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Academic
Plan
October 2007




                     M a d i s o n A r e a Te c h n i c a l C o l l e g e D i s t r i c t , W i s c o n s i n
                                           Madison College Strategic Vision
                                             Transforming lives, one at a time.

                                          Madison College Strategic Mission
Madison Area Technical College provides accessible, high quality learning experiences that serve the community.

                                                  Madison College Values
                                                               Excellence
                                                                Respect
                                                                Integrity

               Madison Area Technical provides equal opportunity in education and employment.
                          A copy of this publication and the Executive Summary can be found at the following URL:
                                                   http://matcmadison.edu/in/academic-plan

                                             Questions regarding the report can be directed to:
                                                       Terry Webb, Learner Success
                                  (608) 246-6270 • fax (608) 246-6948 • email: tswebb@matcmadison.edu
 Madison Area Technical College
        Academic Plan
Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District


                    Prepared by:
           Terrance S. Webb, J.D., M.B.A.
          Vice-President / Learner Success

                    October 2007




             Terrance S. Webb, J.D., M.B.A.
            Vice-President / Learner Success

               Bettsey L. Barhorst, Ph.D.
                       President
Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan
Table of Contents

                                                                                                                                                                                                      Page
Overview ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1
Academic Plan Activities........................................................................................................................................................... 2
The Madison College Commitment to Academic Programming............................................................................................ 2
Enrollment and Demographic Trends ...................................................................................................................................... 3
   Recommendations – Enrollment and Demographic Trends......................................................................................................................... 7
Educational Attainment and Workforce Participation ............................................................................................................ 8
   Recommendations – Educational Attainment and Workforce Participation ............................................................................................... 10
Student Academic Preparedness ........................................................................................................................................... 10
   Recommendations – Student Academic Preparedness............................................................................................................................. 11
The Changing World of Work.................................................................................................................................................. 11
   Recommendations – The Changing World of Work ................................................................................................................................... 13
Trends in Technical and Community College Education ..................................................................................................... 13
   Career Pathways........................................................................................................................................................................................ 13
           Recommendations – Career Pathways .......................................................................................................................................... 15
   Economic and Workforce Development ..................................................................................................................................................... 15
           Recommendations – Economic and Workforce Development........................................................................................................ 16
   Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness ................................................................................................................................... 16
           Recommendations – Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness ...................................................................................... 17
   Student Access and Success..................................................................................................................................................................... 17
           Recommendations – Student Access and Success ....................................................................................................................... 19
   Technology and Education......................................................................................................................................................................... 19
           Recommendations – Technology and Education ........................................................................................................................... 20
   Transfer in Wisconsin Higher Education .................................................................................................................................................... 20
           Recommendations – Transfer in Wisconsin Higher Education....................................................................................................... 20
   Flexible Delivery and the Adult Learner ..................................................................................................................................................... 21
           Recommendations – Flexible Delivery and the Adult Learner ........................................................................................................ 22
Industry and Occupational Trends ......................................................................................................................................... 22
   Industry Trends .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 23
   Growth Industries ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 24
   Emerging and Notable Industries ............................................................................................................................................................... 26
   Occupational Growth.................................................................................................................................................................................. 28
          Recommendations – Industry and Occupational Trends ................................................................................................................ 30




                                                                      ~ table of contents continued on next page ~
Program Area Analysis and Recommendations ................................................................................................................... 31
   Overview of Enrollment Trends by Program Area...................................................................................................................................... 32
   Program Area Summaries and Recommendations.................................................................................................................................... 35
   Program Area: Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing ....................................................................................................................... 35
   Program Area: Agriculture & Natural Resources....................................................................................................................................... 37
   Program Area: Applied Arts....................................................................................................................................................................... 39
   Program Area: Applied Engineering.......................................................................................................................................................... 41
   Program Area: Arts & Sciences................................................................................................................................................................. 43
   Program Area: Business & Information Technology ................................................................................................................................. 45
   Program Area: College Preparedness & Academic Advancement (CPAA) .............................................................................................. 47
   Program Area: Construction...................................................................................................................................................................... 49
   Program Area: Education .......................................................................................................................................................................... 51
   Program Area: Hospitality ......................................................................................................................................................................... 53
   Program Area: Human Services................................................................................................................................................................ 55
   Program Area: Laboratory Sciences (Biotechnology & Electron Microscopy) .......................................................................................... 57
   Program Area: Manufacturing ................................................................................................................................................................... 59
   Program Area: Nursing & Health-Related ................................................................................................................................................. 61
   Program Area: Protective Services & EMS ............................................................................................................................................... 63
   Program Area: Safety Education............................................................................................................................................................... 65
   Program Area: Transportation................................................................................................................................................................... 67
   Program Area: Adult Continuing Education (ACE).................................................................................................................................... 69
   Program Area: Business, Industry, and Community Services (BICS)....................................................................................................... 71
   Program Area: Learner Development ....................................................................................................................................................... 73
Index of Figures and Tables.................................................................................................................................................... 75
References................................................................................................................................................................................ 76
Overview
Madison Area Technical College (Madison College) is dedicated to providing accessible, high quality instruction
and technical experience to meet the needs of its students, community and area employers. Founded in 1912 to
teach vocational skills, today Madison College is a nationally recognized technical and community college. It is
the second largest of the Wisconsin Technical College System’s 16 colleges and serves approximately 44,000
individuals annually. The College provides “real world smart” education through a comprehensive curriculum of
technical, liberal arts and sciences, adult basic education and continuing education, as well as customized
training for employers. The College awards associate degrees, technical diplomas and certificates and offers
classes that transfer to four-year degree programs.

Madison College has earned a solid reputation for high quality, practical and affordable education. It offers small
classes, dedicated teachers and personalized attention. It also offers a variety of online and other distance
learning courses. More than 90 percent of graduates are employed soon after graduation. In addition, satisfaction
scores among graduates and their employers routinely rate above 90 percent.

Madison College offers an impressive array of technical programs designed to teach students skills necessary to
successfully enter many different occupations. The College has programs in Business and Marketing, Business
Technology, Applied Arts, Allied Health, Information Technology, Nursing, Transportation, Accounting and
Finance, Hospitality, Applied Engineering, Protective Services, Manufacturing, Construction, Agriscience and
Natural Resources, Human Resources, Education, Emergency Medical Services, Laboratory Sciences, and
Safety Education. In addition, Madison College is one of only three technical colleges in the state to offer a wide
selection of liberal studies classes that transfer to four-year colleges and universities. Madison College is the
single largest source of students transferring to the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the UW System. The
College has significant offerings in developmental education and serves a growing population of stakeholders in
English Language Learners offerings. Madison College Business and Industry Contracting Services (BICS) is one
of the state’s leading providers of customized training for employers and in providing workforce development
training to several different targeted populations. The Business Procurement and Assistance Center (BPAC)
annually assists over 1,200 businesses statewide in selling their products and services to the government.
Madison College is one of a few technical colleges in the state that continues a high level of commitment to adult
and continuing education by offering non-credit certificates and life enrichment courses.

Madison College serves parts of 12 counties located in Southcentral Wisconsin. Its 10 college facilities are spread
among five campuses. Madison College’s regional campuses are located in the communities of Fort Atkinson,
Portage, Reedsburg and Watertown. In addition, the College offers instruction in hundreds of other locations
throughout its district.

Madison Area Technical College is a member of the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS.)

The WTCS Vision statement reads:
The Wisconsin Technical College System is the premier provider of technical education. We develop individuals
who apply knowledge and skills to enhance quality of life and boost economic vitality. We are committed to
extending learning beyond the classroom and throughout life. To meet each student’s educational needs, we:
     1. deliver high quality instruction and services that are responsive, flexible and accessible;
     2. join talent and technology to make learning generously available and imaginatively delivered;
     3. commit to high standards and accountability;
     4. create strategic alliances that expand students’ learning opportunities;
     5. respect each other’s dignity, embrace diversity and offer opportunities for growth.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007    1
Academic Plan Activities
This plan is the product of many activities designed to maximize the participation of faculty, staff and external
stakeholders. Its recommendations are based on that input and research into expected demographic changes,
the economic outlook for jobs, and trends in higher education. Activities related to the plan include presentations
to the College community, faculty interaction with external technical experts, faculty input department by
department, face-to-face meetings with program directors and lead teachers, surveys of every college advisory
committee member and three focus group sessions with external stakeholders nominated by staff and faculty.
Those activities resulted in the first draft of this plan on August 2, 2007. Another college-wide feedback session
was held at the end of August. That common themes and threads from that feedback and revised program area
recommendations are reflected in this final plan draft.



The Madison College Commitment to Academic Programming
This Plan reaffirms the College commitment to continue to offer responsive, flexible and accessible programming
designed to create opportunities for our students to succeed. We recognize that students come to the College
with widely varying educational goals and ever changing intentions. We affirm our commitment to helping
students achieve their intended outcomes. Specifically, the College firmly commits to academic offerings in the
following critical areas:

Technical and Occupational Education
Education that prepares students for a specific occupation or career track is the foundation of the academic
programming at Madison College. These offerings are essential to maintain the College’s role as the chief
economic development engine in the Madison College service area.

Transfer and Liberal Arts Education
Education that prepares students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities complements the technical
mission of the College and serves thousands of students yearly by providing access to the various baccalaureate
degree options in the State. Liberal Arts education provides students with education beyond specific occupational
skills; preparing students for further studies and for life skills the College recognizes as essential Core Abilities for
all students.

Transfer and Technical Education
Transfer readiness and technical preparation are not mutually exclusive outcomes. Madison College offers many
programs that blend transfer and technical offerings to train students for occupations while simultaneously
preparing them for entry into baccalaureate programs.

Developmental Education
The College has a significant and growing role in preparing students to become employable and to transition to
career and transfer programming through its developmental education offerings. Nationwide and in the Madison
College District, the need for developmental education is exploding as new immigrants and underserved
populations serve as the foundation for much of our emerging workforce. Developmental offerings, offerings in
English Language Learners, and bilingual bicultural offerings are an essential piece of the Madison College
mission in both workforce development and in providing access to all the higher education systems in the State of
Wisconsin.

Economic and Workforce Development
Madison College is committed to expanding its role in workforce and economic development programming.
Generally this training serves displaced workers and incumbent workers with specialized coursework related to
training for new careers, sharpening skills linked to changing workforce and technology demands, and customized
training offered to employers and employees to meet specific needs especially newly emerging needs in business
and industry.



Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007         2
Adult and Continuing Education
Madison College values its role in promoting lifelong learning and offering non-credit learning opportunities
throughout its service district. The College will continue to meet the needs of its stakeholders by providing a
variety of offerings that promote workforce development, personal enrichment, and community building.

Learner Support
Support for students aiming to achieve their educational goals is an essential element that provides the
foundation for all Madison College academic programming and services. The Madison College Learner Success
services plans provide for orientations, advising, assessment, and placement, career services, tutoring, academic
support, and other specialized student support systems. Madison College offers counseling services to support
student goal achievement in personal growth and development, educational effectiveness, career development,
problem solving and effective communication and collaboration. The Madison College Library organizes and
manages free access for students and staff to the recorded knowledge of human civilization in a variety of formats
to support the teaching and learning processes of the college.

Student Life and Athletics
Student Life serves as an advocate for all Madison College students, helping ensure that their interests are
represented and their rights are protected. Student Life guides students' educational growth, providing them with
opportunities to apply what they've learned in the classroom or challenging them to explore new possibilities
through participation in student clubs, newspapers, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, Student Senate, and
many other experiences that promote leadership and a sense of College community. Madison College is
committed to celebrating the accomplishments of its students, taking special time to recognize and reward them
for their academic achievements. Athletics plays a key role in offering learning experiences that complement
academic studies. Madison College is committed to competing at the highest levels in inter-collegiate athletics for
men and women.



Enrollment and Demographic Trends
This analysis of demographic trends and economic trends borrows heavily from work done by the Center on
Wisconsin Strategy (COWS.) COWS is a non-profit, nonpartisan “think and do tank” dedicated to improving
economic performance and living standards in the State of Wisconsin and nationally. Based at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison, COWS works to promote “high road” strategies that support living wages, environmental
stability, strong communities and public accountability. Two COWS publications in particular are used throughout
this analysis, The State of Working Wisconsin 2006, by Laura Dresser and Joel Rogers, and Seeds of Workforce
Change - A Regional Approach to Improving our Economic Landscape in Southwest and South Central
Wisconsin, compiled by the Center on Workforce Strategy, 2006. (See Appendix A & B for an Executive
Summary of both of those works.) Madison College extends its thanks and appreciation for the use of these
important works.

The Madison College service district includes portions of 12 counties. The characteristics of those counties differ
not only in geographic location, but also in terms of demographics, economic base and predominant industries.
This analysis will borrow the COWS strategy of studying these counties by grouping them into three types.

Urban Counties
Dane County is the only county in the Madison College District that has predominately urban characteristics.
Dane County serves as the population center of the District and also as its primary economic engine. The City of
Madison and its surrounding suburbs of Middleton, Sun Prairie, Fitchburg and Verona focus the Districts economy
and population around the State Capital.

Rural Under Urban Pressure Counties
Counties that surround Dane and are clearly linked to its economy include Sauk, Iowa, Columbia, Dodge,
Jefferson and a small piece of Rock County. These counties are linked to Dane by commuting patterns, land use
trends and general economic activity.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       3
Rural Counties
These counties include part of Richland, Juneau, Adams, Green and all of Marquette County. Generally, these
counties feature lower population density, slower rates of population growth and slower economic growth as well.

Figure 1 shows the District counties and designations.



                                                                                   Figure 1 • Madison College District Counties and Designations




                 Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.



Population Growth and Enrollment Patterns
The Madison College District population is healthy and growing at rates that exceed statewide growth rates and
growth rates in the United States. The District population is projected to grow at a 1.57% annual rate through
2011. This will result in a projected population increase of nearly 58,000 residents by 2011. Seventy-five percent
of that growth is projected to occur in Dane County and much of the remainder in the rural under pressure
counties.

Table 1 details growth rates and comparisons to state and national projections. When examined in conjunction
with Madison College enrollment patterns, this data set provides both the most basic and the most important
information in this Plan.

                                                                  Table 1 • Population Growth Rates
                                                                                       2006              2011         2006-11 Annual
                                                                                   Population        Population        Growth Rate
                        U.S.A.                                                     300,085,840       314,836,272          0.96%
                        Wisconsin                                                   5,593,957         5,815,436           0.78%
                        Dane County                                                  473,395           516,974            1.78%
                        Rural Counties Under Urban Pressure                          221,765           235,083            1.17%
                        Rural Counties                                                35,115            37,274            1.20%
                        Madison College District                                     714,064           771,722            1.57%
                       Note: Sub-district totals may not equal District totals due to software limitations.
                       Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness adapted from COWS analysis.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                    4
Figure 2 shows Madison College enrollment as a percentage of the adult District population.


                                                       Figure 2 • MATC Enrollment as as a Percentage of
                                                   Figure 2 • Madison College Enrollment a Percentage of
                                                                   District Adult Population
                                                                   DistrictAdult Population
                              12.0%
                                          10.2%         10.0%         10.0%          9.2%
                              10.0%                                                                  8.6%
                                                                                                                  8.1%   7.8%
                                  8.0%

                                  6.0%

                                  4.0%

                                  2.0%

                                  0.0%
                                          2000          2001          2002          2003             2004         2005   2006

                                                        MATC Enrollment as % of Population 18 Years and Over


                             Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.



In 2000 Madison College served 10.2% of the adult District population. By 2006, the service percentage
decreased to 7.8% of the adult population. This trend is a wake-up call for a College that serves as the primary
point of access for its district residents to higher education. Underlying these trends is a differential in growth rates
by age in the District.

Figure 3 compares the District age distribution currently to that projected in 2011.


                                                   Figure 3 • MATC District 2006-2011 Age Distribution
                                               Figure 3 • Madison College District 2006-2011 Age Distribution

                       200,000

                       160,000

                       120,000                                                                                           2006 Population
                                                                                                                         2011 Population
                        80,000

                        40,000

                              0
                                   8




                                                                                                                  +
                                           0


                                                    4


                                                            4


                                                                     4


                                                                               4


                                                                                      4


                                                                                                 4


                                                                                                         4
                                         -2


                                                  -2


                                                          -3


                                                                   -4


                                                                             -5


                                                                                    -6


                                                                                               -7


                                                                                                       -8
                                  r1




                                                                                                             85
                                         18


                                                  21


                                                        25


                                                                 35


                                                                          45


                                                                                   55


                                                                                            65


                                                                                                      75
                              de
                            Un




                    Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness based on ESRI data.



The median age (that age such that 50% of residents are older and 50% are younger) is steadily increasing. In
2000, the District median age was 34.7, in 2006 the median age was 36.1, and in 2011 the projected median
district age will be 37.1.

A review of Figure 3 shows that there is little expected growth in the 18-20 age group, some growth in the 21-34
group, and significant growth in age groups over 45. This is an important development for a College that depends
on the 18-34 age group for the bulk of its enrollment.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                            5
Figure 4 shows the current enrollment patterns at Madison College by age group and Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
students.


                                         Figure 4 • Madison College Enrollment FTE 2005-2006 Age Distribution
                                            Figure 4 • MATC Enrollment FTE 2005-2006 Age Distribution

                       40.00%
                       35.00%
                       30.00%
                       25.00%                                                                                                  % of Population
                                                                                                                               Enrolled
                       20.00%
                       15.00%
                                                                                                                               % of FTEs
                       10.00%                                                                                                  Generated
                        5.00%
                        0.00%
                                           0


                                                     4


                                                              4


                                                                       4


                                                                                4


                                                                                         4




                                                                                                                    +
                                                                                                   4


                                                                                                            4
                                 8

                                        -2


                                                  -2


                                                           -3


                                                                    -4


                                                                             -5


                                                                                      -6


                                                                                                -7


                                                                                                         -8

                                                                                                                  85
                               r1

                                      18


                                                21


                                                         25


                                                                  35


                                                                           45


                                                                                    55


                                                                                              65


                                                                                                       75
                             de
                           Un




                      Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.


FTE students are not actual students, but they do represent full-time students enrolled at the College. Each FTE
represents 30 credits over an academic year. The chart discloses that the 38% of the College FTE comes from the
18-20 year old age group and 22% comes from the 21-24 age group. The College serves 60% of its FTEs from the
18-24 year old demographic. Students 45 years of age and older constitute only about 8% of the College FTE.

Madison College has stated goals aimed at increasing the percentage of its District residents served. In fact, this
percentage is targeted to increase to 9.9% of adults by 2011. (Planning for the Future – Enrollment Management
Plan – Madison Area Technical College February 2006, 2) The data lead to the conclusion that in order for
Madison College to meet its target enrollment goals and serve the needs of its residents the College should reach
out to older students while maintaining or increasing its excellent service levels to the 18-24 year olds. Further
discussion of the needs of older students in the District appears in the analysis of higher education trends
beginning on page 20.

The District population is also becoming increasingly diverse.

Table 2 describes the projected population growth across the District by race and ethnicity.

                 Table 2 • Projected Demographic Changes by Race and Ethnicity Across the Madison College District

                                               Dane                          Rural/Urban Pressure                                   Rural
        Race and               2006          2011                           2006              2011                        2006       2011
                                                            Change                                         Change                                Change
        Ethnicity             Percent       Percent                        Percent           Percent                     Percent    Percent
        White Alone             83.23%         80.71%         -2.52%         93.44%           92.40%            -1.04%    93.29%     92.36%       -0.93%

        Black Alone              4.49%          5.02%         0.53%           0.60%            0.68%            0.08%      1.73%       1.96%      0.23%
        American
                                 0.33%          0.34%         0.01%           0.50%            0.52%            0.02%      1.09%       1.16%      0.07%
        Indian Alone
        Asian Alone              4.36%          5.31%         0.95%           0.50%            0.62%            0.12%      0.38%       0.48%      0.10%
        Pacific Islander
                                 0.04%          0.04%         0.00%           0.02%            0.03%            0.01%      0.05%       0.05%      0.00%
        Alone
        Some Other
                                 1.69%          1.96%         0.27%           1.09%            1.29%            0.20%      0.42%       0.49%      0.07%
        Race Alone
        Two or More
                                 1.87%          1.98%         0.11%           0.83%            0.90%            0.07%      0.94%       1.02%      0.08%
        Races
        Hispanic Origin
                                 3.99%          4.64%         0.65%           3.01%            3.55%            0.54%      2.10%       2.48%      0.38%
        (Any Race)
        Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness Census data based on COWS analysis.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                            6
The largest projected change in population mix in the District involves the reduction in the proportion of White
residents. Each type of county is expected to see its White population decline as a percentage of the total
population over the next five years. In Dane County, the Asian and Hispanic groups will see the largest increase
in population growth. In the Rural Pressure counties, the largest growth will be among Hispanic residents, and in
the Rural counties, the fastest growth will be in Black and Hispanic stakeholders. The Rural counties also serve
as home to the largest concentration of Native American residents.

