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									 Disability Resources to
Assist the Whole of School
         Planning
Banyule & Nillumbik Schools Disability Network
                                October 2009




                                             2
                               THE PURPOSE OF THE GUIDE



 This electronic based resource has been compiled to assist members of the Banyule
 Nillumbik Schools Disability Network to support students with a disability by drawing
 into focus a number of resources which may be of value in their whole of school
 planning process

 The hard copy document is simply to highlight the resources which are available via
 the web or via direct contact with identified agencies and should be used with the
 electronic based resource.




 For inquiries regarding this publication please contact:

 Steven Plant
 Project Manager
 Banyule/Nillumbik Local Learning and Employment Network
 162 Main Road
 Lower Plenty 3093
 Ph: 9439 6522
 Email: steveplant@bnllen.org.au


Disclaimer: This publication is designed as a guide only. No responsibility is accepted for the accuracy of
                                                                                                 3
information contained in the document.
                                                            Table of Contents
MANAGEMENT...................................................................................................................................................... 5
ADVOCACY & RIGHTS .......................................................................................................................................... 5
   HREOC – Australian Human Rights & Equal Opportunity Commission ....................................................... 5
   Disability Rights Victoria ................................................................................................................................ 6
   Victorian Equal Opportunity & Human Rights Commission .......................................................................... 7
   Safe Schools .................................................................................................................................................... 8
DATA & TRACKING .............................................................................................................................................. 9
   Best Practice in Student Data Transfer ........................................................................................................... 9
   Students At Risk Mapping Tool ..................................................................................................................... 10
DISABILITY STANDARDS IN EDUCATION............................................................................................................. 11
   DDA Education Standards Website .............................................................................................................. 11
   Disability Standards for Education ............................................................................................................... 12
   Disability Standards For Education 2005 .................................................................................................... 12
   Disability Standards for Education 2005 in Plain English ........................................................................... 13
   The Net Impact of the Introduction of the Disability Standards for Education: Main Report ...................... 14
FUNDING ............................................................................................................................................................ 15
   Funding for Students with Disabilities .......................................................................................................... 15
   Literacy, Numeracy and Special Learning Needs Programme ..................................................................... 16
   Program for Students With Disabilities (DEECD) ....................................................................................... 18
MISCELLANEOUS ................................................................................................................................................ 19
   Disability Access Symbols ............................................................................................................................. 19
PARTNERSHIPS .................................................................................................................................................... 20
   CAMHS and Schools Project Report ............................................................................................................ 20
   Making It Easy – Enhancing partnerships through protocols SFYS 2002 .................................................... 20
TRANSITION ........................................................................................................................................................ 21
   Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA) ................................................................................... 21
PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT .................................................................................................................................... 22
   Positive Partnerships: Supporting School Aged Students on the Autism Spectrum ...................................... 22
   AusLD-list (Australian Learning Disability Discussion List) ....................................................................... 22
   National Disability Coordination Officers (IMVC) ...................................................................................... 23
   Opening All Options II .................................................................................................................................. 23
   Protective Behaviours Program .................................................................................................................... 24
TEACHING PRACTICES ................................................................................................................................. 25
INCLUSIVE TEACHING ......................................................................................................................................... 25
   Centre for Learning Innovation –Connected Learning ................................................................................. 25
   Effective Teaching and Learning Practices for Students with Learning Difficulties In New South Wales ... 27
   Effective Teaching and Learning Practices Initiative for Students with Learning Difficulties - DEST ........ 27
   Inclusive Practice Is Good Practice .............................................................................................................. 28
   Person Centered Planning: Key Features and Approaches.......................................................................... 28
   Project to Improve the Learning Outcomes of Students with Disabilities in the Early, Middle and Post
   Compulsory Years of Schooling .................................................................................................................... 28
   Students with Disabilities in Mainstream Classrooms .................................................................................. 29
   Students with Disabilities: Their Literacy and Numeracy Learning ............................................................. 29
   Submission by Australian Learning Disability Association to the National Inquiry into the Teaching of
   Literacy ......................................................................................................................................................... 29
   Teaching Students with Particular Impairments ........................................................................................... 29
   Teaching Students with Particular Impairments 2 ........................................................................................ 32
INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY ......................................................................................... 32
   Australian Disability Clearinghouse on Education and Training (ADCET) ................................................ 33
   Effective Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to Enhance Learning For
   Disadvantaged School Students .................................................................................................................... 33
   Making Better Connections: ......................................................................................................................... 34
   Technology for Learning: Students with Disabilities .................................................................................... 35
VELS ................................................................................................................................................................. 36
   The Victorian Essential Learning Standards – Students with Disabilities Guidelines .................................. 36
VET ................................................................................................................................................................... 36
   National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) ................................................................... 36
   People with A Disability In Vocational Education And Training - A Statistical Compendium .................... 37
   What’s the Difference – School Vs VET Vs UNI ........................................................................................... 37




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Management

Advocacy & Rights

HREOC – Australian Human Rights & Equal Opportunity Commission
www.hreoc.gov.au/

Statutory responsibilities include:

      education and public awareness
      discrimination and human rights complaints
      human rights compliance
      policy and legislative development.

This is done through:

      resolving complaints of discrimination or breaches of human rights under federal laws
      holding public inquiries into human rights issues of national importance
      developing human rights education programs and resources for schools, workplaces and
       the community
      providing independent legal advice to assist courts in cases that involve human rights
       principles
      providing advice and submissions to parliaments and governments to develop laws,
       policies and programs
      undertaking and coordinating research into human rights and discrimination issues.

The website contains a specific section related to Disabilities and Discrimination.
       Disability Rights
       Education Page
       Brief Guide to Disability Discrimination Act and Education
       Employment Page

   Brief Guide to Disability Discrimination Act and Employment




                                                                                           5
Management

Disability Rights Victoria
Source: www.advocacyhouse.org


Service:
Provides individual advocacy, information and support to people with physical and multiple
disabilities via its network of regional advocates located in 9 centers across Victoria.
Contact:
179 High Street,
NORTHCOTE, 3070
Ph: 9489-2999
Fax: 9489-2988
Email: drvic@advocacyhouse.org
Website: www.advocacyhouse.org
Monday - Friday, business hours.




