chesney by keralaguest

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									Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003




                                  6. Chesney
                                     Landscape
                                     Zone
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003

                                                   6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                            6.1 Chesney Landscape Zone description

Chesney Landscape zone (85,956 ha) is bounded to the east by the Goulburn
Broken CMA – North East CMA interface (north of Glenrowan), to the north by the
Moira-Delatite Shire boundary, Binney Road and Thoona–Boweya Road, to the west
by the Benalla–Tocumwal Road (which is included within the zone) and the Broken
River (between Benalla and Swanpool), and to the south (between Swanpool and
Glenrowan) by the interface of the plan area with the Central Victorian Uplands
bioregion.
Benalla and Glenrowan are major towns on the margins of the zone. Other townships
include Molyullah, Kilfeera, Goorambat, Devenish, Nooramunga and Thoona.
Delatite Shire is the Local Government Area overlying most of the zo ne, with
Wangaratta Rural City responsible for several easterly fragments and Moira Shire
covering only Rowan Swamp Wildlife Reserve, in the north (Map 21).
                                                   The alluvial plains and terraces of the
                                                   Victorian Riverina bioregion occupy 58,527
                                                   h a ( 6 8 % ) of t h e zo n e , o c c u r r i ng i n
                                                   association with the stream systems of the
                                                   Broken, Boosey, Blind, Holland and Ryan
                                                   Creeks, and the Broken River (LCC 1983,
                                                   1984). These streams provide all drainage
                                                   from the zone, in a predominantly north-west
                                                   direction. Lake Mokoan, a major off-stream
                                                   storage, is also located on the riverine plain of
                                                   the Broken River. The riverine plains here, as
                                                   in surrounding zones, have been very
                                                   extensively cleared of native vegetation.
                                                   Nevertheless, Chesney Landscape zone
                                                   overall retains a high level of biodiversity
                                                   significance, largely due to the attributes
                                                   contained within the rises of the Northern
                                                   Inland Slopes, which occupy the remaining
                                                   27,729 ha (32%) of the zone. Two main hill
                                                   complexes can be identified: the Chesney
                                                   Vale – Goorambat hills, which are
                                                   sedimentary in the south and granitic in the
                                                   north; and the Warby Range, a vast granitic
                                                   plateau with broad colluvial slopes (LCC
                                                   1983, 1984).
Pre-1750 vegetation cover on the plains and terraces of the Victorian Riverina
bioregion was primarily plains grassy woodland (e), with some pine box woodland /
riverina plains grassy woodland mosaic (e) in the Nooramunga–Devenish area and
other more localised valley, wetland and creekline EVCs along drainage lines (Map
25).
 Mokoan Swamp, prior to inundation, supported extensive wetland formation (e) and
plains grassy woodland / gilgai plain woodland / wetland mosaic (e). The latter EVC
also occurred in the Boweya area, in the north-east of the zone. These and other
wetland vegetation types (mostly dominated by River Red Gum and Grey Box) are
today represented mainly by linear remnants along drainage lines (notably floodplain
riparian woodland [v] along Holland Creek and Broken River) and roadsides (such as
gilgai plains woodland / wetland mosaic [e] along Blind Creek), or by mature trees
scattered across paddocks as individuals or in small clusters. Understorey, if present, is
generally heavily grazed or weed infested, or both.
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                            6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                            6.1 Chesney Landscape Zone description
                                                 (cont'd)

In contrast to the plains vegetation, the various hill formations of the Northern Inland
Slopes bioregion, although also extensively cleared, retain a number of substantial
public land remnants, the most prominent of these being contained within Warby
Range State Park and Mt Meg Flora and Fauna Reserve (Map 21). These reserves
retain much of the elevated granitic hills woodland (lc), grassy dry forest (d), heathy
dry forest (lc) and valley grassy forest (e) which occurred prior to settlement,
although the grassy woodland (e) which clothed the colluvial slopes below has
largely disappeared (Map 26). The vegetation on these reserves, and in associated
remnants on freehold and roadsides, still contains Blakely’s Red Gum, Red
Stringybark, various box species, White Cypress-pine, Lightwood and Drooping She-
oak, and continues to support a diverse biota, which includes Carpet Python,
Turquoise Parrot, Swift Parrot, Regent Honeyeater, Northern Sandalwood, Yellow
Hyacinth-orchid and Narrow Goodenia (Maps 28-30). (This is one of the most
important areas within the distribution of Narrow Goodenia, with respect to numbers
of plants present, these all be
The hills furthest to the
west in t he zone — at
Chesney Vale and north
of Chesney —formerly
supported box ironbark
forest (v) or box ironbark
forest / shrubby granitic-
outwash grassy
woodland mosaic (v), a
few patches of which
remain on freehold and
roadsides. Regent and
Painted Honeyeaters, as
well as Turquoise and
Swift Parrots, have been
r e c o r d e d f r om t h e se
remnants.
The sedimentary hills immediately to the south-east of the zone (in Central Victorian
Uplands bioregion) once carried numerous stands of box ironbark forest (Mugga,
Red Stringybark, box species and Blakely’s Red Gum). Although this area (Lurg
Hills) is now highly fragmented, it still contains many patches of good-quality habitat
on freehold, unused roads and roadsides (see Davidson 1996). Over the past
decade, this area has attracted much conservation interest and has seen extensive
voluntary community activity to retain its particular biodiversity values, which include
regular usage by Regent Honeyeater and occupation by numerous colonies of the
rapidly-declining Grey-crowned Babbler. The existence of these significant patches of
good-quality habitat undoubtedly has a positive influence upon biodiversity values
(particularly with respect to bird species) within nearby areas of Chesney Landscape
zone.
Environmental threats across the zone include chronic dieback of Blakely’s Red Gum
and other remnant trees, and there is a need to promote remnant retention and
revegetation to alleviate the effects of salinity recharge. Weed invasion, further
fragmentation of remnants, degradation of riparian vegetation and loss of floristic
diversity also threaten existing biodiversity values. The spread of Cinnamon Fungus is
a concern, especially in the Warby Range area (Davidson 1996).
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003

                                            6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                            6.1 Chesney Landscape Zone description
                                                 (cont'd)

Table 18. Total area of pre 1750 and extant EVCs in the Chesney Landscape
zone, within the Victorian Riverina bioregion
 Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                            6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                            6.1 Chesney Landscape Zone description
                                                 (cont'd)

Table 19. Total area of pre 1750 and extant EVCs in the Chesney Landscape
zone, within the Northern Inland Slopes bioregion




Table 20. Total area and number of current EVCs in each conservation status
in the Chesney Landscape zone.
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                           6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                           6.1 Chesney Landscape Zone description
                                                (cont'd)

Table 21. List of current threatened flora and their conservation status in the
Chesney Landscape zone (as at December 2002, NRE 2002c).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.1 Chesney Landscape Zone description
                                                  (cont'd)

Table 22. List of current threatened fauna and their conservation status in the
Chesney Landscape zone (as at December 2002, NRE 2002d).




