knowing the main propositions of each work on their list and for being
    able to relate those propositions to others in the field.
9. Ph.D. comprehensive examinations: Students take Ph.D. comprehensive exams following the
    completion of all required course work and language requirements. Administered in three
    parts on separate days, exams are structured around students’ reading lists. The
    comprehensive exam in Systematic Theology has three parts: one devoted to the student’s
    area of specialization and two addressing the student’s six collateral subfields. The area
    director oversees the formulation of exam questions by faculty members, and then assigns
    faculty members to evaluate the answers. At least two, and in some cases three, faculty
    members read each part of each exam and evaluate it on a pass/fail basis, and the area
    director tabulates and records the results. If a student fails a comprehensive examination,
    s/he may repeat it only once, typically in the following semester at the earliest. A second
    failure automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
10. Candidacy: Students who have passed the comprehensive exam become eligible for
    consideration for admission to doctoral candidacy. Students’ performance on exams, research
    papers, and course work are the grounds on which the academic area decides on candidacy.
    If approved, candidacy begins in the semester following successful completion of the
    comprehensive exams. Students have five years from the beginning of candidacy to complete
    and deposit their dissertations.
11. Research proposal: Once a faculty member has agreed to direct that student’s dissertation, the
    area director appoints a dissertation committee that includes at a minimum the director and
    two readers in consultation with the director. This committee then works with the student to
    refine his/her dissertation proposal, which must conform to a four-page format approved by
    the University. Once the student’s committee has approved the proposal, the area director
    forwards it to other faculty in the area for comment and approval within 48 hours.
    Subsequently, the STRS Ph.D. Committee and the Dean of the School must approve it. The
    proposal is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who sends it to a blind reviewer
    elsewhere in the University for a final approval process.
12. Dissertation: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance. In
    Systematic Theology, readers determine individually at which points in the drafting process
    they will review individual chapters. The dissertation is eligible for defense only when the
    director and readers have signified their approval by signature.
13. Oral defense: The director organizes the dissertation defense. It involves a committee

                                                86
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the dissertation. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to
    pass or fail the dissertation and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated
    orally and in writing to students following the defense.
14. Revision and deposit of the dissertation: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    dissertation, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required and
    bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
15. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
    are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
    for their benefit.
16. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
    Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
17. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.


                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the HST area, functioning as a committee of the whole, uses the
   various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the Ph.D. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership of the area
   director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate language skills,
   create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate dissertations. Based on these
   processes, the academic area periodically re-calibrates its practices and requirements for each
   degree program, including language requirements, course staffing, and modes of
   documenting student progress. Any changes in procedures or policies for students are posted
   on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full faculty

                                                87
   meetings. Working with data and profiles from students across the School, the Executive
   Council can harmonize language requirements, respond to negative patterns in teaching as
   reported in course evaluations, and add requirements that cross several areas (such as the
   course in hermeneutics that fulfills a requirement in several areas).
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                               *****

                           PASTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

STRS offers pastoral degrees to prepare students for ordination in the Catholic Church or lay
ministry of various sorts through a coordinated program of courses in academic subjects, pastoral
skills, and supervised ministry. These professional degree programs include the Master of
Divinity (M.Div.) and Master of Divinity in Hispanic Ministry; the Master of Religious
Education (M.R.E.), and the Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.). (Since 2005, STRS has offered the
D.Min. only in a format that pairs intensive summer courses with online courses during the
academic year.)

Students who complete STRS’s Ecclesiastical or Civil graduate degree programs are also eligible
to pursue a Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Ministry.

                                   Master of Divinity (M.Div.)

                                     I. Program Description

Although the Master of Divinity (M.Div.) is open to lay as well as clerical students, most
students in the program are Catholic seminarians preparing for ordination to the priesthood. The
requirements for ordination are more extensive than those for the M.Div, and there is a
recommended sequence of courses for seminarians, which includes the courses in the M.Div., so
that there has not been a need for a separate sequence of courses for the degree itself. In addition
to the general M.Div. degree, the School also offers a specialized M.Div in Hispanic Ministry,
described separately.