                                                                                             6
Management

Victorian Equal Opportunity & Human Rights Commission
Source: www.humanrightscommission.vic.gov.au


Education
Under Victoria's Equal Opportunity Act, it is against the law to treat someone unfairly or harass
(hassle) them in education. This includes sexual harassment.
How is education covered?

Education covers schools, colleges, universities or other institutions where training or education is
provided. It also covers people or bodies that run educational institutions.

How can discrimination in education happen?
If it is based on a personal characteristic protected by law, unlawful discrimination may happen
when:
              deciding who will be admitted as a student;
              refusing to accept a student's application;
              denying or limiting access to benefits;
              expelling a student; or
              any other unfair treatment based on a characteristic protected by law.

Are there any exceptions?
There are some exceptions that apply to the law covering education.

              When are discrimination and harassment against the law?
              Are there any exceptions?
              How do I make a complaint?




      Frequently asked questions
      Publications




                                                                                                    7
Management

Safe Schools
Source: www.humanrightscommission.vic.gov.au/Safe%20Schools/Introduction/

A resource developed by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission Safe Schools is
dedicated to the needs to students, their families, teachers and school leaders.

Safe Schools is about creating an environment where the entire school community can
feel safe, secure and supported. It is about building an environment where the diversity of
staff, students and their families is recognised, and where human rights are respected.
When every student and staff member is supported, each individual can begin to realise
their full potential. Put simply, Equal Opportunity is a Human Right.

This section presents information about equal opportunity law in Victoria and its relevance to
students, families, teachers and school leaders so we can have a clear understanding of the
responsibilities we have to ourselves and to each other. It also provides some general information
about Victoria's new Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and suggests ways that this
provides an excellent opportunity for schools to embrace and contribute to a developing a human
rights culture in Victoria (which includes a culture of Equal Opportunity).
For teachers and school leaders, here is where you‟ll find employer guidelines, strategies and
tools for ensuring student well-being, curriculum materials, and professional development
opportunities.

For students, this is the place to learn more about what „equal opportunity‟ means to you and your
friends, and where you‟ll find fun interactivities! And for parents and families, there is information
to help you understand the law and how it works, and how you can support your child.




                                                                                                  8
Management

Data & Tracking

Best Practice in Student Data Transfer
Source: www.dest.gov.au

Using a series of 16 case studies, this project identifies the most useful range of student
record information which should be collected and transmitted by schools to minimise the
potential impact of mobility on student learning outcomes.
Abstract

Student mobility which involves the transfer of students between schools can present challenges
in relation to student learning. This project places a strong emphasis on student record
information as a key to minimising the potential impact of mobility on student learning outcomes.
The project identifies the most useful range of information to be collected by the Sending School
and the most effective ways of transmitting this information to the Receiving School. This
information can then inform the decisions made by the Receiving School regarding student
placement and induction. A series of 16 school case studies were undertaken to assist
identification of issues and good practice, obtaining a representative view from across the
country, with schools from each sector and each state being chosen. The discussion identifies
strengths and weaknesses of the current practices in the various jurisdictions across the nation.

This analysis, and the identification of the common features characterising best practice,
highlights a number of areas that must be addressed if the situation is to improve, including:
improving the timeliness of information transfer; enhancing the capacity of teachers to understand
what the information that is available from different jurisdictions mean in terms of their own
context; strengthening the development of a school culture in which the use of information for
decision making and planning is a valued activity; strengthening the development of a school
culture that places a consideration of the well-being of each student at the centre of all that they
do; and strengthening the development of a school culture in which parents and caregivers are a
welcome and valued partner in the schooling process.

Author(s) Tim Wyatt; Bob Carbines; Leone Robb

Topics Covered
           Curriculum issues
           Information management
           Student participation and achievement

Full report: download PDF      (638.5 KB, 139 pages)
        Main document: download PDF        (333.0 KB, 94 pages)
        Main document: download DOC         (798.5 KB, 94 pages)
        Appendices: download PDF       (307.1 KB, 44 pages)
        Appendices: download RTF       (10.2 MB, 44 pages)
        Bibliography: download PDF      (6.7 KB, 1 page)
        Bibliography: download RTF      (9.9 KB, 1 page)




                                                                                                9
Management

Students At Risk Mapping Tool
Source: http://www.education.vic.gov.au/sensecyouth/careertrans/mips/default.htm

Students At Risk Mapping Tool - The purpose of the Students At Risk Mapping Tool is to provide
authorised school staff with a systemic process to assist them to identify students at risk of early
leaving, select and map appropriate interventions, and evaluate selected interventions

Getting the most out of the Students at Risk Mapping Tool - Information on a whole-of-school
approach and use of quality data




                                                                                                10
Management

Disability Standards in Education

DDA Education Standards Website
Source: http://www.ddaedustandards.info/index.php


The Standards became federal law in August 2005.
This website has been designed to help users understand important parts of the DDA
Education Standards. Whether you are a person with a disability, an associate of a person
with a disability, or a person involved in the delivery of education, this website will help
you understand some important parts of the DDA Education Standards.


It does not cover the full detail of the DDA Education Standards, just the more important parts of
the Standards.
The information is provided in three different ways.
           Plain English Text

                AUSLAN (Quicktime)

                Audio format (mp3)


Inclusions on the website:

 What is Disability Discrimination?                 Making a complaint
 Education Standards                                Glossary
 Obligations                                        Audio/Video Files
 Exceptions                                         Sitemap
 Important Things                                   Tech Info & FAQ
 Useful Links                                       Download A4 Booklet (pdf)




                                                                                               11
Management

Disability Standards for Education
Source: http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Programs/Pages/disabilitystandardsforeducation.aspx

Disability Standards for Education were formulated under the Disability Discrimination Act
1992 and tabled in the Parliament on 17 March 2005. They came into effect in August 2005.
The Standards clarify the obligations of education and training providers to ensure that
students with disabilities are able to access and participate in education without
experiencing discrimination.

