Parent and Family Involvement Pl

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					  Standard 1:
Communicating
                           10 Ways to Communicate With Parents



1- Newsletter
   A newsletter is a printed report giving news or information of interest to a special group. The
   class newsletter will consist of things that we are going to be doing in class that week, the
   subject that the students are learning about and special events that are happening at school.
   How is it two-way and meaningful ?
   The newsletter is two way and meaningful because it lets the parents be informed about what
   is going on with their students education. Also, in the newsletter I will provide a section that
   has readers comments. The parents can write a letter about anything that they would like to
   ask or are concerned about and send the letter with their child.
   Barriers
   A barrier that might occur when doing these newsletter is that the parents that are Spanish
   speaking might not be able to read the newsletter. One thing that can be done to help the
   parents are is to make the news letter bilingual.


2- School-to-home notebooks
   These notebooks are communication books to share information with parents, particularly for
   children who have special learning needs. The notebook can be sent at the end of the week
   and come back the following Monday or go home everyday if needed. The parents and
   teachers can write about how the student is doing that week or day or their concerns for that
   student.

   How is it two-way and meaningful?
   The notebook is shared by both the teacher and the parents so both parties are being given the
   opportunity to share their thoughts and concerns. The parents will really feel that the teachers
   cares about what the parents think and are feeling.

   Barriers
   A barrier that there might be is that the parent does know how to write in English, so what can
   be done to overcome this barrier is to have the parent write in their native language and the
   teacher can find a way to translate what the parents is saying.
3- Letter to parents before the start of the school year

   Letters will be sent to the parents before the start of the school the letter will consist of what
   we will be learning about that year. Also, it will give the parents a little autobiography of me
   and ways to communicate with me if they need it.

   How is it two-way and meaningful?
   The letter is meaningful because the teacher is introducing themselves to the parents before
   the school year starts. Also, the letter provides ways for the parents to be able to communicate
   with the teacher before the school year even begins.

   Barriers
   A barrier that might occur when doing these letter is that the parents that are Spanish speaking
   might not be able to read the letter. One thing that can be done to help the parents are is to
   make the letter bilingual.


4- Phone calls home
   Teacher can call called the parents of each child in her class monthly to discuss concerns or to
   answer questions

   How is it two-way and meaningful?
   Phone calls are very meaningful because anyone can write a note home but a phone call takes
   time and it shows that you actually care enough to call and talk about the student, whether it
   be about concerns or to just let the parents know what a joy it is to have them in the class. The
   parents can also call and talk to the teachers about their concerns or just to check how their
   student is doing.
   Barriers
   A parent might not know how to speak English well or not at all so they will not be able to
   communicate very well but what can be done is find someone that is bilingual and call the
   parents for the teacher.
5- Parent-teacher conference
   Parent-teacher conferences are an opportunity to create a successful partnership between the
   teacher and the parents. It is a time where the teacher can communicate to the parent how their
   student is doing and talk about anything that they are concerned about and the parents can do
   the same.

   How is it two-way and meaningful
   The teacher and parent are there face to face and are able to discuss the whatever they need to
   about the student or whatever else that they feel comfortable about talking about. It is more
   meaningful when you are able to talk one on one with one another.

   Barrier
   A parent might not know how to speak English well or not at all so they will not be able to
   communicate very well but what can be done is find someone that is bilingual and have them
   translate at the parent-teacher conference.

6- Notes Home
   Teachers can send a note home to the students parents. It can be as simple as letting the parent
   know what a joy it is to have their child in the class or asking a question that they might have.

   How is it two-way and meaningful
   Simple little notes can be meaningful because it is showing the parents that you want to
   communicate with them even if it is through a little note. The parents can do the same and
   send notes back to the teacher.

   Barrier
   The parent might not know how to write in English but that should not discourage the parents,
   have the parents write in their native language and then the teacher can translate it. Also, you
   could have the student tell you what the parent is wanting to communicate.


7- Technology
   Internet, video tapes, audio tapes, emails,..etc. Teachers may create a group e-mail messages
   to students’ families to quickly notify them of upcoming events or to survey them for input on
   a variety of topics.