Admissions criteria for the M. Div. program include combined GRE scores indicating ability to
succeed in the program (typically at least 1000), 12 credit hours of philosophy at the
undergraduate or master’s level, and undergraduate grades indicating ability to succeed in

                                                 88
graduate study. Students whose native language is not English demonstrate their ability to
communicate well in written and spoken English via the TOEFL or completion of ESL courses.

Students complete a minimum of 90 credit-hours of graduate courses to earn the M.Div.,
distributed as follows: systematic theology (18), moral theology (12), biblical studies (12), and
one course each in canon law, church history, liturgical studies, and spirituality (12), academic
electives (12), pastoral ministry (18), and the ministry seminars (6). All students entering the
program must take the following courses in the first fall semester: Pro-seminar for Masters
Students, History and Method in Theology (TRS 660), and Foundations of Christian Moral Life
(TRS 630A). All students are usually required to take six credits of Basic Supervised Ministry
(TRS 652A, TRS 652B) They must also take at least one course in a non-Catholic ecclesial
tradition through the offerings of the Washington Theological Consortium.

Within the past four years, STRS significantly revised the Master of Divinity program in light of
a one-year review that included faculty, students, alumni and input from the seminaries where
graduates receive their priestly formation. Replacing three required seminars of a strictly
academic nature, which, it was determined, were inadequate for assessing student achievement in
pastoral practice, are a two-semester Pastoral Leadership Seminar, which builds on the
experience gained in Basic Supervised Ministry and requires planning and execution of a
pastoral project that each student develops.

Since students in CUA’s M.Div. program are mostly seminarians, typically they are ordained to
the priesthood upon the completion of their program and serve as parish priests.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Divinity will:

1. Demonstrate a firm understanding of major areas of theological inquiry, including systematic
   theology, moral theology, liturgical studies, spirituality, and scripture;
2. Possess reading proficiency in Latin;
3. Exhibit basic pastoral competence, including the knowledge and skill to engage in
   theological reflection, preach, interpret and apply canon law, celebrate sacraments, engage in
   basic pastoral counseling, and exercise leadership ministry within a parish.

                         III. Student Outcome Assessment Measures

1. Admission: Applicants should have GRE scores indicating ability to succeed in the program
   (typically a minimum 1000 total verbal and mathematical skills), 12 credit hours of
   philosophy, and undergraduate grades indicating ability to succeed in graduate study.
   Students whose native language is not English must demonstrate their ability to write and
   speak in English via the TOEFL in compliance with university requirements, or by
   completion of ESL courses.
2. Foreign language requirement: Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Latin by
   the end of the first fall semester. This requirement may be satisfied by passing a written one-
   hour test involving translating a scriptural passage, or by passing an approved Latin course

                                                89
     such as TRS 500A: Theological Latin.
3.   Advising: Each student has a faculty advisor with whom the student consults before
     registering for each upcoming semester. The advisor is also available should the student need
     academic advice during the semester. Completion of requirements toward graduation is
     tracked by the Associate Dean for Seminary and Ministerial Studies, and advisors also have
     access to the electronic tracking system.
4.   Course work/GPA: Students must maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.75 to remain eligible for
     the degree. Instructors typically assess performance in course work through examinations,
     research and reflection papers and class participation.
5.   Group supervision: Students are assigned placements, normally in hospital settings, where
     they work under a Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Supervisor; at the same time, they
     participate in a weekly two-hour class. They receive three credits for this course and their
     performance is evaluated according to the normal letter-grade scale.
6.   Preaching assignments: Students take two three-credit courses, TRS 653A: Introduction to
     Liturgical Preaching and TRS 653B: Advanced Preaching, in which their preaching skills
     are honed.
7.   Pastoral project: Over the course of two three-credit courses, TRS 657A: the Art of Pastoral
     Leadership and TRS 657B: Pastoral Leadership—Reflection, Evaluation, and Integration,
     students either develop a new parish program or evaluate an existing one under faculty
     supervision.
8.   Course Evaluations: Students submit course evaluations for all courses.
9.   Informal End-of-Program Surveys: The ADSMS carries out informal exit interviews with
     students who have completed the program.