Detailed maps showing the locations of Pre-1750 EVCs (Map 25), Current EVCs
(Map 26), EVC conservation status and public land (Map 27), threatened flora
(Map 28), threatened fauna (Map 29) and 1A threatened species and management
actions (Map 30) are at the end of this document.
For Threatened Biodiversity Assets, the codes used in brackets are:
 Conservation status Victoria - lower case, Australia - upper case; followed by
    BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa (1A, 2A, 2B, etc., or NR – not
     ranked).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.2 Chesney Landscape Zone priorities


6.2.1 Summary of priority biodiversity actions for Chesney Landscape Zone

    Protect and enhance existing biodiversity attributes of parks and reserves, giving
     priority to Warby Range State Park (A3) and Reference Area (B5); Mount Meg
     Flora & Fauna Reserve (G10); Rowan Swamp Wildlife Reserve (C28); and
     Bushland Reserves H93, 95, 97, 99 & 100 and *I69-70.
    Protect (possibly through Public Authority Management Agreement) a high-value
     section of Melbourne–Albury Railway reserve (6 ha), located west of Glenrowan.
    Improve protection and management of Public Land Water Frontage and key
     unreserved creeklines throughout the zone, giving priority to the Public Land and
     Water Frontage reserve on Boosey Creek between Rowan Swamp Wildlife
     Reserve and Thoona township, and on tributaries (Katamatite, Gnarite and
     Boughyard Creeks) of Boosey Creek. Support and encourage weed control and
     restoration of native vegetation on Public Land and Water Frontage and freehold
     creekline in Molyullah–Tatong area. Assist and promote landholder involvement to
     improve habitat management on freehold creekline frontage along Broken Creek,
     on the western margin of the zone.
    Protect and enhance roadside remnants of native vegetation, giving priority to
     those in the Chesney, Thoona and Bungeet areas, and around the margins of the
     Lurg Hills area. Ensure that maximum habitat protection is afforded all roadside
     remnants at known and likely sites of Grey-crowned Babbler and Squirrel Glider
     colonies, within the zone.
    Ensure that, subject to its primary function of water supply, Lake Mokoan irrigation
     storage is managed so as to sustain existing habitat values for native fish and
     waterbirds.
    Prevent further decline in biodiversity values of native vegetation due to domestic
     grazing on public land by removal or continued exclusion of stock, and fencing of
     relevant reserves where needed. Give priority to Warby Range State Park and
     RA; Mount Meg Flora and Fauna Reserve; Rowan Swamp Wildlife Reserve; all
     Bushland Reserves; all Public Land and Water Frontages on Boosey Creek
     system within the zone; Melbourne–Albury Railway reserve (Glenrowan); and
     high-value roadsides at Chesney, Thoona and Bungeet, and around the margins
     of the Lurg Hills area.
    Identify localised sites of high biodiversity value and provide appropriate
     protection and management. Select the most strategic sites around which to
     develop Local Area Plans, where appropriate. These plans would use vegetation
     restoration to expand and extend existing remnants across tenures, for the most
     effective biodiversity outcome. Priority sites include areas surrounding Warby
     Range State Park; Mount Meg Flora and Fauna Reserve; Rowan Swamp Wildlife
     Reserve; Bushland Reserves H93, 95, 97, 99 & 100 and *I69-70; all Public Land
     and Water Frontages on Boosey Creek system within the zone; Melbourne–Albury
     Railway reserve (Glenrowan); and high-value roadsides at Chesney, Thoona and
     Bungeet, and around the margins of the Lurg Hills area.
 With LGA, DSE, DPI and CMA, develop and implement a strategy to control the
  spread of Cinnamon Fungus.
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                           6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                           6.3 Private Land

Land Tenure Details:
This tenure includes all private land in the zone, with associated creeklines, and
occupies some 90% of the total zone area. Freehold in the extreme south
(Molyullah–Tatong area) occupies riverine plain country (Victorian Riverina bioregion)
with River Red Gum, box species and Red Stringybark, and tends to be either
entirely cleared, or with only widely-spaced trees remaining in paddocks. Drainage
lines are commonly unprotected from stock and tree cover is discontinuous.
Replanting of some creeklines and other areas has been undertaken (such as by
Molyullah–Tatong Land Protection Group). Extensive clearing on riverine freehold is
evident north of the Hume Freeway also. However, land associated with granitic hills
and outcrops (Northern Inland Slopes bioregion) tends to have greater persistence of
remnants (especially Blakely’s Red Gum, box species and White Cypress-pine),
often due largely to the additional protection from browsing stock provided to
regenerating native vegetation by the more rugged and rocky terrain. Creeklines too
tend to be less degraded on the rocky hills of the tenure than on riverine freehold.
Infestation with weeds (particularly St John’s Wort) and pasture grasses is an
additional threat to hill remnants, especially in regrowth areas where there is already
a depauperate understorey.
The entire length of Broken Creek, along the western margin of the zone, has been
identified by Robinson (1998b) as part of a ‘site of major conservation significance in
the eastern Northern Plains’. It is also part of a much longer drainage system
(‘Broken Creek’) which is listed (VIC036) in the Directory of Important Australian
Wetlands (EA 2001). Todd (1999) identified a 40-hectare freehold property
containing plains grassy woodland (e) at Nooramunga as warranting protective
status. Freehold remnants on fringing foothills in the Lurg–Glenrowan area are
especially important for conservation of Regent Honeyeater (Davidson 1996), a
critically endangered species. Granitic freehold sites at Chesney Vale and in the
upper reaches of Boosey Creek (near G10) are important for the endangered Yellow
Hyacinth-orchid and Northern Sandalwood, respectively.

Land Manager:
Private landholders

Stakeholders:
Key CMA, LGA, Lc, DSE, DPI, PV
Other TFN, LFW, BG, GAV, CVA, GNP, FNC, VAA, VFF
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                           6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                           6.3 Private Land (cont'd)

Threatened Biodiversity Assets (in brackets: Cons status Vic - lower case, Aust -
upper case; followed by BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa = 1A, 2B,
etc., or un - unassessed):
EVCs: Vegetation types formerly supported on freehold (pre-1750) on the riverine
plain (VR) of the zone included primarily plains grassy woodland (e), as well as pine
box woodland / riverina plains grassy woodland mosaic (e) (Nooramunga–Devenish
area), gilgai plain woodland / wetland mosaic (e), and a number of more localised
valley, wetland and creekline EVCs. In the more hilly NIS bioregion, granitic hills
woodland (lc) and grassy woodland (e) dominated the granitic substrates on freehold.
Today, an alarmingly small number of natural woodland remnants remain on freehold
in VR bioregion, although there is often still an abundance of large old trees
(predominantly River Red Gum and Grey Box) scattered across the heavily-grazed
farmland. Persistent patches of granitic NIS vegetation still commonly retain Blakely’s
Red Gum, Red Stringybark, Red Box, White Box or Long-leaved Box, as well as
occasional White Cypress-pine, Drooping She-oak or Yellow Box. Hills of
sedimentary origin (Central Victorian Uplands bioregion) immediately to the south-
east of the zone (between Kilfeera and Glenrowan) carried box ironbark forest (v),
and continue to support small but important patches of Mugga, Red Stringybark, box
species and Blakely’s Red Gum (Davidson 1996).


             Threatened flora: Yellow Hyacinth-orchid (e, 3A - NIS),
             Northern Sandalwood (e, 2B - NIS), Narrow Goodenia (Vv,
1A - NIS), Umbrella Grass (v, 1B), Western Silver Wattle (v,
4A - NIS), Common Fringe-sedge (v, unr - NIS), Plump
Windmill Grass (v, unr - VR), Mugga (r, unr - NIS), Flat-leaf
Bush-pea (r, unr - NIS), Small Chocolate-lily (k, unr - NIS).