These growing minority populations also present a different age demographic than the majority White populations.

Figure 5 demonstrates that the median ages of the emerging minority potential students skew much younger than
the White population. The fast growing Asian and Hispanic populations have median ages 12 and 13 years
younger than the White population in the District while the Black population median age is over 11 years younger.
The data suggest that more of the younger students who will be coming to Madison College should come from
minority racial and ethnic groups.


                                                  Figure 5 • 2006 MATC District Median Age & Ethnicity
                                                  Figure 5 • 2006 Madison College District Median Age & Ethnicity
                  40       37.9
                  35                                      30.3                          31.3
                  30                       26.2                          25.4                          24.3                      24.2
                  25
                                                                                                                     19.1
                  20
                  15
                  10
                   5
                   0
                           White          Black        American         Asian      Pacific Islander Some Other    Two or More   Hispanic
                                                        Indian                                      Race Alone      Races

             Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness based on ESRI data.



Recommendations – Enrollment and Demographic Trends
     1. Increase Madison College enrollment to match the Enrollment Management Plan goal of serving 9.9% of
        the adult population by academic year 2011-2012. In order to reach that goal the College should take the
        following steps:
           a. Serve more students from the 18-24 year age group in the next five years in order to maintain healthy
              FTE growth.
           b. Prepare to serve an increasing number of minority students – especially those that are in the 18-24
              year age group.
           c.    Determine the needs of students from the 25-54 year age group and devise strategies to meet those
                 needs.
           d. Determine the needs of students in the fast growing 55+ age group and devise strategies to meet
              those needs.
           e. Set specific enrollment targets (headcount and FTE) for each program area offered at the College.
           f.    Regional campuses and Deans must collaborate to set specific enrollment targets (headcount and
                 FTE) for each regional campus area that reflect population growth rates and specific needs in those
                 areas.
           g. Plan to meet facilities and space related challenges related to rapid enrollment growth and enhance
              learning environments across the College District.
           h. Plan to meet the need for faculty and staff positions related to enrollment growth district-wide.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                            7
Educational Attainment and Workforce Participation
Most experts agree that educational attainment levels are a primary driver of economic growth. The level of
education attained by Madison College District residents is especially important to the College as the portal to the
entire higher education system in this District. Unfortunately, data reflecting attainment is dated. The latest reliable
figures come from the 2000 census.

Figure 6 shows the percentage of District residents by educational attainment.


                                                Figure 6 • 2000 Population 25+ by Educational Attainment


                      30.0%                                           28.2%


                      25.0%

                                                                                    20.6%                              20.1%
                      20.0%


                      15.0%
                                                                                                                                          12.0%

                      10.0%                                                                           8.4%
                                                      6.7%

                                     4.0%
                       5.0%


                       0.0%
                                Less than     9th-12th Grade,   High School   Some College,   Associate Degree Bachelor's Degree    Master's/Prof/
                                 9th Grade      No Diploma       Graduate      No Degree                                           Doctorate Degree


             Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness based on ESRI obtained census data.



Attainment rates have increased in the 1990’s although it is generally agreed that the increase is really a result of
the decrease in older residents who lived in a time that did not have the same imperatives to attend high school or
college.

Madison College has an important role in leading educational attainment for those residents who are high school
graduates (or who have dropped out of high school and aspire to a GED or HSED), or have some college but no
degree, or have not graduated high school. That total population group made up nearly 60% of our population
over 25, or about 250,000 people in 2000. There is every reason to believe that number has grown since that
time.

Our fast growing populations of Latino and African American residents tend to lag behind in attainment. Statewide
data shows that while about 87% of our white residents have a high school education, only about 55% of the
Hispanic population and 68% of our African American population has a high school degree. Similarly, while 23%
of the White population has a Bachelor’s degree, only about 11% of Hispanic state residents and 10% of African
American state residents have graduated from a four-year college. (U.S. Census 2000)




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                       8
The Power of Associate Degrees
The good news is that the College can play a crucial role in promoting educational attainment and its consequent
economic benefit. The power of an associate degree from the Wisconsin Technical College System is made clear
by Table 3.

                      Table 3 • Median Wages and Shares of the Workforce by Education, Wisconsin and U.S., 2005
                                                   (Hourly Wages in 2005 dollars)
                                                           Excerpt from The State of Working Wisconsin 2006


                                                                                                                         Shares within
                                                                                    Wages                     Shares   Associate Degrees
                    Wisconsin
                    Dropouts                                                         $ 9.66                    6.6%
                    High School                                                       12.98                   35.2
                    Some College, No Degree                                           12.22                   19.3
                    Associate Degrees                                                16.19                    13.6
                                      Occupational/Vocational                         16.34                   10.3                 75.7%
                                      Academic                                        15.61                    3.3                 24.3
                    College                                                           22.03                   25.4

                    United States
                    Dropouts                                                         $ 9.08                   10.4%
                    High School                                                       12.14                   30.1
                    Some College, No Degree                                           12.49                   20.0
                    Associate Degrees                                                 15.28                    9.8
                                      Occupational/Vocational                         15.17                    5.2                 53.3%
                                      Academic                                        15.52                    4.6                 46.8
                    College                                                           22.44                   29.6
                 Source: COWS analysis of CPS ORG data.




Nationally, those who begin college and do not complete a degree see almost no wage enhancement compared
to high school graduates. In Wisconsin, high school graduates actually earn slightly more than the some college,
no degree population. The first educational level that significantly affects real wages is reserved for those who
complete associate degrees.

Wisconsin’s associate degrees reward the workers who earn them. The median wage for Wisconsin workers with
occupational associate degrees was $16.34 compared to $15.17 for the same category of associate degree
holders nationally.

About 13% of Wisconsin workers have earned an Associate Degree. Nationally, about 10% hold associate
degrees and about half of those are occupational degrees. In Wisconsin, the occupational to academic associate
degree ratio is 3 to 1.

COWS concludes, “The bottom line is that Wisconsin’s technical college system produces substantially more
occupational associate degrees than other states, and provides good wages for the holders of those degrees.
This is a testament to the strong technical training system in the state, and the long standing connections that our
Technical Colleges have to leading employers.” (Dresser and Rogers 2006, 30)

Dramatic differences in educational attainment levels have lasting negative consequences for economic
development and opportunity in Wisconsin and in the Madison College District. The consequences are
heightened by the faster growth rates among our minority populations if the current differential in attainment rates
continues.

Madison College can play a pivotal, perhaps the pivotal role, by providing the education necessary to redirect
these trends. The College is strong in its technical associate degrees which have been demonstrated to
significantly enhance wages for those who earn them. Additionally the Madison College collegiate transfer
programs are an excellent vehicle for providing the first two years of a four-year college degree and the enhanced
earnings that eventually come with a baccalaureate degree.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                            9
Recommendations – Educational Attainment and Workforce Participation
     1. Market the economic advantages of an associate degree to the Madison College District population –
        especially Latino and African American residents.



Student Academic Preparedness
A discussion of educational attainment cannot be complete without reference to the continuing and growing need
for adult basic skills education (ABE), developmental, and remedial education in the Madison College District and
throughout the State. A combination of factors makes this a growing imperative for academic planning at Madison
College.

First, there are an increasing number of students entering Madison College degree programs who are not
academically prepared to succeed. This is especially true of those programs that are math-based or
writing/reading intensive. According to Madison College data collected in connection with the Mandatory
Assessment Advising and Placement (MAAP) initiative, well over 50% of entering students require some
remediation in Mathematics. Nearly 30% of entering students require some remediation in English.

Second, recent research at the state system level indicates a persistent image problem for the state Technical
Colleges. There is a perception among the general public that the technical colleges offer a less challenging
academic experience than the four year colleges in the state. Unfortunately those perceptions are apparently
shared by some high school counselors and high school student parents. That perception coupled with the open
admissions mission of the system combines to create an impression that academic preparation is not as vital for
an entering student in a technical college as it is in a four year college.

Third, nearly 16% of Wisconsin residents lack a high school diploma or GED/HSED and are not enrolled in
school. (Back to Basics 2006, 3) By implication these residents will most likely lack the basic skills in computer
literacy, mathematics, and communication necessary to be productively employed. As the total population ages
and demands for skilled labor increase, this segment of the population will need to be prepared for work.

Fourth, the aforementioned high school completion gap between white students and students of color is dramatic.
The fastest growing segments of the Madison College District population are persons of color. If present trends
continue, the need for more developmental education for this population will increase.

Fifth, the District’s growing immigrant population will require education to overcome skills and language barriers to
productive employment.

Sixth, the disconnect between skills required for success in Madison College programs and minimum high school
graduation requirements (two years of Mathematics, two years of Natural Science) means some high school
graduates come to Madison College unprepared for high level technical, health related, or transfer programs.

The need for more work on transitions from high school to college is recognized by the PK-16 Leadership Council
who are engaged in studies related to the high school senior year. These preliminary discussions involve using
the senior year as serious preparation for college through advanced coursework, youth options programming, or
dual enrollment in high school and college. (Wisconsin PK-16 Leadership Council,
http://www.wisconsin.edu/pk16/senior.htm)

The need for attention to Basic Skills education is exacerbated by the lack of funding the State of Wisconsin
applies to these efforts. Wisconsin spends about $360/student on enrolled ABE students while Minnesota spends
$778, Iowa $708, and Michigan $1,846. (Back to Basics 2006, 6)

Evidence indicates that ABE students tend not to pursue occupational associate degrees at high rates, despite the
demonstrated wage enhancement that comes with that credential. Strategies for offering developmental and
remedial education should include strategies to clarify transition paths. Integrating occupational training into the
ABE instruction is considered a “best practice” nationally to encourage transitions. For example, the State of
Washington’s Integrated Education and Basic Skills Training has resulted in demonstrably improved transition rates.
(Back to Basics 2006, 7) The College already has an AQIP related work team planning to improve transitions.



Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007      10
English Language Learners (formerly ESL) Education
It should be noted that the need for ELL education will also increase as new immigrants enter the District. While
ELL is not necessarily developmental in nature or purpose, its funding patterns and some enrollment patterns are
similar to those in developmental education. Data on population growth in the District points to an increasing need
for ELL for Spanish speakers and those who speak various Asian languages. The need for more ELL and also
developmental training in Spanish language for Spanish speakers was mentioned repeatedly in various
conversations with stakeholders in preparation for this Plan.

Recommendations – Student Academic Preparedness
     1. Redesign college practices in basic education, remedial, and developmental education to increase the
        number of students transitioning from those courses to credit programs, certificates, and transfer courses.
     2. Continue the focus on student academic preparedness by doing the following:
           a. Build better bridges with high school faculty and community-based organizations to communicate the
              preparedness levels needed to succeed in Madison College programs.
           b. Fully implement the Mandatory Assessment Advising and Placement initiative, including the Adult
              Basic Education (ABE) comprehensive assessments, and offer the appropriate assessments to
              District high school students.
           c.    Design programs specifically targeting young minority students at risk of lacking appropriate
                 academic preparation.
           d. Link high-level English Language Learners (ELL) and ABE programming directly to occupational and
              transfer programs. Offer pre-program student status to students enrolled in these courses –
              especially for those on program wait lists.
           e. Assess the effectiveness of high school completion options and programs.
           f.    Continue curriculum articulation work between College Preparedness and Academic Advancement
                 Center (CPAAC) and the other academic Centers.
     3. Engage in the design and implementation of the Wisconsin High School Senior Year initiative to promote
        greater student preparedness when entering Madison College.
     4. Motivate entering students to academically prepare for studies at Madison College by developing a
        strategy to change perceptions of Madison College from a college of “second choice and second
        chances” to an institution of higher learning with a hands-on, student-focused, practical approach to
        education.



The Changing World of Work
It has now been several decades since Peter Drucker observed the shift from the industrial age to the information
age by coining the term “knowledge worker”. The knowledge worker uses intellectual capacity to improve
productivity across a variety of professions. Many of the programs Madison College currently offers create the
capacity for students to become knowledge workers in their chosen field. This is a broader mission than preparing
students to be technically competent in a profession. Although technical competence is still necessary, the
constantly changing technology that is used to boost productivity requires ever evolving technical skills and
perhaps more importantly - the capacity to learn how to use the new tools and technology as they evolve.

The added value of the knowledge worker is increasingly more important in the face of increasing global
competition. In his book, The World is Flat, Thomas L. Friedman suggests that the world is "flat" in the sense that
the competitive playing fields between developed industrial and emerging market countries are leveling. Friedman
provides many examples in which companies in India and China are part of large global supply chains that extend
across the earth. Outsourcing has created a competitive environment where workers in the Madison College
District are competing with lower paid workers in Asia and South America. This effect is now clear to District
manufacturing businesses as testified to in advisory committee surveys and the academic plan focus groups.
However it is also clear from those groups that manufacturing is only the first wave of outsourcing. Intersecting
technologies such as the Internet, fiber-optics, PC networks, cell phones, and high definition images create the
potential to outsource even the most sophisticated medical and engineering related jobs.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   11
These trends put pressure on employers to constantly add more value to their processes and products. In turn
that pressure is felt by workers who face a time of constant change. Again and again in our surveys and
conversations with employers we were told that valued workers are critical thinkers, team players, problem
solvers, good communicators, mathematically competent, and technically astute.

Global competition has also created the need for more global awareness and cultural sensitivity. As the District
population grows through the addition of immigrants from other countries it is important that workers know how to
work together in teams of mixed ethnicity or racial origin. As business operations continue to spread around the
globe workers will need to know how to communicate in different cultures. The most valued employees will be
those that possess these culture-crossing skills.

Gold Collar Workers
These trends have lead employers to seek a different type of worker. Some are referring to this new type of
workers as “gold collar” workers.

In the past, workers were typically seen as member of two classes - blue-collar and white-collar workers. Blue-
collar workers did manual labor in a factory or other industrial setting for hourly pay, whereas white-collar workers
did more intellectual work in an office on salary. However, changes in the nature of work and the workplace have
led to large growth in the numbers of a particular kind of knowledge worker--the gold-collar worker, whose most
valuable assets are problem-solving abilities, creativity, talent, and intelligence; who performs non-repetitive and
complex work that is difficult to evaluate; and who prefers self-management. The gold-collar worker is, for
example, the computer engineer as opposed to a lower-level knowledge worker such as an input operator.
(Adapted from ERIC Digest, www.ericdigests.org/2003-2/gold.html)

Gold Collar jobs are significantly more difficult to outsource because the skills used in maintaining the positions
keep changing. Adapting to change and constantly adding value to work make gold collar jobs more secure for
employees. Many have written about gold collar workers and definitions do differ, but those workers share these
common characteristics.
     •     For gold-collar workers, knowledge is not just having information; it is using information--to solve
           problems, to create solutions and strategies, to learn from experience.
     •     Gold-collar workers typically use knowledge from more than one area. In some cases, gold-collar
           knowledge crosses formal, academic disciplines like science and business; in others, occupationally
           specific technical knowledge is used in combination with more general process, communication, and
           learning-to-learn skills.
     •     Gold-collar workers tend to be autonomous. Traditional gold-collar professionals (engineers, lawyers)
           have always enjoyed a high degree of autonomy. With the disappearance of much middle management,
           newer gold-collar workers like online CSRs and CPI operators, formerly considered skilled trades, often
           perform work once done by degreed professionals. (Adapted from ERIC Digest)

Gold collar jobs are those that require technical training but not a bachelor’s degree. The expectation for these
high paying, high tech jobs is that the worker can adapt to constantly changing requirements. This requires the
ability to learn on the job or to quickly learn new skills in a post-secondary setting.

Since the premium in gold collar jobs is on application of knowledge, it is essential that these gold collar workers
continually seek new skills. As technology continues to change work at ever increasing speed workers need to
keep current on the latest developments in many fields. A technical college is an excellent place to offer that type
of skill building.

Time after time advisory committee members, focus group participants, and Madison College faculty have called
for workers to bring sophisticated “soft skills” to work. These skills are described in the Madison College Core
Abilities and have been adapted to meet requirements of other disciplines such as in the “Core Manufacturing
Skills” project. The Core Abilities are the key skills for knowledge workers who seek “gold collar” jobs.

Another theme related to the changing world of work is the call for much more interdisciplinary programming.
Faculty in all areas of the College have indicated the need for this change. For example, students in almost all
occupational programs could probably benefit from some type of business orientation. Students in business
programs could benefit from language instruction or cultural competence education. Students in occupational /
technical areas may benefit from some instruction in related technical areas and students in transfer programs


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       12
could benefit from some technical skill building. The possibilities for interdisciplinary programming at a
comprehensive technical college such as Madison College are limitless.

Recommendations – The Changing World of Work
     1. Examine the effectiveness of the current Core Abilities program in building “knowledge workers”. Revise
        the program as necessary to solidify its role in developing knowledge workers.
     2. Infuse the Madison College curriculum and campus with opportunities for global and cultural awareness.
     3. Identify programs that lead to gold collar jobs and ensure the curriculum is designed to teach the
        adaptability skills those positions require.
     4. Allocate curriculum planning and development resources to create more inter-disciplinary coursework.
     5. Remove internal Madison College barriers to inter-disciplinary studies and work with the Wisconsin
        Technical College System (WTCS) to eliminate state system barriers.



Trends in Technical and Community College Education
Career Pathways
“The necessary elements for regional economic success in the 21st century are no mystery: communities will
thrive or decline based on how well they cultivate and retain ‘knowledge workers.’ These individuals possess
post-secondary educational credentials, technical skills, the ability to learn rapidly and an entrepreneurial
approach to work and career management.” (Jenkins and Spence 2006, 1)

The College and Career Transitions Initiative of the League for Innovation in the Community College
(www.league.org) is promoting career pathways as a means of:
           Decreasing the need for remediation at the postsecondary level
           Increasing enrollment and persistence in postsecondary education
           Increasing academic and skill achievement at both the secondary and postsecondary levels
           Increase attainment of postsecondary degrees, certificates, and other credentials
           Increased entry into employment or further education

A career pathway is a connected series of education and training programs and support services that enable
individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector and to advance over time to
successively higher levels of education and employment. Each step on a career pathway is designed explicitly to
prepare for the next level of employment and education. (Jenkins and Spence 2006, 2)

Career Pathways generally begin in high school and continue through graduate school. Each career pathway is a
customized path that fills an important need for workers in the local economy. Usually, career pathways use
existing programs and services and adapt them to a modularized laddered approach to technical and academic
skill building. Curriculum is modular in career pathways so that discrete technical skill sets and/or academic
readiness skill targets are met throughout the course of a student’s program. This allows students to move in and
out of programs achieving ever higher levels of skills and academic readiness. Existing programs that lead to
associate degrees are often broken into discrete chunks of skills leading to Certificates of Completion and
identified employment. Students can then return to the technical college to complete the next highest level of skill
until they reach the associate degree plateau. A complete Career Pathway then points to the baccalaureate level
major or program in their career path. Career Pathways have no dead-ends. In fact, technical colleges can
participate in post-baccalaureate career pathways by offering intensive technical skill building certificates to
baccalaureate (or higher) degree holders. As a local employer related, “There are more bachelor degree holders
in the labor pool (for laboratory technicians) than there are AAS graduates. Bachelor degree graduates need
training in technical job skills.”




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007    13
According to the Career Pathways How-To Guide, common characteristics of career pathways are:
           “Extensive reliance upon data, from the initial step of selecting industries or occupations for pathway
           development, through the work of identifying gaps in education and training for the target industries, and finally
           evaluating how successful efforts to improve educational attainment and economic advancement in those
           industries have been.
           Use of “road maps,” jointly produced by educators, workforce development professionals and employers, that
           show the connections between education and training programs and jobs at different levels within a given
           industry or occupational sector at different levels.
           Clear linkages between remedial, academic and occupational programs within educational institutions, and
           easy articulation of credits across institutions to enable students to progress seamlessly from one level to the
           next and earn credentials while improving their career prospects and working within the field.
           Curricula defined in terms of competencies required for jobs and further education at the next level, and, where
           possible, tied to industry skill standards, certifications or licensing requirements.
           Emphasis on “learning by doing” through class projects, laboratories, simulations and internships.
           Programs offered at times and places (including workplaces) convenient for working adults and structured in
           small modules or “chunks,” each leading to a recognized credential.
           The flexibility to enter and exit education as participants’ circumstances permit.
           “Wrap-around” support services, including career assessment and counseling, case management, child care,
           financial aid and job placement.
           “Bridge programs” for educationally disadvantaged youths and adults that teach basic skills like
           communication, math, and problem solving in the context of training for advancement to better jobs and
           postsecondary training.
           Target jobs in industries of importance to local economies
           Create avenues of advancement for current workers, jobseekers, and future labor market entrants
           Increase supply of qualified workers for local employers in the target industries
           Alignment of both public and private funding sources, such as the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical
           Education Act (Perkins), Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF),
           state and federal financial aid and employer tuition reimbursement, and sharing of costs among partners to
           provide needed education and support services in a cost effective way.