                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty in Pastoral Studies, under the leadership of the ADSMS, uses the
   various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for making
   adjustments to the M.Div. program. Program faculty members advise students, instruct and
   grade students, oversee pastoral placements, and direct and evaluate pastoral projects. Based
   on these processes, the faculty periodically re-calibrates the practices and requirements for
   each degree program. For example, the M.A. reading lists are periodically reviewed and
   updated to include the most recent scholarship. Any changes in procedures or policies for
   students are posted on the School website.
2. The ADSMS and other responsible faculty members evaluate student evaluations and the
   comments, concerns, and suggestions of the rectors of the houses of formation that provide
   seminarians for the M.Div program. Based on these materials, adjustments may be made to
   the individual courses or to the curriculum as a whole.
3. The Dean and ADSMS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically
   make suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their
   courses. Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of
   teaching software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted
   under the auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also
   benefited in the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on
   teaching skills.

                                                90
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                                *****

                       Master of Divinity (M.Div.) in Hispanic Ministry

                                    I. Program Description

The goal of the concentration in Hispanic Ministry is to prepare M. Div. students to play an
active role in the life of Hispanic Catholics in North America. Although the M.Div. in Hispanic
Ministry is open to lay as well as clerical students, most students in the program are Catholic
seminarians preparing for ordination to the priesthood. The requirements for ordination are more
extensive than those for the M.Div, and there is a recommended sequence of courses for
seminarians, which includes the courses in the M.Div. program, so that there has not been a need
for a separate sequence of courses for the degree itself.

Admissions criteria for the M. Div. program include combined GRE scores indicating ability to
succeed in the program (typically at least 1000), 12 credit hours of philosophy at the
undergraduate or master’s level, and undergraduate grades indicating ability to succeed in
graduate study. Students whose native language is not English demonstrate their ability to
communicate well in written and spoken English via the TOEFL or completion of ESL courses.

Students complete a minimum of 90 credit-hours of graduate courses to earn the M.Div.,
distributed as follows: systematic theology (18), moral theology (12), biblical studies (12), and
one course each in canon law, church history, liturgical studies, and spirituality (12), academic
electives (12), pastoral ministry (18), and the ministry seminars (6). All students entering the
program must take the following courses in the first fall semester: Pro-seminar for Masters
Students, History and Method in Theology (TRS 660), and Foundations of Christian Moral Life
(TRS 630A). All students are usually required to take six credits of Basic Supervised Ministry
(TRS 652A, TRS 652B) They must also take at least one course in a non-Catholic ecclesial
tradition through the offerings of the Washington Theological Consortium. The M. Div. in
Hispanic Ministry also requires (1) Spanish language proficiency; (2) a course in Hispanic
theology and culture; (3) three credits in Hispanic Ministry along with a field placement ina
Hispanic setting and (4) competency in sacramental ministry. Students can use these courses to
satisfy their elective requirements.

Within the past four years, STRS significantly revised the Master of Divinity program in light of
a one-year review that included faculty, students, alumni and input from the seminaries where
graduates receive their priestly formation. Replacing three required seminars of a strictly
academic nature, which, it was determined, were inadequate for assessing student achievement in
pastoral practice, are a two-semester Pastoral Leadership Seminar, which builds on the
experience gained in Basic Supervised Ministry and requires planning and execution of a
pastoral project that each student develops.

                                                91
Since students in CUA’s M.Div. program are mostly seminarians, typically they are ordained to
the priesthood upon the completion of their program and serve as parish priests.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Divinity in Hispanic Ministry will:
   1. Demonstrate a firm understanding of major areas of theological inquiry, including
       systematic theology, moral theology, liturgical studies, spirituality, and scripture;
   2. Be knowledgeable about the identity and the contributions of the Latino population in the
       United States, and capable of engaging in historical, pastoral, social, and theological
       reflection on the experience of Hispanic Catholics;
   3. Possess reading proficiency in Latin, and speaking and reading proficiency in Spanish;
   4. Exhibit basic pastoral competence, including the knowledge and skill to engage in
       theological reflection, preach, interpret and apply canon law, celebrate sacraments,
       engage in basic pastoral counseling, and exercise leadership ministry within a parish.

