Community Technology and Digital Divide by wanghonghx

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 53

									Building the Case for Community
       Centers in Missions


               Andrew Sears
               Executive Director
               www.techmission.org/missions/
Outline

   Technology in Church History
   Christian Community Computer Centers in Urban
    Missions in the USA
   Christian Community Computer Centers in
    International Missions
   Outcomes Data from existing Christian Community
    Computer Centers
   Biblical Foundations for Technology in Urban
    Missions
Technology in Church History

         Paul &            Wycliffe, Hus    Luther & the
       Roman Roads         & Handwriting   Printing Press

   New Testament Church    Middle Ages      Reformation
         (0-500)           (500-1500)       (1500-1800)




       Sunday School       Jesus Film &
         & Literacy         Radio/TV               ?
   Industrial Revolution   Broadcast Era   Information Revolution
       (1750-1900)          (1900-1990)        (1990-Present)
Learning from the
Success of the Jesus Film

   2 billion viewers with 200 million decisions to
    follow Jesus
   Reasons for success
    –   Recognized global trends in growth of Christianity
    –   Recognized need to translate into local languages
    –   Partnered with indigenous leaders
    –   Local implementation of global resources
What is the “killer app” for Christians
and the Internet?

   We do not know yet!
   Principles for finding it:
    1.   Based on global trends in growth of Christianity
    2.   Putting tools in the hands of indigenous
         Christian leaders (in local languages)
    3.   Local implementation of global resources
    4.   Takes advantages of differences between
         broadcast and Internet
Differences Between Broadcast and
Internet

         Broadcast                     Internet
   One to Many                Many to Many
    Communication               Communication
   Broadcast is a medium      Internet is a tool (and a
                                medium)
   Centralized content        Centralized & distributed
    development                 content development
   One way                    One way and two way
    communication               communication
  Christian Community Computer
Centers in Urban Missions in the USA
“Killer app” for Urban Missions:
Christian Community Computer Centers

   In the past 15 years, over 2,000 community
    computer centers have been started in
    Christian organizations
    –   Over 500 of these sites are now members of the
        Association of Christian Community Computer
        Centers (AC4)
About TechMission

   Mission: to support Christian organizations in using
    technology in urban ministry
   Programs:
    –   Association of Christian Community Computer Centers
        (AC4): providing technology training to over 500 Christian
        organizations serving at-risk communities
    –   TechMission Corps: provides 20 full-time urban ministry
        interns to programs using technology to serve at-risk youth
    –   TechMission Safe Families: program focused on
        protecting at-risk youth from pornography and other dangers
        on the Internet
Three Values of TechMission

1.   Jesus
2.   Justice
3.   Technology

     Having these three values is what makes TechMission unique

Their level of importance is in that order: Jesus then Justice then Tech
Christian Community Computer
Centers in the USA (C4s)

   Vision: “Computer skills to make a living and
    a spiritual foundation to make a life”
   Types of C4’s
    –   Computer classes for the unemployed
    –   After school child care involving computers
    –   Adult rehabilitation programs using computers
    –   Adult education (GED, ESL) using computers
Digital Divide
        Computer Literacy and Jobs in USA


        Manufacturing                                                             Computer Industry     ***



                            Jobs Down 55-65%*                                            Jobs Grown to 7.4 million &
                                                                                         Increasing 6.5% per year

                            Once provided 52%
                            of jobs to some groups,                                      65% of all jobs use computers
                            but now only 28%**


                                                                                         90% of all jobs use computer-
                                                                                         related technologies
* In a range of Northern cities between 1967-1987, When Work Disappears
** Statistics are for inner-city black men in Chicago
*** Other sources include Bureau of Labor Statistics and Department of Commerce
Locations of USA AC4 Members
AC4 Members in Other Organizations
                    AGRM

                       40
   Salvation                        Youth: UYWI &
             200                  30
    Army                           Compassionworks


 CCDA      92
                    AC4                 60 HUD NN
                   Members

    HLIC    ?                      93   CTCNet
                       ?

                   World Vision
Christian Community Computer
Centers in International Missions
Why Information Technology (IT) in
Missions?

