Docstoc

COMMA-REVIEW-AND-PRACTICE-SHEET

Document Sample
COMMA-REVIEW-AND-PRACTICE-SHEET Powered By Docstoc
					                  COMMA REVIEW AND PRACTICE SHEET

  1. IN A SERIES: Use a comma between the items in a series or list. Be sure to include
      comma before the “and” or “or” that marks the end of the series/list.

    Examples:
    I like my cheeseburgers with bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes.
    For your birthday, would you prefer an i-Pod, a puppy, or a trip to Poughkeepsie?

    Practice:
    Put commas where they belong in the following:
    Everyone likes Sam Libby and Dave.
    Is your favorite appetizer chicken fingers potato skins or nachos?
    Did you put away your socks underwear and t-shirts in their proper drawers?


1 2. IN DATES:
2   a. Use a comma between the day and the year (i.e. between the two numbers).
3   b. Do NOT use a comma between just a month and the year (only between numbers!)
4   c. When information follows the year in a sentence, insert another comma after the
  year.

    Examples:
       a. I flew to Bermuda on June 17, 2009.
       b. I flew to Bermuda in June 2009.
       c. I flew to Bermuda on June 17, 2009, but the plane almost crashed!

    Practice:
    Put commas where they belong in the following:
    The last day of school is June 13 2010.
    We are in school until June 2010.
    The last day of school is June 13 2010 unless we have snow days.

    You need to send in your taxes on or before April 15 2011.
    You need to send in your taxes in April 2011.
    You need to send in your taxes on or before April 15 2011 unless you move to Venus.

    Harry was born on June 21 1975.
    In August 1945 the planes dropped bombs on Japan.
    Would you believe that on May 22 1951 my husband let out a loud laugh when he was born?
5 3. IN ADDRESSES:
6 a. Use a comma between the city and state in an address (i.e. between two words).
7 b. The same is true for the name of a city and a country, or a city, state, and country.
8 c. If the sentence continues after the state/country, insert a comma after the name of
9      the state/country.
10
    Examples:
      a. I was born in Albany, New York.
     b. She went to Paris, France.
     b. She is a resident of Hartford, Connecticut, USA.
     c. I have often visited Dayton, Ohio, where my aunt and uncle live.
     c. We flew to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on our way to Alaska.

    Practice:
    How are things in Dallas Texas?
    Did you stop in Dallas Texas on your way to Phoenix Arizona?
    I want to see the changing of the guard in London England before I leave for home.
    She sent a package from Nome Alaska to Berlin Germany and on to Miami Florida USA.




  4. IN LETTERS:
      - Insert a comma after the greeting/salutation in a friendly letter (use a colon in a
        business letter).
       -Use a comma after the sign-off in all kinds of letters.

     Examples:
     Dear Jimmy,
     Dear Sweetie-Pie,
     Sincerely,
     Yours truly,
     Love,
5. WITH AN APPOSITIVE (a word or phrase that adds information about a noun):
a. At the beginning of a sentence, put a comma after the appositive
b. In the middle of a sentence, use a comma before and after the appositive
c. At the end of a sentence, use a comma before the appositive.

  Examples:
     a. A fine yodeler, Gustav quickly made his mark on the Alpine world.
     b. Uncle Toledo, a rather heavy drinker, fell down the stairs on his way home.
     c. Our dog chased Mr. Hendrickson, the mean guy down the street.

  Practice:
  Underline the appositive and insert commas where needed in the following:
  Did you see Mike Yukon the skinny new kid run in gym?
  The oldest in his family Sammy was in charge of homework in his household.
  I really like Mr. Petersen the new social studies teacher.
  I asked Tara the smart girl in my chemistry class to help me study for the test.
  A bundle of laughs Krista made the whole English class smile.




6. WITH PARTICIPIAL PHRASES (the –ing form of verbs):
a. At the beginning of a sentence, put a comma after the participial phrase
b. In the middle of a sentence, use a comma before and after the participial phrase
c. At the end of a sentence, use a comma before the participial phrase.

  Examples:
     a. Running out of time, the bank robber jumped to safety just before the bomb blew.
     b. My sister, knowing I’d rat on her, told my parents first.
     c. Seamus smiled, bunching his fat cheeks into apple-like mounds.

  Practice:
  Underline the participial phrase and insert commas where needed in the following:
  “Cruising for a bruising” my brother told my dad to bug off.
  The general surrendered acknowledging his defeat.
  My English teacher hoping to get us all to pass put together a fine study guide.
  Building a bridge of trust we set out for tribal Africa knowing our chances were slim.
  He shouted at the bully to stop mustering every ounce of courage.
  Finishing before the bell the students sighed with relief that the test was over.
 7. WITH PARENTHETICAL EXPRESSIONS – a word or phrase that supplies
    non-essential information, including transition words:
    a. At the beginning of a sentence, put a comma after the parenthetical expression
    b. In the middle of a sentence, use a comma before and after the paren. expression
    c. At the end of a sentence, use a comma before the parenthetical expression

Parenthetical expressions include the following:
   - however, nevertheless, in fact, therefore, for instance, consequently, for example,
     moreover, perhaps, first, second, third, finally, in conclusion, of course, well
   - brief, disposable phrases such as “as you can see,” “on the contrary,” “believe it or
     not,” or “to be honest”

Practice:
Underline the participial phrase and insert commas where needed in the following:
For example I am studying yoga with a Zen master.
It is clear that she should therefore pay the price: a year in jail.
Although he had a fever all night he got up and went to school nevertheless.
The speech was perhaps a turning point in his career.
The bird was released into the wild despite its gorgeous plumage.
Moreover it is high time that you got me a diamond engagement ring.
My temperature believe it or not was 103 degrees.


8. WITH QUOTATIONS
   a. To introduce a direct quotation, insert a comma before the opening quote mark.
   b. To close a quotation that is a statement (not a question or exclamation), insert a
      comma inside the closing quote mark.
   c. To interrupt a quotation, do both of the above.
TIP: THE COMMA ALWAYS APPEARS TO THE LEFT OF A QUOTATION MARK!!!!!!

Examples:
   a. He actually told me, "She does not care."
   b. “My parents are going to kill me,” cried the boy as the police put him in handcuffs.
   c. "Why," she asked, "do you always put too much sugar in my latte?”

Practice:
Insert commas where needed in the following dialogue:

      “Come with me to my fine den” said the spider to the fly.
      The fly paused and muttered “That’s highly unlikely.”
      “Why do you flies always villainize me” moaned the spider “when I am really such a
   swell guy?”
      “I can’t say for sure” replied the fly “but I think it has something to do with the fact
   that you ate Aunt Milly.”
      “Drat” cried the spider. “Who told you?”

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:18
posted:6/10/2011
language:English
pages:4