At each point along career pathways, the objective is not only to prepare youths and adults for the next levels of
education and employment, but to motivate them to advance by exposing them to the opportunities available.”
(Jenkins and Spence 2006, 3-4)

Career Pathways are a relatively new phenomena at technical and community colleges. Neither Madison College
nor most community/technical colleges have many complete career pathways. The closest program example
Madison College offers now may be Nursing. Nursing builds relatively seamlessly from Patient Care Technician or
Medical Assistant to Nursing Assistant to Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing to Bachelor of Science in
Nursing. Each step has a progressively higher level of technical skill and academic rigor attached to it. Nursing
lacks the connections to high school and the post-baccalaureate skill improvement certificates that would make it
a more complete pathway.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007               14
A few of the current Madison College initiatives and programs that include significant Career Pathways features
are:
        Biotechnology Intensive Post-baccalaureate Certificate
        Post-baccalaureate Paralegal
        Electrical Engineering Technology and its articulation with the Milwaukee School of Engineering
        AYES and Automotive Technology
        Lab Animal Technician and Veterinary Technician
        Architectural Technician and its articulation with the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
        Bilingual Certificates in Microsoft Office, Office Assistant, and Early Childhood Education that prepare
        students to succeed in the Associate degree programs
        Bilingual Certificates in Supervisory Management and Small Business that can lead to Associate degree
        programs

Madison College’s most significant effort to-date at creating Career Pathways is being funded by a Department of
Labor Community Based Job Training Grant. Madison College has already constructed a segment of curriculum
that leads to a specific job caring for laboratory animals and can also be used to ladder into the Lab Animal Tech
and Vet Tech programs. The College is currently exploring more pathways in the medical laboratory fields through
this grant. The grant intends to train 435 people over two years.

Madison College is the lead WTCS College involved in constructing career pathways for adults as part of the
statewide Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE) initiative. The RISE initiative focuses on policy change
needed to facilitate the growth of more Career Pathways in Wisconsin.

Recommendations – Career Pathways
     1. Direct significant efforts and resources to develop career pathways in all technical diploma and associate
        degree programs.
     2. Take a leadership role in statewide planning to remove system barriers to the career pathways models
        through the Regional Industry Skills Education (RISE) initiative.
     3. Form career pathways teams including Business, Industry, and Community Services (BICS)
        representatives, faculty, and administrators to build complete pathways for specific identified industries
        that demonstrate clear paths to advancement for workers.
     4. Develop systems that support the collaboration with employers needed to design career pathways by
        integrating workforce development and business and industry needs into the curriculum design process.
     5. Initiate a focused effort to enter into transcripted credit agreements with District high schools in support of
        career pathways.
     6. Expand modularized technical training in high demand fields for working adults who already have
        degrees.
     7. Encourage and reward efforts to build modules within existing programs that lead to identifiable technical
        and academic skills and allow working adults the flexibility to participate in programs as their
        circumstances permit.
     8. Address facilities and space challenges associated with building modularized technical curriculum.


Economic and Workforce Development
Community and Technical Colleges have long been the leaders in providing workforce development strategies to
meet emerging needs (http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ovae/pi/cclo/workforc.html.) The WTCS colleges are
considered the primary driver of workforce and economic development in Wisconsin. Madison College is a state
leader in offering basic education at the workplace throughout the District.

The trend in workforce development is to design training that meets immediate needs of dislocated workers or
incumbent workers that require skill upgrades. Madison College, through its Business, Industry, and Community
Services (BICS) unit and also through the Adult and Continuing Education (ACE) units has designed and offered
several of these short term credit and non-credit training opportunities to respond to immediate worker needs. For
incumbent workers, these learning opportunities can be offered at the workplace or offered at times and places


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       15
convenient for working adults. For dislocated workers, the College has offered intensive accelerated “boot camp”
type learning experiences to help workers get back to the job market. Through the ACE unit the College has
offered short term non-credit certificates in different languages to build a pathway to degree programming for
ethnic minority populations. The State of Wisconsin has provided resources for some of this training by offering
Worker Advancement Training Grants. These grants are used to serve consortium of companies that might not
otherwise be able to afford worker training.

Madison College has a strong partnership with the Workforce Development Board of South Central Wisconsin.
That partnership has resulted in substantial grant funds for Madison College to design career pathways for
workers and to train dislocated workers in new skills. Recently the Workforce Development Board of South
Central Wisconsin and its partners were awarded a Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development
(WIRED) grant to transform regional economic development efforts by creating more career pathways, launching
degree programs in agriculture, laboratory science, and utility worker, and expanding technical training capacity in
Health Care and Advanced Manufacturing. Madison College is a primary partner in that initiative.

Madison College will be asked to do more and more of this customized training work to promote both economic
and workforce development.

The College has also taken an active role in economic development strategies through the Technology,
Education, and Commerce (TEC) center, the Business Procurement Assistance Center (BPAC), and partnerships
in regional strategies to build economic development infrastructures. The academic plan focus groups
consistently indicated a need for the College to further develop its role in regional economic development.

Recommendations – Economic and Workforce Development
     1. Construct systems that develop faculty expertise in customized training teaching and design.
     2. Form rapid response teams to meet emerging industry training needs in specific program areas.
     3. Provide availability of faculty and facilities to support customized training needs through flexible
        scheduling practices.
     4. Build faculty expertise in new and emerging scientific and technical fields.
     5. Align ACE and BICS functions to provide a clear economic and workforce development training portfolio
        of offerings.
     6. Systematically leverage College expertise to serve incumbent and dislocated workers throughout the
        entire Madison College District.
     7. Address facilities challenges related to offering “just-in-time” training and training in new and converging
        technologies.
     8. Determine faculty and staff needs to increase economic and workforce development work.
     9. Determine headcount and FTE goals for each Center in customized training and in Career Pathways
        training.


Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
Community and Technical Colleges have long served as the initial point of entry for protective services personnel
training. Following the events of September 11, 2001, these same colleges have launched into homeland security
and emergency preparedness training with new purpose and renewed vigor. Several community colleges now
host Institutes for Homeland Security and have taken on the mission of high level training in the areas of security,
prevention, and threat analysis. New degree programs in security and emergency management are appearing
throughout the country. The two year colleges have taken the lead in meeting this important need.

First responders need to know how to deal with natural and man-made disasters. Technical colleges in Wisconsin
are best positioned to teach those skills. There are no other accessible post-secondary institutions that feature
programming in public safety, health care, law enforcement, materials analysis, animal health and safety,
information technology, biotechnology and community service. In fact the League for Innovation in the Community
College (www.league.org) is conducting a special project to leverage these strengths and promote community


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007        16
and technical colleges as the nation’s first choice for emergency preparedness training.

Recommendations – Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
     1. Create an emergency preparedness/homeland security training unit that uses expertise in disciplines
        throughout the College.
     2. Address serious facilities and equipment issues associated with increasing and modernizing protective
        services and emergency preparedness training.


Student Access and Success
Madison College has maintained a clear focus on promoting student success for several years. Primarily through
the Mandatory Advising, Assessment, and Placement initiatives (including an entire Learner Success strategy)
the College has positioned itself as a “right to succeed” College instead of a “right to fail” institution. Despite these
fine efforts there is still an inequity in access and success rates at Madison College and throughout higher
education. There is increasing research on what can affect student success. The Lumina Foundation has funded
much of that research and compiled a short report summarizing “What We Know about Access and Success in
Postsecondary Education”. In essence the research has determined that access and success depends on four
dimensions of the student experience – Preparation, Awareness, Financial Issues, and Institutional Responsibility.
Here is a summary of the Lumina report. (Lumina Foundation for Education, http://www.luminafoundation.org/)

Preparation issues
           Variance in graduation rates by student background characteristics (socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity,
           etc.) and variation in participation in college-preparation curriculum by similar characteristics.
           Variation in state investment in K-12 education.
           Lack of alignment between K-12 curriculum requirements and postsecondary requirements.
           Completion of application procedures varies by student background.
           Significant numbers of students enter postsecondary education needing remediation and these students
           disproportionately attend community colleges.

Awareness issues
           There is a lack of accurate information about college pricing and the range of college choices.

Student Financial Issues
           The share of college costs paid by students and families is increasing while government support is
           declining.
           Students increasingly work during college.
           Rising tuition leads to lower enrollments.
           Merit based financial aid systems flow disproportionately to higher income students and merit based aid is
           increasing.
           Financial aid programs are not geared towards adult learners.
           Educational debt burdens are growing for college graduates.

Institutional Responsibility
           Educational attainment rates vary considerably by student background characteristics.
           Community colleges serve the largest number of at-risk students.
           Colleges must adapt their teaching and learning strategies to meet the needs of working adults.

Some of this research suggests new directions for student success initiatives. Madison College cannot lose its
focus on academic preparedness but the College should consider other dimensions of preparedness it can
influence. The College should pay particular attention to its hours of operation and accessibility to technology
resources.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007        17
Student Success Rates at Madison College
In order for students to reap the economic rewards of associate degrees they must be provided clear
opportunities to succeed. The College has invested significantly in efforts to increase preparedness levels of its
students and to retain students in programs. Course success encourages student persistence. Student
persistence ultimately leads to higher goal attainment rates. Through its Learner Success initiatives Madison
College has learned that student success rates are enhanced by accessible, available, and relevant support. That
support is found in tutoring services, peer to peer networks, the Madison College learning centers, advising and
career resources and the College counseling faculty. The College can benefit from focusing on student support
mechanisms it knows will improve student success rates. Table 4 below compares success rates (defined as “C”
or better) of various student populations in completed coursework. For a different look at course success,
graduation, and persistence data across the college and its various programs please visit the Madison College
Research and Planning website and click on Scorecards – 2007 Board Ends Measures – Course Success,
Graduation, and Transfer rates. (http://matcmadison.edu/researchplanning)

                                            Table 4 • Percentage of Completed Credits – “C or Better”
                                               Ethnicity                                 Fall 2006      Spring 2007
                                               Caucasian                                  89.2%           90.6%
                                               Asian and Pacific Islander                 87.3%           87.5%
                                               Hispanic                                   86.6%           85.9%
                                               Other – Race/Ethnicity Unknown             86.3%           88.4%
                                               American Indian or Alaska Native           85.1%           93.4%
                                               African American                           76.6%           84.1%
                                             Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.


In the recent past, Madison College has invested substantial resources into creating an Equity Scorecard to
measure differentials in success rates between students of different ethnicity. Part of the College strategic plan
calls for all students to succeed at the same rate. All programs are provided data on minority student success
rates through the College Learning Systems Quality Improvement Project (LSQIP) initiative. Although there is
some evidence that gaps are narrowing there is still work to do to equalize success rates and lift success rates for
all students.

Students with Disabilities
Finally, there is every reason to expect more developmentally disabled students will enter Madison College. In
2006, there were 2,169 students with self-reported disabilities attending the College. High Schools throughout out
the Madison College District report significant counts of disabled students.

                                   Table 5 • Percent of Disabled Students by High School District 2006-2007
                                             High School District                              Disabled Students
                                             Baraboo                                                 14.6%
                                             Jefferson                                               16.2%
                                             Madison Metropolitan (All)                              20.0%
                                             Portage                                                 13.1%
                                             Reedsburg                                               16.8%
                                             Sauk Prairie                                            15.7%
                                             Stoughton                                               16.8%
                                             Sun Prairie                                             15.5%
                                             Watertown                                               16.0%
                                             Waunakee                                                12.4%
                                            Source: Wisconsin Department of Pubic Instruction website – WINSS data analysis.


If enrollment continues to follow historic patterns, over half of these students will enroll in a technical college or
other two year college – most likely Madison College.

Focus Group participants expressed the need for Madison College to play a larger role in educating and
employing disabled individuals.



Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                18
Recommendations – Student Access and Success
     1. Determine the financial barriers that limit student access to Madison College and make plans to address
        them.
     2. In light of the growing research in access and success, examine existing student development strategies,
        such as the First-Year Experience strategies at Madison College to determine their efficacy in promoting
        student access and student success.
     3. Investigate the effect of campus locations and learning environments on student access and add new
        locations where appropriate or enhance as needed.
     4. Expand the operating hours of the Madison College campuses to meet needs of various College
        populations. Extend the offering times for support services to match expanded hours.
     5. Examine the effectiveness of the current locations for the Madison College testing center, recommend
        changes to facilitate the testing process, and expand the mission of the center to serve all student testing
        needs.
     6. Build a comprehensive Learning Center that serves all students regardless of enrollment status. The
        Learning Center should offer support to students to improve competency in writing, mathematics, social
        sciences, natural sciences, and technical fields.
     7. Expand hours available to access to hardware and software for students and faculty.
     8. Ensure that students experience ease of access to multiple points of entry to College programming.
     9. Build truly integrated systems that provide the appropriate recruitment contacts to enrollment services to
        financial aid services providing “front door” access and consistent continuing support to students.
     10. Develop Campus Life and student support strategies to address student needs in out-of-classroom
         experiences, co-curricular opportunities and campus environments.
     11. Focus on support programs that address the barriers to success faced by students of color.
     12. Build a comprehensive master plan to support students with disabilities.
         a. Use the principles of universal design in design of learning strategies and work product.


Technology and Education
The advance of technology and its relationship to the workplace and our culture drive the use of technology at
Madison College. Students need to experience the technology they will be expected to use in the workplace. This
requires sometimes substantial investments in machinery and equipment featured in state of the art working
environments. It also requires knowledge and expertise in maintaining and upgrading software and hardware as
technology changes over time.

Teaching and learning are also affected by technology. Students expect the convenience and accessibility that
technology can provide. Faculty are constantly exploring technology to determine its effectiveness in improving
the teaching and learning process. Course management systems, Internet sites, Microsoft Office software, email
and chat systems are just a few of the software packages that are routinely used in courses and programs at
Madison College. Most of that software automates tasks that have been performed in classrooms for years.

The real question is what is next? What will be the role of simulators in technical education? What will be the role
of wiki’s, blogs, social networking sites, like Facebook or MySpace, or similar active participation sites on course
delivery? How do faculty and students use these new tools to create a learner centered active learning
environment? How can a taxpayer funded College keep up with the press of technological change and the
growing expectations it can create?




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007      19
Recommendations – Technology and Education
     1. Update the physical learning environments at all campuses to enable the use of technology to improve
        teaching and learning.
     2. Use the capital budgeting process in a deliberate manner to provide state of the art equipment and
        simulators where appropriate and provide a reliable refresh budget to update and replace that equipment.
     3. Form partnerships with business and industry to support education in the latest technologies.
     4. Examine the technology support infrastructure to determine the level of support required to maintain the
        College equipment, hardware, and software used in instruction and instructional support. Examine
        alternatives to provide necessary support to faculty, staff, and students.
     5. Study best practices in using technology to improve teaching and learning and encourage
        experimentation with the most promising approaches.


Transfer in Wisconsin Higher Education
The UW system and the WTCS system are engaged in several projects designed to increase the number of
baccalaureate degree holders in the State. Wisconsin ranks 30th in the percentage of adults with Bachelor
degrees and 9th in the percentage of adults with Associate Degrees. There are several reasons for these
rankings – including the strength of associate degrees from the state technical colleges. The COBE (Committee
on Baccalaureate Expansion) initiative is designed to increase transfer and articulation offerings between the two
systems. Several strategies are recommended by the COBE groups including, degree completion programs for
technical associate degree holders, degree completion programs in areas of high demand (Business, Nursing,
Early Childhood, and Special Education), career focused pre-major Associate degree programs, and other
collaborative strategies. Transfer between higher education institutions is an essential piece of the Career
Pathways strategy. Madison College has many articulation agreements in specific programs, however given the
number, quality, and rigor of occupational and technical programming at Madison College there are not sufficient
seamless transfer agreements between Madison College and the UW system.

Recent agreements between UW Madison and Madison College point the direction towards seamless transfer in
Liberal Arts. Both the Connections agreement and the Guaranteed Transfer agreement are useful tools to help
students navigate the transfer waters. Additional guaranteed transfer agreements are being negotiated with
specific UW Madison colleges and other UW systems schools.

Transfer has long been an issue between the WTCS and UW systems. Each has protected its own mission and
that has not lead to seamless pathways for the citizens of the State. At Madison College transfer education and
technical education need not be mutually exclusive. Private colleges have recognized this fact for years. The UW
system still presents barriers to the idea of seamless transfer – especially in occupational programming.

Recommendations – Transfer in Wisconsin Higher Education
     1. Actively engage and collaborate with UW institutions to articulate Madison College occupational and
        technical programs and create degree completion options where none exist.
     2. Pursue more guaranteed transfer agreements with the UW system.
     3. Cooperate on building pre-major transfer paths with UW system schools.
     4. Determine the impact of system-wide associate degree level general education on transfer opportunities
        for technical students.
     5. Build more transfer articulation relationships with private four-year colleges.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007    20
Flexible Delivery and the Adult Learner
For years community and technical colleges have been leaders in using flexible delivery methods to improve
student learning and increase access. The use of these new methods of delivering instruction and encouraging
learning is increasing at all postsecondary institutions. The evolution of these strategies is dependent on the
needs of the students and the ever increasing power of information technology. It is widely acknowledged that a
college must employ more flexible delivery methods to serve the working adult population. These methods can
take many forms from online classes, to accelerated classes to training offered at the workplace.

According to a comprehensive study of student enrollment at Madison College conducted by Chuck McIntyre in
2005, “Madison College students are quite sensitive to changes in the real (price-adjusted) cost of enrollment.”
(McIntyre 2005, 7) The cost of enrollment in this analysis includes child care, books, supplies, tuition, fees,
transportation, and the opportunity cost (that is the cost of what must be given up to attend Madison College such
as work, child or parent care, etc.) McIntyre postulates that the elasticity of Madison College enrollment in relation
to cost is -2.44. In other words, for every 1% increase in the real cost of student enrollment there is a 2.4%
decrease in Madison College enrollment (all other variables being equal.)

College tuition and fees are set by the WTCS and so are largely outside of College control. The Madison College
foundation runs scholarship programs and provides help with book purchases. Recently the College started a pilot
in textbook rental for its Economics courses (economists know about opportunity costs.) Other cost items the
College can influence are the costs related to child care, transportation, and increased flexibility in use of a
prospective student’s time. These costs are reduced when the use of flexible delivery options are a viable means
of educating students.

Flexible learning replaces some or all face-to-face traditional class time with a more flexible alternative while
preserving the rigor and expectations of the programs or courses. Flexible options include delivery alternatives
such as online, hybrid or blended courses (part online, part face-to-face), accelerated, self-paced, open entry/exit,
computer based, and modified scheduling practices (8 weeks, 4 weeks, one night a week, etc.) All of these
methods result in more time flexibility (and thus less opportunity cost) for students. Most of the time that means
students spend less time traveling to a location and attending a face-to-face class. It also means that time can be
reallocated or redistributed according to changing priorities in a student’s work or personal life.

Faculty at Madison College have recognized and responded to this need. Table 6 shows the increase in numbers
of degree credit students enrolled in a selected number of flexible learning options.

                       Table 6 • Number of Degree-Credit Students Enrolled in Selected Flexible Learning Options
                                                                                                            % Increase
                                                                         2005        2006        2007       2005-2007
                                       Flexible Headcount               3,784       4,021       5,540          46%
                                       In Person Headcount             21,715      21,787      22,121           2%
                                       Flexible as a % of Total          15%         16%         20%
                                       Flexible FTE                     384.5       421.1       666.6             73%
                                       In Person FTE                  7,487.7       7,386     7,630.9              2%
                                       Flexible as a % of Total           5%          5%          8%
                                       Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.



