University of Oklahoma – Department of Aviation by pengxiuhui

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									University of Oklahoma – Department of Aviation
Instrument Flying - Stages VI thru IX
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL
The lessons are presented in numerical order just as you will fly them. It is your responsibility to
be prepared for each lesson so that you will get the most out of the training hours offered. Under each
lesson number you will find the reference for the concepts/maneuvers to be presented. In the next column
you will find the page/paragraph associated with that concept/maneuver. The last column contains the
material to be covered in the lesson.
The opening paragraph of each lesson contains a completion standard. To determine satisfactory
completion of the lesson your instructor will evaluate whether you did/did not meet the standard. In some
cases, supplemental review information is also listed which you should study to gain a thorough
understanding of the lesson material. After each lesson listing there is a homework assignment. You are
expected to complete the assignment before you come to fly. Your instructor will ask some basic questions
during your pre-flight session to determine your level of preparation. If he/she feels that you did not
adequately prepare for the lesson then it may be terminated, and you will be required to use the time to
prepare. You must be prepared for the next scheduled session. Failure to prepare wastes valuable training
time/opportunities, and therefore may be reflected by your grade. Chronic failure to arrive prepared will
result in counseling, and possible course termination. Due to the costs associated with these flying courses
it is absolutely vital that you accept the responsibility for your training.
TEXT ABBREVIATIONS
AFH = Airplane Flying Handbook
IFH = Instrument Flight Handbook
AIM = Airman’s Information Manuel
FAR = Federal Aviation Regulations
WOH = Piper Warrior Information Manuel
ITS = Instrument Pilot Practical Test Standards
IFHM = Instrument Flight Training Manuel (Dogan)
G430 = Computer Based Garmin 430 Simulator
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6-1
During this lesson, the student is provided with an in-depth review of takeoff and landing procedures and
attitude instrument flying with special emphasis on learning precise control by instrument reference.
LESSON REVIEW INFORMATION
Flight Page/ Material
Lesson Text Paragraph To Be Covered
3-1 IFH - Flight Instruments
55-93 Attitude Instrument Flying - Airplanes
FAR 91.125 ATC Light Signals
91.171 VOR Equipment Check for IFR Operations
.91.203 Civil Aircraft, Certifications Required
91.205 Powered Civil Aircraft with Standard Category U.S.
Airworthiness Certificates: Instruments and
Equipment Requirements
91.409 Inspections
91.417 Maintenance Records
WOH Section 3 Emergency Procedures
Section 4 Normal Procedures
Section 5 Performance
Section 6 Weight and Balance
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. What equipment, in addition to that required for VFR flight, is required for IFR flight?
2. What pre-flight action should be performed on the equipment in your airplane before every IFR flight?
3. What instruments in your airplane are gyroscopically driven? Of these which are electrically driven
and which are vacuum driven?
4. Which instruments in your airplane operate off of the pitot-static system? How often does this system
require an inspection?
5. How many degrees per second is a standard rate turn? Which instrument displays rate of turn?
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6-2
This lesson reviews full panel, attitude instrument flying to prepare the student for the later introduction of
partial panel airwork.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
4-1 IFH - Attitude Instrument Flying - Airplanes
SUPPLEMENTAL STUDY MATERIAL
IFHM Chap.1 The Rating
Chap.2 The Flight Instruments
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Define the following terms:
Cross-check
Fixation
Omission
Emphasis
Instrument Interpretation
Aircraft Control
Spatial Disorientation
2. Explain briefly how to accomplish attitude control, heading control, and airspeed control.
3. Explain how to perform a level, standard rate turn. Include which instruments are primary and
secondary instruments.
4. List the steps required to recover from both a nose high and nose low unusual attitudes.
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6-3
The objective of this lesson is to increase the student’s proficiency in attitude instrument
flying..SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
4-1 IFH - Attitude Instrument Flying - Airplanes
FAR 91.167 Fuel Requirements
91.409 Inspections
91.171 VOR Equipment Check for IFR
Operations
91.207 E.L.T.
91.215 ATC Transponder and Altitude
Reporting Equipment and Use
6-3 (Continued)
SUPPLEMENTAL STUDY MATERIAL
IFHM Chap.3 Attitude Instrument Flying – Airplanes
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. What equipment is required for an airplane to fly in Instrument Meteorological Conditions, (IMC)?
