Scientific Program - PDF by JamiePeacock

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									Scientific Program
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Content

   •   Mayors’ Workshop
   •   Thematic Session
   •   Poster presentation
   •   “Compilation of Case Studies”
   •   Presentation of the concept of “Historic urban Landscape”
   •   Synthesis of the ideas exchanged on the Congress theme
   •   Study Visit

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Mayors’ Workshop
Quito, September 9, 2009/ 08h30 – 17h30
Coordination: Jeff Cody (GCI), Françoise Descamps (GCI), Carlos Pallares (Fonsal)
and Fonsal staff

The Mayors’ Workshop at the OWHC’s Congress is designed for mayors who would like to
share ideas about how to confront the complex challenges associated with protecting and
managing historic resources in their cities.

Under the general theme of the Congress: “Revitalization of Historic Centers: How to
engage all the social actors?”, the workshop will focus on Quito’s experience in the
recuperation of its historical center through the involvement of its inhabitants. It is designed
so that there will be a balance between brief formal presentations, site visits, and informal
discussion among mayors and/or their representatives.

The following themes have been selected to spark productive discussions among
participants:

● Rehabilitation of the urban and architectural fabric as a positive activity for all of
  Quito’scitizens.
● Methods that might be used to communicate with residents during the complex process
  of urban rehabilitation.
● Roles that public space and transportation play in the rehabilitation of urban areas.
● Important links between the historic center and peripheral places in historic cities.

Eligible participants

● All OWHC/OCPM mayors are welcome to participate.
● Each mayor may be accompanied by one assistant.
● If a mayor cannot attend, but wishes to have one assistant attend in his/her place, that is
  also possible.
● To coordinate the workshop efficiently, it would be helpful if mayors would indicate their
  desire to participate before they arrive in Quito (OWHC/OCPM will send pre-registration
  requests to potential participants in advance).

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Thematic session
Quito, September 9 -10, 2009 /08h30 – 12h00
Coordination: Françoise Descamps (GCI), Carlos Pallares (Fonsal)

General Introduction
The 10th World Congress of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC) is a unique
forum. Every two years it brings together politicians and professionals who are committed to
the preservation of historic cities, particularly those inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage
List. The first of these events was held in 1991 and, ever since, this event has enabled
participants to discuss topics of common interest, share their experiences and learn about
new strategies for meeting the challenges associated with the conservation and
management of World Heritage Cities. The event has also underscored the dynamism and
open-mindedness of the OWHC.

The aims of the scientific program:
•   to provide participants with inspiring presentations that focus on the latest
    developments related to the Congress’ theme;
•   to generate an exchange of ideas between politicians and professionals;
•   to provide participants with an opportunity – through a poster session – to present case
    studies related to the theme; and
•   to involve young people of Quito, future actors in the city’s development, by giving them
    an opportunity to express their ideas.

To articulate the theme, the organizers of the Congress have developed a program that
includes four keynote presentations, several small group discussions centered on questions
raised by the presentations, a poster session featuring case study analyses related to the
Congress’ theme, and activities for a select group of university students in Quito, who will
contribute their ideas in the context of the 10th Congress’ host city.

Participants will leave the 10th World Congress not only with a clearer understanding of the
presented topics, but also with greater insight into processes and mechanisms that may
help them to face the complex challenges associated with the conservation and
revitalization of historical centers.


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Theme of the Congress:
“Revitalization of historical centers: How to engage all social actors?”

The revitalization of historical cities goes beyond the preservation and conservation of their
fabric. It requires a process that beyond the material fabric of the place takes into account all
the cultural values embedded in the spatial and physical components of the place, and that
involves residents and all other relevant participants from the public and private sectors, to
ensure the appropriate and sustainable conservation and development of historic centers.

The 10th World Congress of the Organization of World Heritage Cities will examine the
pivotal role of heritage conservation and social engagement as a catalyst for urban
regeneration and revitalization and for the development of sustainable solutions to secure
lively and livable cities.

This theme is well supported by the impressive projects that have been implemented by the
local authorities of the city of Quito in the physical and cultural recovery of the fabric of the
historic center.