The College tracks enrollments in Online, e-Tech, Computer Delivered, and Accelerated courses. Those four
delivery strategies are combined to form the Flexible Learning sum in the table above. Degree credit headcount in
flexible learning options has increased 46% over the last three years while face-to-face headcount increased only
2%. The FTE growth is even more dramatic at 73%. These flexible delivery strategies now account for 20% of the
college degree credit headcount and 8% of its FTE. It should be noted that these figures do not include the
increase in hybrid learning strategies employed throughout the College. Madison College does not track hybrid
courses although some may be reported in the Computer Delivered category. The lack of accounting for hybrid
means these flexible learning enrollment numbers are almost certainly under-reported.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007          21
Flexible options are most important to adult students. Access to higher education is increased dramatically when
adult students (25 years and older) are offered flexible learning opportunities convenient to their work and
personal lives. According to the Lumina Foundation literature review, “What We Know About Adult Learners”,
access is increased by the availability of online courses, financial aid, convenient locations, accelerated
programs, multiple and flexible class schedules, and employer support. Not surprisingly these same factors
positively impact persistence. (Lumina Foundation for Education)

Advisory committee members and academic plan focus group participants repeatedly mention flexible delivery
alternatives as key expectations for the College in the future. Every faculty leader who responded to requests for
input into this plan discussed the growing need for flexible delivery options in their programming.

Career Pathways provide a potential mechanism for packaging educational services in a way that may appeal to
a broader section of learners than many programs attract now. The College should seriously consider changes to
the associate degree to chunk it into manageable discreet pieces that can be delivered inside or outside of the
traditional semester timeframe.

As the College creates more and more flexible alternatives to serve adult learners, it needs to create concurrent
student support systems. Faculty who teach in these methods as well as students enrolled report increasing
difficulty accessing College support systems. Support systems must include easy registration, comprehensive
help-desk type support, academic counseling and advising, orientations, and academic support systems (tutoring,
learning centers, etc.)

Recommendations – Flexible Delivery and the Adult Learner
     1. Create a comprehensive plan that will guide the growth of flexible delivery options including an analysis of
        District need, quality guidelines, data based assessments and future planning for new flexible learning
        methods.
     2. Immediately create and staff a comprehensive plan to support students enrolled in flexible delivery
        programming, particularly students enrolled in online courses and accelerated courses.
     3. Develop a plan for a comprehensive testing center that accommodates the need for proctored
        examinations in online courses.
     4. Market flexible delivery options in a manner that makes it easy for adult learners to identify the character,
        location, and duration of the options.
     5. Design offering times and schedules based on student needs. Determine a method to track scheduling
        changes that create flexibility for students and create incentives to promote scheduling alternatives.
     6. Consider additional Madison College locations to offer face-to-face learning closer to work or home for
        working adult learners.



Industry and Occupational Trends
The threshold question in attempting to predict employment needs in the District for the next several years is what
type of data is most useful? Trends data is compiled by both industry and occupation.

Industry data reflects growth or decline in entire North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes.
The codes group similar businesses by industry cluster to make projections. Simply put, an industry is where you
work. This data is helpful when looking at broad economic drivers and general industry patterns. Those drivers
and patterns will influence our academic programming.

Occupation related data is based on projections for growth or decline in identified jobs. These jobs are classified
in the Standard Occupational System (SOC.) Occupations span the breadth of all industries. For example,
administrative assistants are in demand in health care, manufacturing, accounting, recreation, government, and
many other industries. Simply stated, an occupation is what you do. Occupation data is directly relevant to
College programming since most of what Madison College offers trains workers for specific occupations.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       22
Industry Trends
A review of the major industries in South Central Wisconsin is provided in Table 7.

                                                      Table 7 • Top 5 Industries by Employment,
                                                      Average Earnings and County Designation
                  NAICS                                             Dane                     Urban Pressure                 Rural
                  Industry                                    Workers   Earnings            Workers   Earnings        Workers    Earnings
                  Health Care and Social Assistance            40,201    $40,378              9,186    $42,045          6,931     $28,245
                  Educational Services                         38,360    $39,331
                  Government                                   36,894    $50,572                                        4,799     $38,808
                  Retail                                       34,670    $28,939              24,638        $27,581     7,590     $25,855
                  Manufacturing                                28,129    $58,337              33,764        $50,446     9,488     $43,918
                  Accommodation and Food Services                                             14,770        $12,478
                  Agriculture and Forestry                                                    13,999        $22,447    11,592     $18,740
                 Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness adapted from COWS analysis.



This table provides industries by numbers of employees and includes an earnings indicator. This earning
indicator, borrowed from the COWS analysis in “Seeds of Workforce Change” is a gross measure of income per
employee in each industry. Since it a gross measure it includes all wages paid in the industry divided by the gross
number of workers, both full- and part-time. As such it is not a measure of what a full-time employee is likely to
earn in a given industry but rather a useful comparator to provide a picture of workforce compensation as high,
medium, or low wage.

In Dane County, the top employing industry is Health Care and Social Assistance. This industry includes
physicians, physician’s offices, home health care, medical labs, clinics, hospitals, specialty care, nursing and
residential care, social agencies, vocational rehabilitation services, child care services and sundry related
businesses. It is the fifth largest industry in the Rural Under Pressure counties and the fourth largest in the rural
counties. With some exceptions, these industries do pay well; however, the earnings decline significantly in the
Rural counties.

The next largest employers in Dane County are educational services including elementary, secondary, technical
colleges, universities, trade schools and all educational support businesses. The sprawling campus of the
University of Wisconsin, the central campuses of Madison College and the Madison Metropolitan School District
drive these numbers. These industries also tend to pay well.

Third is the government sector due to the location of the State government in Madison, the state capital.
Government is also the fifth largest employer in the Rural counties. Government is the second highest paying
industry in the both types of counties.

Fourth is the retail sector. This includes all retail outlets, motor vehicle sales, electronics, clothing and non-store
retail (catalogs and internet sales.) Retail is the second largest employer in the Rural Under Pressure counties
and the third largest in the rural counties. Retail is a mid-range to low paying industry. Earnings do not vary much
between the three county types.

Finally, manufacturing is the fifth largest employer in Dane County. Manufacturing includes food and beverage
manufacturing, textiles, wood products, paper and chemical manufacturing, metals and machines and many other
related manufacturing areas. Manufacturing is the largest employer in the Urban Pressure counties and second
largest in the rural counties. Employees in manufacturing have the highest earnings in each of the county
segments.

Accommodation and Food Services is the third highest employer in the Urban Pressure counties and by far the
lowest paying. The prominence of this industry is due to the location of the Wisconsin Dells in Sauk County and
the earnings are somewhat skewed due to the seasonal/temporary nature of some of the work there.

Agriculture and Forestry is the fourth largest employer in the urban pressure counties and the largest employer in
the rural counties. Earnings in this industry are lower than most.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                             23
Growth Industries
Projections of new job creation and job replacement can be made in several sub-industries. Table 8 shows the
projected job growth by industry in Dane County.

                                               Table 8 • 2004-2014 Projected Job Growth by Industry
                                                                  Dane County
                                   Dane                                              Jobs    % Gain Earnings
                                   Ambulatory Healthcare Services                    5,405      30%     $58,006
                                   Social Assistance                                 4,088      37%     $15,336
                                   Administrative/Support Services                   3,848      25%     $21,916
                                   Food Services/Drinking Places                     3,734      18%     $14,446
                                   Computer Systems Design and Related Services      3,351      68%     $64,810
                                   State & Local Government                          2,190        7%    $48,168
                                   Nursing Home and Residential Care                 2,177      40%     $27,941
                                   Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods               2,045      27%     $62,812
                                   Specialty Trade Contractors                       1,938      16%     $41,775
                                   Insurance Carriers and Related Activities         1,822      11%     $57,954
                                        Red = High Wage         Blue = Moderate Wage      Green = Low Wage
                                   Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness adapted from COWS analysis.



The table spotlights the top 10 growth industries (2004-2014) for the County along with earning estimates.

Ambulatory Health Care Services will grow the most jobs. The ambulatory health care industry includes services
that are outpatient focused. Social Assistance describes a broad range of family services including social workers
and childcare providers. Administrative Support Services describes all services related to office support, facilities
support, employment support and any other business support work. Computer systems design includes services
such as software creation, data management, networking management, internet related design, and like services.
Merchant wholesalers sell all manner of goods that are not perishable. Specialty Trade Contractors include
services related to construction of buildings or structures. Insurance Carriers provide many jobs in the County and
the need for all types of workers in that industry are projected to grow as well. Eight of 10 of these industries
provide moderate to high wages.

The Rural/Urban Pressure Counties growth industries are described in Table 9.

                                               Table 9 • 2004-2014 Projected Job Growth by Industry
                                                          Rural/Urban Pressure Counties
                                   Urban Pressure                                     Jobs    % Gain Earnings
                                   Administrative/Support Services                    2,970      50%     $15,961
                                   Accommodations                                     1,932      47%     $16,148
                                   Non-Store Retailers                                1,809      19%     $31,870
                                   Food Services/Drinking Places                      1,744      16%     $11,062
                                   Specialty Trade Contractors                        1,730      23%     $37,762
                                   Ambulatory Health Care Services                    1,612      36%     $54,394
                                   Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing             1,466      24%     $51,033
                                   Nursing Home and Residential Care                  1,336      28%     $24,763
                                   State & Local Government                           1,200      11%     $41,910
                                   Printing and Related Services                      1,105      31%     $47,440
                                         Red = High Wage         Blue = Moderate Wage      Green = Low Wage
                                   Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness adapted from COWS analysis.



Hospitality related industries show strong potential. Manufacturing and Printing both portend solid growth potential
and are high wage industries. Seven of 10 of these industries provide high or moderate wages.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                 24
The rural counties include many of the same growth industries as Dane and the RUP Counties but also include
machinery manufacturing and plastics and rubber manufacturing - both high wage industries. Table 10 shows that
overall the rural counties include only seven of ten industries that pay moderate or high wages.

                                              Table 10 • 2004-2014 Projected Job Growth by Industry
                                                                 Rural Counties
                                   Rural Pressure                                    Jobs    % Gain Earnings
                                   Social Assistance                                   640      37%     $10,945
                                   Administrative/Support Services                     628      49%     $15,889
                                   Ambulatory Healthcare Services                      620      33%     $39,112
                                   Nursing Home and Residential Care                   578      36%     $20,788
                                   Specialty Trade Contractors                         508      20%     $29,092
                                   Machinery Manufacturing                             373      45%     $48,340
                                   Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing              336      54%     $38,173
                                   Membership Associations and Organizations           336      33%     $14,274
                                   Plastics and Rubber Products Mfg                    305      63%     $36,196
                                   Hospitals                                           292      17%     $41,048
                                         Red = High Wage        Blue = Moderate Wage      Green = Low Wage
                                   Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness adapted from COWS analysis.



Ambulatory Health Care Services and Administrative Support Services are by far the fastest growing industries in
the District. Food Services and Drinking Places is next, followed closely by Social Assistance, Specialty Trade
Contractors, and Nursing Home and Residential Care.

A review of statewide job growth presented by the Department of Workforce Development projects net job losses
through 2014 only in the following industries:

                               Table 11 • Estimated Employment Change (Job Losses) by Industry through 2014
                    Industry                                                                                      Estimated Employment
                                                                                                                         Change
                    Natural Resources and Mining                                                                           -170
                    Durable Goods Manufacturing (losses include expected gains in fabricated metal
                                                                                                                         -6,240
                    manufacturing and transportation equipment manufacturing)
                    Textile, Paper, Apparel, Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing                                   -5,730
                    Gasoline Stations                                                                                    -1,160
                    Rail and Pipeline Transportation                                                                        -80
                    Utilities                                                                                              -470
                    Broadcasting (except Internet)                                                                         -150
                    Telecommunications                                                                                   -1,400
                   Source: Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development – Wisconsin Detailed Industry Employment Projections, 2004-2014.



All other industries are projected to have job growth through 2014. In fact significant statewide growth is expected
in the following industries:

                                 Table 12 • Estimated Employment Change (Growth) by Industry through 2014
           Industry                                                   Employment Change                              % Employment Change
           Education and Health Services                                   132,710                                           22.2%
           Professional and Business Services                               57,270                                           22.7%
           Leisure and Hospitality                                          38,210                                           15.2%
           Accommodation and Food Services                                  34,680                                           16.0%
           Construction                                                     23,570                                           18.6%
           Financial Activities                                             18,250                                           11.6%
           Transportation and Warehousing                                   13,720                                           12.5%
           Real Estate and Rental/Leasing                                    4,130                                           14.9%
           Source: Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development – Wisconsin Detailed Industry Employment Projections, 2004-2014.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                             25
Emerging and Notable Industries
The Madison College District is fortunate to play a key role in several emerging industries in the State of
Wisconsin. These industries are still in development, but appear to have the staying power to help fuel important
economic growth in the District. In addition, there are several “traditional” industries that need to be spotlighted
due to unique circumstances. These industries are also highlighted in the COWS work cited previously. This
section also reflects the work of the Collaboration Council, a regional economic development group that provided
a report in February, 2007 to provide a focus to the economic development efforts of REDE, a newly launched
regional economic development entity that serves much of the Madison College District.

Emerging Industries
Biotechnology
There are over 120 biotechnology companies in the Madison College District. These businesses are engaged in
product development and creation in fields such as drug production and research, biomedical products and
agricultural biotechnology. The greater Madison area is nationally recognized as a biotechnology center. Madison
College already has an associate degree program that trains biotechnology technicians, as well as a post-
baccalaureate program. The Wisconsin bioscience industry, comprised of 338 companies throughout the state,
had revenues of $6.4 billion in 2005 and employed 22,372 people in the state.

The Wisconsin bioscience industry, as measured by revenues, grew by 16% annually from 2003-2005 and added
3,000 employees during that time. The Wisconsin bioscience industry is young and growing. Half of the
companies in the sector are less than 10 years old. Two-thirds are less than 15 years old. (Wisconsin Association
for Biomedical Research and Education, www.wabre.org/)

The Capitol Region Collaboration Council cites Biotechnology and Bioscience as one of the three major emerging
industries in the Madison College District.

Bio-industry and Renewable Energy
This collection of industries relies on renewable bio-based feedstocks or biomass for raw material. Bio-industry
makes value added products out of these raw materials and waste products. Bio-energy products convert
biomass to electricity and heat sources. Bio-fuels are renewable fuels intended to replace or supplement fossil
fuels. Bio-products are products that use biomass to replace products traditionally made from petroleum based
products. This industry is not nearly as well developed as the Biotechnology group but it does have the potential
to generate significant economic development activity. In fact, the University of Wisconsin was recently named
one of three regional centers for bio-energy research by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Great Lakes
Bioenergy Research Center will be located in Madison and should provide a significant boost to this budding
industry here.

Nanotechnology
Although not an industry per se, nanotechnology receives special attention from the Collaboration Council report.
Nanotechnology is the science of fabricating things smaller than 100 nanometers (less than a billionth of a meter.)
It is predicted to become the basis for much more powerful technology, medical devices and treatments,
environmental controls and filters, as well as a whole new wave of consumer products. The University of
Wisconsin is in the forefront of nanotechnology research and the Madison College District is in the forefront of
medical device creation and manufacture. The convergence between nanotechnology and Biotechnology or
Health Care makes it a powerful potential driver of the District’s economic well-being.

Organic Farming
Wisconsin already has the second highest number of certified organic farms in the nation. Many of those farms
are located in the Madison College service area. The State government has developed several strategies to grow
this industry. The growing national demand for organic food coupled with the predominance of small to medium
sized farms in Wisconsin could create fertile conditions for growth and employment in this industry. Recently the
South Central South West Workforce Development Boards were awarded $5,000,000 under the federal WIRED
(Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development) initiative to respond to economic development
opportunities across southern Wisconsin. That award includes seed money for Madison College and Southwest
Technical College to begin a program in Sustainable and Entrepreneurial Agriculture that responds directly to the
organic farming educational needs.



Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007     26
Notable Industries
Health Care
The single most important driver of jobs in the Madison College District is the Health Care industry. The need for
workers in health care related jobs will increase over the next several years. Many of these jobs are “gold collar”
jobs that require less than a bachelor degree and offer high wages such as Registered Nurse, Radiography
Technician, Dental Hygienist, or Clinical Lab Technician to name a few. Health Care workers are needed
throughout the District and health care careers are excellent candidates for Career Pathways curriculum design
strategies.

Advanced Manufacturing
As noted in the analysis above, manufacturing is a key component of the District’s economic well-being. It is the
highest paid sector in the District and even though some jobs may be declining (with the important exception of
Plastics and some metal fabrication manufacturing) it is a dynamic occupational area that has continually offered
high wage jobs and ever changing high skill, high wage career options within the Madison College District.
Manufacturing relates to many businesses such as food production, fuel production, medical technology
manufacturing, modern fixture production, plastics, nano scale processes, bio-related manufacturing and more.
Service industry growth tends to recycle dollars whereas production related growth provides new dollars – directly
affecting economic growth and well-being. Madison College needs to play a role in keeping the jobs and other
economic benefits that come from this sector. The saga of manufacturing in the United States is well known by
now. The competition from less expensive labor abroad as well as the dynamic nature of the manufacturing
process has lead to a decrease in jobs in this area. The path to stability in employment and opportunity lies in
what are being termed advanced manufacturing processes. These processes focus on improving worker
production, using technology to increase quality, and making processes more effective. The emphasis on
automation increases the need for technologically savvy workers as well as highly skilled industrial maintenance
personnel. The WIRED grant referenced earlier includes funds to establish an advanced manufacturing training
center in the region. Surveys of Madison College advisory committee members and comments from academic
plan focus group participants point to the need for the College to support this important sector.

Agriculture
Highlighted by the Collaboration Council as a major strength of the region, agriculture plays a key role in our
economic well being. The emergence of organic farming as a key value added process in this industry is noted
above. Other processes are being created and employed to add value to agriculture processes such as specialty
products and food processing.

Construction
Although not a new industry, construction openings exist throughout the Madison College service area and are
projected to grow at impressive rates here and throughout the State. This growth is fueled by continued upswings
in commercial and residential construction and the ongoing retirement of skilled workers in this industry. These
are high wage positions that do not require a four year degree. Demand will continue to increase for carpenters,
electricians, laborers, welders, plumbers, and pipe fitters to name a few. This growth will put pressure on
Apprenticeship offerings and should lead to increases in enrollment in all of our construction related programs.
Additionally construction related programs such as Madison College applied engineering programs should also
see increases in demand for “gold collar” workers.

Educational Services
Unlike other areas of the country the school age population in the Madison College District will continue to
increase. As teachers retire, new teachers must take their place. There is a statewide need for teachers in
elementary and secondary schools. There is also a predicted increase in the need for teaching assistants.

Insurance and Financial Services
This industry provides excellent high paying jobs and has been a cornerstone of economic development –
especially in Dane County.

Leisure and Hospitality/Travel and Tourism
This industry supplies the Madison College District with over 50,000 jobs, nearly 9% of the employment base
here. Sauk County alone produced 9% of the travel dollars spent in the State generating over $1 billion in 2005.
Tourism is an important and growing industry in the Madison College service area. The apparently insatiable
appetite for water parks and other diversions drives employment and opportunity in recreation related fields. Dane
County is the state’s second most popular tourist destination.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       27
Occupational Growth
Industry growth tells part of the story about the economic future of the District. Occupational growth projections
provide an estimate of growth in the demand for specific skilled workers the College can plan for over the next
several years.

Looming Labor Shortage
The aging of the workforce creates potential issues of labor shortages throughout the District and the State.

A Wisconsin Technology Network article “Wisconsin Labor Shortage on the Horizon” describes the scenario widely
communicated by Terry Ludeman, former chief economist for the Department of Workforce Development. “According
to Ludeman, Wisconsin ranks twenty-eighth in the U.S. for population growth and is a slow growth state. Wisconsin
also ranks below the national average for wages, household income, and percentage of population with college
degrees. Ludeman is concerned about how we get people to fill jobs. The state’s population of baby boomers makes
up 31% of the population. The state ranks 39th out of 50 in children under age 5, 38th for children under the age of 18
and 20th for citizens over the age of 65. He predicts that in the next twenty years the state will experience little growth
in ages 0-19 and no growth in the 20-39 age bracket. At the same time, the state will experience significant growth in
ages 40-59 and the number of citizens over the age of 60 will continue to grow. He predicts through the year 2030, at
least 27% of the state’s population will be over 60. The state is continuing to experience brain drain as college
graduates are forced to leave the state in search of careers and higher paying jobs. Once students are college
educated in Wisconsin, they leave in percentages way above the national average of 71% who stay in the state they
attended college. Illinois retains almost 82% of their college graduates, while Wisconsin retains a little over 61% of
college grads.” (Wisconsin Technology Network, 2003)

This scenario is widely supported by the participants in both the program advisory committee survey and the
academic plan focus groups. Both groups spoke of the “impending” labor shortage as a future concern for their
businesses. Those in the Health Care industry speak of the shortage in the present tense.

Table 13 shows Dane County projected growth by Standard Occupational Code (SOC) designated Broad
Occupation.