Threatened fauna: Regent Honeyeater (Ecen, 2A - NIS),
  Intermediate Egret (cen, 3A - NIS), Swift Parrot (Ve, 1A - VR, 4A - NIS), Bush Stone-
 curlew (e, 1A - VR, 2A - NIS), Black Falcon (e, 1A - VR), Carpet Python (e, 3A - VR,
1B - NIS), Grey-crowned Babbler (e, 2A), Squirrel Glider (e, 3A), Great Egret (e, unr),
White-bellied Sea-eagle (e, unr - VR), Painted
Honeyeater (Rv, 1B - NIS), Nankeen Night
Heron (v, 1B - VR), Blue-billed Duck (v, 4B -
VR), Murray Cod (v, unr - VR), Golden Perch (v,
unr - VR), Speckled Warbler (v, unr - NIS),
Turquoise Parrot (ln, 3C - VR, 1C - NIS),
Barking Marsh Frog (dd, 3B - VR), Crimson-
spotted Rainbowfish (dd, 3B - VR), Lace Monitor
(dd, unr - NIS).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.3 Private Land (cont'd)

Recommended actions:
Protection of existing remnants:
 Assess all freehold remnants larger than 2 ha in the zone, giving priority to those
  sites identified as significant by Robinson (1998b), Todd (1999) or Davidson
  (1996) (see above under Land tenure), and use voluntary programs, incentives or
  planning controls, as appropriate, to protect biodiversity values.
 Continue to identify and monitor sites in Glenrowan area used by Regent
  Honeyeater for winter feeding and for breeding, and encourage and assist
  landholders to maintain this habitat.
    Highlight the need to protect habitats over 2 ha in extent at or near Grey-crowned
     Babbler or Squirrel Glider colonies, especially patches adjoining roadsides.
    Urge Shires to develop or upgrade local conservation strategies, including
     procedures for minimising clearing of remnants for subdivision (Davidson 1996).
 Adhere strictly to native vegetation retention controls, focusing particular effort on
  retaining large trees and woodlots near Grey-crowned Babbler or Squirrel Glider
  colonies, and on habitat regularly used by Regent Honeyeater.
    Ensure that Shire staff know locations and importance of freehold remnants
     having biodiversity values.
 Assist Shire to align any priority freehold remnants having strategic connective
  value or potential with roadside conservation plans.
    Protect and enhance status of unreserved stream frontages which connect or
     extend existing Public Land Water Frontage reserves on Boosey, Gnarite and
     Katamatite Creeks (Thoona area).
    Promote exclusion of stock from remnants (Davidson 1996).
 Assist Landcare groups to implement control and eradication of St John’s Wort
  from remnants.
 Assess current status of Yellow Hyacinth-orchid on granitic slopes freehold at
  Chesney Vale. Through consultation with landholders, ensure adequate protection
  of the species, especially with respect to grazing.
    In consultation with landholders, monitor and ensure protection (especially from
     weeds and fire) of Northern Sandalwood on freehold near G10.
 Assist landholders to identify funds for fencing remnants and for other strategic
  management actions. Consider land purchase where necessary and appropriate.
    Monitor freehold remnants on granite rises to ensure that habitat is not further
     degraded by illegal granite removal.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.3 Private Land (cont'd)

Management to enhance remnants for threatened taxa (BNA response level in
brackets: 4 = full commitment, 3 = substantive participation, 2 = opportunistic action, 1
= watching brief):
 Supplement habitat for Swift Parrot (4 - VR, 2 -
  NIS), Black Falcon (4 - VR), Bush Stone-curlew (4
  - VR, 3 - NIS), Squirrel Glider (2), Regent
  Honeyeater (3 - NIS), Painted Honeyeater (3 -
  NIS), Grey-crowned Babbler (3), Lace Monitor (2 -
  NIS), Speckled Warbler (2 - NIS) and Turquoise
  Parrot (1 - VR, 2 - NIS), by mitigating against tree
  dieback, retaining understorey and fallen timber or
  litter, conserving mistletoe clumps for feeding and
  nesting sites for honeyeaters, enhanc ing
  connectivity and increasing abundance of mature
  and hollow trees.
 Supplement habitat for Golden Perch (2 - VR) and Barking Marsh Frog (1 - VR),
  by improving quality and extent of riparian vegetation.
    Implement enforcement, and educational and interpretive programs, to benefit
     Carpet Python (3 - NIS).
 Control cats and foxes to curtail predation on Bush Stone- curlew (4 - VR, 3 -
  NIS), Squirrel Glider (3), Grey-crowned Babbler (3), Lace Monitor (2) and
  Turquoise Parrot (1 - VR, 2 - NIS).
    Exclude stock from grazing on or near shallow wetlands used by Intermediate
     Egret (3 - NIS).
    Enhance flow regimes in streams and wetlands
     to improve habitat for Intermediate Egret (3 -
     NIS), Great Egret (2), White-bellied Sea-eagle
     (2 - VR), Barking Marsh Frog (1 - VR) and
     Crimson-spotted Rainbowfish (1 - VR), as well
     as Golden Perch (2 - VR), Murray Cod (2 - VR)
     and Blue-billed Duck (1 - VR).
 Supplement availability of shallow wetland habitats, and tree cover suitable for
  roosting or nesting, to benefit Nankeen Night Heron (3 - VR).
 Change stocking levels (and develop appropriate grazing management
  guidelines) or exclude grazing, to reduce physical disturbance, or understorey loss
  or damage, affecting Narrow Goodenia (4 - NIS), Bush Stone-curlew (4 - VR, 3 -
  NIS), Grey-crowned Babbler (3) and Squirrel Glider (2 - NIS).
 Control weeds affecting habitat of Narrow Goodenia (4 - NIS), Bush Stone-curlew
  (4 - VR, 3 - NIS) and Northern Sandalwood (2 - NIS), notably St John’s Wort.
 Control introduced herbivore and macropod numbers, and maintain natural water
  regimes, to benefit Narrow Goodenia (4 - NIS) on freehold slopes fringing Mt Meg
  and Warby Range.
    In controlling introduced herbivore levels (particularly when fumigating rabbit
     burrows), ensure that adverse effects upon Carpet Python (3) are carefully
     avoided.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.3 Private Land (cont'd)

    Encourage and promote grazing control (preferably exclusion by fencing) to
     conserve understorey near sites used by or suitable for Regent Honeyeater (3 -
     NIS), Grey-crowned Babbler (3), Squirrel Glider (2) and Turquoise Parrot (1 - VR).
     Managing for understorey may also benefit Speckled Warbler (2 - NIS).
    Discourage use of barbed-wire fencing near Squirrel Glider (2) habitat, as this
     fatally snares many gliders (van der Ree 1999).
    Determine appropriate management to enhance habitat of Yellow Hyacinth-orchid
     (3 - NIS) at Chesney Vale.
    Modify domestic grazing levels as appropriate, and implement weed control, to
     benefit Umbrella Grass (3), notably in Chesney Vale–Mt Meg area.
 Assess known or potential habitat of Western
  Silver Wattle (2 - NIS), Plump Windmill Grass
  (2 - NIS), Mugga (2 - NIS), Common Fringe-
  sedge (2 - NIS), Flat-leaf Bush-pea (2 - NIS)
  and Small Chocolate-lily (2 - NIS), and advise
  landowners of any appropriate protection or
  management action.