The following documentation is available in both Rich Text Format (RTF) and Portable Document
Format (PDF):

          Disability Standards for Education 2005 ( PDF 113KB |        RTF 326KB)
          Guidance notes ( PDF 47KB |         DOC 151KB)
          Disability Standards for Education plus Guidance Notes (    PDF 635KB)

Other relevant information:

          Regulation Impact Statement (     PDF 115KB |     RTF 346KB)

Attachment to the Regulation Impact Statement:

          The Net Impact of the Introduction of the Disability Standards for Education
          ( PDF 746KB | RTF 2.1MB)




Disability Standards For Education 2005
http://www.sofweb.vic.edu.au/wellbeing/disabil/standards.htm


Resource:
The Disability Standards for Education 2005 clarify and make more explicit the obligations
on schools and the rights of students under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DD
Act).

The Standards cover enrolment, participation, curriculum development, student support services
and harassment and victimisation.

All schools are currently required to comply with the Standards introduced by the Federal
Government in August 2005.




                                                                                                12
Management

Disability Standards for Education 2005 in Plain English
Source: http://www.communitylaw.org.au/clc_ddls/cb_pages/about_us.php


A publication by the Disability Discrimination Legal Service explaining the Disability
Standards for Education in simple form
www.ydas.org/images/Education%20Standards%20in%20plain%20English.doc

Disability Discrimination Legal Service Inc
Level 2
247-251 Flinders Lane
Melbourne VIC 3000
Ph:      9654-8644
Fax:     9639-7422
TTY: 9654-6817
Country:         1 300 882 872
Email: info@ddls.org.au




                                                                                         13
Management

The Net Impact of the Introduction of the Disability Standards for Education: Main
Report
Source: www.dest.gov.au

The primary purpose of the proposed Disability Standards for Education is to clarify the rights of
people with disabilities, and the obligations of education and training service providers, in relation
to participation in education and training by people with disabilities.

Author(s) The Allen Consulting Group

Topics Covered
Sectors :          Higher education
                   School education
                   Training & skills
Detailed :         Disability


Download PDF         or RTF




                                                                                                  14
Management

Funding

Funding for Students with Disabilities
Source www.dest.gov.au Last updated 01 May 2008

http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/programmes_funding/programme_categories/s
pecial_needs_disadvantage/funding_for_students_with_disabilities.htm (18.4 KB)

Improving the learning outcomes of educationally disadvantaged school students, including
students with disabilities, is a major Commonwealth priority. Australian Government financial
assistance to the States and Territories to improve the educational outcomes of students with
disabilities in the school sector largely comprises:

a)   the General Recurrent Grants Programme, which is the principal source of Commonwealth
       funding (an estimated $27.9 billion over 2005-2008);

b)   the Literacy, Numeracy and Special Learning Needs (LNSLN) Programme – (an
       estimated $2.1 billion 2005-2008), which provides additional targeted funding for students
       with disabilities through:

Schools Grants element which will contribute an estimated $1.87 billion over 2005-2008 to
government and non-government education authorities to achieve improved outcomes for
educationally disadvantaged students, including students with disabilities;

Non-government Centre Support (NGCS) element which will contribute an estimated $146 million
over 2005-2008 to improve the educational opportunities of children with disabilities who receive
services from non-government centres;

National Projects element which will contribute an estimated $32 million over 2005-2008 to fund
national projects and initiatives aimed at improving the learning outcomes of educationally
disadvantaged students.

From 2002, $4.5 million was allocated for national and State/Territory research projects under the
Effective Teaching and Learning Practices for Students with Learning Difficulties (SWLD) initiative
under the National Projects element. The aim of the projects is to increase teachers‟ knowledge
and understanding of how to enhance the literacy and numeracy development of school students
with learning difficulties and disabilities.

Funding provided under other Commonwealth targeted programmes such as the Country Areas
Programme, English as a Second Language - New Arrivals Programme and various Indigenous
education programmes, may also be used to assist students with disabilities.
The Literacy Numeracy and Special Learning Needs Programme is the key targeted programme
that provides assistance to educationally disadvantaged students, including students with
disabilities.




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Management

Literacy, Numeracy and Special Learning Needs Programme
Source: http://www.dest.gov.au


The DEST Literacy, Numeracy and Special Learning Needs Programme aims to improve the
literacy, numeracy and other learning outcomes of students who are educationally disadvantaged
and who require additional assistance.

This Programme is the main source of targeted Australian Government funding for students with
disabilities. It is also the Australian Government‟s key programme which contributes towards
implementing the National Literacy and Numeracy Plan (NLNP).

The LNSLN Programme has three distinct elements:
1. Schools Grants (formerly known as SAISO)

Target Group
Schools Grants funding seeks to target the most educationally disadvantaged school students,
including students with disabilities who may face barriers to effective participation at school and
who:
             Are not achieving or are at risk of not achieving a national benchmark standard of
                literacy and/or numeracy or other appropriate standard of achievement; and/or
             Require additional assistance to reach an appropriate standard of achievement.
Educational disadvantage may be associated with a range of factors such as a disability or
learning difficulty, a language background other than English, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
background, low socio-economic background or geographical isolation.

2. Non-Government Centres Support (formerly known as the Special Education - Non-
   Government Centres Support (SENGCS) Programme)

NGCS funding may be targeted to:
         provide learning and development opportunities for children with disabilities who
            are below school age to prepare them for integration into regular pre-schools or
            schools;
         assist school-aged children with severe disabilities by improving their access to
            educational programmes; or
         assist children with disabilities in residential care.

An estimated $146 million will be allocated through this element over 2005-2008. Of this amount,
an estimated $37.471 million will be allocated for 2008.