                                                       Table 13 • 2004-2014 Occupational Growth
                                                                      Dane County
                                                                                                    New and           Earnings
     Description                                                                               Replacement Jobs   (Wages + Benefits)
     Retail salespersons                                                                             5,143               $   22,789
     Cashiers, except gaming                                                                         3,722                   16,206
     Waiters and waitresses                                                                          3,549                   12,060
     Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food                              3,085                   12,940
     Customer service representatives                                                                2,489                   35,099
     Registered nurses                                                                               2,402                   59,815
     Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners                                   2,230                   20,244
     Child care workers                                                                              2,213                   10,349
     Receptionists and information clerks                                                            1,853                   24,356
     Personal and home care aides                                                                    1,832                   11,923
     Office clerks, general                                                                          1,815                   25,893
     Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, except technical and scientific             1,771                   74,593
     Laborers & freight, stock, and material movers, hand                                            1,725                   26,522
     Teacher assistants                                                                              1,577                   22,221
     Computer systems analysts                                                                       1,519                   87,034
     All other business operations specialists                                                       1,367                   62,914
     General and operations managers                                                                 1,313                  106,409
     Carpenters                                                                                      1,171                   46,606
     Bartenders                                                                                      1,148                   12,185
     Stock clerks and order fillers                                                                  1,145                   24,878
                                          Blue = Occupations with direct Madison College program support
     Source: COWS – Seeds Workforce Change.

These are the top 20 occupations projected to grow the fastest over the next seven years. Those occupations that are
directly related to programming already offered by Madison College are highlighted in blue.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                        28
Tables 14 and 15 show the Rural Under Pressure and Rural counties projected occupational growth patterns.

                                                       Table 14 • 2004-2014 Occupational Growth
                                                            Rural/Urban Pressure Counties
                                                                                                     New and           Earnings
     Description                                                                                Replacement Jobs   (Wages + Benefits)
     Retail salespersons                                                                              3,399               $   22,740
     Cashiers, except gaming                                                                          2,709                   14,819
     Waiters and waitresses                                                                           2,169                     9,763
     Farmers and ranchers                                                                             1,943                   10,131
     Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food                               1,547                   10,053
     Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners                                    1,242                   17,527
     Laborers & freight, stock, and material movers, hand                                             1,203                   24,483
     Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer                                                         1,188                   41,322
     Customer service representatives                                                                 1,175                   28,015
     Registered nurses                                                                                1,056                   48,768
     Door-to-door sales workers, news and street vendors, and related workers                         1,023                   16,090
     Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, except technical and scientific               904                    61,614
     Office clerks, general                                                                            849                    21,286
     Maids and housekeeping cleaners                                                                   833                    11,877
     Child care workers                                                                                797                      9,798
     First-line supervisors/managers of retail sales workers                                           797                    33,894
     Receptionists and information clerks                                                              790                    19,199
     Stock clerks and order fillers                                                                    759                    22,995
     Team assemblers                                                                                   727                    37,439
     Bartenders                                                                                        719                    10,285
                                           Blue = Occupations with direct Madison College program support
     Source: COWS – Seeds Workforce Change.

                                                       Table 15 • 2004-2014 Occupational Growth
                                                                     Rural Counties
                                                                                                     New and           Earnings
     Description                                                                                Replacement Jobs   (Wages + Benefits)
     Farmers and ranchers                                                                             1,655                $    8,412
     Cashiers, except gaming                                                                           960                    13,872
     Retail salespersons                                                                               789                    22,056
     Waiters and waitresses                                                                            548                      7,800
     Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food                                516                      9,410
     Registered nurses                                                                                 476                    48,410
     Personal and home care aides                                                                      416                    10,577
     Child care workers                                                                                397                      8,271
     Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer                                                          397                    33,835
     Customer service representatives                                                                  352                    24,435
     Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants                                                          343                    19,169
     Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners                                     289                    15,534
     Laborers & freight, stock, and material movers, hand                                              285                    21,737
     Home health aides                                                                                 249                    16,596
     Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, except technical and scientific               244                    49,723
     Office clerks, general                                                                            244                    19,096
     Receptionists and information clerks                                                              230                    16,535
     Bartenders                                                                                        227                      9,315
     Automotive service technicians and mechanics                                                      210                    25,978
     Carpenters                                                                                        208                    29,215
                                           Blue = Occupations with direct Madison College program support
     Source: COWS – Seeds Workforce Change.


Customer Service Representatives, Registered Nurses, Child Care Workers, Receptionist and Information Clerks,
Office Clerks and Sales Representatives appear on all the lists and are good fits for programs Madison College
offers now. High wage jobs on the lists include Customer Service Representatives, Registered Nurses, Sales
Representatives, Computer Systems Analysts, other Business Operations specialists, General and operations
managers, Carpenters, Truck Drivers, and Team Assemblers.


Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                         29
It is important to note that these occupations are expected to grow the fastest in the region. That does not mean
that other occupations - particularly those in demand by the fastest growing industries - will decline in numbers.
The steady growth in population throughout the District coupled with the expected labor shortages makes it
realistic to assume that more jobs will be available in the coming years than are available now. Most experts
agree there will be looming labor shortages in many occupations.

Statewide occupation growth data shows substantial growth in almost all occupational areas.

                                                  Table 16 • Statewide Occupation Growth 2004-2014
                            Broad Occupational Area                              Est. Avg. Annual Jobs            % Change 2004-2014
                            Office and Administrative Support                             13,110                            4.3%
                            Food Preparation & Serving                                    12,710                          14.2%
                            Sales and Related                                             11,460                            6.9%
                            Production                                                     9,290                            2.1%
                            Transportation and Material Moving                             7,360                          10.0%
                            Education, Training, Library                                   6,980                          16.1%
                            Healthcare Practitioners and Technical                         6,430                          26.7%
                            Construction & Extraction                                      5,030                          15.9%
                            Personal Care & Service                                        4,250                          19.1%
                            Business and Financial Operations                              4,130                          17.1%
                            Building and Grounds Cleaning and Mtce.                        4,020                          15.9%
                            Management                                                     3,850                          12.4%
                            Installation, Mtce, & Repair                                   3,740                            9.5%
                            Healthcare Support                                             3,550                          28.0%
                            Computer and Mathematical Occupations                          2,070                          27.1%
                            Community and Social Service                                   2,070                          18.7%
                            Protective Services                                            1,800                            7.9%
                            Architecture and Engineering                                   1,590                            9.7%
                            Arts, Design, Media, etc.                                      1,590                            9.9%
                            Life, Physical, and Social Science                             1,150                          15.6%
                            Legal Occupations                                                380                          11.4%
                            Farming, Fishing, Forestry                                       160                          11.4%
                          Source:     Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development –
                                      Wisconsin Projections 2004-2014 Detailed Occupational Trends.

An interesting trend in the Madison College District towards entrepreneurship or owning your own business
should be noted. Small businesses are sprouting up across the country. The Rural counties are actively
participating in that trend. About 29% of workers in our rural counties and 24% in our rural pressure counties are
self-employed. This compares to only about 14% in Dane County. These self-employed individuals present new
programming opportunities for the College.

Recommendations – Industry and Occupational Trends
     1. Continue to expand health care education to meet market need. The expansion can begin with additional
        nursing assistant and medical assistant training at all campus locations.
     2. Create short- and long-term plans to increase graduates in all nursing and allied health programs.
     3. Address the considerable facilities challenges presented by increased enrollment in health care
        programs.
     4. Expand agricultural-related programming by focusing on organic and sustainable agriculture and
        renewable and non-petroleum energy production. Consider other programming options in agriculture.
     5. Capitalize on the College’s growing expertise in renewable energy and bio-fuels by offering occupational
        training in these areas and creating inter-disciplinary offerings in related technical programs.
     6. Design and offer career pathways for laboratory sciences technicians.
     7. Expand laboratory science technician training to meet anticipated needs in Bio-related industries, such as
        post-Baccalaureate programs in biotechnology and electron microscopy, bioinformatics, stem cell
        technologies, and bio-manufacturing.



Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                        30
     8. Determine space, location, and facilities needs related to expansion in agricultural programming,
        renewable energy, and laboratory science technician training.
     9. Integrate instruction in nanotechnology into appropriate program areas.
     10. Re-focus manufacturing related programming towards advanced manufacturing and determine how to
         make that programming available at all regional campus sites.
     11. Address space and facilities challenges related to expanding training options in manufacturing-related
         programs.
     12. Create a manufacturing education and training facility in collaboration with business and industry and the
         UW system and staff it with a “solutions team” of interdisciplinary faculty members.
     13. Expand all construction-related programs, including construction-related apprenticeships, where possible.
     14. Address the serious facilities and space challenges presented by expanding construction programs.
     15. Create new programming in teacher education preparation. Consider creating teaching assistant
         programming.
     16. Analyze the changing skill requirements for administrative assistants and office support workers and
         create modular career pathways programming to meet immediate and long-term market needs.
     17. Determine the most effective ways to support the tourism industry with educational programming.
     18. Create programming that effectively prepares workers for careers in finance and insurance.
     19. Examine business-related offerings to fashion new training alternatives for customer service
         representatives and salespersons.
     20. Create entrepreneurial education programming and make it available district-wide.
     21. Use customized training in new and emerging occupational/technical areas to lay the foundation for
         programming in those areas.
     22. Plan carefully for the faculty and staff needs presented by offering the recommended new programming.



Program Area Analysis and Recommendations
This section of the Academic Plan paints a picture of Madison College programming as it exists now and provides
recommendations for the future. This analysis groups programs into related areas loosely based on national
career cluster models (http://www.careerclusters.org/whatis.cfm.) This section details general enrollment patterns
in each programming area and by doing so collectively represents enrollment for the College as a whole. General
recommendations are made for programming work in each area. The feedback from advisory committees, lead
faculty, and program directors as well as the analysis in the body of the plan are the primary sources for these
recommendations. For purposes of this analysis program areas include non-credit programming in Adult Basic
Education, English Language Learners, Adult and Community Education and Community Services.

Each program area is described by:
     1. Programs and Offerings
     2. Degrees Offered
     3. Certificates Offered
     4. Student Enrollment Trends
            Unduplicated Headcount Trends
            Student FTE Trends
            Credits/Student Trends
     5. Student enrollment as a percentage of total enrollment in FTE and Headcount




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   31
Overview of Enrollment Trends by Program Area
Table 17 shows the enrollment headcount and the FTE history of each program area over the last four academic
years. Changes and percentage changes reflect time periods from academic year 2003-04 to 2006-07.

                                                   Table 17 • Unduplicated Headcount & FTE Trends by Program Area
                                                                                            Year
                                                                                                                           Headcount                    FTE
                                                                                                                            Change              %     Change       %
Program Area                                                  Data            2004        2005         2006        2007*   2004 - 2007        Change 2004 - 2007 Change
                                                              Headcount      3,322       2,985        3,044        3,300            -22         -0.7%
Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing
                                                              FTE              950         857          863          933                                     -17    -1.8%
                                                              Headcount        398         391          417          458             60        15.1%
Agriculture & Natural Resources
                                                              FTE              127         126          129          139                                     12     9.4%
                                                              Headcount      1,287       1,328        1,349        1,480            193        15.0%
Applied Arts
                                                              FTE              399         421          427          432                                     33     8.3%
                                                              Headcount        599         651          587          662             63        10.5%
Applied Engineering
                                                              FTE              189         212          183          203                                     14     7.4%
                                                              Headcount     11,310      11,415       11,270       12,130            820         7.3%
Arts & Sciences
                                                              FTE            3,588       3,680        3,690        3,982                                    394    11.0%
                                                              Headcount      4,405       4,423        4,507        4,404                 -1     0.0%
Business & Information Technology
                                                              FTE              686         680          652          647                                     -39    -5.7%
                                                              Headcount      5,670       5,599        5,944        5,653            -17         -0.3%
College Preparedness & Academic Advancement
                                                              FTE              523         521          542          512                                     -11    -2.1%
                                                              Headcount        583         560          660          696            113        19.4%
Construction
                                                              FTE              110         125          141          156                                     46    41.8%
                                                              Headcount        266         178          178          164           -102        -38.3%
Education
                                                              FTE               85          67           64           61                                     -24   -28.2%
                                                              Headcount        722         704          688          677            -45         -6.2%
Hospitality
                                                              FTE              229         220          234          230                                      1     0.4%
                                                              Headcount        138         132          143          160             22        15.9%
Human Services
                                                              FTE               62          65           62           67                                      5     8.1%
                                                              Headcount        121          88          103           99            -22        -18.2%
Laboratory Sciences (Biotechnology & Electron Microscopy)
                                                              FTE               36          33           37           36                                      0     0.0%
                                                              Headcount      1,257       1,174        1,174        1,336             79         6.3%
Manufacturing
                                                              FTE              241         246          208          205                                     -36   -14.9%
                                                              Headcount      3,100       3,120        3,142        3,527            427        13.8%
Nursing & Health-Related
                                                              FTE              690         729          694          777                                     87    12.6%
                                                              Headcount        972         925          919          989             17         1.7%
Protective Services & EMS
                                                              FTE              308         296          308          302                                      -6    -1.9%
                                                              Headcount      5,963       5,326        4,435        3,748          -2,215       -37.1%
Safety Education
                                                              FTE               65          66           60           54                                     -11   -16.9%
                                                              Headcount        375         389          400          426             51        13.6%
Transportation
                                                              FTE              212         227          231          243                                     31    14.6%
Adult & Continuing Education and Community Service            Headcount     17,616      17,105       16,632       16,262          -1,354        -7.7%
(aid codes 42, 47, 60 -- excludes Safety Education above)     FTE              384         360          353          352                                     -32    -8.3%
Total Headcount (duplicated)                                                58,104      56,493       55,592       56,171
Total FTE                                                                    8,882       8,932        8,878        9,331                                    449     5.1%

*as of July 25, 2007

Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.

Headcount and FTE Changes
ACE and Safety Education lost the most headcount over this time period. ACE lost 8% of its enrollment while
Safety lost 37% of its enrollment. Education also lost significant headcount. Headcounts grew significantly in
Agriculture, Applied Engineering, Health Occupations, Arts & Sciences, Applied Arts, Construction, Human
Services, and Transportation.

FTE losses were largest in Manufacturing despite headcount increases in the period. Education and Safety also
lost significant FTE. FTE gains were seen in Agriculture and Natural Resources, Health Occupations, Applied
Arts, Applied Engineering, Arts & Sciences, Human Services, and Transportation. Huge percentage FTE gains
were made in Construction.



Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                                        32
Table 18 compares the relative percentage of unduplicated headcount students enrolled in each area to the total
(duplicated) headcount enrolled. It then measures changes by relative rank of each programming area to the
other programming areas in unduplicated headcount.

                                         Table 18 • Unduplicated Headcount Percentage by Program Area

                                                                                             2004                                 2007 Rank
                                                                                  2004       Rank        2005      2006   2007*   Rank Change
       Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing                                   5.7%           6       5.3%      5.5%    5.9%     7       -1
       Agriculture & Natural Resources                                            0.7%          14       0.7%      0.8%    0.8%    14        0
       Applied Arts                                                               2.2%           8       2.4%      2.4%    2.6%     8        0
       Applied Engineering                                                        1.0%          12       1.2%      1.1%    1.2%    13       -1
       Arts & Sciences                                                           19.5%           2      20.2%     20.3%   21.6%     2        0
       Business & Information Technology                                          7.6%           5       7.8%      8.1%    7.8%     4        1
       College Preparedness & Academic Advancement                                9.8%           4       9.9%     10.7%   10.1%     3        1
       Construction                                                               1.0%          13       1.0%      1.2%    1.2%    11        2
       Education                                                                  0.5%          16       0.3%      0.3%    0.3%    16        0
       Hospitality                                                                1.2%          11       1.2%      1.2%    1.2%    12       -1
       Human Services                                                             0.2%          17       0.2%      0.3%    0.3%    17        0
       Laboratory Sciences (Biotechnology & Electron Microscopy)                  0.2%          18       0.2%      0.2%    0.2%    18        0
       Manufacturing                                                              2.2%           9       2.1%      2.1%    2.4%     9        0
       Nursing & Health-Related                                                   5.3%           7       5.5%      5.7%    6.3%     6        1
       Protective Services & EMS                                                  1.7%          10       1.6%      1.7%    1.8%    10        0
       Safety Education                                                          10.3%           3       9.4%      8.0%    6.7%     5       -2
       Transportation                                                             0.6%          15       0.7%      0.7%    0.8%    15        0
       Adult & Continuing Education and Community Service                        30.3%           1      30.3%     29.9%   29.0%     1        0
       *as of July 25, 2007
       Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.



The ACE and Community Services area serves nearly 30% of the headcount at Madison College. Arts &
Sciences is next followed by the CPAAC group, the business and information technology group, Safety
Education, Health, and the Accounting, Finance, Business, and Marketing area. In fact, these areas together
provide nearly 90% of the Madison College headcount. The most significant change in headcount percentages
from 2004 to 2007 was in Safety Education which dropped two places in rank and in Construction which gained
two places. Madison College is serving relatively more students in Business and Information Technology, College
Preparedness and Advancement, and Nursing and Health Related Occupations. It is significant to Madison
College planning and financing that 3 of the top 5 headcount enrollment areas offer primarily no credit or low
credit courses.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                  33
                                                       Table 19 • FTE Percentage by Program Area

                                                                                             2004                                 2007 Rank
                                                                                  2004       Rank        2005      2006   2007*   Rank Change
       Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing                                  10.7%           2       9.6%      9.7%   10.0%     2        0
       Agriculture & Natural Resources                                            1.4%          13       1.4%      1.5%    1.5%    14       -1
       Applied Arts                                                               4.5%           6       4.7%      4.8%    4.6%     6        0
       Applied Engineering                                                        2.1%          12       2.4%      2.1%    2.2%    12        0
       Arts & Sciences                                                           40.4%           1      41.2%     41.6%   42.7%     1        0
       Business & Information Technology                                          7.7%           4       7.6%      7.3%    6.9%     4        0
       College Preparedness & Academic Advancement                                5.9%           5       5.8%      6.1%    5.5%     5        0
       Construction                                                               1.2%          14       1.4%      1.6%    1.7%    13        1
       Education                                                                  1.0%          15       0.8%      0.7%    0.7%    16       -1
       Hospitality                                                                2.6%          10       2.5%      2.6%    2.5%    10        0
       Human Services                                                             0.7%          17       0.7%      0.7%    0.7%    15        2
       Laboratory Sciences (Biotechnology & Electron Microscopy)                  0.4%          18       0.4%      0.4%    0.4%    18        0
       Manufacturing                                                              2.7%           9       2.8%      2.3%    2.2%    11       -2
       Nursing & Health-Related                                                   7.8%           3       8.2%      7.8%    8.3%     3        0
       Protective Services & EMS                                                  3.5%           8       3.3%      3.5%    3.2%     8        0
       Safety Education                                                           0.7%          16       0.7%      0.7%    0.6%    17       -1
       Transportation                                                             2.4%          11       2.5%      2.6%    2.6%     9        2
       Adult & Continuing Education and Community Service                         4.3%           7       4.0%      4.0%    3.8%     7        0
       *as of July 25, 2007

       Source: Madison College Institutional Research & Effectiveness.



Table 19 shows the program areas and their relative FTE percentages. Arts & Sciences dominates FTE with
about 43% of all college FTE in Arts & Sciences. All associate degree programs must have at least 21 credits of
Arts and Sciences. The next highest FTE service is in the Accounting, Finance, Business, and Marketing group
who serve about 10% of the College FTE, closely followed by Health, Business and Information Technologies,
CPAAC, Applied Arts, and ACE. These top 7 areas serve over 80% of the College FTE. Agriculture, Education,
Manufacturing, and Safety Education all lost rank in FTE over the time period while Construction, Human
Services, and Transportation moved up in rankings.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                  34
Program Area Summaries and Recommendations

Program Area: Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Accounting                                                                   Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Accounting Assistant                                                                  Accounting
           Business Management                                                                   Business Management
           eBusiness Certificate                                                                 Fashion Marketing
           Fashion Marketing                                                                     Finance
           Finance                                                                               Marketing
           Human Resources Certificate                                                           Paralegal
           Marketing                                                                             Real Estate
           Paralegal                                                                             Supervisory Management
           Paralegal Post-baccalaureate Certificate
           Quality Management                                                           One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Real Estate                                                                           Accounting Assistant
           Small Business Entrepreneurship                                                       Small Business Entrepreneurship
           Supervisory Management
                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    eBusiness Certificate
                                                                                                    Human Resources Certificate
                                                                                                    Paralegal Post-baccalaureate Certificate
                                                                                                    Quality Management




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                  Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405       FY0506    FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           3,322         2,985        3,044        3,300
       …% change from previous year                 ------     -10.1%         2.0%         8.4%
FTE                                                   950          857          863          933                  8,882      8,932         8,878    9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -9.8%         0.7%         8.1%                    ------    0.6%         -0.6%     5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  8.6          8.6           8.5          8.5
        …% change from previous year                ------      0.4%         -1.3%        -0.3%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       5.7%        5.3%         5.5%     5.9%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     -7.6%         3.6%     7.3%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                  10.7%           9.6%         9.7%     10.0%
                                                             …% change from previous year                      ------       -10.3%         1.3%      2.9%


Several of the themes that run through this Academic Plan revolve around expertise found in this program area.
Themes such as entrepreneurism, cross-disciplinary studies, global business, lean manufacturing processes, and
business outreach all relate to the work of this area. It is expected that this area will grow its offerings in
Entrepreneurship and develop offerings in introductory business to support other programs. This program group
already leads the College in accelerated learning options. An enhanced focus on short-term skill-building sets of
offerings as well as a growing emphasis on accelerated offerings will contribute mightily to the College need to
serve a growing adult working population. Enrollments should continue to increase substantially here.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                        35
Accounting, Finance, Business, Marketing Program Area Recommendations

     1. Examine the numerous management education options offered by Madison College and clarify
        educational paths for students by differentiating or combining offerings.