                         III. Student Outcome Assessment Measures

1. Admission: Applicants should have GRE scores indicating ability to succeed in the program
   (typically a minimum 1000 total verbal and mathematical skills), 12 credit hours of
   philosophy, and undergraduate grades indicating ability to succeed in graduate study.
   Students whose native language is not English must demonstrate their ability to write and
   speak in English via the TOEFL in compliance with university requirements, or by
   completion of ESL courses.
2. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
   introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
   academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
3. Foreign language requirement: Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Latin by
   the end of the first fall semester. This requirement may be satisfied by passing a written one-
   hour test involving translating a scriptural passage, or by passing an approved Latin course
   such as TRS 500A: Theological Latin. Students must also show speaking and reading
   proficiency in Spanish, as evaluated by TRS faculty.
4. Advising: Each student has a faculty advisor with whom the student consults before
   registering for each upcoming semester. The advisor is also available should the student need
   academic advice during the semester. Completion of requirements toward graduation is
   tracked by the Associate Dean for Seminary and Ministerial Studies, and advisors also have
   access to the electronic tracking system.
5. Course work/GPA: Students must maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.75 to remain eligible for
   the degree. Instructors typically assess performance in course work through examinations,
   research and reflection papers and class participation.
6. Group supervision: Students are assigned placements in a Hispanic setting, where they work
   under a Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Supervisor; at the same time, they participate in a
   weekly two-hour class. They receive three credits for this course and their performance is
   evaluated according to the normal letter-grade scale.
7. Preaching assignments: Students take two three-credit courses, TRS 653A: Introduction to
   Liturgical Preaching and TRS 653B: Advanced Preaching, in which their preaching skills

                                               92
    are honed.
8. Pastoral project: Over the course of two three-credit courses, TRS 657A: the Art of Pastoral
    Leadership and TRS 657B: Pastoral Leadership—Reflection, Evaluation, and Integration,
    students either develop a new parish program or evaluate an existing one in a Hispanic parish
    under faculty supervision.
9. Course Evaluations: Students submit course evaluations for all courses.
10. Informal End-of-Program Surveys: The ADSMS carries out informal exit interviews with
    students who have completed the program.


                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning


   1. When needed, the faculty in Pastoral Studies, under the leadership of the ADSMS, uses
      the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for
      making adjustments to the M.Div. program. Program faculty members advise students,
      instruct and grade students, oversee pastoral placements, and direct and evaluate pastoral
      projects. Based on these processes, the faculty periodically re-calibrates the practices and
      requirements for each degree program. For example, the M.A. reading lists are
      periodically reviewed and updated to include the most recent scholarship. Any changes in
      procedures or policies for students are posted on the School website.
   2. The ADSMS and other responsible faculty members evaluate student evaluations and the
      comments, concerns, and suggestions of the rectors of the houses of formation that
      provide seminarians for the M.Div program. Based on these materials, adjustments may
      be made to the individual courses or to the curriculum as a whole.
   3. The Dean and ADSMS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically
      make suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to
      their courses. Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use
      of teaching software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy
      conducted under the auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The
      School has also benefited in the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for
      various events on teaching skills.
   4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
      student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
      alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
      example by improving material support, information access, and web content.


                                               *****

                           Master of Religious Education (M.R.E.)

                                    I. Program Description

The Master of Religious Education (M.R.E.) is a professional degree designed for those students
preparing for leadership positions in religious education or catechetics on the parish, diocesan

                                               93
and national level; teaching in elementary or secondary-level religion programs; or seeking
catechetical, liturgical or theological updating. The approach is interdisciplinary and draws upon
theology, scripture, liturgy, history, psychology, social science, and education within the context
of contemporary culture. Academic and pastoral courses on the Hispanic/Latino experience are
available for students, both Hispanic and non-Hispanic, preparing for ministry in the
Hispanic/Latino community. The M.R.E. program is currently undergoing review and faces
possible restructuring.