Quito, along with Cracow (Poland), was the first city to be inscribed on the UNESCO World
Heritage List in 1978. The conservation and preservation of the historic city has been a
central concern of local and national authorities since 1976, as attested by the “Normas de
Quito” (Quito Guidelines) and efforts undertaken after the dramatic 1987 earthquake with
the creation of the “Fondo de Salvamento” (Salvage Fund). This dynamic and pro-active
leadership has since been reinforced in 2000 by strong municipal policy, promoting identity
and cultural values, and supported by efficient tools and operational structures. It has
allowed for the recovery of the space and function of the core of the historic center of the
city, giving a sense of a place to its inhabitants, citizens and visitors.
The theme is articulated around four topics to be presented in plenary sessions at the
Centro Espejo

Presentations
   • Introduction to the theme:
      “Historic Cities and their survival in a globalized World” by Francesco Siravo
   • Policies for Integration and Social Inclusion:
      “Micro Finance Programs in the Old City of Aleppo” by Maan Chibli
   • Use of Public Space:
       “Manilla Intramuros: An Island of Heritage” by Augusto Villalón
   • Promoting and Generating Public/Private Partnerships in Historic Areas:
      “Sleeping with the Enemy – Private Sector Involvement in World Heritage
      Preservation” by Ron Van Oers



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Group Discussions
Quito, September 9 – 10 / 10h30 – 12h30

   Immediately following each session, participants will be divided into groups according to
   one of three languages: English, Spanish or French [the three official languages of the
   OWHC]. Facilitators will lead the group discussions and promote the exchange of ideas
   and experiences among participants. A summary of the ideas will be capture in each
   working room.

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Presentations
Quito, September 9, 2009/08h45 – 09h15
”Historic Cities and their Survival in a Globalized World” Francesco Siravo


The first plenary session will focus on the sense of identity and belonging represented by
historic cities and examine the issue of their future survival in a highly interconnected world.
This session will begin with a look at why historic cities are so important as repositories of
social and cultural identity, and why they respond to a universal need for beauty and human
permanence. We will then examine their differences in size, geographic location and cultural
significance, and how they are all threatened by a combination of neglect and uncontrolled
new development. The risk that these places may disappear or be irreversibly altered is not
only real but immediate. In providing an overview of common failures and partial successes,
the first plenary presentation advocates a major and urgent shift in approach, and outlines a
radically different course of action to safeguard the essential values and long-term viability
of historic cities in today’s globalized world.

Biography
Francesco Siravo is an Italian architect specializing in town planning and historic
preservation. He received his professional degree from the University of Rome, La
Sapienza, and specialized in historic preservation at the College of Europe, Bruges, and
Columbia University in New York. Since 1991 he has worked for the “Historic Cities
Programme” (HCP) of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture on the implementation of restoration
and urban conservation projects in various Islamic cities, including Cairo, Lahore, Mopti
(Mali), Mostar, Samarkand and Zanzibar. Before joining the HCP, he consulted for local
municipalities, governmental and international organizations, including UNESCO, ICCROM
and the World Bank. Previous work includes the preparation of conservation plans for the
historical areas of Rome, Lucca, Urbino and Anagni in Italy, and for the old town of Lamu in
Kenya (UNESCO). He has written books, articles and papers on various architectural
conservation and town planning subjects, including “Zanzibar: A Plan for the Historic Stone
Town” (1996) and “Planning Lamu: Conservation of an East African Seaport” (1986).



Quito, September 9, 2009/ 09h15 – 09h45
“Micro Finance Programs in the Old City of Aleppo” Maan Chibli

Urban rehabilitation is a complex socio-economic process that cannot be realized on the
basis of laws, regulations or sanctions alone. Therefore Aleppo City Council embarked on
creating favorable surrounding conditions for the rehabilitation process; legislative and
regulatory frameworks combined with a system of incentives, such as loans and subsidies.
The two most significant programs in the category of loans and subsidies are the Housing
Fund and the SME Fund. These two programs helped to channel private investments and
citizens’ behavior toward private house renovation, and development of small and medium
enterprises. Rather than implementing political goals by force, offering loans and subsidies
created an enabling environment that is giving citizens the freedom to act on their own
accord. This has consequently led to more sustainable results.