     2. Develop introductory Business courses and other relevant business courses for use in other program
        areas.

     3. Reach across the District with course offerings to support entrepreneurial development and small
        business management.

     4. Collaborate with Agriculture faculty to build programming in sustainable and entrepreneurial agriculture.

     5. Establish career pathways in appropriate business related occupations.

     6. Increase flexible delivery offerings (online, hybrid, accelerated) to serve working adults. Develop online
        associate degrees and certificate options.

     7. Incorporate flexibility into course and program scheduling times and locations.

     8. Build stronger partnerships with the Business Industry and Community Services (BICS) to serve more
        incumbent workers.

     9. Coordinate with Adult Continuing Education (ACE) curriculum to initiate financial planning and financial
        literacy coursework.

     10. Address greater need for cultural understanding, language training, and international business/marketing
         operations throughout business related curriculum.

     11. Completely integrate Core Abilities skills and other “soft skills” in student learning to support development
         of knowledge workers.

     12. Increase the numbers of articulation agreements and clear transfer opportunities in Business related
         areas.

     13. Build curriculum modules that focus on short to-the-point training and skill building in the context of
         broader skill training.

     14. Meet needs for programming in sales related training, non-store retail, and traditional retail training.

     15. Create programming that effectively prepares workers for careers in finance and insurance.

     16. Develop offerings in techno-marketing, business to business marketing and green marketing.

     17. Explore the areas of digital marketing and communication.

     18. Invest in the Madison College learning environment to build flexible physical space to complement flexible
         learning delivery strategies (movable walls, furniture, WIFI, pod casts on Web, etc.)

     19. Ensure adequate funding for software purchases to maintain pace with the latest programs.

     20. Offer continuing education and “specialty” offerings particularly in paralegal, real estate, and finance.

     21. Incorporate offerings in Spanish into program curriculum for Spanish speakers.

     22. Expand non-credit topic-specific courses around the entire District in collaboration with ACE and BICS.

     23. Build relationships with District community services organization to offer management and related
         courses.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007      36
Program Area: Agriculture & Natural Resources
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Basic Horticulture                                                           Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Farm Business & Production Management                                                 Laboratory Animal Technician
           Laboratory Animal Technician                                                          Veterinary Technician
           Renewable Energy Certificate
           Veterinary Technician
                                                                                        Less-Than-One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
                                                                                                 Basic Horticulture
                                                                                                 Farm Business & Production Management

                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    Renewable Energy Certificate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                             Agriculture & Natural Resources

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304        FY0405      FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              398          391          417          458
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -1.8%         6.6%         9.8%
FTE                                                   127          126          129          139                  8,882      8,932     8,878      9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -0.8%         2.4%         7.8%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%       5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.6           9.7          9.3          9.1
        …% change from previous year                ------       1.0%        -4.0%        -1.9%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       0.7%       0.7%         0.8%    0.8%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     1.0%         8.4%    8.7%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      1.4%        1.4%        1.5%    1.5%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     -1.3%        3.0%    2.5%


Agriculture is one of the most important economic drivers in the Madison College District. The College, however,
has few offerings in the field. The Veterinary Technician program is the only accredited program in the State and
its enrollments dominate this segment. The Department of Labor laboratory sciences grants and the new WIRED
initiative to build a program in Sustainable and Entrepreneurial Agriculture will help increase the College outreach
here. The Madison College leadership role in renewable energy education should also enhance an important
evolving industry. More thought should be given to other offerings – especially those short-term offerings (credit
and non-credit) in selected emerging agriculture related topics. The College’s agriculture offerings should serve
more than .8% of the College headcount.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                      37
Agriculture & Natural Resources Program Area Recommendations

     1. Develop programming in entrepreneurial and sustainable agriculture.

     2. Investigate current offerings in Farm Business and potential new offerings to serve agriculture industries.

     3. Take leadership in Renewable Energy and Biomass programming.

     4. Develop and offer career pathways programming for laboratory technicians and animal caretakers.

     5. Increase flexible delivery offerings – especially in new program areas.

     6. Explore new and expanded facilities options such as a working farm or other “hands on” venue.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   38
Program Area: Applied Arts
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Animation – Concept Development                                              Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           College Transfer Art                                                                  Animation – Concept Development
           Graphic Design and Illustration                                                       Graphic Design and Illustration
           Interior Design                                                                       Interior Design
           Photography                                                                           Photography
           Printing                                                                              Printing & Publishing
           Printing & Publishing                                                                 Visual Communications – Media Design
           Visual Communications – Media Design
           Web Page Design                                                              One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
                                                                                                 Printing

                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    Web Page Design

                                                                                        Other Instructional Offerings:
                                                                                                   College Transfer Art




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                         Applied Arts

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           1,287        1,328         1,349        1,480
       …% change from previous year                 ------      3.2%          1.6%         9.7%
FTE                                                   399         421           427          432                  8,882      8,932     8,878      9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      5.5%          1.4%         1.2%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%       5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.3          9.5           9.5          8.8
        …% change from previous year                ------      2.3%         -0.2%        -7.8%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       2.2%       2.4%         2.4%    2.6%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     6.1%         3.2%    8.6%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      4.5%       4.7%         4.8%     4.6%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     4.9%         2.0%    -3.7%


This program area shows steady growth in both headcount and FTE. Madison College enjoys an excellent
reputation for quality in the Applied Arts and already serves a strong number of students with other degrees or
seeking a career change. Additionally, the transfer art courses provide a cost effective student focused path to the
University system. The recommendation is to do more of the same. Design plays a key role in quality of life in the
District and quality of life in turn leads to economic development and growth. This program area is well positioned
to reach out even more to working professionals with cutting-edge skill upgrades. It is also a prime candidate for
inter-disciplinary offerings with Business and Information Technology.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                      39
Applied Arts Program Area Recommendations

     1. Explore new programming in digital marketing communications.

     2. Leverage Madison College expertise in applied arts to support the growth and development of the City of
        Madison downtown art community.

     3. Negotiate additional articulation agreements with four year institutions in Applied Arts programs.

     4. Introduce hybrid options and fast-track options to address changing student needs and provide some
        flexibility in space use.

     5. Examine the market for each program in this program area and clarify the role of each in offering a
        comprehensive applied arts portfolio of offerings.

     6. Determine how to offer access to specialized software applications on an as needed basis.

     7. Merge disciplines to produce workers who can provide images in print, on video, and on the web.

     8. Offer data management training for printing industry workers.

     9. Determine how to obtain access to equipment that runs the latest software products because workers
        must have up-to-date technology skills to survive in a competitive industry.

     10. Build multi-disciplinary programs because success requires knowledge in design, personal skills,
         technical skills, and business skills.

     11. Consider new offerings in medical visualization and architectural visualization.

     12. Develop continuing education offerings at convenient times or on the web for working professionals.

     13. Design and offer new modularized curriculum in different interior design options, aging in place health
         care design, universal design, and home place dynamics.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007    40
Program Area: Applied Engineering
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Architectural Technician                                                     Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Civil Engineering Technology                                                          Architectural Technician
           Electrical Engineering Technology                                                     Civil Engineering Technology
           Electronics                                                                           Electrical Engineering Technology
           Mechanical Design Technology                                                          Electronics
                                                                                                 Mechanical Design Technology




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                   Applied Engineering

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506    FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              599         651           587          662
       …% change from previous year                 ------      8.7%         -9.8%        12.8%
FTE                                                   189         212           183          203                  8,882      8,932     8,878    9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------     12.2%        -13.7%        10.9%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%     5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.5          9.8           9.4          9.2
        …% change from previous year                ------      3.2%         -4.3%        -1.6%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       1.0%       1.2%      1.1%     1.2%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------    11.8%     -8.4%    11.6%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      2.1%       2.4%       2.1%    2.2%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------    11.5%     -13.2%    5.5%


All of these programs lead to what can be considered “gold collar” jobs. Another program area with an
outstanding reputation, several programs have started significant work on Career Pathways with articulations to
various baccalaureate degree options. These programs could begin to take the next steps in building career
pathways. If the curriculum in any of these disciplines can be broken into modules that lead to recognized skill
sets, those shorter offerings that will eventually lead to a degree may be more accommodating to a working adult
who seeks a career boost. Additionally, these programs may wish to consider articulation or dual credit
arrangements with interested District high schools to build career paths starting in secondary schools. Finally, it
may be worth investigating the type of academic bridge that would have to be built to serve adults entering this
programming after a significant break from school.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                    41
Applied Engineering Program Area Recommendations

     1. Complete the career pathways for students in Architecture Tech and Electrical Engineering Technology
        by partnering with high schools.

     2. Build career pathways in Mechanical Design and Civil Engineering Technology by exploring the use of
        Project Lead the Way bridges from high schools and building bridges for returning adult learners.

     3. Develop post-baccalaureate certificates in applied engineering disciplines.

     4. Determine how to provide access to instructional software on an as needed basis. Explore a laptop rental
        program for all applied engineering students.

     5. Build more dynamic computer systems support infrastructure.

     6. Open facilities and provide faculty to enable more industry training opportunities.

     7. Build cross-disciplinary opportunities into the curriculum, such as design, marketing, and sales.

     8. Embrace and support non-traditional teaching methods.

     9. Incorporate web-based engineering education, meetings and communication strategies.

     10. Explore methods to accommodate working adult students in applied engineering programs.

     11. Market programs to non-completers of engineering programs at four year institutions. Create career
         pathways that accommodate this marketing strategy.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   42
Program Area: Arts & Sciences
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Liberal Arts Transfer                                                        Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           General Education                                                                     Liberal Arts Transfer
           International Education
           Internet Developer Certificate-IDC                                           Certificates (All types):
           Journalism Certificate                                                                   Internet Developer Certificate-IDC
           Technical Communications Certificate                                                     Journalism Certificate
                                                                                                    Technical Communications Certificate

                                                                                        Other Instructional Offerings:
                                                                                                   General Education
                                                                                                   International Education




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                      Arts & Sciences

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405     FY0506       FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                          11,310       11,415       11,270        12,130
       …% change from previous year                 ------      0.9%        -1.3%          7.6%
FTE                                                3,588        3,680         3,690        3,982                  8,882      8,932          8,878    9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      2.6%          0.3%         7.9%                    ------    0.6%          -0.6%     5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.5          9.7           9.8          9.8
        …% change from previous year                ------      1.6%          1.6%         0.3%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                   19.5%          20.2%         20.3%     21.6%
                                                           …% change from previous year                        ------         3.8%          0.3%      6.5%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                  40.4%          41.2%         41.6%     42.7%
                                                             …% change from previous year                      ------         2.0%          0.9%      2.7%


The largest area in terms of student enrollment at the College has a critical role to play in helping to develop both
knowledge workers and career pathways. The Core Abilities employers look for in employees have direct
connections to general education and the easy transferability of liberal arts courses builds academic bridges to
baccalaureate degree options. It is important to make certain the college transfer courses are available to support
the career pathways students will follow at Madison College. Further, this unit will play a critical role in the new
WTCS transition courses (called General College.) These developmental offerings as well as outreach like the
Writing Center and proposed Mathematics Center build bridges from developmental education to college level
academic work. That transition can have a profound affect on a student’s future economic well-being. This area
will also serve to prepare more and more students to enter four-year programs with pre-majors and other
transitions smoothing offerings leading to greater student transfer success. Arts & Sciences will also play an
important role in international education options and world language offerings. Continued enrollment growth
should be expected here.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                         43
Arts & Sciences Program Area Recommendations

     1. Provide critical support to career pathways models by offering coursework that prepares students to enter
        the next academic level of study, including skill building in professional communications.

     2. Consider building a writing across the curriculum program and/or a project based learning opportunities
        project to share best practices in developing writing, research, and critical thinking skills for knowledge
        workers.

     3. Build pre-major pathways with UW-Madison in transfer areas of highest demand.

     4. Create new courses in relevant areas and ensure the full transferability of those courses and all college
        transfer level courses.

     5. Create an Madison College plan to transition to WTCS General College developmental courses; include
        curriculum assessment, teaching strategies, and student performance parameters.

     6. Expand the writing centers at all campuses.

     7. Increase offerings in occupation related language education and allocate resources to support,
        coordinate, and lead that effort.

     8. Consider placement tests for world languages courses.

     9. Consider expanding foreign language offerings in strategic languages such as Arabic and Chinese.

     10. Expand flexible delivery options to support accelerated and online programs within Arts & Sciences and in
         other disciplines.

     11. Experiment with class size related strategies or other ways of increasing faculty-student contact with an
         eye towards greater levels of student success.

     12. Determine appropriate strategies to reduce class sizes in social science classes.

     13. Create a Math and Science Learning Center that can serve liberal arts students on and off Madison
         College campuses.

     14. Significant growth in Health related programming creates the need to increase natural science faculty and
         laboratory space.

     15. Lead the creation of interdisciplinary coursework especially in the natural sciences, pre-Engineering, pre-
         and pre-business.

     16. Offer interdisciplinary units in areas such as leadership, critical thinking, personal development, and
         cross-cultural communication. Build assessment strategies related to development of these “soft skills”.

     17. Investigate initiation of pre- major teacher education programming.

     18. Increase the number and availability of multi-media classrooms to enhance teaching strategies.

     19. Promote the integration of international programming through various strategies like the Global Studies
         Certificate.

     20. Expand advising resources devoted to transfer students at Madison College.

     21. Investigate methods to serve students who are on wait lists for Arts & Sciences courses.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       44
Program Area: Business & Information Technology
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Administrative Assistant                                                     Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Basic Medical Reception Skills Certificate                                               Administrative Assistant
           Broadcast Captioning                                                                     Broadcast Captioning
           Business Software Applications Specialist                                                IT–Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA)
           Essential Office Skills Certificate                                                      IT–Computer Systems Administration Specialist
           IT–Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA)                                           IT–Help Desk Support Specialist
           IT–CompTia A+ Computer Essentials Certificate                                            IT–Network Security Specialist
           IT–Computer Systems Administration Specialist                                            IT–Network Specialist
           IT–Help Desk Support Specialist                                                          IT–Programmer/Analyst
                                                                                                    IT–Web Analyst/Programmer
           IT–Information Security Certificate
                                                                                                    Judicial Reporting
           IT–LAMP Open Source Development Certificate                                              Medical Administrative Specialist
           IT-Mainframe Programming Certificate
           IT–Microsoft® Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA)                         One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Certificate                                                                              Business Software Applications Specialist
           IT–Microsoft® Visual Studio.NET Certificate                                              Medical Transcriptionist
           IT–Network Security Specialist                                               Certificates (All types):
           IT–Network Specialist                                                                    Basic Medical Reception Skills Certificate
           IT–Programmer/Analyst                                                                    Essential Office Skills Certificate
           IT-VOIP/Convergence Certificate                                                          IT–CompTia A+ Computer Essentials Certificate
           IT–Web Analyst/Programmer                                                                IT–Information Security Certificate
           IT–Web Programming Certificate                                                           IT–LAMP Open Source Development Certificate
           Judicial Reporting                                                                       IT-Mainframe Programming Certificate
           Medical Administrative Specialist                                                        IT–Microsoft® Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) Certificate
           Medical Transcriptionist                                                                 IT–Microsoft® Visual Studio.NET Certificate
           Microsoft® Office Certificates                                                           IT-VOIP/Convergence Certificate
           Project Management Certificate                                                           IT–Web Programming Certificate
           Website Development Certificate                                                          Microsoft® Office Certificates
                                                                                                    Project Management Certificate
                                                                                                    Website Development Certificate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                       Business & Information Technology
                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405              FY0506       FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           4,405        4,423         4,507        4,404
       …% change from previous year                 ------      0.4%          1.9%        -2.3%
FTE                                                   686          680          652          647                  8,882        8,932              8,878        9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -0.9%        -4.1%        -0.8%                    ------      0.6%              -0.6%         5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  4.7           4.6          4.3          4.4
        …% change from previous year                ------      -1.3%        -5.9%         1.6%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       7.6%         7.8%              8.1%          7.8%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------       3.3%              3.6%         -3.3%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      7.7%         7.6%               7.3%         6.9%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------      -1.4%              -3.5%        -5.6%


Both Business Technology and Information Technology enrollments should increase in the coming years. Business
Technology serves one of fastest growing occupational areas of office support, administrative assistant, medical support,
reporting services and other business support services. The low number of average credits for this program area is
reflective of the short-term programming students in this area require. The challenge is to build career pathways by putting
these short-term options together, while at the same time meeting the need for skilled workers in business support.
Information Technology is poised to grow enrollments again. This area is at once in the heart of the “gold collar” job
growth and at risk of continued outsourcing. Building knowledge workers is crucial for employers and employees in both
Business Technology and Information Technology.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                                    45
Business & Information Technology Program Area Recommendations

     1. Program area needs must inform a collaborative decision making process between academic programs
        and Information Technology Services in the planning and implementation for emerging technologies that
        are critical to support high level instruction in these areas.

     2. Continue to define and build career pathways for business support workers.

     3. Increase options to provide high quality, flexible, accessible courses to meet high demand for support
        workers and reporting workers.

     4. Construct curriculum plans for retraining workers who move into this high demand area with different skill
        sets.

     5. Build career pathways in information technology programs.

     6. Identify short term skill needs and serve incumbent and entry level workers with certificate offerings.

     7. Partner to create interdisciplinary coursework with business and organizational behavior offerings.

     8. Explore the need for offerings including business process analysis and business management.

     9. Enhance high level, soft skills training into curriculum for business support workers.

     10. Increase online options in Information Technology courses – especially for working professionals.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   46
Program Area: College Preparedness & Academic Advancement (CPAA)
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Adult Basic Education                                                        Other Instructional Offerings:
           Developmental Education                                                                 Adult Basic Education
           High School Options                                                                     Developmental Education
           English Language Learners (ELL)                                                         High School Options
           Individualized Technical Studies                                                        English Language Learners (ELL)
                                                                                                   Individualized Technical Studies




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                             College Preparedness & Academic Advancement
                                             Note: Headcount and FTE for FY0607 are not yet complete


                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405    FY0506     FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           5,670         5,599        5,944        5,653
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -1.3%         6.2%        -4.9%
FTE                                                   523          521          542          512                  8,882      8,932      8,878     9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -0.4%         4.0%        -5.5%                    ------    0.6%      -0.6%      5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  2.8          2.8           2.7          2.7
        …% change from previous year                ------      0.9%         -2.0%        -0.7%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       9.8%       9.9%      10.7%      10.1%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     1.6%       7.9%      -5.9%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      5.9%        5.8%        6.1%     5.5%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     -0.9%        4.7%   -10.1%


There is no more crucial area to serve the Madison College future population than CPAA. From building the most
basic skills for economic survival to offering transitional programming to highly paid and highly skilled technical
and health programs at Madison College, this unit is asked to do a great deal of the important work at the College.
It is expected that this program area’s headcount and FTE will continue to grow as a percentage of the College-
wide total. The focus on student transitions from basic education to college level programming will affect the
operations of this program area. The continuing increase in the number of international immigrants to the Madison
College district should cause a significant increase in ELL offerings. Finally, the growing number of disabled
students attending Madison College points to the need for a comprehensive plan to meet their needs.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                      47
College Preparedness & Academic Advancement Program Area Recommendations

     1. Continue to improve college practices in basic education, remedial, and developmental education to
        increase the number of students transitioning from those courses to credit programs, certificates and
        transfer courses.