   How is it two-way and meaningful
   It shows the parents again how dedicated you are to the students of the class and how you take
   the time to send an email. The parents can also send emails back if they have computers .
   Barriers
   Parents of ESL students might not know how to type or use the computer but you could have
   provide them a list of places where they can access a computer or have them write the email in
   their language.

8- Back-to School Night/Open house
   At these activities, parents meet the teachers, followed by teachers shouldering much of the
   direction for the evening, explaining their hopes and plans for the school year.

   How is it two-way and meaningful
   It is meaningful in the way that teachers and parents are able to meet each other and the
   parents get to see who their child’s teacher is and what that person is going to do to educate
   their students and make sure they succeed. The teachers also get to meet the parents and who
   the parents of their students are.

   Barriers
   A barrier might be that teachers might have some parents that speak Spanish and do not
   understand much English or have a parent of a different language. The teacher could see if
   they can find a translator for those parents or have the students translate for them.

9- Home visits
   In home visits the teacher goes to the students at their home.

   How is it two way and meaningful
   In these visits it can help build rapport with the family, and also can help you as a teacher
   learn about the students personal characteristics from the family’s perspective. The teacher
   can also learn about the family’s worldview and their funds of knowledge. The parents can
   also learn about the teacher better

   Barrier
   The parents might not want the teacher to come because they do not know how to speak
   English and therefore will not be able to communicate effectively with the parents. The
   teacher can see if they can obtain a translator to join them at the visit.

10- Problem –Solving Meetings
    When student are experiencing difficulties at school it may be appropriate to arrange meetings
    with family members to discuss how to them.
How is this two way and meaningful
The parents might have the same concerns that the teacher has and this meeting could be the
perfect way for the teacher and parent to talk about what is bothering them and what they can
do to help the student. The teacher and parent work together as a partnership.

Barriers
A parent might not know how to speak English well or not at all so they will not be able to
communicate very well but what can be done is find someone that is bilingual and have them
translate at the problem-solving meeting.
Standard II:
 Parenting
                      Parenting Programs for parents to develop better parenting skills


1- Parents ToolshopK programs

                 The goal/philosophy of Parents ToolshopK programs is to empower parents to think
         for themselves by teaching them a unique, reliable problem-solving method that helps them
         find individualized solutions to their parenting challenges. Only Parents
         Toolshop'sK Universal BlueprintTM programs teach this problem-solving method and 100+
         practical tools parents can use at each step of their response. These skills are based on sound
         parenting theories that have been known to parent educators for decades and include the most
         practical and effective parenting tools every parent needs to know and use. Parents also learn
         how to apply these steps and skills to any relationship — including non-parenting adult
         relationships. Parents get practical solutions they can use every time, every day —
         with lasting results! With over 10 years outcome-focused skill assessment results and long-
         term follow-up, the Parents Toolshop model has been proven effective with thousands of
         parents nationwide.

         Website

         http://www.parentstoolshop.com/index.htm

         Barriers

         A barrier that this program might have is that they will not have anyone that speaks a foreign
         language to help those parents that want help but do not speak English. One thing that can be
         done is ask the program if they could provide someone that is bilingual.

    2- The Nurturing Skills Parenting Program

                The Nurturing Parenting Programs are evidenced based programs that have proven
            effectiveness in treating and preventing the recurrence of child abuse and neglect. The
            Programs are designed to be family based with a highly structured series of sequenced
            lessons. To maximize the potential in achieving the results of years of research with the
            Nurturing Program, fidelity to the program content, sequence of lessons, program length
            and manner of implementation should be followed rigorously. The Nurturing Programs
            work best with families identified as abusive and/or neglecting. The strength of the
            Nurturing Programs is that skills and competencies are taught to all families in a
            predetermined sequenced manner. The Nurturing Programs are recognized for their
            effectiveness in preventing the recurrence of child abuse and neglect.

            Website

            http://www.nurturingparenting.com/nurturing_skills.php
        Barrier

        A barrier that this program might have is that they will not have anyone that speaks a
        foreign language to help those parents that want help but do not speak English. One thing
        that can be done is ask the program if they could provide someone that is bilingual.