   IT provides “Tent Making Business” for missions
   IT plays an Essential Role in Education and Holistic
    Ministry
   Global economic growth primarily in Information
    Technology sector
   Growing “digital divide” between countries with IT
    skills and those without with further economic divides
   Data from experience shows it is an extremely
    effective tool for missions
International Digital Divide Graph
AC4 and International Members

   AC4 currently has over 150 members outside
    of the USA
   Although AC4 started with a focus on the
    USA, we are becoming increasingly focused
    internationally
    –   As an effort to grow our international membership,
        organizations outside the USA with limited
        budgets may have membership fee waived
International Model 1:
“Tent Making” Model for C4’s

   Description: C4’s can operate as “tent making”
    businesses for missionaries
   Cybermission.org model (John Edmiston)
    –   Provide for-fee Internet access in developing countries
    –   One cyber café can support four missionaries
    –   Café provides forum for evangelism
    –   Replicated at eight sites
    –   Focus on normal users and techies in developing countries
    –   May have low range radio station
International Model 2: Using C4’s to
Start Christian Colleges

   Description: C4’s form the basis to start a
    Christian college in developing countries
   Sim-tec.org model
    –   Start C4’s in Developing Country to offer
        computer classes
    –   Develop C4’s into fully accredited Christian
        colleges
    –   Focus is on non-users, normal users, and techies
        in developing countries
International Model 3: Technology in
Holistic Christian Programs

   Description: technology is one component in
    a holistic program addressing poverty and
    providing jobs (focus on non-users)
   Example Christian program models
    –   Computer classes in a Christian jobs/vocational
        training program
    –   Discipleship or rehabilitation programs involving
        technology
    –   Micro-loan program which provides a computer
Example: Technology Centers and
Evangelism in AGRM

   Association of Gospel Rescue Missions was
    founded in 1913 and is a group of over 300
    Christian homeless shelters
    –   Last year over 85,000 people enrolled in AGRM educational
        programs
    –   Meeting Spiritual Need: Estimated that over half (over 42,500)
        of these made decisions to follow Jesus
    –   Meeting Felt Need: 5,000 graduated with a GED or other
        diploma, and nearly 15,000 formerly homeless individuals
        completed training programs and became productive members
        of society
International Model 4: Equipping
Church Techies with Technology

   Description: provide technology training to
    those providing tech support on the mission
    field
   International Conference on Computing and
    Missions Model
    –   Provides a conference for those providing tech
        support on the missions field
    –   Focus is on techies
    –   www.gospelcom.net/iccm/
International Model 5: Equipping Church
Leaders in Developing Countries

   Description: providing technology training to
    indigenous church leaders in developing
    countries (focus on normal users)
   Examples
    –   Provide training on audio/visual systems for
        services
    –   Providing training in getting a ministry website
International Model 6: Providing IT
Skills Needed for Jobs

   Description: Oasis International Net2Work
    Program teaches Information Technology
    (IT) skills needed for jobs on mission fields
   28 centers in 10 countries
   Over 1,000 students now e-literate & huge
    demand for more centers
    –   Job placements nearly 50%
    –   Students have gone from unemployed slum
        dwellers to good full time jobs within 4 months
International Model 7: Internet Enabled
International Christian Radio

   Cybercafe also uses low-powered FM
    transmitter to provide community radio
    station
    –   Can utilize digital audio content from the internet
    –   Enables improved global distribution of Christian
        message via radio across different languages (top
        sermons globally in Spanish, Arabic, etc.)
Measuring Outcomes:
 AC4 Site Statistics
Total AC4 Member Site Statistics

Budgets                                                    $4,146,833
Tech Participants                                          43,760
Tech Volunteers                                            1,149
Tech Staff                                                 1,214
Computers                                                  4,517


   * Note these numbers only include active members who are paid up on dues, the numbers including defaulted
   members are: Budgets = $12,416,081 and Participants = 92,593
   ** These numbers are extrapolated for all active members based on 130 sites reporting.
 Measurable Outcomes from AC4 Sites

       Outcome Area                                                        Number of Participants
       Completed Computer Classes                                          15,605
       Received Certification                                              3,282
       College Placement                                                   1,049
       Placed in Job                                                       2,629
       Received GED                                                        1,051
       Received Discipleship                                               3,121
       Started following Jesus                                             3,086
* Extrapolated for all active members with 130 sites reporting
** Note many outcomes of AC4 sites are not measurable in these terms (after school programs, etc.
Average AC4 Site Statistics