To be eligible for funding, a non-government organisation must provide programmes or activities
designed specifically for children with disabilities. The organisation must not be managed or
controlled by, or on behalf of, the government of the State in which it is located or conducted for
profit. Examples of a non-government centre include a pre-school, an early intervention centre, a
registered charity, a religious organisation, a local government instrumentality, or community
organisation eg: parent group

3. National Projects (formerly known as the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies and
   Projects Programme)

The National Projects element, provides funding for national projects and initiatives that seek to
address emerging priority areas for educationally disadvantaged students.

                                                                                                16
Management

Use of Funds
The National Projects element supports projects aimed at improving the educational outcomes of
educationally disadvantaged students, including improved literacy and numeracy outcomes. It
also funds early childhood education initiatives; and development of policies for the use of
information and communication technologies to improve learning outcomes for students who are
educationally disadvantaged.




                                                                                          17
Management

Program for Students With Disabilities (DEECD)
Source: www.education.vic.gov.au/healthwellbeing/wellbeing/disability/default.htm

The Program for Students with Disabilities Program For Students With Disabilities (PSD) provides
additional support within the Student Resource Package for eligible students with disabilities in
regular and specialist schools.

The 2009 Guidelines for Students with Disabilities can be accessed online, see Handbook and
Guidelines.

Other information about the following is available through this site:
       Curriculum and Assessment
       Integrated Outsourced Assessment Service
       Research
       PSDMS - Program for Students with Disabilities Management System
       Home Based Programs
       Resources
       Archives
       Contacts




                                                                                            18
Management

Miscellaneous

Disability Access Symbols
Source: www.gag.org/resources/das.php


The twelve symbols below may be used to promote and publicize accessibility of places,
programs and other activities for people with various disabilities
The downloadable files below (under 150k each) are available in both positive (black on a white
background) or negative (white on a black background.) Each is in an uncompressed TIF format.
Click here for PC download of complete set in TIFF format in a ZIP file.
click here for MAC download of complete set in TIFF format in a stuffit file
.




                                                                                           19
Management

Partnerships

CAMHS and Schools Project Report
Source: http://www.sfys.infoxchange.net.au/resources/public/items/2004/11/00097-upload-00001.doc
 nd
(2 option) http://www.health.vic.gov.au/mentalhealth/camhs/camhs-school-project.pdf


This project was conducted in recognition of the benefits of promoting the social and
emotional wellbeing of young people and intervening early where problems are indicated.
Project Goal: To develop a coordinated approach between CAMHS (Child & Adolescent Mental
Health Services) and Government Schools that will enhance the timely treatment of children‟s and
young people‟s mental health problems in the school environment.


Making It Easy – Enhancing partnerships through protocols SFYS 2002
Source: http://www.sfys.infoxchange.net.au/resources/public/items/2002/6/00036-upload-00001.pdf


A guide for developing protocols between schools and services based in the community
A working document “This booklet has been produced to provide a simple yet comprehensive
resource for the development of protocols between primary schools, secondary schools, and
services and agencies based in the community. It is in a proforma format for developing
protocols, and includes a range of information in areas relevant to the development of protocols.”
It is recommended that this document be used as a reference when developing local protocols
between schools and CAMHS.




                                                                                                   20
Management

Transition

Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA)
Source: VCAA Web Site http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au


Special Provision for School-Based Assessment Requirements
Students are eligible for Special Provision for school-based assessment if their ability to
demonstrate their achievement is adversely affected by:

       illness - acute or chronic
       impairment - long term personal circumstances.

Students who think they might be eligible for this Special Provision must apply to their VCE
Coordinator. For a medical condition, students will need to provide their school with a current
medical letter outlining their diagnosis, and the symptoms and issues which will impact on their
school performance. Students who have experienced a recent personal trauma will require
current external evidence. Long-term impairments/disabilities will require a medical statement or
recent intellectual and educational testing evidence (learning disability) and a history of how they
have been assisted at school over the years.

If a student is eligible, their school will be able to assist them by:

       rescheduling assessment tasks, or
       setting alternative or substitute tasks, or
       allowing more time to complete a task, or
       allowing the use of different arrangements to complete an assessment.
If none of these provisions reasonably overcomes a student‟s situation, their school may decide
to determine their result from other assessments or work already done in that study.
Students with Disabilities Guidelines | Teaching and Learning Support | Victorian Essential
Learning Standards

The Victorian Essential Learning Standards – Students with Disabilities Guidelines provides
teachers in all schools with guidelines that link the rationale and structure of the Victorian
Essential Learning Standards to individual program development and assessment for students
with disabilities.
The guidelines reflect current educational reform at a state, national and international level, and
are informed by inclusive education principles and practices.
The guidelines contain a framework for planning inclusive curriculum so teachers can equip all
students with the knowledge, skills and behaviours to help them succeed in a world that is
increasingly complex, rapidly changing and rich in information and communications technology.
Information Extracted April 2009




                                                                                                21
Professional Support

Positive Partnerships: Supporting School Aged Students on the Autism Spectrum
Source: http://www.autismtraining.com.au/

The Positive Partnerships: supporting school aged students on the autism spectrum
project will deliver the two components of the Helping Children with Autism package being
implemented by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
(DEEWR). The aim of both components is to improve the educational outcomes for school
aged children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

The two components are:
   1. professional development for teachers and other school staff who are working with
      students with ASD (Professional Development Component); and
   2. workshops and information sessions for parents and carers of school aged children with
      ASD (Parent/Carer Component).

Both components will be delivered nationally by the Australian Autism Education and Training
Consortium (AAETC).

A professional network will also be established offering advice and support for teachers and other
school staff who attend the professional development courses.

Fact Sheet PDF or RTF

AusLD-list (Australian Learning Disability Discussion List)
Source: http://mailman.med.usyd.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/ausld-list

The AusLD-list -- Australian Learning Disability Discussion List is a discussion list for
discussing issues regarding Learning Disability, and related neurological disorders in
schools, TAFE, Universities and Employment across Australia.