Restoration of strategic vegetation blocks or linkages:
    Encourage and assist landholders to conserve strategic freehold remnants, and
     maintain and enhance connectivity between public land blocks, in Warby Range,
     Mount Meg, and Chesney Vale areas (Davidson 1996).
    Encourage and assist landholders with significant freehold remnants to restore
     and expand existing habitats, and improve connectivity to any nearby remnants on
     freehold, road reserves or other tenure, giving priority to significant remnants
     identified by Todd (1999), Robinson (1998b) and Davidson (1996), as well as
     those along the Broken and Boosey Creek systems and Holland Creek–Broken
     River system, within the zone.
    Promote the development and implementation of local area plans for the above
     areas.
    Urge and assist Landcare groups, Land for Wildlife extension officers and Trust for
     Nature officers to inform landholders of their potential role in conserving
     biodiversity, and to coordinate their involvement for the best possible outcome.
 Co-ordinate restoration and revegetation initiatives to assist landholders and the
  Shire in consolidating local remnants.
     On freehold abutting roadside habitats of Squirrel Glider or Grey-crowned
      Babbler, promote and assist establishment of buffer strips (at least 15 m wide
      and 0.5 km long) which have preferably been neither ploughed nor ripped.
    In consultation with CMA, develop habitat management plans for streamsides on
     freehold, with particular emphasis upon protecting and expanding habitat nodes
     (e.g. creekline-roadside intersects).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.3 Private Land (cont'd)

EXISTING POLICIES, PLANS OR PROGRAMS supporting one or more of the
recommended actions:
    FFG Action Statement Grey-crowned Babbler (34).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Regent Honeyeater (41).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement White-bellied Sea-eagle (60).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Narrow Goodenia (72).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Northern Sandalwood (75).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Bush Stone-curlew (78).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Cat (80).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Yellow Hyacinth-orchid (82).
                                    −




    Management Plan Brolga (Arnol et al. 1984).
                              −




    Recovery Plan – Regent Honeyeater (Menkhorst et al. 1999).
    Recovery Plan – Swift Parrot (Swift Parrot Recovery Plan 2000).
 CAMBA – Great Egret, White-bellied Sea-eagle.
 JAM BA – Great Egret.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.4 Public Land Water Frontage

Land Tenure Details:
Several segments of Public Land Water Frontage (K1, *K1) occur in the zone. Some
are on tributaries of Boosey Creek, upstream of Rowan Swamp Wildlife Reserve
(C28), while other segments are on tributaries of Broken River, such as Hollands
Creek at Tatong, and Ryans and Watchbox Creeks (tributaries of Hollands Creek) at
Molyullah. Public Land and Water Frontage between C28 and Thoona, on Boosey
Creek, has been identified by Robinson (1998b) as part of a ‘major site of
conservation significance in the eastern Northern Plains’. Native vegetation in the
tenure is in many places discontinuous, and understorey is generally heavily
degraded. In Molyullah–Tatong area, woody weeds (particularly Salix spp.) are
prolific along the frontage, which is effectively bereft of native flora.

Land Manager:
Land Victoria

Stakeholders:
Key CMA, DSE, DPI, Private
Other LGA, Lc, WAG, RAG, LFW, GAV, CVA, GNP, VFF, VAA


Threatened Biodiversity Assets (in brackets: Cons status Vic - lower case, Aust -
upper case; followed by BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa = 1A, 2B,
etc., or un - unassessed):
EVCs: Water frontage reserves in this zone all formerly supported creekline grassy
woodland (e) surrounded by plains grassy woodland (e). Few discernible remnants of
these vegetation types remain along the drainage lines today, and these water
frontages are mostly disconnected from the larger ‘granitic hills’ remnants.


Threatened flora: None recorded.

Threatened fauna: None recorded.

Recommended actions:
Protection of existing remnants:
    Protect and enhance status of Public Land Water Frontage in the zone, giving
     priority to Boosey Creek between C28 and Thoona, and to the Public Land and
     Water Frontages on tributaries of Boosey Creek, which supply Rowan Swamp
     Wildlife Reserve (C28).
    Exclude licensed grazing from water frontage, in order to permit natural
     regeneration of remnants.
    Enhance awareness of landholders and key stakeholders of the potential
     biodiversity linkage value of these frontages, once restored.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.4 Public Land Water Frontage (cont'd)

Management to enhance remnants for threatened taxa (BNA response level in
brackets: 4 = full commitment, 3 = substantive participation, 2 = opportunistic action,
1 = watching brief):
No specific recommendations.

Restoration of strategic vegetation blocks or linkages:
    Initiate weed control and revegetation of degraded creekline frontages, giving
     priority to sections where increased connectivity will be most strategic and
     potentially effective.
    Identify adjoining or strategic landholdings and easements having potential
     connectivity value, and encourage complementary revegetation using incentives
     and voluntary programs.

EXISTING POLICIES, PLANS OR PROGRAMS supporting one or more of the
recommended actions:
     ECC (2001) recommendation to redesignate all K1 in the zone as Natural
      Features Reserve.
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                           6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                           6.5 Water Production

Land Tenure Details:
The tenure is represented in the zone primarily by Lake Mokoan (D56; 8 500 ha), a
major ‘off-stream’ water storage in the Goulburn–Murray irrigation system. The
reserve provides habitat for a range of threatened waterbird species, and other fauna
taxa associated with wetlands. As well as storing water for irrigation, domestic and
flood- mitigation purposes, D56 has significant value for water-based recreation, and
is a popular duck-hunting venue. DSE/DPI manages a 20-hectare portion in the
north-east of the reserve for wildlife purposes (LCC 1985). A small site on Broken
Creek contains Bailey’s Weir (D37) while D36 & 38 are minor pump sites near
Devenish. Glenrowan Service Reservoir (D1) contains remnant vegetation in a buffer
intended primarily to protect water quality.


Land Manager:
Rural Water Authority, DSE, DPI


Stakeholders:


Key CMA
Other LGA, FNC, BG, TSN, PV, VAA

Threatened Biodiversity Assets (in brackets: Cons status Vic - lower case, Aust -
upper case; followed by BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa = 1A, 2B,
etc., or un - unassessed) :
EVCs: The land within the boundary of D56 formerly supported a large wetland
formation (e) (Mokoan Swamp), flanked to the south-west by plains grassy woodland
(e) and to the north-east by plains grassy woodland / gilgai plains woodland / wetland
mosaic (e). The latter vegetation type also surrounded a substantial red gum wetland
(e). On slightly more elevated sites in the original swamp, grassy woodland (e) and
lunette woodland (e) occurred. Today, only a few small remnants of former (pre-
1750) woodland persist. The main component of fauna habitat is aquatic vegetation.
D1 retains some remnant grassy woodland (e).

Threatened flora: None recorded.

Threatened fauna: Intermediate Egret (cen,
unr - VR), Great Egret (e, unr - VR), White-
bellied Sea-eagle (e, unr - VR), Freckled Duck
(e, 3A - VR), Golden Perch (v, 1 B - VR),
Murray Cod (v, 2A - VR), Blue-billed Duck (v,
3B - VR), Royal Spoonbill (v, unr - VR).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.5 Water Production (cont'd)

Recommended actions:
Protection of existing remnants:
    Maintain status of D56, to conserve and enhance wetland habitat values for flora,
     fish and waterbirds whilst providing for recreation and water supply purposes.
 Ascertain the biodiversity value or potential of buffer vegetation in D1, and ensure
  that any such values are protected appropriately.