Applicants to the M.R.E. program should have combined GRE scores indicating ability to
succeed in the program (typically a total 1000 in verbal and mathematical skills), 12
undergraduate credits in theology and/or biblical studies, and undergraduate grades indicating
ability to succeed in graduate study. Students whose native language is not English demonstrate
their ability to write and speak in English via the TOEFL or by completion of ESL courses.

Earning the M.R.E. requires completion of 30 semester hours of course work, including core
courses in Foundations of Religious Education (TRS 751F) and Liturgical Catechesis (TRS
743A) and electives in Religious Education/Catechesis or from other areas of the School (e.g.
Historical and Systematic Theology, Moral Theology, Spirituality) or Departments within the
University (e.g. Education, Psychology). Every student undertakes a professional field project or
internship linked to a formal paper written in conjunction with a seminar or course (6 credits).
This paper may be either a research paper or a report on an aspect of the internship or fieldwork.
Students choose their courses in consultation with an advisor and in light of their own specific
goals.

Graduates of the M.R.E. program typically assume leadership positions in parish and diocesan
religious education programs. These include: parish director of religious education; parish, high
school, college youth minister; adult faith formation director; and parish director of the
catechumenate. Graduates are qualified for positions available in diocesan offices of religious
education, elementary or secondary level teaching, religious publishing, and Hispanic ministry.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Religious Education will:

1. Demonstrate a critical, cross-disciplinary knowledge of issues and methodologies in religious
   education and catechetics and identify and critique current approaches to religious
   education/catechesis for various age levels;
2. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of and the skill to articulate the biblical, historical,
   doctrinal, liturgical and ecclesial sources foundational to ecclesial ministry;
3. Have acquired the practical training that qualifies them for leadership positions in religious
   education and catechetics on the parish and diocesan level or in elementary or secondary-
   level religion programs.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants should have combined GRE scores indicating ability to succeed in the

                                                94
    program (typically a minimum total 1000 in verbal and mathematical skills), 12
    undergraduate credits in theology and/or biblical studies, and undergraduate grades
    indicating ability to succeed in graduate study. Students whose native language is not English
    demonstrate their ability to write and speak in English by meeting university requirements
    for the TOEFL or by completion of ESL courses.
2. Advising: Each student has a faculty advisor with whom the student works closely to design
    a curriculum that meets his/her individual needs. Advisors also hold group meetings to
    discuss program goals, answer questions and solicit student feedback.
3. Pro-Seminars: M.A. students are required to participate during their first year in workshops
    introducing them to the University’s library system, to research methodologies, and to
    academic writing. Participation is noted in an electronic checklist.
4. Course work/GPA: Students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA. Instructors typically assess
    performance in course work through examinations, research and reflection papers, and class
    participation.
5. Fieldwork/internship: The field placement is overseen by a faculty member or CPE
    supervisor and is evaluated according to program guidelines. The placement carries three
    credits and letter grades are awarded.
6. Project paper: Every student must write one formal paper describing a professional field
    project done in conjunction with a seminar or other courses. This may be in the form of a
    research paper or a written report on an aspect of an internship or fieldwork. The paper is
    graded by the course instructor on a letter-grade basis.
7. M.R.E. comprehensive examination: Students typically take an M.R.E. comprehensive
    examination during their last semester of course work or on completion of course work on
    the dates specified in the academic calendar. Questions for this exam are culled by the
    program coordinator, who makes up the exam, from the content of the courses that have
    made up a student’s program, including religious education/catechetics courses, theology and
    religious studies courses and any electives taken in education or behavioral sciences. The
    exam is given in three-hour increments over two days. Three professors evaluate the two
    parts as one examination on a pass/fail basis. Students who fail the exam may retake it once.
8. Course Evaluations: Students submit course evaluations for all courses. These are reviewed
    by instructors, the program coordinator, the ADGS, and the Dean.
9. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
    Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
    students. In these sessions, students are informed of ongoing developments within the school
    and have the opportunity to bring their questions and concerns to the School administrators.
10. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
    year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
    placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
    CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