2. Explain how to execute climbs and descents during IMC? Be Thorough!
3. List the fuel requirements for IFR flight?
4. Which equipment checks must your aircraft have before it is legal for IFR flight?
5. What are the requirements for filing an alternate airport on an IFR flight?
6. Explain the procedure for lost communications during IFR flight?
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6-4
This lesson provides additional practice in full panel, attitude instrument flying, and introduces more
complex partial panel instrument procedures. The student will also be introduced to IFR flight plans and
IFR clearances.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
4-1 IFH - Attitude Instrument Flying – Airplanes
46-49 Magnetic Compass Errors

FAR 61.57 Recent Flight Experience
AIM 5-33 Required Reports
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Explain magnetic compass errors.
2. List the pilot currency requirements for IFR flight.
3. List the required reports for IFR flight.
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6-5
This lesson continues to develop the student’s knowledge and skill in full, and partial panel, attitude
instrument flying. It also prepares the student for the more complex procedures, specifically, combining
attitude instrument flight and radio navigation. Any maneuvers previously determined by the instructor
should be reviewed in this lesson..SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
6-5 IFHM 29-52 Attitude Instrument Flying – Airplanes
205-208 Emergencies
9-26 The Flight Instruments and Using Them
REVIEW INFORMATION
IFH 3-1Basic Flight Instruments
FAR 91.205 Powered Civil Aircraft with Standard Category U.S.
Airworthiness
WOH Section 3 Emergency Procedures
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Explain partial panel flying.
2. Explain what you could expect in the event of a pitot-static system failure. Describe which
instruments would be affected, and what indications each of these instruments might display.
3. Review previous assignments in preparation for the stage seven, instrument quiz.
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6-5 (Continued)
REVIEW INFORMATION
IFH 3-1 Basic Flight Instruments
FAR 91.205 Powered Civil Aircraft with Standard Category U.S.
Airworthiness
WOH Section 3 Emergency Procedures
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
4. Explain partial panel flying.
5. Explain what you could expect in the event of a pitot-static system failure. Describe which
instruments would be affected, and what indications each of these instruments might display.
6. Review previous assignments in preparation for the stage seven, instrument quiz.
7-1
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
This lesson has two objectives: To teach orientation in relation to a VOR station, and to intercept and track
a specified radial.
IFH 3-16 Electronic Aids to Instrument Flying
AIM 1-3 VHF Omni-Directional Range (VOR)
1-4 VOR Receiver Check
1-6 VHF Omni-Directional Range/Tactical Air
Navigation (VORTAC)
1-8 Navaid Service Volumes
FAR 91.171 VOR Equipment Check for IFR Operations
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. How often must the VOR be checked in an airplane for it to be legal for IFR flight?
2. Describe how and where one could perform a VOR check in an OU aircraft, include a brief
explanation of where you attained your information
3. Explain the five different types of VOR checks.
4. Describe what documentation must be kept, and where you might find documentation that your
airplanes’ VOR is current for IFR flight.
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7-2
The student is given the opportunity to practice VOR orientation, radial interception, and tracking
procedures. VOR time, speed, and distance computations, and the interception, and tracking of DME arcs,
(if the airplane is so equipped) are introduced.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
7-2 IFHM 81-103 VOR Equipment Orientation and Tracking
IFH 7-1 Using the Navigation Instruments
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. How many degrees of deflection does each dot represent on a VOR receiver?
2. By approximately how many degrees should you lead an initial turn to intercept a DME arc? How
many degrees of heading change would you accomplish?
3. Explain thoroughly how to determine time, speed, and distance using a VOR.
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7-3
This lesson uses previously learned VOR procedures to introduce the student to ADF orientation. The
differences between ADF homing and the interception and tracking of NDB bearings.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
7-3 IFHM 107-121 ADF Equipment Orientation and Tracking
AIM 1-2 Nondirectional Beacon (NDB)
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. List the different classifications of NDB’s and their power output..2. Explain the difference between
tracking, and homing, using an NDB.
3. List the formulas for determining position both “To”, and “From” an NDB.
4. Explain how to intercept a bearing “TO” an NDB station.
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7-4
This lesson reviews previously learned VOR procedures, as well as introduce ILS navigation, localizer, and
holding patterns, and the use of RNAV/GPS
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
IFH 7-1 - Using the Navigation Instruments
IFHM 142-162 Nonprecision Approaches
165-178 Precision Approaches
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Explain how to compute time, speed, and distance problems using an NDB.