Management to enhance remnants for threatened taxa (BNA response level in
brackets: 4 = full commitment, 3 = substantive participation, 2 = opportunistic action, 1
= watching brief):
    Enhance wetland regimes, providing seasonally natural water levels, to benefit
     Murray Cod (3), Golden Perch (3) and Freckled Duck (3), as well as Great Egret
     (2), White-bellied Sea-eagle (2), Royal Spoonbill (2), Intermediate Egret (2) and
     Blue-billed Duck (1).
 Also enhance wetland habitat, providing quiet backwater conditions, with variable
  depths but abundant shallows, and substrates with shelter sites and weeds, to
  benefit Murray Cod (3) and Golden Perch (3).
    Provide shallow feeding sites for Freckled Duck (3), Great Egret (2), Intermediate
     Egret (2) and Royal Spoonbill (2), and deeper waters for Blue-billed Duck (1).
 Supplement lakeside habitat to provide nest trees and feeding sites for Great
  Egret (2) and White-bellied Sea-eagle (2), and low cover for Blue-billed Duck (1).


Restoration of strategic vegetation blocks or linkages:
    Encourage collaboration with adjoining landholders to restore connectivity via
     creeklines and other remnants.


EXISTING POLICIES, PLANS OR PROGRAMS supporting one or more of the
recommended actions:
    FFG Action Statement White-bellied Sea-eagle (60).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Freckled Duck (105).
                                        −




 CAMBA – Great Egret, White-bellied Sea-eagle.
 JAM BA – Great Egret.
   Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                            6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                            6.6 Other State Government

Land Tenure Details:
The tenure includes all unused roads, the Benalla–Yarrawonga and Melbourne–
Albury Railway reserves, the Midland Highway and Hume Freeway easements, and
several Recreation Reserves (O4, *M4). Several small uncategorised blocks (Z99 on
GIS maps) are also present, but appear to lack remnants. In addition, a number of
Stone or Gravel Reserves at Nooramunga (R14-15; total 9 ha), Thoona (R17; 6 ha)
and near Winton (*R5) are all recommended for some level of revegetation (LCC
1985, 1986). Several small blocks categorised as ‘Other Reserves And Public Land’
(LCC 1985, 1986) also occur in the tenure—several fragments of *U1 at Glenrowan
(adjoining BR *I70) are subject to continued (unspecified) existing use, a further *U1
fragment (apparently a stone reserve) adjoins *I69, and Water Reserve U51 (8 ha) at
Taminick is proposed for revegetation and reservation as a Bushland Reserve.
Management of some of the above reserves having intensive community use (e.g.
O4, T1, Z99) may be delegated to LGA. A segment (6 ha) of Melbourne–Albury
Railway reserve, west of Glenrowan, has been identified by Robinson (1998b) as a
‘major site of conservation significance in the eastern Northern Plains’. Cropper
(1996) describes a number of potential threats to native vegetation adjacent to the
Hume Freeway (throughout the zone).

Land Manager:
Land Victoria, Public Transport Corporation, VicRoads

Stakeholders:


Key DSE, DPI, CMA
Other VAA, BG, TSN, GNP, FNC, LGA, Private.
Threatened Biodiversity Assets (in brackets: Cons status Vic - lower case, Aust -
upper case; followed by BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa = 1A, 2B,
etc., or un - unassessed):
EVCs: Vegetation types formerly (pre-1750) on land in this tenure included
(predominantly) plains grassy woodland (e), grassy woodland (e), box ironbark forest
(v) and granitic hills woodland (lc - NIS). Today only a few blocks in the tenure retain
native remnants. For example, box ironbark forest (v) elements persist at R15
(though with introduced grasses), R17 at Thoona carries Grey Box-dominated
granitic hills woodland (v - VR) and Glenrowan Rail Reserve contains a diverse flora
within plains grassy woodland (e) remnants. However, most land in the tenure is
extensively disturbed, if not actually cleared.

Threatened flora: Deane’s Wattle (e, unr - NIS), Narrow Goodenia (Vv, unr - NIS), Purple Diuris (v,
3B - VR, unr - NIS), Slender Club-sedge (v, unr - VR), Common
Fringe-sedge (v, unr - NIS).

Threatened fauna: Grey-crowned Babbler (e, unr - VR),
Blue-billed Duck (v, 3B - VR).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.6 Other State Government (cont'd)
Recommended actions:
Protection of existing remnants:
    Identify, protect and monitor sites of occurrence of threatened EVCs and
     significant taxa.
    Ensure PTC planning and maintenance staff are aware of the site location and
     significance of remnant vegetation nodes, notably on sections of rail reserve
     around Glenrowan and near Mokoan Outlet Channel crossing.
    Encourage PTC to enter into a Public Authority Management Agreement (PAMA)
     to protect biodiversity values within the rail reserve, and to liaise with Shires over
     roadside conservation plans pertaining to management of the road reserves
     adjacent to the above sites.
    Ensure VicRoads planning and maintenance staff are aware of the site location
     and significance of remnants and biodiversity values on Hume Freeway road
     reserve, particularly Grey-crowned Babbler sites between Winton and Glenrowan.
    Encourage VicRoads to enter into a PAMA to protect biodiversity values within the
     freeway reserve. In particular, issues include vegetation disturbance associated
     with road works and maintenance, positioning of fire-breaks, mistletoe
     conservation, and the conservation of protected flora (Cropper 1996).
    In consultation with licensees, review status of unused roads and, where habitat
     values (or potential values) exist, assess fencing, grazing exclusion, and
     regeneration to ensure maximum possible habitat protection.
    Ensure that all fenced and ungrazed unused roads remain so.
    Ensure that habitat of Blue-billed Duck beside Midland Highway north of Benalla
     remains suitably protected.
    Monitor management needs at R15 annually (Davidson 1996).
    Explore options for *U1 fragments to be annexed to BR *I70 at Glenrowan.

Management to enhance remnants for threatened taxa (BNA response level in
brackets: 4 = full commitment, 3 = substantive participation, 2 = opportunistic action,
1 = watching brief):
    Increase availability of mature and hollow-bearing trees, conserve natural
     understorey vegetation, and retain fallen timber and litter, to benefit Grey-crowned
     Babbler (2) on Hume Freeway road reserve.
    Enhance flow regimes and supplement available habitat to benefit Blue-billed
     Duck (1 - VR).
 Control introduced predators to benefit Grey-crowned Babbler (2).
    Implement weed control, limit grazing pressure from introduced herbivores and
     macropods, adjust domestic grazing pressure appropriately and implement
     ecological burns under expert guidance, to benefit Purple Diuris (1 - VR) on rail
     reserve.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.6 Other State Government (cont'd)

    Determine appropriate management to enhance habitat
     of Deane’s Wattle (2 - NIS), Narrow Goodenia (2 - NIS),
     Purple Diuris (2 - NIS), Slender Club-sedge (2 - VR)
     and Common Fringe-sedge (2 - NIS) on *U1 fragments
     at Glenrowan.
 Through consultation with licensees, fence key
  elements of Grey-crowned Babbler (2) habitat on
  unused roads.