   1. When needed, the faculty of the RE/C program, functioning as a committee of the whole,
      uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for
      making adjustments to the M.R.E. program. Area faculty members, under the leadership
      of the area director and program coordinator, advise students, instruct and grade students,

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      teach and evaluate language skills, create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct
      and evaluate theses. A Curriculum Committee periodically re-evaluates the structure of
      the program, based in part on faculty discussion, student interviews, and formal class
      evaluations. Based on these processes, the academic areas periodically re-calibrate the
      practices and requirements for each degree program. Any changes in procedures or
      policies for students are posted on the School website.
   2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and
      academic area directors – can take the initiative to revise master’s programs, as can full
      faculty meetings. The system of pro-seminars, for example, was established at this level.
      More recently, this body has taken up the question of the degree to which language
      exams should be harmonized across areas.
   3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically
      make suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to
      their courses. Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use
      of teaching software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy
      conducted under the auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The
      School has also benefited in the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for
      various events on teaching skills.
   4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
      student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
      alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
      example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                              *****

                                  Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)

                                    I. Program Description

The Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) degree is a professional doctorate offering students advanced
theological and pastoral formation for competent and effective ministry. The program combines
theory and pastoral experience. If offers three specializations: Adult Spiritual Formation,
Ministry through the Life Cycle and Word and Worship.

To address the inability of many interested students, who were actively engaged in ministry, to
complete a program based on a traditional academic calendar, STRS radically revised the D.Min.
four years ago with student and faculty input. The revision included the addition of three on-line
courses, with corresponding training for CUA faculty providing this instruction. The revised
program combines four 3-week intensive on-campus sessions running from May to June with
three on-line courses and a final project in ministry, which students complete at their own pace in
their own ministerial setting. The schedule change has enabled more students to enroll and
complete the program successfully.

Applicants have a Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent with at least a 3.0 G.P.A., and they
have completed at least three years in active ministry, in lay or clerical positions.



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Earning the D.Min. requires completion of a total of 36 hours of course work beyond the M.Div.
and a final project.

The recommend sequence of core courses is:

Summer 1: Pastoral Theology (TRS 852) and Working in Small Groups (TRS 854A)
Summer 2: Doctor of Ministry Supervision (TRS 850A and TRS 850B)
Intervening Year 1 or 2: Principles and Practices of Adult Religious Education (TRS 855C) and
       Pastoral Planning (TRS 855D)
Following completion of 24 credits: Doctor of Ministry Seminar (TRS 855E)
Following approval of project proposal: Pastoral Project (TRS 997A)

Students take fifteen credits worth of electives; numerous options are available. Students
complete the program by designing and implementing a project in ministry within their own
ministerial context.

Graduates with the D.Min. have found employment in parish ministry, diocesan ministry, and
undergraduate and graduate teaching positions.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctor of Ministry will:

1. Demonstrate advanced skills in pastoral leadership within a chosen area of concentration and
2. Exhibit the knowledge and skill to integrate biblical, theological, and pastoral knowledge for
   excellence in ministry.

                          II. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants have a Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent with at least a 3.0
   G.P.A., and they have completed at least three years in active ministry.
2. Advising: The Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program serves as D.Min. students’
   advisor. Once students have begun their project in ministry, their Project advisor assumes
   these responsibilities.
3. Course work/GPA: Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 to remain eligible for the
   degree. Instructors evaluate them through examinations, research and reflection papers and
   final projects.
4. Group supervision: During the intensive summer sessions students engage in group projects
   evaluated by CUA faculty.
5. Demonstration of specific pastoral skills: Three courses on praxis are required as core
   courses: Doctor of Ministry Supervision (TRS 850A and TRS 850B), Principles and
   Practices of Adult Religious Education (TRS 855C) and Pastoral Planning (TRS 855D). In
   these courses, CUA faculty members evaluate the pastoral skills of students.
6. Candidacy: Students may apply for candidacy after completing 24 credit hours of doctoral
   level course work with a 2.75 GPA. Students may not advance to candidacy and hold the
   Consultation on the D.Min. Project during the same semester.