3- Be Happy in Life : Life coaching classes

             At Be Happy in LIFE, we believe that better parenting skills can be learned.
        Unfortunately, we don't learn them in a structured manner during our life. Therefore, we
        react to uncomfortable situations, rather than having a clear vision of our desired family
        life. If you ask any parent in the world what they want for their kids, they will say "to be
        happy". Happiness is, no doubt, the most valuable feeling we can give our kids. Yet, since
        being a role model is our greatest tool to pass on our beliefs to our kids, it will be very
        hard to pass on happiness until we are happy ourselves.

        Our Better Parenting Skills Program is a future-focused coaching course for parents who
        want to break free from the common self fulfilling prophecy that "parenting kids is hard
        and that kids are terrible, cost lots of money and are never grateful for what their parents
        do for them". It is the best program for parents who feel they are blaming or justifying,
        but understand they only project their fears and anxieties on their kids and are willing to
        take control over their own and their kids' wellbeing.

        In our Better Parenting Skills Program, we teach parents to coach themselves and their
        family towards positive thinking, self acceptance, appreciation, self
        confidence, love and caring. You'll learn new ways, integrate them into your life and get
        the philosophy and the principles behind them in order to be able to use them when
        needed, long after you have completed the coaching course.

        Website

        http://www.behappyinlife.com/parentingclasses.php

        Barriers

        A barrier that this program might have is that they will not have anyone that speaks a
        foreign language to help those parents that want help but do not speak English. One thing
        that can be done is ask the program if they could provide someone that is bilingual.
4- CICC ( Center for Improvement of Child Caring)

       These programs are designed to improve parental effectiveness by providing a clear
       parenting philosophy and a set of positive parenting skills and strategies that can be used
       immediately to address a variety of child-rearing challenges and problems.

        Research has shown that these programs

              Increase parental confidence
              Reduce parental stress and anxiety
              Improve parenting skills
              Reduce or eliminate spanking and hitting
              Improve parent-child relations
              Reduce child behavior problems
              Improve child cooperation
              Improve child self-esteem
              Improve child adjustment
              Improve child academic performance
              Strengthen families

       The vast majority of programs are taught by professional instructors who have received
       specialized training in how best to teach them

       Website

       http://www.ciccparenting.org/ParSkillBuildingPrograms.aspx

       Barriers

       A barrier that this program might have is that they will not have anyone that speaks a
       foreign language to help those parents that want help but do not speak English. One thing
       that can be done is ask the program if they could provide someone that is bilingua

5- Love and Logic

       This program is known as Parenting with Love and Logic, a philosophy founded by Jim
       Fay and Foster W. Cline, M.D., and based on the experience of a combined total of over
       75 years working with and raising kids.
       Many parents want their kids to be well prepared for life, and they know this means kids
       will make mistakes and must be held accountable for those mistakes. But these parents
       often fail to hold the kids accountable for poor decisions because they are afraid the kids
       will see their parents as being mean. The result is they often excuse bad behavior, finding
       it easier to hold others, including themselves, accountable for their children's
       irresponsibility.
Jim Fay teaches us that we should "lock in our empathy, love, and understanding" prior to
telling kids what the consequences of their actions will be. The parenting
course Becoming a Love and Logic Parent teaches parents how to hold their kids
accountable in this special way. This Love and Logic method causes the child to see their
parent as the "good guy" and the child's poor decision as the "bad guy." When done on a
regular basis, kids develop an internal voice that says, "I wonder how much pain I'm going
to cause for myself with my next decision?" Kids who develop this internal voice become
more capable of standing up to peer pressure.
What more could a parent want? Isn't that a great gift to give your child? Parent child
relationships are enhanced, family life becomes less strained, and we have time to enjoy
our kids instead of either feeling used by them or being transformed from parent to
policeman.

Website

http://www.loveandlogic.com/

Barrier

A barrier that this program might have is that they will not have anyone that speaks a
foreign language to help those parents that want help but do not speak English. One thing
that can be done is ask the program if they could provide someone that is bilingual.
                        Annotated Bibliographies for Articles on Better Parenting



Adamsons, K., & Buehler, C. (2007). Mothering versus Fathering versus Parenting: Measurement
     Equivalence in Parenting Measures. Parenting: Science & Practice, 7(3), 271-303.

Arditti, J., Burton, L., & Neeves-Botelho, S. (2010). Maternal Distress and Parenting in the
        Context of Cumulative Disadvantage. Family Process, 49(2), 142-164.