Restoration of strategic vegetation blocks or linkages:
    Restore native vegetation and expand patch size on
     small blocks within the tenure, giving priority to those
     remnants with potential to link to adjacent or nearby
     habitats, such as roadsides or creeklines.
    Encourage and assist PTC and VicRoads land managers to expand or extend
     linear remnants on rail and freeway reserves, and to consolidate with any
     adjoining habitat on road reserves or freehold land.
    In consultation with licensees, improve habitat quality and connectivity of unused
     roads retaining native vegetation.
    Propagate Western Silver Wattle in R17 (Thoona GR) from seed sources on
     nearby Thoona–Devenish Road reserve (L6) (Davidson 1996).


EXISTING POLICIES, PLANS OR PROGRAMS supporting one or more of the
recommended actions:
    FFG Action Statement Grey-crowned Babbler (34).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Red Fox (44).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Narrow Goodenia (72).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Cat (80).
                                    −




    ECC (2001) recommendation to redesignate most O4 reserves as Community
     Use Areas, and one (6 km north of Chesney) as Natural Features Reserve. *U1
     adjoining *I69 is recommended to remain a Stone Reserve (for granite).
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                           6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                           6.7 Local Government

Land Tenure Details:
The tenure includes municipal roadsides and township land throughout the zone.
Also included are two Roadside Conservation reserves (L6)—on Binney Road,
Bungeet; and Thoona–Boughyard Creek Road, Thoona. The L6 sites (mainly Grey
Box and Yellow Box) are recognised for the biodiversity significance of their Western
Silver Wattle stands (LCC 1985). The BNA process recognises this wattle as a key
threatened taxon for the Northern Inland Slopes bioregion but not for Victorian
Riverina. As both segments of L6 lie (marginally) within the latter bioregion, the
Western Silver Wattle stands they contain do not appear on GIS-generated maps for
the zone.
In that part of the zone north of the Hume Freeway, roadside vegetation tends to be
fragmented, with understorey highly modified, although exceptions (apart from L6)
include parts of Chesney Vale Road and Old Thoona Road (Davidson 1996). Many
linkages remain between roadsides and remnants on small and large public land
blocks. South of the Hume, around the fringes of Lurg Hills, roadsides become
increasingly important as the main biodiversity stronghold for some flora, as intact
examples of local vegetation types, as valuable fauna habitat (notably Mugga -
dominated woodland used by Regent Honeyeaters) and as a habitat network through
which fauna may move through the landscape (Davidson 1996). Notable roadsides
occur on Old Lurg Road and Government Lane, but become dramatically more
abundant in the adjoining bioregion of Lurg Hills, beside the zone to the east.

Land Manager:
Local Government Authority

Stakeholders:
Key DSE, DPI, CMA, PV
Other Private, BG, LFW, FNC, CVA, GAV

Threatened Biodiversity Assets (in brackets: Cons status Vic - lower case, Aust -
upper case; followed by BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa = 1A, 2B,
etc., or un - unassessed) :
EVCs: Vegetation types formerly supported on land in this tenure (pre-1750) on the
plains of VR bioregion included primarily plains grassy woodland (e), as well as pine
box woodland / riverina plains grassy woodland mosaic (e), and a number of
localised valley, wetland and creekline EVCs. On the more hilly NIS bioregion,
granitic hills woodland (lc), grassy woodland (e) and box ironbark forest (v)
predominated. Today, roadsides through the hill country retain many remnants of the
former vegetation cover. However, representation on the plains is far less evident,
due to the extreme amount of clearing which has ensued on associated and adjacent
tenures.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.7 Local Government (cont'd)

Threatened flora: Red Swainson-pea (Ve, 3A - VR), Downy Swainson-pea
(e, 1A - VR), Yellow Hyacinth-orchid (e, unr - NIS), Narrow Goodenia (Vv,
4A - NIS), Western Silver Wattle (v, 1A - NIS), Purple Diuris (v, unr - VR),
Umbrella Grass (v, unr - NIS), Common Fringe-sedge (v, unr - NIS), Mugga
(r, unr - NIS), Small Chocolate-lily (k, unr).

Threatened fauna: Regent Honeyeater (Ecen, unr - NIS),
Swift Parrot (Ve, unr), Grey-crowned Babbler (e, 1A), Squirrel
Glider (e, 1A - VR), Bush Stone-curlew (e, unr), Great
Egret (e, unr - VR), Carpet Python (e, unr - NIS), Barking
Owl (e, unr - NIS), Speckled Warbler (v, unr - NIS),
Turquoise Parrot (ln, unr - VR), Lace Monitor (dd, unr -
NIS).


Recommended actions:
Protection of existing remnants:
     Protect existing roadside remnants, giving priority to those having mature and
      hollow-bearing trees, and tall shrubby understorey with sparse grassy ground
      layer. In particular, recognise the high-value habitat of roadsides in the Chesney,
      Thoona and Bungeet areas, and around the margins of the Lurg Hills area
      (Davidson 1996).
     Exclude grazing on or near all roadsides retaining native vegetation elements,
      even if the community is fragmented and degraded.
    Assist Shires to develop roadside conservation plans and encourage integration
     with voluntary efforts on adjacent freehold. Promote voluntary programs (e.g.
     LFW) and planning overlays, as tools to assist Shires in protecting and managing
     roadsides.
     Identify in Shire roadside conservation plans known and likely habitat of Grey-
      crowned Babbler, Squirrel Glider, Bush Stone-curlew, Carpet Python and Lace
      Monitor, and advise CFA to avoid or limit control burning on these sites.
     Prevent removal from roadside habitats of ground litter, fallen timber, logs or
      dead-standing trees, which provide valuable shelter and forage sites for Grey-
      crowned Babbler, Bush Stone-curlew, Carpet Python and Lace Monitor.
     Investigate site record of Squirrel Glider on south-west corner of Benalla–Winton
      Road junction with Benalla–Tatong Road, Benalla, and determine whether habitat
      protection or management is a practical option.
     Ensure that Shire staff (especially road crews) are aware of significant habitat
      and taxa on roadsides, and that they avoid ground disturbance due to fire
      protection works, utility works or road maintenance (Davidson 1996).
     Monitor roadside remnants on granite rises to ensure that habitat is not further
      degraded by illegal granite removal.
     In consultation with PV, DSE, DPI and CMA, develop and implement a strategy to
      control the spread of Cinnamon Fungus in this and adjoining tenures (Davidson
      1996), especially in the Warby Range.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.7 Local Government (cont'd)