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7. D.Min. Project Proposal: This project is usually related to the concentration in which the
    student has enrolled. It is intended to demonstrate the student's ability to identify a problem
    in ministry and identify and use appropriate interdisciplinary resources and theologically and
    pastorally relevant methods for its resolution. These projects typically have three
    components: (a) research, including familiarity with current literature on the problem and
    its theological background; (b) experience, including a significant amount of time spent
    working with the problem in a specific pastoral situation; and (c) evaluation, offering an
    interdisciplinary analysis of data along with an appraisal of the methods employed and the
    theological principles involved. The project design must be defended in a Consultation with
    faculty, and then approved by the School D.Min. Project Committee, the Dean, and the office
    of the Dean of Graduate Studies.
8. D.Min. Project: Academic areas vary with respect to their practices for dissertation guidance.
    In the D.Min. program, readers determine individually at which points in the drafting process
    they will review individual chapters. The D.Min. project is eligible for defense only when the
    director and readers have signified their approval by signature. The text is limited to 100
    pages.
9. Oral defense: The director organizes the D.Min. project defense. It involves a committee
    including the director, the readers, and a Chair and Secretary recruited from outside STRS.
    At the defense, the student provides a 10- to 15-minute presentation describing the origins of
    the project, the specific topic and methodology involved, and the chief conclusions. There
    follows an initial round of fifteen minutes of questioning from the director and each of the
    readers, followed by a second round of the same length, at the conclusion of which the
    Secretary and Chair may also pose questions. After excusing the candidate, the committee
    then deliberates about whether the student has passed. The chief criteria for this judgment are
    the scope of the student’s knowledge, his or her ability to respond effectively and thoroughly
    to questions, the degree of critical and analytical thought evinced in the student’s
    performance, and the student’s skill at expanding on his or her findings and applying them to
    problems and issues beyond the scope of the project. Following a particularly impressive
    defense, a member of the committee – but not the director – may propose that the student
    pass ―with distinction.‖ In this case, the committee votes by secret ballot; the result must be
    unanimously in favor to confer the distinction. If there is no such proposal, a vote is held to
    pass or fail the project and the defense. Comments and corrections are communicated orally
    and in writing to students following the defense.
10. Revision and deposit of the D.Min. Project: Once a candidate has successfully defended the
    D.Min. project, s/he must revise it to include any changes the examining committee required
    and bring it into conformity with the formatting requirements that the office of the Dean of
    Graduate Studies has set out before it can be deposited.
11. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations for both on-site and online
    courses that are scanned so that they are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS.
    Instructors then receive the evaluations for their benefit.
12. Informal student feedback: During each summer intensive session a general meeting is held
    with faculty and the program director at which students have the opportunity to discuss the
    program and suggest improvements.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning



                                                98
1. When needed, the faculty of the D.Min. program, functioning as a committee of the whole,
   uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis for
   making adjustments to the program. Pastoral studies faculty members, under the leadership
   of the program director, advise students, instruct and grade students, teach and evaluate
   language skills, create and assess comprehensive exams, and direct and evaluate
   dissertations. Based on these processes, the program periodically re-calibrates its practices
   and requirements for each degree program, especially its on-line offerings. The program
   faculty members also hold an annual general meeting with students at which they invite
   students’ observations and criticisms regarding the program. Any changes in procedures or
   policies for students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise doctoral programs, as can full faculty
   meetings. The system of pro-seminars, for example, was established at this level, and this
   body has also exercised oversight over changes to the D.Min. project proposal procedure.
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.


                           Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Ministry


                                     I. Program Description

The Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Ministry provides students who have successfully
completed an advanced theological degree (e.g., the S.T.B., S.T.L., or M.A.) with basic
knowledge and fundamental skills for pastoral ministry. The program was originally designed to
serve exchange students from the University of Nijmegen, but has since served only the
occasional CUA student.