2. Explain the limitations associated with an ADF.
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7-5
This lesson uses previously learned VOR procedures to introduce the student to ADF orientation, and time,
speed, and distance calculations.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
IFH 3-16 - Electronic Aids to Instrument Flying
AIM 1-10 Instrument Landing System (ILS)
1-10 Localizer
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. How would you describe a localizer to someone who knows nothing about flying?
2. Explain the difference between a front course, and a back course localizer approach.
3. How does tracking a localizer course differ from tracking a VOR radial.
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7-6
This lesson reviews previously learned procedures, including orientation, and time, speed, and distance
calculations. In addition, the student will earn a greater proficiency in holding.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
AIM 5-37 Holding
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Do holding speeds vary for different aircraft? What are the maximum holding speeds for all aircraft?.2.
Give two examples of a holding clearance that you might receive from ATC, and then draw the
holding patterns.
3. Explain how to correct for wind while holding.
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7-7
During this flight, the student learns front and back course localizer tracking. The primary emphasis is on
learning to interpret the CDI indications associated with the increased sensitivity of the localizer while
tracking inbound on the front or back course. NOTE: If a back course localizer is unavailable, then it is not
necessary to do one to complete the lesson.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
AIM 5-37 Holding
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Explain “Reverse Sensing”.
2. Draw the following holding patterns. Some of the holds may be impossible.
(a) Hold south on the 180 degree radial, 10 DME fix.
(b) Hold southwest on the 210 degree radial, 10 DME fix.
(c) Hold on the 090 degree radial, left turns.
(d) Hold northwest on the 330 degree radial, 20 DME fix.
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7-8
The objective for this lesson is for the student to review and practice basic attitude instrument flight and
navigation to increase proficiency. VOR holding will be introduced.
AIM 5-37 Holding
7-8 (Continued)
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Draw the following patterns.
(a) Hold on the 005 degree bearing “TO” the station, left turns.
(b) Hold north on the 270 degree bearing.
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7-9
During this flight, the student will be able to apply past knowledge to new procedures. GPS holding
patterns will be introduced..
REVIEW INFORMATION
.AIM 5-37 Holding
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
1. Draw the following holding patterns.
(a) Hold on the 030 degree radial, left turns.
(b) Hold on the 030 degree bearing, right turns.
2. On the G430, select and activate the OUN GPS03 Approach, using COFIX as the IAF.
    (a) How do you program the Garmin to put GPS course guidance on the Navigation CDI
    (a) Program the G430 to do the published hold at COFIX. Fly the simulator to COFIX and enter the
holding pattern.
    (b) When turning outbound how do you know you are abeam the GPS fix?
    (c) When turning inbound the “SUSP” light goes out. If you want to continue holding and not proceed
to the next fix on the approach, what must you do?
7-10
During this flight, the student will be able to apply past knowledge to VOR, and GPS holding patterns.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. What is the purpose of the OBS function on the G430? Program the G430 to display the IRW 150 radial
on the map page.
2. How do you program the Garmin to display course guidance from the IRW VOR on the Navigation
CDI?
2. From OUN, fly the simulator to intercept the IRW 150 radial, fly to the 15 DME fix and hold to the
NW, right hand turns.
3. When turning outbound, how do you know you are abeam the 15 DME fix?
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7-11
During this flight, the student will be able to apply past knowledge to VOR, LOC and GPS holding
patterns.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT

1. Program the G430 to fly to the Purcell airport.
2. As you approach the Purcell airport, program the G430 to display the 090 radial off the Purcell airport.
3. Hold on the 090 radial from the Purcell airport, left hand turns.
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7-12
The objective of this lesson is for the chief instructor, or the designated assistant, to evaluate the student’s
proficiency in attitude instrument flight and navigation to ensure the student is prepared for more complex
procedures.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
Review previous stage lesson material.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
As assigned by the instructor.