     2. Address the barriers to access reflected in declining headcount in ELL instruction.

     3. Create a Madison College plan to transition to WTCS General College developmental courses; include
        curriculum assessment, teaching strategies, and student performance parameters.

     4. Continue the focus on student academic preparedness by doing the following:
                 a. Build better bridges with high school faculty and community based organizations to communicate
                    the preparedness levels needed to succeed in Madison College programs.
                 b. Fully implement the Mandatory Assessment Advising and Placement initiative, including the ABE
                    comprehensive assessments, and offer the appropriate assessments to District High School
                    students.
                 c.    Design programs specifically targeting young minority students at risk of lacking appropriate
                       academic preparation.
                 d. Link high-level ELL and ABE programming directly to occupational and transfer programs. Offer
                    pre-program student status to students enrolled in these courses – especially for those on
                    program wait lists.
                 e. Assess the effectiveness of high school completion options and programs.
                 f.    Continue curriculum articulation work between CPAAC and the other academic Centers.

     5. Recognize students enrolled in CPAAC courses as Madison College students.

     6. Build a comprehensive Learning Center, including outreach sites that can support all students in all
        programs. Assess the faculty and staff needs to support those Learning Center sites.

     7. Create more hybrid and online options for students in Adult Basic Education and ELL.

     8. Build a comprehensive master plan to support students with disabilities.
                 a. Use the principles of universal design in learning strategies and academic work product.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007        48
Program Area: Construction
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           ABC Electrical Apprenticeship                                                Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           ABC Sheet Metal                                                                       Technical Studies–Journeyworker
           Building Services
           Cabinetmaking & Millwork                                                     One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Carpentry (construction)                                                              Building Services
           Carpentry ABC                                                                         Cabinetmaking & Millwork
           Cement Mason                                                                          Construction & Remodeling
           Construction & Remodeling
           Electrical Construction (tech)                                               Apprenticeship Programs:
           Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning ABC                                          ABC Electrical Apprenticeship
           Ironworker Apprenticeship                                                              ABC Sheet Metal
           Painting and Decorating                                                                Carpentry (construction)
           Plastering Apprentice                                                                  Carpentry ABC
           Plumbing ABC                                                                           Cement Mason
           Residential Wirer Apprenticeship                                                       Electrical Construction (tech)
           Sheet Metal (construction)                                                             Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning ABC
           Sheet Metal (industrial)                                                               Ironworker Apprenticeship
           Steamfitting (construction)                                                            Painting and Decorating
           Steamfitting (service)                                                                 Plastering Apprentice
           Tech Brick                                                                             Plumbing ABC
           Tech Plumbing                                                                          Residential Wirer Apprenticeship
           Technical Studies–Journeyworker                                                        Sheet Metal (construction)
           Voice, Data, Video Installer/Technician                                                Sheet Metal (industrial)
                                                                                                  Steamfitting (construction)
                                                                                                  Steamfitting (service)
                                                                                                  Tech Brick
                                                                                                  Tech Plumbing
                                                                                                  Voice, Data, Video Installer/Technician




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                         Construction

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405    FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              583          560         660           696
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -3.9%       17.9%          5.5%
FTE                                                   110         125          141           156                  8,882      8,932       8,878     9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------     13.6%        12.8%         10.6%                    ------    0.6%       -0.6%      5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  5.7          6.7           6.4          6.7
        …% change from previous year                ------     18.3%         -4.3%         4.9%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       1.0%        1.0%      1.2%       1.2%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     -1.2%     19.8%       4.4%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      1.2%       1.4%       1.6%       1.7%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------    13.0%      13.5%       5.3%


This fast growing program area should expect even more dramatic growth in the future. The need for workers
related to construction is considered a top priority for economic development in the Madison College District. As
the older workers retire and construction needs continue to grow, there will be a labor shortage of skilled workers
who can design, construct, and repair the District infrastructure. Additionally, the changing technologies in the
workplace have increased the need for incumbent worker training in Construction areas.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                       49
Construction Program Area Recommendations

     1. Build bridges with refresher courses to support student success. Coursework needs to address academic
        preparedness, computer / technology literacy, and employability soft skills.

     2. Offer content-based English language instruction to individuals whose native language is not English.
        Courses should be offered to incumbent workers to insure workplace safety and to prospective students
        preparing for careers in the construction trades.

     3. Offer advanced training options beyond the one-year diploma programs currently available in
        Construction / Remodeling and Cabinetmaking & Millwork. (i.e. 2 year diploma or Advanced Technical
        Certificate in Finish Carpentry).

     4. Continue working with the Joint Apprenticeship Committees and Associated Builder’s and Contractors to
        clearly define apprenticeship career pathways for the construction trades.

     5. Develop new courses in construction management.

     6. Emphasize problem solving skills in construction curriculums.

     7. Develop offerings in emerging technologies such as lean construction, green building, computerized
        numerical control (CNC), renewable energy, and others.

     8. Encourage more cross disciplinary / cross cluster collaboration with other disciplines (i.e. Mechanical
        Design, Plastics, and Wood industries) in the development of new courses.

     9. Offer continuing education to serve contractor licensing needs. (Currently, plumbers are state-licensed,
        and work is in progress to require licensing for electricians and contractors. Continuing education is
        required for license renewal.)

     10. Employ alternative delivery strategies such as self-directed curriculum to better serve students.

     11. Serve working adult students using hybrid and online courses.

     12. Incorporate cultural competency into all construction trades curricula.

     13. Continue funding and staff support for efforts aimed at diversifying apprenticeship and workforce
         participation in construction. (i.e. Tools for Tomorrow, Construction Workforce Diversity Alliance, START
         program and others.)

     14. Provide enhanced support for students in programs, such as ELL assistance, tutoring, etc. to impact
         retention and success.

     15. Create facilities space to support expansion in construction training. All programs currently lack adequate
         facilities to meet student needs. Areas of highest priority are: construction, plumbing, painting, welding,
         and electrical.

     16. Explore more opportunities for live work projects with community partners such as Habitat for Humanity,
         Rebuilding Together, K-12 school districts with home building projects, etc.

     17. Encourage the use of shared faculty / facilities / equipment across program disciplines to maximize
         college resources.

     18. Seek ways to grow resources through grants, foundation fund-raising, partnerships, etc.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007      50
Program Area: Education
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Early Childhood Education                                                    Two-Year Associate Degrees:
                                                                                                 Early Childhood Education




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                           Education

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              266          178          178          164
       …% change from previous year                 ------     -33.1%         0.0%        -7.9%
FTE                                                    85           67           64           61                  8,882      8,932     8,878      9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------     -21.2%        -4.5%        -4.7%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%       5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.6        11.3          10.8         11.2
        …% change from previous year                ------     17.8%         -4.5%         3.4%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       0.5%        0.3%        0.3%     0.3%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------    -31.2%        1.6%    -8.8%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      1.0%        0.8%     0.7%        0.7%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------    -21.6%    -3.9%       -9.3%


Early Childhood Education is the only formal education offering at Madison College. The need for specialists in
early childhood has been demonstrated time and again to be a social good, and this Plan also demonstrates the
growing need for workers in childcare and social assistance occupations. The College should consider offering
other education related offerings. Education is the second largest industry by employment in the Madison College
District, yet less than one percent of our students are enrolled in the subject area. There is a great deal of
childcare and some early childhood education being offered through ACE that is not reflected in this data.
Enrollment in education related programming should increase at Madison College.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                      51
Education Program Area Recommendations

     1. Partner with high schools to create robust career pathways in early childhood education.

     2. Partner with Arts & Sciences to investigate pre-major teacher education programming.

     3. Offer more continuing education training to meet the needs created by greater regulation and
        accreditation of child care industry.

     4. Offer blended delivery options to align with workshop type offerings.

     5. Plan how to provide greater access to full-time workers and workers with children.

     6. Anticipate higher demand for child care administrator credential.

     7. Increase in demand for workers in this field will increase need for faculty and facilities space.

     8. Design offerings that recognize the need for bilingual workers.

     9. Expand locations for early childhood education district-wide by using contracted agencies spaces.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   52
Program Area: Hospitality
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Baking/Pastry Arts                                                           Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Barber/Cosmetologist                                                                  Culinary Arts
           Barber/Cosmetologist (Apprenticeship)                                                 Hotel & Restaurant Management
           Culinary Arts                                                                         Meeting & Event Management
           Destination Management Certificate                                                    Recreation Management: Activity/Fitness Leader
           Food Service Production                                                               Recreation Management: Facility Operations Specialist
           Health Club Technician Certificate
           Hotel & Restaurant Management
           Meeting & Event Management                                                   One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Meeting & Event Management Certificate                                                Baking/Pastry Arts
           Nail Technician Certificate                                                           Barber/Cosmetologist
           Recreation Management: Activity/Fitness Leader
           Recreation Management: Facility Operations Specialist                        Less-Than-One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
                                                                                                 Food Service Production

                                                                                        Apprenticeship:
                                                                                                  Barber/Cosmetologist (Apprenticeship)

                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    Destination Management Certificate
                                                                                                    Health Club Technician Certificate
                                                                                                    Meeting & Event Management Certificate
                                                                                                    Nail Technician Certificate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                          Hospitality


                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405    FY0506       FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              722          704          688          677
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -2.5%        -2.3%        -1.6%
FTE                                                   229          220          234          230                  8,882      8,932         8,878     9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -3.9%         6.4%        -1.7%                    ------    0.6%         -0.6%      5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.5           9.4        10.2         10.2
        …% change from previous year                ------      -1.5%         8.8%        -0.1%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       1.2%       1.2%          1.2%      1.2%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     0.3%         -0.7%     -2.6%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      2.6%        2.5%        2.6%       2.5%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     -4.5%        7.0%      -6.5%


Leisure, Hospitality, Culinary and Personal Services are big business in the Madison College District. As the
population ages, the demand for personal services increases, and the expectation of employees is that they be
multi-skilled. The Madison College Culinary and Baking/Pastry Arts programs serve an ever increasing number of
students returning to college to build a skill or fulfill a lifelong dream. Recreation and Facilities managers are in
demand throughout the District. Every data element about industries and occupations supports the prediction of
healthy continued growth in these industries.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                          53
Hospitality Program Area Recommendations

     1. Design career pathways through the Hospitality business, i.e. entry worker to manager.

     2. Determine how to serve the growing Latino population that is entering the hospitality related fields now.

     3. Emphasize the importance of communication skills throughout the hospitality areas; students need to
        learn excellent communication skills to compete effectively.

     4. Recognize and plan to include sustainable practices in hospitality industry training.

     5. Design appropriate career and training pathways for chefs, bakers, food service workers and other
        hospitality workers.

     6. Train bilingual personal care workers.

     7. Culinary facilities at Madison College Truax are outdated and must be remodeled.

     8. Investigate establishment of a full service hospitality facility to serve the community and train students.

     9. Modular curriculum and flexible delivery formats should be offered to serve working adult students.

     10. Offer training leading to professional certifications in appropriate areas.

     11. Integrate business training into program curriculum.

     12. Articulate with high schools and four year colleges/universities to build recognized pathways for meeting
         and event planners.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       54
Program Area: Human Services
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Human Services Associate                                                     Two-Year Associate Degrees:
                                                                                                 Human Services Associate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                      Human Services

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506    FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              138          132          143          160
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -4.3%         8.3%        11.9%
FTE                                                    62          65            62           67                  8,882      8,932     8,878    9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      4.8%         -4.6%         8.1%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%     5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                 13.5        14.8          13.0         12.6
        …% change from previous year                ------      9.6%        -12.0%        -3.4%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       0.2%        0.2%     0.3%     0.3%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     -1.6%    10.1%    10.7%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      0.7%       0.7%      0.7%     0.7%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     4.3%     -4.0%     2.8%


Social Assistance workers are expected to be the second highest growth occupation in Dane County and the first
in the rural counties. This program addresses a portion of that need. As the District population changes, the need
for human services workers that reflect that population change with it. This is an excellent area for Career
Pathways work as increasingly high credentials are needed for advancement. New certification requirements may
create a need for incumbent worker training.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                    55
Human Services Program Area Recommendations

     1. Build clear career pathway models from entry workers to graduate degrees.

     2. Recognize clear need for multiple language skills in human services professionals.

     3. Offer program specific and continuing education to meet emerging certifications in human services fields.

     4. Recognize time of day schedule variations may attract older working students.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   56
Program Area: Laboratory Sciences (Biotechnology & Electron Microscopy)
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Bioinformatics Certificate                                                   Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Biotechnology Intensive Post-baccalaureate Certificate                                Biotechnology Laboratory Technician
           Biotechnology Laboratory Technician                                                   Electron Microscopy
           Biotechnology Post-baccalaureate Certificate
           Electron Microscopy
                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    Bioinformatics Certificate
                                                                                                    Biotechnology Intensive Post-baccalaureate Certificate
                                                                                                    Biotechnology Post-baccalaureate Certificate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                  Laboratory Sciences

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405      FY0506         FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              121           88         103            99
       …% change from previous year                 ------     -27.3%       17.0%         -3.9%
FTE                                                    36           33          37            36                  8,882      8,932         8,878         9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -8.3%       12.1%         -2.7%                    ------    0.6%         -0.6%          5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  8.9        11.3          10.8         10.9
        …% change from previous year                ------     26.0%         -4.2%         1.2%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       0.2%        0.2%        0.2%            0.2%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------    -25.2%       18.9%           -4.9%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      0.4%        0.4%        0.4%            0.4%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     -8.8%       12.8%           -7.4%


The “bio-economy” is one of the most important emerging economic drivers in the District. Madison College
already has internationally recognized laboratory programs in biotechnology/bioinformatics and electron
microscopy. The offerings provided by these departments should be expanded and strengthened to continue to
meet the rapidly growing needs of the region’s biology and related industries. Workforce development grants have
already been secured to finance a major expansion of training for laboratory technicians in various steps on a
career pathway. The post-baccalaureate pathway seems a good fit for both of these offerings. The College also
needs some version of a general laboratory science pathway – perhaps with different specialty options.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                              57
Laboratory Sciences Program Area Recommendations

     1. Expand laboratory science technician training to meet anticipated needs in Bio-related industries.

     2. Design and offer post-baccalaureate training in Electron Microscopy.

     3. Design and offer career pathways for laboratory sciences technicians.

     4. Determine whether additional programming in Biotechnology related areas is needed.

     5. Integrate instruction in nanotechnology into appropriate program areas.

     6. Introduce business concepts such as total quality management in laboratory science curriculum.

     7. Provide background in the science of molecular sciences, genetics, and associated techniques to
        laboratory sciences students.

     8. Offer more flexible alternatives; hybrid and weekends may be best choice.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   58
Program Area: Manufacturing
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           CNC Specialist Certificate                                                   Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Custodial Services                                                                    Plastics Technology
           Electrician (industrial)
           Industrial Maintenance Technician                                            Two-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Injection Mold Set-Up                                                                 Industrial Maintenance Technician
           Machine Tooling Technics                                                              Machine Tooling Technics
           Machinist Apprenticeship
           Maintenance Mechanic/Millwright                                              One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Plastics Technology                                                                   Welding
           Tool and Die
           Welding                                                                      Less-Than-One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
                                                                                                 Custodial Services

                                                                                        Apprenticeship:
                                                                                                  Electrician (industrial)
                                                                                                  Injection Mold Set-Up
                                                                                                  Machinist Apprenticeship
                                                                                                  Maintenance Mechanic/Millwright
                                                                                                  Tool and Die

                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    CNC Specialist Certificate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                         Manufacturing

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           1,257         1,174        1,174        1,336
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -6.6%         0.0%        13.8%
FTE                                                   241         246           208          205                  8,882      8,932     8,878      9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      2.1%        -15.4%        -1.4%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%       5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  5.8          6.3           5.3          4.6
        …% change from previous year                ------      9.3%        -15.4%       -13.4%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       2.2%        2.1%        2.1%    2.4%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     -3.9%        1.6%   12.6%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      2.7%       2.8%       2.3%       2.2%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     1.5%     -14.9%      -6.2%


Manufacturing is a crucial piece of the employment and economic development infrastructure in the District.
The question is not whether Madison College should have offerings in manufacturing; it is what should those
offerings be? More and more outsourcing, technological automation, and the need to operate in a lean
environment changed the nature of manufacturing work. Advanced manufacturing training stresses the need for
workers with problem-solving and critical thinking skills. The new and changing technologies increase the need for
workers to maintain the equipment. The emphasis on process improvement and statistical control demand
workers with more sophisticated knowledge of mathematical tools. All of these changes conspire to suggest
changes in this area that reflect the changing manufacturing environment. Incumbent workers need training;
manufacturers need trainers and facilities to train and experiment with product innovations. Madison College
could develop some significant partnerships in this important program area.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                      59
Manufacturing Program Area Recommendations

     1. Re-focus manufacturing related programming towards advanced manufacturing and determine how to
        make that programming available at all regional campus sites.

     2. Address space and facilities challenges related to expanding training options in manufacturing-related
        programs.

     3. Build career pathways in manufacturing related programs – focus on modularized instruction.

     4. Build self-paced curriculum opportunities and student support systems to complement them.

     5. Recognize the higher skill levels demanded from manufacturing workers – need for incumbent worker
        training is increasing.

     6. Partner with manufacturers in training and even in new product development.

     7. Offer more blended/online courses to meet the needs of incumbent workers.

     8. Obtain modern manufacturing cells with robotic machines and labs for motor controls, electronics, and
        industrial maintenance.

     9. Recognize that facilities and equipment issues at Truax campus are critical; in present configuration there
        is no room to expand and equipment is not up to date.

     10. Integrate curriculum for common technical skills (such as electronics or alternative fuels) across programs
         and program areas.

     11. Build customized bridges for ELL students to manufacturing curriculum.

     12. Build curriculum to incorporate manufacturing core abilities skills into programs.

     13. Offer instruction in lean manufacturing and six sigma quality.

     14. Offer programs in non-traditional class times and hours.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   60
Program Area: Nursing & Health-Related
Programs & Offerings                                         By Degree Type
                                                             Two-Year Associate Degrees:                                    Certificates (All types):
           Advanced Medical Coding                                        Associate Degree Nursing
           Specialist                                                                                                                   Mammography Certificate
                                                                          Clinical Laboratory Technician                                Polysomnography
           Associate Degree Nursing                                       Dental Hygienist
           CBRF Caregiver                                                 Dietetic Technician
           Clinical Laboratory Technician                                 Occupational Therapy Assistant                    Other Instructional Offerings:
           Dental Assistant                                               Optometric Technician                                         Medication Assistant
           Dental Hygienist                                               Physical Therapist Assistant                                  Patient Care Assistant
           Dietetic Technician                                            Radiography                                                   Phlebotomy
           Health Unit Coordinator                                        Respiratory Therapist                                         Restorative & Rehabilitation
                                                                                                                                        Therapy Aide
           Language Interpreter for Health
           Services                                          One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Mammography Certificate                                        Advanced Medical Coding
           Medical Assistant                                              Specialist
           Medical Coding Specialist                                      Medical Assistant
           Medication Assistant                                           Practical Nursing
                                                                          Surgical Technologist
           Nursing Assistant
           Occupational Therapy Assistant
                                                             Less-Than-One-Year Technical Diploma
           Optometric Technician
                                                             Degrees:
           Patient Care Assistant                                         CBRF Caregiver
           Phlebotomy                                                     Dental Assistant
           Physical Therapist Assistant                                   Health Unit Coordinator
           Polysomnography                                                Language Interpreter for Health
           Practical Nursing                                              Services
           Radiography                                                    Medical Coding Specialist
           Respiratory Therapist                                          Nursing Assistant
           Restorative & Rehabilitation                                   Therapeutic Massage
           Therapy Aide
           Surgical Technologist                                   (continued in next column)
           Therapeutic Massage



                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                Nursing & Health-Related
                                                              Program Area                                                        Collegewide
                                                 FY0304        FY0405         FY0506       FY0607            FY0304               FY0405           FY0506         FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           3,100         3,120          3,142        3,527
       …% change from previous year                 ------       0.6%           0.7%        12.3%
FTE                                                   690          729             694         777                8,882              8,932           8,878             9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------       5.7%           -4.8%       12.0%                  ------            0.6%           -0.6%              5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  6.7           7.0             6.6          6.6
        …% change from previous year                ------       5.0%           -5.5%        -0.3%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       5.3%               5.5%               5.7%        6.3%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------             3.5%               2.3%       11.1%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      7.8%               8.2%            7.8%              8.3%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------             5.1%           -4.2%              6.5%

The Health area is projected to have the greatest need for employment in the foreseeable future. Almost every program
area Madison College offers should see growth. In order to meet these needs clear career pathways need to be laid so
workers can simultaneously work and prepare for advancement into the next level of medical profession. Excellent
starts have already been made here in Nursing related programming. Additionally the demographic changes dictate that
older workers will need to be recruited to fill needs in some key areas. Alternative scheduling and delivery will help meet
that need.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                                           61
Nursing & Health-Related Program Area Recommendations

     1. Significant growth requires expansion of facilities, recruitment of qualified faculty, and increased clinical
        placement opportunities.