Applicants must have completed a Master of Arts in Theology, a Bachelor's or Licentiate in
Sacred Theology, or the equivalent, and provide a rationale for pursuing the certificate.

To earn the certificate, students complete four courses (12 credits) that include either TRS 656,
Pastoral Theology, or TRS 852, Pastoral Theology for D.Min., paired with an additional core
course selected from a list of approved offerings with a ministerial component (e.g., TRS 851A:
Pastoral Counseling, TRS 851B: Marriage and Family Counseling, TRS 854A: Use of Small
Groups in Parish Ministry). Students take two other courses with a significant ministerial
component with the permission of the director of the Certificate program, either at or under the
auspices of STRS.

After the successful completion of four courses, the student has earned a Certificate of Pastoral
Ministry. Students cannot apply toward this certificate courses they have used to satisfy other

                                                99
degree requirements. However, students may apply courses they take in this certificate program
to a Doctor of Ministry degree at CUA with the approval of the Director of the D.Min. degree
program.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Certificate in Pastoral Ministry will:

1. Have augmented their graduate degree with additional training in pastoral theology; and
2. Have acquired exposure to the theory and practice of religious ministry through a series of
   applied courses in the field.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admission: Applicants must have completed a Master of Arts in Theology and Religious
   Studies, a Bachelor's or Licentiate in Sacred Theology, or the equivalent.
2. Advising: The director of the Certificate program works closely with each student in
   designing a curriculum that meets the student’s individual needs.
3. GPA: Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to qualify for the Certificate.
4. Student course evaluations: Students submit course evaluations that are scanned so that they
   are available for review by the Dean and the ADGS. Instructors then receive the evaluations
   for their benefit.
5. Informal student feedback: The Dean meets periodically with members of the STRS Student
   Organization and also holds occasional ―Town Hall Meetings‖ with any interested graduate
   students. Should these meetings bring to light problems specific to an academic area, the
   Dean will communicate as appropriate with the ADGS and/or the relevant area director.
6. End-of-program survey: The Career Services Office has administered up through the present
   year a questionnaire to graduated students and reported its findings to the School regarding
   placement, starting salaries, and satisfaction with career path. This function will migrate to
   CPIT beginning next year.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. When needed, the faculty of the Pastoral Studies program, functioning as a committee of the
   whole, uses the various findings of the Student Assessment Outcome Measures as the basis
   for making adjustments to the Graduate Certificate program. Area faculty members, under
   the leadership of the program coordinator, advise, instruct and grade students. Based on these
   processes, the program faculty periodically re-calibrates the practices and requirements for
   the program. The coordinator consults with students and faculty members to determine which
   courses best serve the purposes of the Graduate Certificate program. Any changes in
   procedures or policies for students are posted on the School website.
2. In addition, the Executive Council – a monthly meeting of the School’s deans and academic
   area directors – can take the initiative to revise degree and certificate programs, as can full
   faculty meetings.
3. The Dean and ADGS, in reviewing teaching evaluations and syllabi, may periodically make
   suggestions to individual faculty members regarding potential improvements to their courses.

                                               100
   Faculty have ready access to technical and instructional support for the use of teaching
   software from CPIT, and are also included in workshops on pedagogy conducted under the
   auspices of the School’s Teaching and Learning program. The School has also benefited in
   the past from funding from the Wabash foundation for various events on teaching skills.
4. School administrators also use the results from ―Town Hall Meetings,‖ meetings with the
   student organization STRSSA, informal colloquies with students, and end-of-program or
   alumni surveys as the impetus for initiatives designed to enhance student learning, for
   example by improving material support, information access, and web content.

                                          *****
                         Graduate Certificate in Hispanic Ministry

Prior to the reorganization of STRS, a Graduate Certificate in Hispanic Ministry was offered
taking advantage of summer courses offered through the Program in Hispanic Pastoral
Leadership, a program jointly sponsored by CUA and the Northeast Institute for Pastoral
Formation. Although a reference to the certificate program remains on the STRS website, it has
not received students in at least five years and may be considered suspended.




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