The AusLD-list aims to promote:
       the discussion of issues related to LD
       answer people‟s inquiries regarding LD
       disseminate news and events related to LD in Australia


The discussion list is open to anybody wishing to discuss LD in Australia.

To subscribe to the AusLD-list to go to http://mailman.med.usyd.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/ausld-list
and follow the instructions at the bottom of the page.




                                                                                              22
Professional Support

National Disability Coordination Officers (IMVC)
Source: www.imvc.com.au

The Inner Melbourne Vet Cluster (IMVC ) which delivers the NDCO Program across an area
inclusive of Banyule and Nillumbik local government areas provides a range of Professional
Development activities aimed at supporting school staff assist students with disabilities be better
prepared for their transition from secondary school.

Details can be found in the Calendar of Events section of the IMVC Web site


For further details or information Contact:

Effie Kapsalos
National Disability Coordination Officer
Inner City Melbourne, North Middle and Outer Melbourne
Inner Melbourne VET Cluster
197 Coventry Street
South Melbourne VIC 3205
T: (03) 9686 2354
M: 0423 050 853
E: ekapsalos@imvc.com.au




Opening All Options II
Source:: www.adcet.edu.au/oao/default.aspx


This site provides information and resources about learning disabilities (LD). A learning
disability can affect the way in which a person takes in, remembers, understands and expresses
information. People with learning disability are intelligent and have abilities to learn despite
difficulties in processing information.


Students with learning disabilities can succeed in higher education if individual skills and
strategies are developed and relevant alternative arrangements are provided.

           News & Events                                  Learning Strategies

           What is LD?                                    Assistive Technology

           Impact on Life & Study                         Support Practices

           Identification & Testing                       Training Resources

           Teaching Strategies                            Legislation/Support




                                                                                                23
Professional Support

Protective Behaviours Program

Service:
Protective Behaviours (personal safety program)
The Children's Protection Society runs Protective Behaviours, a personal safety program
which aims to promote resilience using empowerment strategies, clear communication,
and awareness of 'safe' behaviours.
It is a training and professional development program for professionals working with children and
families (i.e. teachers, child care, welfare)


Eligibility/Target Group:
Training can be delivered to Schools, Child Care Centres and other Welfare organisations by the
Program Coordinator or an accredited trainer.


Contact:
Program Coordinator 9460 2811 BH
70 Altona Street
HEIDELBERG WEST VIC 3081
(03) 9458 3566 BH
(03) 9457 6057 FAX
email: cps@cps.org.au
website: www.cps.org.au




                                                                                             24
TEACHING PRACTICES

Inclusive Teaching

Centre for Learning Innovation –Connected Learning
Source: http://www.cli.nsw.edu.au/cli/e-learning/clearn.shtm

The Connected Learning section of the CLI website which has been developed to support
teachers in the educational use of information and communications technologies (ICT).

The site provides quick and easy access to up-to-date curriculum and professional
development resources

Included is a section on Adaptive Technologies

The aim of is to provide teachers with up-to-date information in the important field of adaptive
technology.

You can explore the material on this site and follow the links to other helpful sites. Information
will be added to this site regularly, so please check often.

Adaptive Technologies News and Reviews

Information on resources relevant to students who have special needs, including product reviews.

Vision Impairment and Blindness

Technology options for Vision Impairment and Blindness

        Enlargement of paper-based text - Options for magnifying hardcopy material

        Computer access - Technologies providing access to computers for people who are Vision
        Impaired or Blind

        Note-taking options - Some note-taking options for people who have Little or no Vision

Hearing Loss and Deafness

Technology options for Hearing loss and Deafness

        Summary of Hearing Aids

        Equipment which connects to hearing aids to increase effectiveness

Physical Disabilities




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TEACHING PRACTICES


Physical disability technology options
       Keyboard modifications - Some options for making keyboards more accessible
       Alternative keyboards - Some alternative keyboards to meet needs of people who have
       Physical Disabilities
       Switches -Switches as an alternative to a keyboard
       On-screen keyboards - On-screen keyboard software for use with keyboard alternatives
       Predictive software - Software to help increase input speed
       Speech input to computers - Speech input as an alternative to a keyboard
       Pointing device options - Pointing devices for use with computers
       Mouse emulation - Alternatives to a standard computer mouse
       Alternative access to printed material - Some options for people who have difficulty
       handling hardcopy material

Neurological Disabilities

Technology options for Neurological Disability
       Talking calculators
       Talking clocks and watches
       Educational computer games




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TEACHING PRACTICES

Effective Teaching and Learning Practices for Students with Learning Difficulties In
New South Wales

Abstract
The focus of this project was the identification of teaching strategies that have been shown to be
effective for students who have difficulties in learning mathematics. Schools from three education
sectors, in both country and metropolitan areas, were identified for inclusion in the project.
On the basis of an extensive literature review, the use of „explicit instruction‟ and „strategy
instruction‟ were identified as effective strategies in teaching students with difficulties in
mathematics in mainstream classrooms. Evaluation of school participation and data-gathering
were also important in improving outcomes.
A CD Rom has been designed to improve the capacity of teachers to assist students who have
difficulties in learning mathematics. The CD Rom can be accessed by contacting Disability
Programs at the NSW Department of Education and Training.

Author(s) The NSW Department of Education and Training, the Catholic Education Commission
of NSW and the Association of Independent Schools of NSW


Download Effective Numeracy Practices Research Report July 07 in PDF or RTF

Effective Teaching and Learning Practices Initiative for Students with Learning
Difficulties - DEST
Source: www.dest.gov.au/NR/rdonlyres/6705607F-578D-40A0-B487-
ED014FF82F63/18731/FINALPDforDESTWEBSITESept072.rtf

In brief, the report contains information related to the research component of the project, namely:
  1. the development of assessment and reporting tools that are effective in monitoring the
     literacy and numeracy achievement progress of students with learning difficulties in the
     early and middle years of schooling (Years 1-9), located in Victorian government,
     Catholic and independent schools; and
  2. the identification of teaching and learning practices in the early and middle years of
      schooling that: (a) meet the literacy and numeracy learning needs of students with
      learning difficulties, and (b) add „value‟ to their achievement progress in terms of
      measurable improvements.