Quito, September 10, 2009/ 08h45- 09h15
“Manila Intramuros: An Island of Heritage” Augusto Villalón

Once the heart of Spanish colonial authority in the Philippines, Manila Intramuros was
leveled during World War II. Only the World Heritage inscribed 16th century San Agustín
Church survived intact. Damaged fortifications, the Manila Cathedral, and a few clusters of
19th century traditional houses have since been reconstructed.

Encircled by 16th century fortifications, Manila Intramuros is now an isolated urban island in
the center of over-populated, polluted Manila. It’s planning and development is not
integrated with the rest of the city.

Protective legislation in the 1970s envisioned Intramuros as an outdoor museum, a view that
prevented building a strong resident population or attracting new business establishments
into the area. Since most of Intramuros was never rebuilt after World War II, vast empty
areas attracted illegal residents who squatted on private or state-owned properties.
There appears to be two sides to Intramuros today. One side is off the main streets in
squatter areas where their vibrant community life spills out to open spaces and narrow
streets. Activities are restricted to residents, discouraging non-residents and tourists from
participating. The other side of Intramuros is its public face, seen on the main streets and
open plazas where non-residents, tourists, and office employees go.

The underutilized and unappreciated heritage resources of Intramuros need re-evaluation to
update the Intramuros Plan of the 1970s, which does not include public-private initiative and
cooperation, the attraction of permanent residents, or business activities to give life to
Intramuros.

Its unused public spaces should finally be integrated into Manila’s daily activities to alleviate
the serious lack of urban open space, to improve the quality of urban life and, more
importantly, to introduce heritage to unaware citizens.


Biography
Augusto Villalón is an architect and cultural heritage planner based in Manila. He holds the
following academic degrees: BA Sociology/History of Art from the University of Notre Dame
(US), M. Architecture from Yale University (US), and PhD Humanities from Far Eastern
University (Manila). His firm A Villalón Architects is involved in architecture, heritage
conservation, and cultural tourism initiatives, undertaking projects for international agencies
and foreign governments. Mr. Villalón represented the Philippines in the World Heritage
Committee from 1989 to 2001, was Member of the ICOMOS Executive Committee until
2005, and is now Member of the ICOMOS International Advisory Committee and President
of its Philippine Committee.

Completed Philippine projects include World Heritage Nomination Dossiers for the Rice
Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras, the Historic City of Vigan, and Batanes Cultural
Landscape. Other work includes conservation and cultural tourism plans for historic
settlements in Sichuan and Shandong provinces in China, Buddhist sites in Lumbini (Nepal),
and the Heritage Impact Study for new urban development in World Heritage inscribed
George Town (Malaysia). Mr. Villalón has written several books and continues to publish
and present academic papers internationally. He also writes a weekly column for the
Philippine Daily Inquirer.



Quito, September 10, 2009/ 09h15 – 09h45
“Sleeping with the Enemy – Private Sector Involvement in World Heritage
Preservation” Ron Van Oers

This presentation will focus on two cases of World Heritage preservation: the first, a specific
project that is being carried out in the city of La Havana, Cuba, and the second, a proposal
for development in natural and cultural World Heritage sites, some of them cities, where
collaboration between the public and private sector is key in achieving a financially
sustainable practice of heritage preservation. In both cases, approaches, principles,
methodologies and modalities for promotion, support and public control will be the focus of
discussions. The role of municipalities to encourage private-sector involvement, maintain
oversight, and evaluate partnerships and modalities of implementation will be central to the
discussions.
Biography
Ron Van Oers was trained as an urban planner (MSc, 1993) and specialized in urban
conservation (MTD, 1996) at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, where he
received his doctorate (PhD, 2000) on research into the principles of Dutch colonial town
planning. For the past nine years he has worked at UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre in
Paris gaining skills and experience world-wide in project management, program design and
policy development. Since 2001 he has managed the US$ 2 million Netherlands Trust Fund
at the Centre, and between 2003 and 2005 he was responsible for the Latin American and
Caribbean Region as Chief of Unit. Since 2005 he has coordinated the Program for Small
Island Developing States and the World Heritage Cities Program, spearheading the
international “Historic Urban Landscape Initiative”. In addition, as of January 2009, he has
been appointed Deputy-Director of the World Heritage Training and Research Institute for
the Asia-Pacific Region in China.


