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Iditarod Dream (PowerPoint)

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					Alaska State Capital:
Juneau (population of about 31,262) the only state capital is
the US with no road access. It can only be reached by air or
sea. Learn more about Juneau, Alaska.

Alaska State Population: 626,932

Alaska Area: 586,412 sq. mi. - two and
a half times larger than Texas.

Motto: North to the Future - created to represent Alaska as a land
of promise. more...

Territory: 1912
Entered the Union: 49th state on
January 3rd, 1959
Iditarod Dream
   Iditarod XXXIV starts
        on Saturday,
      March 4th, 2006
“There’s Gold In
Them Hills”
Gold rushes were a major
part of Alaska history
beginning in the 1880's.
     GOLD RUSH of 1909


The last full-scale, old-
fashioned, frontier-style
gold rush in the United
States roared into life in
1909 at Iditarod, 629 trail
miles west of the future site
of Anchorage and half way
to Nome.
    TRANSPORTATION
• Travel was difficult for most of the
  year due to very cold
  temperatures and snowy
  conditions.

• By 1910, the need for year-round
  mail and freight service to the
  miners in western Alaska led the
  Federal government to survey and
  construct a winter trail from
  Seward to Nome for use by dog
  sled teams.

• Thus becoming- the Iditarod Trail.
Month of the Year   Types of Travel
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
The Iditarod Trail, now a
National Historic Trail,
• Had its beginnings as a mail and
  supply route from the coastal towns
  to the interior mining camps. Mail
  and supplies went in. Gold came
  out. All via dog sled. Heroes were
  made, legends were born.


• In 1925, part of the Iditarod Trail
  became a life saving highway for
  epidemic-stricken Nome. Diphtheria
  threatened and serum had to be
  brought in; again by intrepid dog
  mushers and their faithful hard-
  driving dogs.
           Dog Power

• The typical traveler on the Iditarod
  was a musher driving a team of
  twenty or more dogs pulling a
  massive freight sled capable of
  carrying half a ton or more.
              ½ ton = 1,000 pounds
              That is approximately
              50 pounds per dog.
         Why Dogs and Not Horses?
• Dog teams were practically the only way to reliably move
  across long distances in Alaska when river travel was not
  possible.

• Dogs were ideally suited for winter travel for a number of
  reasons.

• Pound for pound, the sled dog is the most powerful draft
  animal on earth, and a team of twenty dogs averaging perhaps
  75 pounds each can easily match a team of horses weighing
  more than twice as much.
          WINNER

                              vs
DOGS RULE…
HORSES DROOL

Dogs are faster than horses over
the long haul.


Capable of maintaining average
speeds of eight to twelve miles
an hour for hundreds of miles
(including rest stops)


Can exceed twenty miles an
hour or more on shorter sprints


Heavy draft animals cannot use
the snow packed winter trails.
         YMMM DINNER!!!
• Even better, dogs can be fed from the land
  with moose, fish, or caribou in the winter,
  while horses or oxen require expensive
  hay or grain.
DOGS ARE AN INTEGRAL
(IMPORTANT) PART OF THE
IDITAROD DREAM…

   WITHOUT THEM- THE
   MUSHER WOULD BE
   WALKING INSTEAD OF
         RIDING…
CARE OF THE DOGS
PAW CARE

Sixteen dogs. Sixteen dogs with four feet each,
each foot needing protection: 16 x 4= 64 booties per
Iditarod dog team.

Of course, that’s just for one wearing. Booties have
a tendency to get lost, have holes poked in them, or
get wet, necessitating repeated changes along the
1,049 mile Iditarod Trail. Most mushers will use
anywhere from 1500 to 2500 booties per race. At a
minimum of a dollar a bootie, that adds up fast.
                        $$$$$
ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU HAVE
 SMART DOGS LIKE THIS 




 In Nome, some dogs help out by
    showing how skilled they can
 become at taking off their booties.
   This is just one of the reasons
   mushers carry extras although.
Weather
  Click on the map for current weather
                forecasts.
Trail in Odd Years
Trail in Even Years
Overlay of Trails
The Most Common Question asked
         about the trail:
• Why does the trail go one way in even years
  (northern) and the other way in odd years
  (southern)?
Both sections of trail are a part of the Iditarod
National Historical Trail which was used in early
years for all winter travel. Dog sleds delivered the
mail, the preacher, the groceries and hauled out
gold and furs all the way to Anchorage or
Fairbanks.

During the early years of the Iditarod Race, the
mushers only traveled the northern trail. After
several years, the Iditarod Board of Directors
realized that the smaller villages were being
heavily impacted by the race coming through their
village year after year. It was decided to use both
sections of the trail.
This decision had a three fold effect. The
 northern villages of Ruby, Galena and
 Nulato only had to deal with the large
 group of mushers, press and volunteers
 every other year.

The second effect was that the race was
 able to pass through the actual ghost town
 of Iditarod.

Lastly, the villages of Shageluk, Anvik and
 Grayling were able to participate in the
 race.
     Jr. Iditarod XXIX, February 25-26, 2006




138 Mile Junior Iditarod Race
    Melissa Owens, winner of the
          2005 Jr. Iditarod




• Melissa won when she was just 15 years old and on
  her 2nd attempt in the Junior Iditarod Race.
Information and Picture References
 • http://welcometoalaska.com/juneau.htm
 • http://www.welcometoalaska.com/Pictures.
   htm
 • http://www.juneau.org/index.php
 • http://wallpapers.jurko.net/pic/1232/
 • http://images.google.com/images
 • www.iditarod.com

				
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