Management to enhance remnants for threatened taxa (BNA response level in
brackets: 4 = full commitment, 3 = substantive participation, 2 = opportunistic action,
1 = watching brief):
    Increase availability of mature and hollow-
     bearing trees, conserve natural understorey
     vegetation, retain fallen timber and litter, and
     conserve mistletoe populations, to benefit Grey-
     crowned Babbler (4), Squirrel Glider (4 - VR),
     Regent Honeyeater (2 - NIS), Swift Parrot (2),
     Bush Stone-curlew (2), Carpet Python (2),
     Speckled Warbler (2 - NIS), Barking Owl (2 -
     NIS), Turquoise Parrot (2) and Lace Monitor (2).
    Enhance flow regimes and supplement habitat on roadside wetlands to benefit
     Great Egret (2).
    Implement weed control programs, and exclude or strictly control fuel-reduction
     burning, in known or likely roadside habitat of Grey-crowned Babbler (4).
    Ensure that Grey-crowned Babbler (4) roadside habitat is clearly marked with
     signs.
 Strictly exclude domestic grazing from roadside habitat of Grey-crowned Babbler
  (4), as well as from known sites of Squirrel Glider (4 - VR; beside School Road,
  Benalla), Bush Stone-curlew (2), Carpet Python (2), Speckled Warbler (2 - NIS),
  Turquoise Parrot (2) and Lace Monitor (2).
 Control introduced predators to benefit Squirrel Glider (4 - VR), Bush Stone-curlew
  (2) and Carpet Python (2).
 Adjust domestic stocking rates appropriately, and ensure signage, on roadside
  habitat of Red Swainson-pea (3 - VR) at Benalla.
    Exclude grazing from roadside habitat of Downy Swainson-pea (4 - VR) at
     Benalla.
 Ascertain any other management requirements to
  enhance habitat for Red Swainson-pea (3 - VR) and
  Downy Swainson-pea (4 - VR) around Benalla
  township.
    Exclude stock and weeds, and protect habitat from
     other disturbance around roadside soaks and springs
     containing Narrow Goodenia (2 - NIS) on outwash
     slopes of Chesney Vale Hills and Warby Range.
    Exclude domestic grazing, control weeds, and implement ecological burns under
     expert guidance, notably on roadsides near Bungeet and Bungeet West, to benefit
     Western Silver Wattle (4 - NIS).
 Assess known roadside habitats of Yellow Hyacinth-orchid (2 - NIS), Umbrella
  Grass (2), Common Fringe-sedge (2 - NIS), Purple Diuris (2 - VR), Mugga (2 -
  NIS), Leafy Wallaby-grass (2) and Small Chocolate-lily (2), and implement any
  necessary protective management.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.7 Local Government (cont'd)

Restoration of strategic vegetation blocks or linkages:
    In determining priorities for roadside habitat restoration in the zone, give special
     consideration to those areas where roadside biodiversity values have the greatest
     potential to complement existing remnants on adjacent tenures. These areas will
     include the outwash slopes fringing the Warby Range and Chesney Vale Hills, the
     Thoona–Bungeet area, and areas fringing the low hills of the Lurg–Winton–
     Glenrowan area.
    Encourage and assist regeneration and consolidation of roadside stands of
     Western Silver Wattle, giving priority to sites on granitic outwash slopes.
    Encourage collaboration between Shires and
     adjoining landholders (particularly where Land for
     Wildlife Groups are established) to develop and
     continue implementing          local    revegetation
     strategies targeting key roadside habitats,
     especially of Grey-crowned Babbler, Regent
     Honeyeater, Swift Parrot, Bush Stone-curlew,
     Carpet Python, Narrow Goodenia and Western
     Silver Wattle.
    Extend and expand existing roadside / creekline habitat linkages known or likely to
     support colonies of Grey-crowned Babbler, giving priority to sites in the hill country
     near Winton and Lurg and targeting suitable sites within 0.3 km of any known
     Grey-crowned Babbler colony.
    In expanding linear habitat networks, utilise nodes on creek -crossings,
     intersections with other road reserves or patches on adjacent freehold.
    Liaise with landholders on adjacent properties to establish habitat strips by which
     to broaden roadside habitat for fauna, and to expand Western Silver Wattle
     stands.
 Also liaise with landholders to fence across paddock corners at key intersections of
  roadside tree lines, to maximise habitat availability for fauna (Robinson &
  Davidson, in prep.).
 Seek opportunities to expand and consolidate township habitats of Red and
  Downy Swainson-pea stands at Benalla.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.7 Local Government (cont'd)

EXISTING POLICIES, PLANS OR PROGRAMS supporting one or more of the
recommended actions:
    FFG Action Statement Grey-crowned Babbler (34).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Regent Honeyeater (41).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Red Fox (44).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Narrow Goodenia (72).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Bush Stone-curlew (78).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Cat (80).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Yellow Hyacinth-orchid (82).
                                    −




    Recovery Plan – Swift Parrot (Swift Parrot Recovery Plan 2000).
    Recovery Plan – Regent Honeyeater (Menkhorst et al. 1999).
 CAM BA – Great Egret.
 JAM BA – Great Egret.
  Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                           6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                           6.8 Parks & Reserves

Land Tenure Details:
The zone contains a number of conservation reserves, the largest being Warby
Range State Park (A3; 6640 ha), only part of which (roughly 3000 ha) occurs in the
zone. Warby Range Reference Area (B5; 170 ha) is an inlier of A3. The granitic
plateau of Warby Range (rising to 480 m) not only contains significant biodiversity
values but is heavily visited for recreation and tourism, and is used by apiarists as an
over-wintering site for bee-hives. Although fragmented by freehold in the south, much
of this adjacent private land retains native vegetation (Davidson 1996). Mount Meg
Flora & Fauna Reserve (G10; 225 ha) straddles a granite ridge of the Chesney Hills
between Thoona and Chesney Vale. Rowan Swamp Wildlife Reserve (C28; 430 ha),
on Boosey Creek at the north edge of the zone, is an intermittent shallow wetland
with surrounding woodland (River Red Gum and box species), some areas of which
have been recommended for revegetation work (LCC 1985). The zone also contains
Bushland Reserves (H87-88, 90-91, 93-95, 97, 99-100 and *I69 & 70) totaling 258
ha, the largest (H99) being 88 ha. A number of these (H93, 95, 97 & 99) support
good-quality examples of rocky outcrop and slopes vegetation, while H100 is a good
example of soak vegetation (Davidson 1996). C28 is part of the extensive Broken–
Boosey creekline-wetland system recommended by Robinson (1998b) as a priority
for conservation reservation and management in the eastern northern plains. A3 has
likewise been recommended.

Land Manager:
Parks Victoria

Stakeholders:
Key DSE, DPI, CMA
Other ECC, VNPA, VAA, TSN, BG, GNP, FNC, Private, LGA


Threatened Biodiversity Assets (in brackets: Cons status Vic - lower case, Aust -
upper case; followed by BNA priority / risk rankings for threatened taxa = 1A, 2B,
etc., or un - unassessed) :
EVCs: Pre-1750 vegetation in A3 (and B5) comprised ‘islands’ of granitic hills
woodland (lc) (the limits of which closely approximated the current public land
boundary), with grassy dry forest (d), heathy dry forest (lc) and valley grassy forest
(e). Although these vegetation types largely still remain, the grassy woodland (e)
which covered the colluvial slopes below is no longer supported. Similarly, the
boundary of G10 reflects the limits of persisting granitic hills woodland, while the
flanking grassy woodland (e) has been cleared. Woodlands remaining on these
reserves commonly include Blakely’s Red Gum, Red Stringybark, a mixture of box
species, White Cypress-pine and Drooping She-oak. C28 retains red gum wetland
(e), however this site formerly also supported plains grassy wetland (e) and plains
grassy woodland (e), with creekline grassy woodland (e) along the drainage lines.
H87 retains remnant creekline grassy woodland, H91 plains grassy woodland, H90
grassy woodland (e), H100 spring soak woodland (e), H93 & 95 rocky outcrop
shrubland / herbland mosaic (d) and H88 & 99 granitic hills woodland.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.8 Parks & Reserves (cont'd)

Threatened flora: Northern Sandalwood (e, 1B - NIS), Small Scurf-pea (Ee, 2A -
VR), Narrow Goodenia (Vv, 1A - NIS), Purple Diuris
(v, 1A - NIS), Slender Club-sedge (v, 1B - NIS),
Dookie Daisy (v, 1C - NIS), Pale Spike-sedge (v, 3B
- VR), Western Silver Wattle (v, unr - NIS), Common
Fringe-sedge (v, unr - NIS), Flat-leaf Bush-pea (r,
unr - NIS), Scaly Greenhood (r, unr - NIS), Slender
Violet-bush (r, unr - NIS), Spur-wing Wattle (r, unr -
NIS), Small-leaf Bush-pea (r, unr - NIS), Mugga (r,
unr - NIS), Small Chocolate-lily (k, unr - NIS).