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8-1
This lesson introduces the student to nonprecision instrument approach procedures, and missed approach
planning.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
8-1 IFHM 141-164 Nonprecision Approaches
178-181 Precision Approaches
AIM 1-9 Marker Beacons
1-10 Instrument Landing Systems (ILS)
5-419 Missed Approach.5-55 Missed Approach
Jepp Charts Legend
NOS Charts Legend
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
1. Define the following symbols:
(a) DH (g) TDZE
(b) DA (h) IAF
(c) MDA (I) IF
(d) HAT (j) FAF
(e) HAA (k) MDA
(f) TCH
2. Explain how an aircraft’s approach category is determined.
3. According to FAR part 91, what must be identifiable before one can proceed beyond the MAP?
4. Explain the difference between a “Circling Approach”, and a “Sidestep Maneuver”.
5. Program the G430 to fly the OUN GPS03 approach from the CUMAF IAF.
    (a) ATC does not initially clear you to fly direct to CUMAF. When ATC does clear you direct to
CUMAF, how can you program the 430 to fly direct to CUMAF without re-selecting and activating the
approach?
    (b) Using either the NAV or HDG function on the simulator, fly the approach. Upon reaching the
MAP, program the G430 to execute the missed approach procedure. Fly to COFIX and hold as published.
    (c) How would you program the G430 for ATC vector to final?
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8-5
The objective of this lesson is to increase the student’s knowledge, and proficiency in the procedures
below. This includes full, and partial panel approaches
REVIEW INFORMATION
8-5 IRM 4-1 – 4-51 Instrument approaches
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Can we substitute distance from the G430 for DME?
2. When assigned the OUN LOC03 approach, program the G430 to show DME distance from the localizer
transmitter.
    (a) What will the distance read when you are at SOONR? What will the distance read when you are at
the MAP?
    (b) How can you program the GPS to display the inbound course on the map page?
    (c) What do you have to do to ensure the CDI on Nav 1 is displaying course information from the
loczlizer transmitter?
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8-6
The student’s holding pattern proficiency is increased through the practice of VOR, and GPS holding
patterns, and the introduction of localizer holding patterns.
IFH 3-16 - Electronic Aids to Instrument Flying
AIM 1-10 Instrument Landing System (ILS)
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Explain RVR and how it is determined.
2. What are the three different types of RVR?
3. Convert the following statute mile visibility’s to RVR.
Visibility, (Statute Miles) RVR
¼
½
5/8
¾
7/8.1
1¼
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8-7
The objective of lesson 7 is for the student to increase proficiency by review, and practice of those listed.
NOTE: If a back course is unavailable, then it is not necessary to do one to complete the lesson.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
AIM 5-410 Radar Approaches
5-55 Missed Approach
8-7 (Continued)
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. What color does the marker beacon receiver display for the OM, MM, and IM?
2. What does the circle around the airport on an approach plate mean?
3. Straight in minimums are shown only when the final approach course is within how many degrees of
the runway?
4. If there are no published straight in minimums can you still land straight in?
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8-8
The student’s ability to execute approaches is enhanced through the practice of ILS, VOR, and GPS
approaches, both full and partial panel.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
Review all stage reading assignments.
HOMWEORK ASSIGNMENT
1. What does a “T” at the bottom of an approach plate mean?
2. What is RVV?
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8-9
The student’s holding pattern proficiency is increased through the practice of VOR, GPS, and localizer
holding patterns.
REVIEW INFORMATION
AIM 5-37 Holding
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
As assigned by the instructor. This should include an overall review of previously assigned materials in
preparation for the stage eight quiz.
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8-11
The objective of this stage check is for the chief instructor, or the designated assistant, to evaluate the
student’s proficiency in the proper execution of holding patterns, and instrument approach
procedures..REVIEW INFORMATION
8-11 IFHM 141-164 Nonprecision Approaches
168, 178-181 Precision Approaches
207 Emergencies
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
As assigned by the instructor.
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9-1
During this lesson, the student will plan and conduct a short IFR cross-country flight. During the flight, the
student will become familiar with IFR departure, and arrival procedures.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
9-1 IFHM 197-209 Emergencies
IFH 10-1,10-2 - Flight Planning
AIM 1-21 – 1-23 Radar Services
5-410 Canceling IFR Flight Plan
2-31 – 5-37 Enroute Procedures
5-41 Standard Terminal Arrival (STAR)
FAR 91.167 Fuel Requirements for IFR flight
91.169 IFR Flight Plan, Information Required
91.173 ATC Clearance and Flight Plan Required
91.175 Takeoff and Landing Under IFR
91.177 Minimum Altitudes for IFR Operation
91.179 IFR Cruising Altitude or Flight Level
91.181 Course To Be Flown
91.183 IFR Radio Communications
91.184 IFR Operations: Two Way Radio Communications
Failure
91.187 Operation Under IFR in Controlled Airspace:
Malfunction Reports
WOH/AOH Section 3 Emergency Procedures
Section 5 Aircraft Performance.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. How is an IFR flight plan terminated?