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Poster presentation
Quito, September 9, 2009 17h30 – 19h00
Coordination: Fonsal

The host city also wishes to invite the participants to present their own experiences through
presentations in the form of posters, or panels explaining a project related to the theme.

A special session presenting these posters will be included in to the program. These posters
will be accessible throughout the Congress.

Special interest will be given to presentations on:


Continuity and social diversity
How to ensure the permanence of the inhabitants, how to involve them in the transformation
and regeneration process, thus avoiding gentrification or resettlement?

How to make sure that the space will be shared between groups having various interests?
How to reconcile totally different interests, such as the expectations of the tourists and the
needs of the daily lives of the inhabitants?


Integration of new users, new services
How to adapt the buildings and the spaces to new forms of life and the diversity of modern
life in all its aspects: new uses, new and changing urban functions, new transportation
systems, without threatening the authenticity of a heritage property?

Mechanisms and instruments of collaboration between the public and the private
sectors
What were the means of funding, the work mechanisms to ensure the transfer of the
responsibility to the new inhabitants and the owners?
Sustainability in the heritage recovery
How to ensure sustainability in the heritage recovery through participation of the population
and improvement of its quality of life?


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“Compilation of case studies”
Quito, September 10, 2009/ 14h00 – 16h00
“Developing Historic Cities: Keys Points to Understand and Act Upon”
Compilation of case studies on the conservation and management of historic cities.

Coordination: Bruno Delas (OVPM - Ville de Lyon), Françoise Descamps (GCI)

In accordance with the objectives of the Strategic Development Plan ratified at the Kazan
General Assembly in June 2007, the OWHC wishes to take advantage of the experiences of
its members and prepare a
contribution on two major questions that the managers of historic cities face:
    • How to manage an urban, inhabited and living heritage site?
    • How to respect the values of heritage while allowing the city to grow and to develop?

The project is being led by a Steering Committee in close contact with local authorities, in
order to be in line with local realities and lead to a practical and helpful tool for both the
organization itself and for those who are responsible for directing the management of
historic cities.

The participating cities have identified and presented exemplary achievements in one of the
fields of heritage management and urban development, such as traffic, lodging, public
space, commercial or tourism functions and architectural creation.

The progress report prepared for the World Congress of the OWHC to be held in Quito
presents the analysis of some twenty proposed case studies approved by the Steering
Committee. The approach, presented and debated in plenary session, will be circulated on
the URBO pages of the OWHC Web site and in a publication in the form of a how-to guide.




Quito September 10, 2009 16h30-17h30
Presentation of the concept of “Historic Urban Landscape”
Presentation by Ron Van Oers



Quito, September 10, 2009 / 17h30 – 18h00
Synthesis of ideas exchanged on the Congress theme

A summary of the most relevant ideas collected during the keynote presentations and group
discussions, as well as the poster session, the Mayors’ Workshop, and student program, will
be presented to participants upon the conclusion of the scientific program of the Congress.
This synthesis will be presented by Dinu Bumbaru.


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Study visit
Quito, September 11, 2009 / 08h30 – 17h30

Following the general theme of the Congress: “Revitalization of Historic Centers: How to
engage all the social actors?”, the visit to the historical center will focus on Quito’s
experience in the recuperation of its historical center through the involvement of its
inhabitants. It will include a general presentation, guided tour, and informal discussion.

The presentation and the site visit will illustrate:
● Rehabilitation of urban architecture as a positive activity for all of Quito’s citizens.
● Methods that might be used to communicate with residents during the complex process
  of urban rehabilitation.
● Roles that public space and transportation play in the rehabilitation of urban areas.
● Important links between the historic center and peripheral places in historic cities.

								
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