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TEACHING PRACTICES

Inclusive Practice Is Good Practice
Source: www.studentservices.utas.edu.au/Gateways/IPIGP_pubs/ipigp.html#_top


Inclusive Practice Is Good Practice aims to promote understanding of the needs of students with
disabilities. It is a comprehensive resource package that provides concise reference information
and guidelines for staff working in different education and training settings

Published by the University of Tasmania - February 1999

This resource contains several copyright works, reproduced with the permission of the original
copyright owners. Persons wishing to make use of such materials are directed to discuss the
matter with the publisher or directly with the agencies listed at the conclusion of each applicable
section and Fact Sheet.

Download Graphics Version or Text Only Version

Also: Fact Sheets


Person Centered Planning: Key Features and Approaches
Source: http://www.paradigm-uk.org/pdf/Articles/helensandersonpaper.pdf


This paper defines person centered planning; identifies five key features that will be
recognised in all approaches to person centered planning; suggests where different
approaches may be useful; and introduces three issues that practitioners may have
different views about.


Project to Improve the Learning Outcomes of Students with Disabilities in the
Early, Middle and Post Compulsory Years of Schooling
Source: www.dest.gov.au/NR/rdonlyres/D3113371-7E2C-49FE-8017-
8495030736BF/19755/InclusiveClassroomTeacherResourceFinal1.pdf


Research Report and Teacher Resource Booklet

Abstract: This project identifies ways to improve learning outcomes of students with
disabilities enrolled in mainstream classes in the early, middle and post-compulsory years
of schooling. The focus is on the activities, interactions and materials that make classroom
practice inclusive and that lead to improved outcomes for all students. Attention was also
directed to the professional development need of teachers so that they acquire the knowledge
and skills to implement inclusive classroom practices.

Author(s) The University of Canberra

Download the Research Report
Or Students with Disabilities in Mainstream Classrooms Teacher Resource Booklet

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TEACHING PRACTICES

Students with Disabilities in Mainstream Classrooms
A resource for teachers
Source: http://www.dest.gov.au/NR/rdonlyres/D3113371-7E2C-49FE-8017-
8495030736BF/19755/InclusiveClassroomTeacherResourceFinal1.pdf


This resource has been written for mainstream teachers who have, or are about to have, a
student with a disability in their classroom. The booklet may also be useful for teaching
assistants, parents and others. The resource is based on recent research and experience in
schools and classrooms across Australia.


Students with Disabilities: Their Literacy and Numeracy Learning
Source www.dest.gov.au Last updated 20 June 2008

This Students with Disabilities: Their Literacy And Numeracy Learning brochure documents some
suggestions for practice in schools and classrooms based on the outcomes of the study “Literacy,
Numeracy and Students with Disabilities conducted in 1998 and 1999. It is hoped that by
identifying the effective practices which were evident in the case studies and those suggested in
the literature review in the project, teachers, support staff and administrators will be able to further
enhance the literacy and numeracy learning of students with disabilities in class

Web link:
www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/publications_resources/summaries_brochures/studen
ts_with_dis.htm (47.5 KB)



Submission by Australian Learning Disability Association to the National Inquiry
into the Teaching of Literacy
Source www.dest.gov.au Last updated 02 May 2005

Submission by Australian Learning Disability Association to the National Inquiry into the Teaching of
Literacy

http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/policy_initiatives_reviews/key_issues/literacy_numeracy/
national_inquiry/documents/rtf/sub_60_australian_learning_disability_association_rtf.htm (16.4 KB )



Teaching Students with Particular Impairments
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

Understanding the implications of a person's impairment is more useful than knowing what a
person‟s disability "label" is. Looking at the implications is the first step in providing suitable
accommodations to ensure that approaches to teaching and support are as inclusive as possible.
Following are brief descriptions of some major impairment groups.

There is a range of inclusive teaching strategies that can assist all students to learn but there are
some specific tips that are useful in teaching a group which includes students with particular
disabilities.

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TEACHING PRACTICES


Blindness or vision impairment

It is estimated that there are about 300,000 Australians who are blind or have some kind of vision
impairment. While some people have a total absence of vision, approximately ninety percent of
people classified as legally blind have some useable vision. Access requirements of people with
vision impairments will therefore vary widely. Vision impairment or blindness can affect:

      Ability to read printed material or diagrams
      Sensitivity to light or screen glare - TV & Video Conference
      Mobility and orientation


See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Blind or Vision Impaired Students

Deafness or Hearing Impairment
It is estimated that there are approximately 30,000 deaf people in Australia who have no useable
hearing and whose first language is Auslan (Australian Sign Language). In addition it is believed
that between one and three million Australians have varying degrees of hearing impairment but
use mainly oral communication. Hearing impairment or Deafness may involve:

      Using sign language
      English as a second language
      Limited aural access to information
      Use of lip reading for oral communication

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Deaf or Hearing Impaired Students

Mental Illness

Disabilities labelled as psychiatric or psychological may include schizophrenia, clinical
depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, and anxiety disorders.
Anxiety and depression will vary according to the type of are two of the most common
psychological disabilities evident in the university environment. Mental illness or (associated
medications) can affect:

      Concentration
      Cognitive processing
      Memory
      Motivation
      Exam anxiety
      Capacity to socialise

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Mental Illness

Learning Disabilities
Learning disability is the result of neurological disorder which may cause the learner to receive
and process some information inaccurately. The most common learning disability found in the
tertiary environment is dyslexia. Other learning disabilities are dysgraphia and aphasia. Research
indicates that at least 5% of tertiary level students have a learning disability which can cause
significant difficulties in perceiving and/or processing auditory, visual or spatial information.