Demby, S. (2009). Interparent Hatred and Its Impact on Parenting: Assessment in Forensic
     Custody Evaluations. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 29(6), 477-490.

García, F., & Gracia, E. (2009). Is Always Authoritative The Optimum Parenting Style? Evidnece
       From Spanish Families. Adolescence, 44(173), 101-131. Retrieved from Academic Search
       Premier database.

Klelin, M.B, & Pierce, J.D. (2010). Parental care aids, but parental overprotection hinders, college
        adjustment. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice , 11(2),
        167-181.

Lugo-Gil, J., & Tamis-LeMonda, C. (2008). Family Resources and Parenting Quality: Links to
      Children’s Cognitive Development Across the First 3 Years. Child Development, 79(4),
      1065-1085

Morawska, A., Winter, L., & Sanders, M. (2009). Parenting knowledge and its role in the
     prediction of dysfunctional parenting and disruptive child behavior. Child: Care, Health &
     Development, 35(2), 217-226.

Skinner, E., Johnson, S., & Snyder, T. (2005). Six Dimensions of Parenting: A Motivational
       Model. Parenting: Science & Practice, 5(2), 175-235.

Smith, R. (2010). TOTAL PARENTING. Educational Theory, 60(3), 357-369.

Weisskirch, R. (2009). Parenting by Cell Phone: Parental Monitoring of Adolescents and
       Family Relations. Journal of Youth & Adolescence, 38(8), 1123-1139.
       doi:10.1007/s10964-008-9374-
Adamsons, K., & Buehler, C. (2007). Mothering versus Fathering versus Parenting: Measurement
     Equivalence in Parenting Measures. Parenting: Science & Practice, 7(3), 271-303.

    The measurement equivalence of three commonly used parenting constructs (acceptance,
psychological intrusiveness, and harshness) was examined across mothers and fathers. Design: A
sample of 832 married individuals (416 mothers and 416 fathers) was used to test seven types of
equivalence for each measure: configural, metric, scalar, unique variance, factor variance, factor
mean, and functional. Results: Acceptance demonstrated configural, factor mean, and functional
equivalence but not metric, scalar, unique variance, or factor variance equivalence. Psychological
intrusiveness demonstrated equivalence at all levels except unique variance equivalence. Parental
harshness demonstrated equivalence at all levels except factor variance equivalence. Conclusion:
Investigations of measurement equivalence should be conducted before drawing substantive
conclusions regarding mothering and fathering and their effects on children's development.

Arditti, J., Burton, L., & Neeves-Botelho, S. (2010). Maternal Distress and Parenting in the
        Context of Cumulative Disadvantage. Family Process, 49(2), 142-164.

    This article presents an emergent conceptual model of the features and links between
cumulative disadvantage, maternal distress, and parenting practices in low-income families in
which parental incarceration has occurred. The model emerged from the integration of extant
conceptual and empirical research with grounded theory analysis of longitudinal ethnographic
data from Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study. Fourteen exemplar family cases
were used in the analysis. Results indicated that mothers in these families experienced life in the
context of cumulative disadvantage, reporting a cascade of difficulties characterized by
neighborhood worries, provider concerns, bureaucratic difficulties, violent intimate relationships,
and the inability to meet children's needs. Mothers, however, also had an intense desire to protect
their children, and to make up for past mistakes. Although, in response to high levels of maternal
distress and disadvantage, most mothers exhibited harsh discipline of their children, some
mothers transformed their distress by advocating for their children under difficult circumstances.
Women's use of harsh discipline and advocacy was not necessarily an ―either/or‖ phenomenon as
half of the mothers included in our analysis exhibited both harsh discipline and care/advocacy
behaviors. Maternal distress characterized by substance use, while connected to harsh disciplinary
behavior, did not preclude mothers engaging in positive parenting behaviors.
Demby, S. (2009). Interparent Hatred and Its Impact on Parenting: Assessment in Forensic
     Custody Evaluations. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 29(6), 477-490.