2. When must an aircraft have an IFR clearance?
3. What are the main elements of an IFR clearance?
4. What elements would an abbreviated clearance contain?
5. What is a cruise clearance?
6. Describe the difference between a contact approach and a visual approach.
8-11 (Continued)
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9-2
During this lesson, the student will plan and conduct a short IFR cross-country flight. During the flight, the
student will become familiar with IFR departure, and arrival procedures.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
9-1 IFHM 197-209 Emergencies
IFH 10-2 - Flight Planning
AIM 1-21 – 1-23 Radar Services
5-411 Canceling IFR Flight Plan
2-31 – 5-37 Enroute Procedures
5-42 Standard Terminal Arrival (STAR)
FAR 91.167 Fuel Requirements for IFR flight
91.170 IFR Flight Plan, Information Required
91.174 ATC Clearance and Flight Plan Required
91.176 Takeoff and Landing Under IFR
91.177 Minimum Altitudes for IFR Operation
91.180 IFR Cruising Altitude or Flight Level
91.181 Course To Be Flown
91.185 IFR Radio Communications
91.186 IFR Operations: Two Way Radio Communications
Failure
91.188 Operation Under IFR in Controlled Airspace:
Malfunction Reports
WOH/AOH Section 3 Emergency Procedures
Section 5 Aircraft Performance
AIM 1-1-20
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. With regard to the GPS 430, what is RAIM?
2. How do you know if G430 has lost RAIM capability?
3. Can you use GPS for IFR navigation without RAIM?
4. How can you determine if there are areas along your route of flight where RAIM might be lost?
5. If the VOR’s fail the VOR check is it legal to fly IFR using just the GPS?
6. What is a mileage breakdown point?
7. How is a VOR changeover point depicted on a low en-route IFR chart?
8. How is a compulsory reporting point depicted on a low en-route IFR chart?
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9-3
The objective of this lesson is to satisfy the IFR long cross country requirements. It is recommended the
student plan a flight that will use incorporate a STAR as well as a departure procedure. The flight must be
a total length of at least 250 nm along airways or ATC-directed routing with at least one segment of the
flight consisting of a straight line distance of at least 100 nm between airports. Three different types of
approaches will be accomplished on this flight
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. If you are planning on using an arrival or departure procedure, what is the minimum documentation you
must have for those procedures?
2. What types of navigation equipment malfunctions require notification of ATC?
3. What changes in airspeed and or ETA require ATC notification?
4. Describe what actions you are required to take in the event of a radio failure:
    (a) Shortly after takeoff in VMC.
    (b) While climbing to 3,000, with an expected altitude of 5,000 in 10 minutes in IMC.
    (c) While holding in IMC
    (d) How do you determine which type of approach to perform upon arrival at your destination?
5. You plan on filing the FINGR 3 arrival into DFW, but note the BYP VOR is NOTAM’d out of service.
     Can you use GPS alone to fly the arrival procedure?

9-4
The objective of this lesson is to evaluate the student’s proficiency in the proper execution of holding
patterns and instrument approach procedures.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
9-4 IFHM Chapter 12 The Flight Test and After
REVIEW INFORMATION
FAR 91.167 Fuel Requirements for Flight in IFR Conditions
91.169 IFR Flight Plan, Information Required
91.173 ATC Clearance and Flight Plan Required
91.175 Takeoff and Landing under IFR
91.177 Minimum Altitudes for IFR Operation
91.179 IFR Cruising Altitude of Flight Level
91.181 Course to be Flown
91.183 IFR Radio Communications
91.185 IFR Operations: Two Way Radio Communications
Failure
91.187 Operation Under IFR in Controlled Airspace:
Malfunction Reports
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. Define the following:
(a) MEA (e) COP
(b) MOCA (f) AMA
(c) MAA (g) MCA
(d) MRA
2. When departing an uncontrolled airfield under IMC, how do you get your IFR clearance?
3. What two pieces of information will that agency require from you prior to issuing your clearance?
4. What is “Void Time?”
5. When landing at an uncontrolled field what are some different ways to close your IFR flight plan?
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9-5
The objective of this lesson is to evaluate the student’s proficiency in preparation for the final stage check.
SYLLABUS PROCEDURES
9-5 Review as assigned by the instructor..HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
1. As assigned by the flight instructor.
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