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TEACHING PRACTICES

Learning disabilities can affect:

       Auditory-visual processing
       Phonological processing
       Short-term or working memory
       Ability to easily read or write text leading to technical errors in punctuation, capitalisation,
        grammar etc

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities


Physical Impairments

Conditions that result in physical disabilities include spinal cord injury, arthritis, cerebral palsy,
acquired brain injury, multiple sclerosis and a number of other conditions of the muscular,
nervous and respiratory systems. These conditions tend to result in some degree of restricted
activity in mobility and manipulation, such as restricted arm and hand movements and
communication. Physical disability or mobility impairment may result in:

       Limited mobility and access to facilities
       Ability to manipulate or lift objects
       Acute or chronic pain
       Restricted ability to write or type
       Inability to sit for extended periods

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Physical Impairments




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TEACHING PRACTICES

Teaching Students with Particular Impairments 2
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

Health Conditions

A wide range of medical conditions may impact on students‟ learning and their ability to attend
lectures and tutorials, complete assignments by due dates or be assessed in the usual ways.
These conditions include epilepsy, asthma, diabetes, kidney disorders, cystic fibrosis, cancer,
hepatitis, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and HIV/AIDS. While some of these conditions are
lifelong, others such as CFS, may last for periods ranging from a few months to several years.

A chronic health condition may result in:

      Allergic reactions
      Chronic fatigue
      Periods of fatigue
      Sensitivity to chemicals
      Increased need to use the toilet
      Difficulty sitting still for long periods

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Health Conditions


Asperger syndrome and Autism

Asperger syndrome is an autistic spectrum disorder caused by a neurological dysfunction which
particularly impacts on social functioning. As this is so intrinsic to the way that most teaching and
learning takes place, students with autism or Asperger syndrome may find the experience of
higher education daunting despite having the intellectual capacity to study at this level. However,
many students have successfully completed a range of subjects including, most commonly,
mathematics and computing.

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Aspergers' or Autism

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is considered a neurological disorder. Research has
indicated that ADHD is likely to be caused by biological factors that influence chemical messages
(neurotransmitters) in certain parts of the brain. Slight imbalances in the neurotransmitters affect
the parts of the brain which control reflective thought and the inhibition of ill-considered
behaviour.

Adjustments in the learning environment can greatly assist a student with AD/HD, but as the
nature of the student‟s disability and its impact on learning will vary significantly adjustments need
to be tailored to meet the individual's needs.

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with AD/HD



Information and Communication Technology



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TEACHING PRACTICES

Australian Disability Clearinghouse on Education and Training (ADCET)
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/

The Australian Disability Clearinghouse on Education and Training (ADCET) is a web
based information source that provides up to date, accurate and comprehensive information
about inclusive teaching, learning and assessment strategies, accommodations and support
services for people with disabilities

The ADCET knowledge base is like a searchable filing cabinet where information is categorised
and updated so that you can easily access the information you need. It consists of a collection of
answers to Frequently Asked Questions, Fact Sheets, News/Events and Resources/ Articles,
Links and Case Studies. The knowledge base is database driven and information is categorised
by topic and keywords



Effective Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to Enhance
Learning For Disadvantaged School Students

The report focuses on how information and communication technology (ICT) can enhance the
learning outcomes of students that have been historically disadvantaged in education.

Abstract
As information and communication technology (ICT) becomes more widely used in classrooms
and schools, attention is being focused on how ICT can make teaching and learning more
effective. This report illustrates the complexity of the nexus between ICT, learning and
disadvantage, and how gender, class, race, indigeneity, ethnicity, disability and location intersect
when ICT is integrated into classrooms in unexpected ways. This report provides the findings
from a joint investigation by the Deakin Centre for Education and Change; The Institute of Koorie
Education; and the Institute of Disability Studies at Deakin University.


The report finds that information and communications technology (ICT) is best used in the
classroom when integrated into general teaching and learning, rather than as a stand alone
subject. The report includes examples of good practice that suggest these benefits can be
achieved in a wide variety of settings for all students, not only those who are educationally
disadvantaged. The report suggests a number of areas for improvement in the use of ICT to
achieve better student learning, including: integration of ICT into subject content and teaching
practices; access to ICT for disadvantaged students, schools and communities; and teacher
training and professional development in the use of ICT.

Author(s) Jill Blackmore; Lesley Hardcastle; Esme Bamblett; Janet Owens;
Deakin Centre for Education and Change; Institute of Koorie Education, Deakin University;
Institute of Disability Studies, Deakin University



Download PDF or RTF



                                                                                                   33
TEACHING PRACTICES

Making Better Connections:

Models of teacher professional development for the integration of information and
communication technology into classroom practice
Source: www.dest.gov.au

The report provides an overview for the integration of information and communication technology
into classroom practice. It identifies barriers and critical success factors, and provides advice and
recommendations which will help inform decisions by school systems, teacher professional
associations and university teacher education faculties both in Australia and overseas.


Abstract

This is the report of a study into ways in which teachers, teacher educators and education leaders
are being supported to acquire the skills and knowledge they need to ensure effective use of
information and communication technology (ICT) in the school setting.

Research indicates that a substantial amount of work is done in teacher education to ensure
student teachers gain both personal skills and pedagogic approaches to using ICT in the
classroom. However, there is evidence that a great deal of difficulty was encountered in
presenting student teachers with valid and meaningful examples of ICT classroom use as part of
their school experience. Course coordinators commented upon the large difference between what
was learned about classroom applications of ICT in the university setting and what was practiced i

As far as training for virtual schooling was concerned, many of the elements for developing
student teachers‟ online learning skills appeared to be present. Student teachers were found to
be using online activities in a variety of ways in their pre-service programmes.