     2. Partner to construct new health care training centers and clinical facilities with local health care training
        community.

     3. Construct career pathways in health related associate degree programs, e.g. Phlebotomy→CLT→CLS.

     4. Expand Nursing Assistant and Medical Assistant enrollment at all campus locations.

     5. Engage in a focused effort to diversify the faculty and students engaged in health care programming.

     6. Increase enrollment to meet demand in the following health related fields that show a shortage of workers
        now and projections for the shortage to increase in the future:
                 a.    Advanced Medical Coding
                 b.    Associate Degree Nursing
                 c.    Clinical Laboratory Technician
                 d.    Dental Assistant
                 e.    Medical Assistant
                 f.    Medical Coding Specialist
                 g.    Nursing Assistant
                 h.    Occupational Therapy
                 i.    Physical Therapy Assistant
                 j.    Practical Nursing
                 k.    Respiratory Therapist
                 l.    Surgical Technologist

     7. Increase the number and availability of multi-media classrooms and student access to computers to
        effectively teach new technologies.

     8. Build more interdisciplinary opportunities between Health programs and between other disciplines e.g.,
        Clinical Lab Tech and Biotechnology.

     9. Partner with the District health care community to make full use of simulators and health care training
        centers.

     10. Investigate offerings in Integrated Medicine blending traditional and complementary medical training.

     11. Offer refresher courses and continuing education for medical professionals across all health related
         occupations.

     12. Cross train health care workers to be more marketable in smaller hospitals.

     13. Expand weekend, evening, accelerated, part-time and non-traditional offerings.

     14. Employ new student success strategies to serve ELL students and other recent immigrants.

     15. Facilities must be open longer hours on weekends to serve continuing education students and new
         markets of working adult students.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007         62
Program Area: Protective Services & EMS
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Criminal Justice–Law Enforcement                                             Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Criminal Justice–Law Enforcement Academy                                              Criminal Justice–Law Enforcement
           Emergency Medical Technician–Basic (EMT-B)                                            Fire Protection Technician
           Emergency Medical Technician–Intermediate Technician                                  Paramedic Technician (2-year)
           (EMT-Intermed. Tech.)
           Emergency Medical Technician–Paramedic
           Fire Protection Technician                                                   One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Fire Service Certification                                                            Criminal Justice–Law Enforcement Academy
           Motorcycle Driving                                                                    Emergency Medical Technician–Basic (EMT-B)
           Paramedic Technician (2-year)                                                         Emergency Medical Technician–Intermediate Technician
                                                                                                 (EMT-Intermed. Tech.)
                                                                                                 Emergency Medical Technician–Paramedic
                                                                                                 Fire Service Certification

                                                                                        Other Instructional Offerings:
                                                                                                   Motorcycle Driving




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                              Protective Services & EMS

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              972          925          919          989
       …% change from previous year                 ------      -4.8%        -0.6%         7.6%
FTE                                                   308          296          308          302                  8,882      8,932     8,878      9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -3.9%         4.1%        -1.9%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%       5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  9.5          9.6         10.1           9.2
        …% change from previous year                ------      1.0%          4.7%        -8.9%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       1.7%        1.6%        1.7%    1.8%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     -2.1%        1.0%    6.5%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      3.5%        3.3%        3.5%     3.2%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     -4.4%        4.7%    -6.7%


Emergency Preparedness training has become the duty of the nation’s community and technical colleges. This
program area needs to take the lead in driving this programming across the College. Continuing needs to
increase the numbers of protective service personnel and emergency medical technicians will drive enrollment
growth in this program area. Serious issues with existing facilities are holding back even more growth in training
for emergency preparedness and protective services.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                         63
Protective Services Program Area Recommendations

     1. Create an emergency preparedness/homeland security training unit that uses expertise in disciplines
        throughout the College.

     2. Address serious facilities and equipment issues associated with increasing and modernizing protective
        services and emergency preparedness training.

     3. Create evening sections of criminal justice training.

     4. Create career pathways in associate degree programs.

     5. Investigate offering associate degree in Paramedic.

     6. Provide career pathways options offering EMT Basic or Paramedic programming to Nursing students and
        creating pathways for EMT students to health care careers.

     7. Offer flexible delivery alternatives to meet continuing education requirements of protective services
        professionals.

     8. Address need for professional EMS workers as Wisconsin transitions from volunteer EMS to varied EMS
        careers.

     9. Establish up-to-date simulation labs.

     10. Plan to serve greater numbers of students as protective services curriculum cross trains fire and law
         enforcement students in beginning EMT.

     11. Determine role of alternative delivery in serving incumbent EMS workers for continuing training.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   64
Program Area: Safety Education
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Group Dynamics                                                               Other Instructional Offerings:
           Multiple Offender                                                                       Group Dynamics
           Responsible Beverage Server                                                             Multiple Offender
           Traffic Safety                                                                          Responsible Beverage Server
           Under Age Alcohol and Other Drug Education                                              Traffic Safety
                                                                                                   Under Age Alcohol and Other Drug Education




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                     Safety Education

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506     FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                           5,963         5,326        4,435        3,748
       …% change from previous year                 ------     -10.7%       -16.7%       -15.5%
FTE                                                    65          66            60           54                  8,882      8,932     8,878     9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      1.5%         -9.1%       -10.0%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%      5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  0.3          0.4           0.4          0.4
        …% change from previous year                ------     13.7%          9.2%         6.5%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                   10.3%           9.4%      8.0%      6.7%
                                                           …% change from previous year                        ------        -8.1%    -15.4%    -16.4%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      0.7%       0.7%      0.7%       0.6%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     1.0%     -8.5%     -14.4%


The enrollment in this area is largely dictated by state laws and the judicial system. Most of the offerings are
court-ordered or are required by law. This area serves many District residents with very little staff and a dedicated
faculty. The College needs to give more thought to how to continually improve the access to important offerings in
this area throughout the District.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                     65
Safety Education Program Area Recommendations

     1. Expand class schedule alternatives throughout the District.

     2. Address scheduling classroom practices related to scheduling classes at all campuses.

     3. Build stronger partnerships with appropriate agencies in the regional campus areas.

     4. Determine need for new course offerings in Safety Education.

     5. Expand recruitment of part time instructors.

     6. Determine whether to add a full-time instructor position.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   66
Program Area: Transportation
Programs & Offerings                                                                    By Degree Type
           Agricultural Equipment Technology                                            Two-Year Associate Degrees:
           Auto Collision Repair & Refinish Technician                                           Agricultural Equipment Technology
           Auto Collision Repair & Refinishing Technician                                        Automotive Technology
           Automotive Custom Painting Certificate                                                Diesel Equipment Technology
           Automotive Technician
           Automotive Technology                                                        Two-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
           Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician                                                   Auto Collision Repair & Refinishing Technician
           Diesel Equipment Technology                                                           Automotive Technician
           Motorcycle, Marine & Outdoor Power Products Technician                                Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician

                                                                                        One-Year Technical Diploma Degrees:
                                                                                                 Auto Collision Repair & Refinish Technician
                                                                                                 Motorcycle, Marine & Outdoor Power Products Technician

                                                                                        Certificates (All types):
                                                                                                    Automotive Custom Painting Certificate




                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                        Transportation

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405      FY0506      FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                              375         389           400          426
       …% change from previous year                 ------      3.7%          2.8%         6.5%
FTE                                                   212         227           231          243                  8,882      8,932        8,878      9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      7.1%          1.8%         5.2%                    ------    0.6%        -0.6%       5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                 17.0        17.5          17.3         17.1
        …% change from previous year                ------      3.2%         -1.0%        -1.2%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                       0.6%       0.7%            0.7%    0.8%
                                                           …% change from previous year                           ------     6.7%            4.5%    5.4%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      2.4%       2.5%            2.6%    2.6%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     6.5%            2.4%    0.1%


The Transportation area is in the midst of some fundamental changes in technology and in expectations of its
workforce. Steady gains in enrollment demonstrate the growing demand for workers in this area. The changing
technology in motor vehicles provides challenges for incumbent worker training, faculty professional development,
and facilities and equipment housing. There are shortages of workers in the field now and these shortages will
grow over time – especially in more rural areas. Transportation, renewable energy, electronics, and business are
prime candidates for inter-disciplinary offerings. Continued enrollment growth should be expected.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                           67
Transportation Program Area Recommendations

     1. Recognize the increasing importance of core ability skills in worker success in the transportation industry.

     2. Build new faculty expertise and cross-discipline instruction in alternative fuels, electronics, and other
        emerging areas.

     3. Build learn to learn and research skills so workers can keep up with ever changing technology.

     4. Create career pathways for transportation workers.

     5. Determine how to expand auto technician programming to evening and weekend hours.

     6. Integrate business skills into transportation programs.

     7. Solve facilities and space issues that restrain customized training growth.

     8. Offer part-time program sections in evenings and weekends.

     9. Consider bilingual instruction in Spanish.

     10. Determine how to increase growth rates in alternative delivery strategies.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007     68
Program Area: Adult Continuing Education (ACE)
Programs & Offerings
Includes non-degree credit courses in aid codes 42, 47, 60 – excluding
Safety Education (See separate listing for Safety Education)



                                                             Student Enrollment Trends
                                                              Adult Continuing Education

                                                              Program Area                                                  Collegewide
                                                 FY0304       FY0405       FY0506        FY0607              FY0304         FY0405   FY0506    FY0607
Headcount (unduplicated)                          17,616       17,105       16,632        16,262
       …% change from previous year                 ------     -2.9%        -2.8%         -2.2%
FTE                                                   384          360          353          352                  8,882      8,932     8,878    9,331
          …% change from previous year              ------      -6.3%        -1.9%        -0.3%                    ------    0.6%     -0.6%     5.1%
Average Credits Enrolled Per Student                  0.7           0.6          0.6          0.6
        …% change from previous year                ------      -3.4%         0.8%         2.0%


                                        Program Area Headcount as a % of Collegewide Total:                   30.3%          30.3%    29.9%     29.0%
                                                           …% change from previous year                        ------        -0.1%    -1.2%     -3.2%
                                               Program Area FTE as a % of Collegewide Total:                      4.3%        4.0%     4.0%      3.8%
                                                             …% change from previous year                         ------     -6.8%    -1.3%     -5.1%


This program area represents not only ACE but all types of continuing education (low credit offerings) and
community services (no state aids) offerings. The primary units that offer these classes are ACE and BICS.
Headcount continues to shrink, but has not changed much as a relative percentage of headcount served at the
College. This area continues to make meaningful contributions to the FTE at the College in spite of declining
enrollments. Recommendations are for a closer alignment of offerings between ACE and BICS.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                    69
Adult & Continuing Education Program Area Recommendations

     1. Standardize ACE curriculum throughout the District.

     2. Align ACE and BICS functions to provide a clear economic and workforce development training portfolio
        of offerings.

     3. Determine appropriate service level (offerings, enrollment, pricing, etc.) for ACE “lifelong learning” course
        offerings.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007     70
Program Area: Business, Industry, and Community Services (BICS)
Programs & Offerings                                                                    Technical Assistance Services:
                                                                                        Occupational Testing
Customized Training services offered in:                                                Test Proctoring
Leadership and Supervision                                                              Document Translation
Manufacturing                                                                           Survey Development
Health                                                                                  Employee Skill Assessment
Computer Technology Applications                                                        Workplace Educational Skill Analyses
Quality
Adult Basic Education                                                                   Note: This is not an all inclusive list.
English Language Learners (ELL)
Occupational Spanish

Career Pathways Training Services
Employability Skills
Biotechnology and Laboratory Sciences
Manufacturing
Healthcare
Career Mapping



                                                          Student Enrollment Trends
                                                Business, Industry, and Community Services




                   UNDER CONSTRUCTION • DATA MINING




BICS provides educational services directly to business and industry using a customized, just-in-time training
approach. Additionally, BICS is the College leader in workforce development initiatives. That combination of
services makes BICS a vital part of the work of the College. BICS depends on the support and collaboration of all
the other Learner Success units at the College to complete its mission. This unit has played a leadership role in
Madison College’s design and implementation of career pathways. The College needs to take the next step in this
progression – that is to truly integrate the career pathways work BICS is doing and the customized training work it
does day to day with the work of the rest of Learner Success.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                    71
Business, Industry, and Community Services Program Area Recommendations

     1. Form career pathways teams including BICS representatives, faculty, and administrators to build
        complete pathways for specific identified industries that demonstrate clear paths to advancement for
        students.

     2. Align ACE and BICS functions to provide a clear economic and workforce development training portfolio
        of offerings.

     3. Build stronger partnerships with the Learner Success Centers to serve more incumbent workers.

     4. Expand non-credit topic-specific courses around the entire District in collaboration with ACE.

     5. Create specific enrollment targets for 38.14 and 38.24 offerings.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   72
Program Area: Learner Development
Programs & Offerings




                                                          Student Enrollment Trends
                                                                  Learner Development




                   UNDER CONSTRUCTION • DATA MINING




Support for students aiming to achieve their educational goals is an essential element that provides the
foundation for all Madison College academic programming and services. The Madison College Learner Success
services plans provide for orientations, advising, assessment, and placement, career services, tutoring, academic
support, and other specialized student support systems. Student Life guides students' educational growth,
providing them with opportunities to apply what they've learned in the classroom or challenging them to explore
new possibilities through participation in student clubs, newspapers, the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, Student
Senate, and many other experiences that promote leadership and a sense of College community. Athletics plays
a key role in offering learning experiences that complement academic studies. The emphasis in this area is on
flexibility in services and programming, creating safe accessible and welcoming learning environments, creating a
meaningful college experience for students, and creating health and wellness support to enhance student
success




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   73
Learner Development Program Area Recommendations

     1. Create flexible programs, services and classes that reflect diverse learner needs.
                 a. Learner Development staff will create and enhance virtual student support services to students
                    and the community in face-to-face, online and other various delivery options and workshops.
                 b. Flexible learning options will be explored, created and delivered.
                 c.    Teaching methods will ensure the learner is engaged in all Learner Development courses.
                 d. Information literacy is addressed as a learning competency for students.
                 e. Universal design pedagogy will be infused into teaching and offerings.

     2. Through collaboration encourage the creation of secure, safe, accessible, and welcoming learning
        environments that will enhance student success.
                 a. Strategies and action plans will be developed to meet the physical space needs that support and
                    enhance the student learning environment.
                 b. Environments (physical and virtual) will foster a sense of community.
                 c.    Creation of Learner Success Centers which provides one-stop academic support for students.
                 d. Virtual services/environments will be secure, and education will be provided to learners in order to
                    support their use of these technologies.

     3. Continue to develop and implement programs and services which foster a meaningful college experience.
                 a. Assess and improve the first year of college experience to enhance the learner’s ability to
                    succeed.
                 b. Develop comprehensive career services (career exploration and employment services) which will
                    be available to and support all students, regardless of location.
                 c.    Provide integrated and comprehensive advising services including development of college
                       transfer center.
                 d. Support pre-college and transitional programming that enables career growth in students through
                    meaningful pathways.
                 e. Provide comprehensive retention programs that address non-academic services which foster
                    student success.

     4. Create health and wellness programs and services which support the retention and success of students.
                 a. Host a college summit to discuss student health care and wellness trends and needs.
                 b. Create strategies and action plans to enhance wellness and health education activities for
                    students throughout the district.
                 c.    Explore student health insurance options and identify multiple coverage plans that support
                       students financial and heath care needs.
                 d. Pursue community partnerships that create health and dental clinics for Madison College
                    students.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007       74
Index of Figures and Tables


Figures                                                                                                                                                                   Page
Figure 1:        Madison College District Counties and Designations ............................................................................................. 4
Figure 2:        Madison College Enrollment as a Percentage of District Adult Population............................................................. 5
Figure 3:        Madison College District 2006-2011 Age Distribution............................................................................................. 5
Figure 4:        Madison College Enrollment FTE 2005-2006 Age Distribution............................................................................... 6
Figure 5:        Madison College 2006 District Median Age & Ethnicity .......................................................................................... 7
Figure 6:        2000 Population 25+ by Educational Attainment .................................................................................................... 8



Tables                                                                                                                                                                    Page
Table 1:         Population Growth Rates........................................................................................................................................ 4
Table 2:         Projected Demographic Changes by Race and Ethnicity Across the Madison College District.............................. 6
Table 3:         Median Wages and Shares of the Workforce by Education, Wisconsin and U.S., 2005 ........................................ 9
Table 4:         Percentage of Completed Credits – “C or Better” ................................................................................................. 18
Table 5:         Percent of Disabled Students by High School District 2006-2007 ........................................................................ 18
Table 6:         Number of Degree-Credit Students Enrolled in Selected Flexible Learning Options ............................................ 21
Table 7:         Top 5 Industries by Employment, Average Earnings and County Designation..................................................... 23
Table 8:         2004-2014 Projected Job Growth by Industry • Dane County .............................................................................. 24
Table 9:         2004-2014 Projected Job Growth by Industry • Rural/Urban Pressure Counties.................................................. 24
Table 10:        2004-2014 Projected Job Growth by Industry • Rural Counties............................................................................ 25
Table 11:        Estimated Employment Change (Job Losses) by Industry through 2014 ............................................................. 25
Table 12:        Estimated Employment Change (Growth) by Industry through 2014.................................................................... 25
Table 13:        2004-2014 Occupational Growth • Dane County .................................................................................................. 28
Table 14:        2004-2014 Occupational Growth • Rural/Urban Pressure Counties ..................................................................... 29
Table 15:        2004-2014 Occupational Growth • Rural Counties ............................................................................................... 29
Table 16:        Statewide Occupation Growth 2004-2014 ............................................................................................................ 30
Table 17:        Unduplicated Headcount & FTE Trends by Program Area ................................................................................... 32
Table 18:        Unduplicated Headcount Percentage by Program Area ....................................................................................... 33
Table 19:        FTE Percentage by Program Area........................................................................................................................ 34




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007                                                                75
References


United States (U.S.) Census 2000. http://www.census.gov/.

Center on Wisconsin Strategies (COWS.) July 2006. Seeds of Workforce Change – A Regional Approach to
        Improving our Economic Landscape in Southwest and Southcentral Wisconsin. Madison, WI: Center on
        Wisconsin Strategies (COWS.)

Center on Wisconsin Strategies (COWS.) November 2006. Back to Basics – Strengthening Adult Basic Education
        in Wisconsin. Madison, WI: Center on Wisconsin Strategies (COWS.)

Dresser, Laura, and Joel Rogers. 2006. The State of Working Wisconsin 2006. Madison, WI: Center on
       Wisconsin Strategies (COWS.)

Friedman, Thomas L. 2006. The World is Flat – A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century. New York: Farrar,
       Straus and Giroux.

Jenkins, Davis, and Christopher Spence. October 2006. The Career Pathways How-To Guide. New York:
        Workforce Strategy Center.

Lumina Foundation for Education. “What We Know About Access, Persistence, and Success for Adult Learners in
       Postsecondary Education: A Review of Contemporary Literature.” http://www.luminafoundation.org/.

Lumina Foundation for Education. “What We Know About Access and Success in Postsecondary Education.”
       http://www.luminafoundation.org/.

Madison Area Technical College (Madison College.) February 2006. Planning for the Future – Enrollment
       Management Plan. Madison, WI: Madison Area Technical College.

McIntrye, Chuck. September 2005. Market Research & Enrollment Management at Madison Area Technical
        College – Scenarios and Simulations. Sacramento, CA: Computer-Aided Planning.

Wisconsin Association for Biomedical Research and Education. BioScience 2006. Executive Summary.
       www.wabre.org/.

Wisconsin PK-16 Leadership Council. PK-16 Goals. “Student Transitions: The Senior Year of High School.”
       http://www.wisconsin.edu/pk16/senior.htm.

Wisconsin Technology Network. “Wisconsin Labor Shortage on the Horizon.” June 13, 2003.
       www.wistechnology.com.

Wonacott, Michael E. “Gold-Collar Workers.” ERIC Digest. http://www.ericdigests.org/2003-2/gold.html.




Note:      Appendix, reference, and other resource documents are available in the Learner Success /
           Associate Vice-President’s Office, Room 245C, Madison Area Technical College, 3550 Anderson Street,
           Madison, WI 53704.




Madison Area Technical College Academic Plan • Meeting the Needs of the Madison College District • October 2007   76

								
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