   Tech Budget                  $13,686
   Participants                 144
   Staff                        4
   Volunteers                   3.8
   Computers                    15
   Computer Class Completions   51
   Certifications               10.8
   College Placements           3.5
   Job Placements               8.7
   GED Recipients               3.5
   Discipleship Recipients      10.3
   Decisions to Follow Jesus    10.2
Computer Centers and Evangelism

    Total Computer Center Budgets: $4,146,833
    Number of Decisions to follow Jesus: 3,086
       –   Of sites that provided data on decisions to follow
           Jesus, over 15% of program participants made
           decisions to follow Jesus



    Note: according to the International Bulletin of Missionary Research, the Average Global Cost Per Baptism
    is $349,000. January 2005. David B. Barrett & Todd M. Johnson http://www.globalchristianity.org/resources.htm
AC4 Members by Membership Type




          498 Total Members
AC4 Members in Other Organizations
                   AGRM

                      27
   Salvation                       Youth: UYWI &
             35                  49
    Army                          Compassionworks


 CCDA      78
                   AC4                 66 HUD NN
                  Members

    HLIC    19                    84   CTCNet
                      ??

                  World Vision
AC4 Membership By Region




USA Members Currently Account for 68% of Members
Number of AC4 Sites with Various
Tech Activities
Participants of AC4 Member Sites
by Race




      * Extrapolated for all active members with 70 sites reporting
Participants of AC4 Member Sites
by Language




      * Extrapolated for all active members with 70 sites reporting
Participants of AC4 Member Sites
by Age




      * Extrapolated for all active members with 70 sites reporting
Participants of AC4 Member Sites
by Urban/Rural




      * Extrapolated for all active members with 70 sites reporting
Participants of AC4 Member Sites
By Other Demographics

   78.4% are low-income
   27.5% are homeless
   14.3% are disabled
AC4 Resource Distribution Outcomes

   Distributed over $1.7 million in resources to
    AC4 member sites
    –   Over $400,000 in sub-grants to AC4 members
        through C4T grants
    –   Over $750,000 worth of new Toshiba equipment
        to AC4 members through Beaumont Partnership
    –   Over $345,000 to sites and partners through CTC
        grant
    –   Over $200,000 to sites through AmeriCorps
Training Outcomes

Conference Participants           90 (220)/year
Workshop Participants             105/year
Conference Call Participants      89 (110)/year
Paper Materials Recipients        200 (525)/year
Electronic Materials Recipients   3,397
   Biblical Foundation for
Technology in Urban Missions
Biblical Model for Missions

 1 Corinthians 9:19-23
 Though I am free and belong to no man, I make myself a slave
 to everyone, to win as many as possible. To the Jews I
 became like a Jew, to win the Jews. To those under the law I
 became like one under the law (though I myself am not under
 the law), so as to win those under the law. To those not having
 the law I became like one not having the law (though I am not
 free from God's law but am under Christ's law), so as to win
 those not having the law. To the weak I became weak, to win
 the weak. I have become all things to all men so that by all
 possible means I might save some.
Who are We Targeting?

   Biblical Application: Technology ministry needs to be
    translated into the local needs/culture
    –    Killer app depends on who you are targeting


    1.   Developed countries or developing countries
    2.   Urban, suburban, or rural
    3.   Techie, normal computer user, or non-user
Where Is Growth of the Church?

   Urban
    –   Since 1900, 70% of new Christians have been in urban
        areas (1.1 billion since 1900)
    –   75% of new Christians will be in urban areas in the future
   Developing Countries
    –   Over 80% of growth of the church is in Asia and the
        Southern Hemisphere (1.17 billion since 1900)
    –   95% of growth in the next 20 years expected to be in Asia
        and the Southern Hemisphere
Stages of Technology and Ministry

1.   By Geeks for Geeks (or “techies”)
2.   By Geeks for Normal Users
3.   By Normal Users for Normal Users
4.   By Normal Users for Non-Users
Biblical Basis for C4’s

James 2:15-16
Suppose a brother or sister is without clothes and
daily food. If one of you says to him, “Go, I wish you
well; keep warm and well fed,” but does nothing about
his physical needs, what good is it?


 Jesus always met both spiritual needs and felt needs!
What Are “Felt Needs”?




Common
Felt Needs in
Urban Missions
Urban and Suburban Felt Needs

Urban Felt Needs   Suburban Felt Needs
 Food/Housing      Convenience/Time
 Jobs/Education    Friends
 Child Care        Activities
 Safety            Self Actualization

								
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