Issues emerging from this study which require further development include: 1. The capacity of
Deans/Heads of Schools to understand the complexity of effective technology integration and the
various enabling factors that need to be addressed. 2. The need for curriculum and pedagogies of
the various teacher education programmes to be developed so that student teachers have ample
opportunities to observe effective use or participate in developing effective use of ICT in
classrooms. 3. Effective incorporation of ICT throughout university programmes. 4. Professional
development of teacher educators emphasising the importance of the integration of ICT in their
own teaching and learning.

The report notes that governments, systems and teacher education institutions and professional
associations need to work collaboratively to develop coherent agendas around the integration of
ICT in schooling. Ths will lead to the development of benchmarks in regard to students‟ learning
outcomes; standards for beginning and advanced teachers; standards for school-based and
system-level capacity; and teacher education programmes and institutions to support the student
outcomes. Ultimately, professional development strategies will be linked to these benchmarks
and standards.

Author(s) Toni Downes; Andrew Fluck; Pam Gibbons; Raplh Leonard; and others




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TEACHING PRACTICES

Technology for Learning: Students with Disabilities
Source:
http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/publications_resources/profiles/technology_learning_stud
ents_disabilities.htm

This report details research on the impact of computer-based learning in schools in Australia,
particularly for students with disabilities. The report identifies a number of factors that contribute
to the successful implementation of computer-based learning programs for students with
disabilities and implications for governments and education sectors in relation to the development
of relevant and effective policies and practices for these students.
Abstract: The use of computer based learning technologies to assist students with disabilities in
schools across Australia is investigated. In addition, the project sought to increase awareness
amongst policy makers and educators of the advantages of this technology for students with
disabilities. The implementation of effective computer-based learning programmes for these
students usually involves changes in school management and teaching methodology, including a
move to work within multidisciplinary teams, catering for individual learning styles and using more
complex technology. The project investigated the extent to which the cultural, political and
physical contexts in which schools operate can affect the implementation of these programmes.
The project focused on students with disabilities in all States and Territories and involved all
education sectors (government, Catholic and independent schools), and a range of school
settings, including remote and rural locations. The case studies within the project provided
examples of how the integration of computer-based technology can affect changes in teaching
practice and student learning.
In terms of programme implementation, several important factors contributed to successfully
classroom practice for students with disabilities. These included:
              development of programs for students with disabilities within established
               curriculum frameworks; integration of computer-based technology in individual
               learning plans;
              selection of appropriate assistive and adaptive technology;
              increased levels of teacher release time for planning and skills development;
              clearly defined plans for classroom activities to assist support staff; and improved
               training for teaching assistants.
The study raises a number of important implication that warrant consideration by Commonwealth,
State and Territory governments and education sectors across Australia. The implications can be
grouped into the various themes of policy and practice for students with disabilities; disability
related support, computer-based technology and critical factors in the classroom.

Author(s): Michelle Cormack; Murray Couch; Margaret McColl
Department of Education, Science and Training

Download PDF or RTF




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TEACHING PRACTICES

VELS

The Victorian Essential Learning Standards – Students with Disabilities Guidelines
Source: www.http://vels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/support/disability.html


The Victorian Essential Learning Standards – Students with Disabilities Guidelines provides
teachers in all schools with guidelines that link the rationale and structure of the Victorian
Essential Learning Standards to individual program development and assessment for students
with disabilities.
The guidelines reflect current educational reform at a state, national and international level, and
are informed by inclusive education principles and practices.
Inclusive education, a term that has been used to articulate the rights of every student to
participate in, or have access to, the full range of programs and services offered by the education
system, supports and celebrates the diversity found among all learners.
The guidelines contain a framework for planning inclusive curriculum so teachers can equip all
students with the knowledge, skills and behaviours to help them succeed in a world that is
increasingly complex, rapidly changing and rich in information and communications technology.
The framework is linked to a whole-school approach to curriculum planning, and reflects the three
core strands of essential learning in Physical, Personal and Social Learning, Discipline-based
Learning and Interdisciplinary Learning.
While focusing on students with disabilities the approaches outlined in the guidelines are valuable
for all students.



VET

National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER)
Source:: www.ncver.edu.au

The National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) is a not-for-profit company
owned by the federal, state and territory ministers responsible for training.

It is unique in Australia's education system. It is responsible for collecting, managing,
analysing, evaluating and communicating research and statistics about vocational
education and training (VET)

Relevant Publications:
       Item 2075 Vocational education and training and people with a disability: A review of the
        research
       Item 2025 Vocational education and training providers in competitive training markets
       Item 2017 Disability and learning outcomes: How much does the disability really matter?
       Item 1970 Helping students with mental illness: Lessons from TAFE classrooms
       Item 1834 Who's supporting us? TAFE staff perspectives on supporting students with
        mental illnesses
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TEACHING PRACTICES

          Item 1798 Connecting the dots: A successful transition for deaf students from vocational
           education and training to employment
          Item 1742 Advancing equity: Merging 'bottom up' initiatives with 'top down' strategies
          Item 1611 Who's missing out? Access and equity in vocational education and training




People with A Disability In Vocational Education And Training - A Statistical
Compendium
Source: http://www.ncver.edu.au/
NCVER has published a report highlighting VET participation and issues a for a range of
disability types

Obtain: Full Report

Obtain: Statistical Compendium
www.ncver.edu.au/statistics/compendia/disability/sp412_appendices.pdf
Provides data specifically related to VET Participation for the following disabilities:

           Physical Disability                    Hearing Disability

           Medical Disability                     Intellectual Disability

           Visual Disability                      Mental Illness

           Learning Disability                    Acquired Brain Injury


Obtain: Key Messages



What‟s the Difference – School Vs VET Vs UNI
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/Uploads/Documents/07%20Info%20sheet%20on%20school%20v%20TAFE%20v
%20uni.DOC


What‟s the Difference – School vs VET vs Uni - This fact sheet compares a number of aspects of
school, VET and university life. Areas looked at: enrolment personal freedom classes
teachers/lecturers studying exams




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