Threatened fauna: Regent Honeyeater (Ecen, 1A -
NIS), Swift Parrot (Ve, 1A - NIS), Squirrel Glider (e, 1A -
NIS), Carpet Python (e, 1B - NIS), Great Egret (e, 2A -
VR), Grey-crowned Babbler (e, unr - NIS), Red-chested
Button-quail (v, 2B - VR), Brolga (v, unr - VR), Speckled
Warbler (v, unr - NIS), Turquoise Parrot (ln, 1C - NIS),
Lace Monitor (dd, unr - NIS).

Recommended actions:
Protection of existing remnants:
 Assess condition and habitat values on all reserves within the tenure, and ensure
  that protection of biodiversity values is adequate. Give priority to A3 / B5; C28;
  G10; and H93, 95, 97, 99 & 100.
    Note actions recommended by Davidson (1996) for Bushland Reserves H88, 90-
     91, 93-95, 97 & 99.
  Ensure that any removal of wood products as a result of park management in A3
   (LCC 1985) will in no way compromise options for habitat supplementation to
   benefit Swift Parrot, Squirrel Glider, Regent Honeyeater, Carpet Python, Speckled
   Warbler, Barking Owl, Grey-crowned Babbler, Turquoise Parrot or Lace Monitor.
 As far as possible, determine measures appropriate to protect known and likely
  habitat of threatened flora taxa recorded from the tenure, and incorporate this
  information into the reserve management planning process.
 Closely monitor apiculture activities within the tenure (notably in A3 and G10), and
  control feral bee infestations where necessary.
    Remove or phase out domestic grazing from all reserves in the tenure.
    Investigate causes of dieback in Blakely’s Red Gum on A3, and implement any
     practical management outcomes (Davidson 1996).
    Facilitate implementation of a weed control strategy for A3, with St John’s Wort as
     a key target (Davidson 1996).
    Monitor effects on flora of fire management practices in A3 (Davidson 1996).
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.8 Parks & Reserves (cont'd)

    In consultation with LGA, DSE, DPI and CMA, develop and implement a strategy
     to control the spread of Cinnamon Fungus in this and adjoining tenures (Davidson
     1996).
    Investigate the status of H100 (immediately east of G10), which is omitted from
     ECC (2001) report.

Management to enhance remnants for threatened taxa (BNA response level in
brackets: 4 = full commitment, 3 = substantive participation, 2 = opportunistic action,
1 = watching brief):
 Giving priority to A3 an d G10, increase
  abundance of mature hollow-bearing trees,
  conserve understorey, retain fallen timber and
  litter, and conserve mistletoe populations, to
  supplement habitat for Regent Honeyeater (4 -
  NIS), Swift Parrot (4 - NIS), Squirrel Glider (4 -
  NIS), Carpet Python (3 - NIS), Grey-crowned
  Babbler (2 - NIS), Speckled Warbler (2 - NIS),
  Turquoise Parrot (2 - NIS) and Lace Monitor (2
  - NIS).
    Implement weed control to benefit Regent Honeyeater (4 - NIS) and Northern
     Sandalwood (3 - NIS).
 Control foxes and cats to benefit Squirrel Glider (4 - NIS), Carpet Python (3 - NIS),
  Turquoise Parrot (2 - NIS), Red-chested Button-quail (2 - VR) and Brolga (1 - VR).
 Supplement habitat to ensure replacement of nest- or roost-trees and provide
  suitable feeding sites for Great Egret (4 - VR), controlling human disturbance at
  roosting or breeding areas.
    Implement enforcement, and exclude human disturbance, to benefit Carpet
     Python (3 - NIS).
    Enhance flow regimes on reserves in VR bioregion to provide more natural
     environmental conditions for Great Egret (4 - VR) and Pale Spike-sedge (1 - VR).
    Exclude domestic grazing to benefit Pale Spike-sedge (1 - VR).
    Maintain or restore natural water regimes to benefit Narrow Goodenia (4 - NIS) in
     A3, G10 & *I70.
 Control levels of grazing pressure from introduced herbivores and macropods, to
  benefit Dookie Daisy (2 - NIS) and Northern Sandalwood (e, 1B - NIS) in A3, and
  Pale Spike-sedge (1 - VR) in C28.
    In controlling macropod and introduced herbivore levels (particularly fumigating
     rabbit burrows), ensure that adverse effects upon Carpet Python (3 - NIS) are
     carefully avoided.
    Biodiversity Action Planning – Landscape plans for Goulburn Broken CMA – North East Goulburn Broken - June 2003


                                             6. Chesney Landscape Zone
                                             6.8 Parks & Reserves (cont'd)

    Determine and implement suitable management
     practices to benefit Small Scurf-pea (3 - VR) on the
     plains at C28; and Narrow Goodenia (4 - NIS), Purple
     Diuris (4 - NIS), Slender Club-sedge (3 - NIS), Flat-
     leaf Bush-pea (2 - NIS), Spur-wing Wattle (2 - NIS),
     Small Chocolate-lily (2 - NIS), Western Silver Wattle (2
     - NIS), Common Fringe-sedge (2 - NIS), Scaly
     Greenhood (2 - NIS), Slender Violet-bush (2 - NIS),
     Small-leaf Bush-pea (2 - NIS) and Mugga (2 - NIS) in
     granitic hill country.


Restoration of strategic vegetation blocks or linkages:
    Investigate with adjoining landholders or other land managers any options to
     bolster connectivity adjacent to existing remnants, especially along drainage lines.
     For more isolated patches, investigate options for buffer establishment on
     adjacent land.
    Implement any revegetation still required on C28 (LCC 1985).
    Propagate Western Silver Wattle in H88 (Thoona BR) from seed sources on
     nearby Thoona–Devenish Road reserve (L6) (Davidson 1996).


EXISTING POLICIES, PLANS OR PROGRAMS supporting one or more of the
recommended actions:
    FFG Action Statement Grey-crowned Babbler (34).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Regent Honeyeater (41).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Red Fox (44).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Narrow Goodenia (72).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Northern Sandalwood (75).
                                    −




    FFG Action Statement Predation by Cat (80).
                                    −




 CAM BA – Great Egret.
 JAM BA – Great Egret.
    Management Plan Brolga (Arnol et al. 1984).
                              −




    Recovery Plan – Regent Honeyeater (Menkhorst et al. 1999).
    Recovery Plan – Swift Parrot (Swift Parrot Recovery Plan 2000).
    ECC (2001) recommendation to recategorise Bushland Reserves *I69-70 and
     H87-88 & 90-91 as NFRs; and Flora and Fauna Reserve G10, together with
     Bushland Reserves H93-95, 97 & 99, as (Mt Meg) Nature Conservation Reserve.
     Also to enlarge Warby Range State Park (A3) by amalgamation with several other
     public land blocks (G11, F1 and M2) to the north (in Tungamah zone).

								
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