    The concept of parental conflict, as it is used in the custody evaluation literature, rarely
conveys the motivational complexity of chronic parental acrimony. The concept of pathological
hatred better describes and explains why some parents continue bitter fighting years after their
divorce. Kernberg's classificatory schema of pathological hatred is applied to high-conflict
divorces in which such hatred may be viewed as an effort to destroy, while at the same time
desperately needing, the other parent. Difficulties mourning the lost marital relationship,
stemming from either character pathology or childhood trauma, create a fertile breeding ground
for pathological hatred. The concept of parental competence is also frequently oversimplified in
the custody evaluation literature, where it is viewed as an assortment of unrelated skills.

García, F., & Gracia, E. (2009). Is Always Authoritative The Optimum Parenting Style? Evidnece
       From Spanish Families. Adolescence, 44(173), 101-131. Retrieved from Academic Search
       Premier database.

    The aim of this paper is to establish which parenting style is associated with optimum youth
outcomes among adolescents of Spanish families. A sample of 1, 416 teenagers from 12 to 17
years of age, of whom 57.2% were females, reported on their parents' child-rearing practices. The
teenagers' parents were classified into one of four groups (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent,
or neglectful). The adolescents were then contrasted on four different outcomes: (1) self-esteem
(academic, social, emotional, family and physical); (2) psychosocial maladjustment
(hostility/aggression, negative self-esteem, negative self-adequacy, emotional irresponsiveness,
emotional instability, and negative worldview); (3) personal competence (social competence,
grade point average, and number of failing grades); and (4) problem behaviors (school
misconduct, delinquency, and drug use). Results showed that both the indulgent and authoritative
parenting styles were associated with better outcomes than authoritarian and neglectful parenting.
Overall, our results supported the idea that in Spain the optimum style of parenting is the
indulgent one, as adolescents' scores in the four sets of youth outcomes were equal or better than
the authoritative style of parenting.
Klelin, M.B, & Pierce, J.D. (2010). Parental care aids, but parental overprotection hinders,
        college adjustment. Journal of College       Student Retention: Research, Theory and
        Practice , 11(2), 167- 181.

        In this article it talks about how when students have troublesome relationships with their
parents they are at a higher risk for poorer college adjustment. In the study, they focused on the
balance between two key aspects of parenting style, parental care and overprotection, as they affect
the transition to college life. The article’s main focus is showing the readers that they way parents
handle their children is going to determine how they do in college. Both the mother and father’s roles
were critical for successful college adjustment. The results have important implications for
understanding how familial issues powerfully influence college adjustment and student retention, and
provide compelling evidence of the need for limits to parental support in students entering college



Lugo-Gil, J., & Tamis-LeMonda, C. (2008). Family Resources and Parenting Quality: Links to
       Children’s Cognitive Development Across the First 3 Years. Child Development, 79(4), 1065-
       1085.
        Reciprocal associations among measures of family resources, parenting quality, and child
cognitive performance were investigated in an ethnically diverse, low-income sample of 2,089
children and families. Family resources and parenting quality uniquely contributed to children’s
cognitive performance at 14, 24, and 36 months, and parenting quality mediated the effects of family
resources on children’s performance at all ages. Parenting quality continued to relate to children’s
cognitive performance at 24 and 36 months after controlling for earlier measures of parenting quality,
family resources, and child performance. Similarly, children’s early cognitive performance related to
later parenting quality above other measures in the model. Findings merge economic and
developmental theories by highlighting reciprocal influences among children’s performance,
parenting, and family resources over time.
Morawska, A., Winter, L., & Sanders, M. (2009). Parenting knowledge and its role in the
     prediction of dysfunctional parenting and disruptive child behavior. Child: Care, Health
     & Development, 35(2), 217-226.

        There is a scarcity of research on the relationship between parental knowledge, parenting
and parenting self-efficacy, and some inconsistencies have been reported in the literature.
Method Parent knowledge of effective parenting strategies was assessed among 68 parents from
a non-clinic sample, who also completed questionnaires relating to parenting confidence, quality
of parenting and child behavior. Results Parents with greater knowledge tended to be less
dysfunctional, and reported significantly higher education and income levels. Parenting
confidence explained a significant proportion of the variance in reported frequency of disruptive
child behavior while knowledge did not independently contribute to the prediction. However, the
relationship between parenting confidence and dysfunctional parenting was moderated by the
level of knowledge. There was a stronger negative relationship between confidence and
dysfunctional parenting when knowledge level was low than when it was high. Post hoc analyses
indicated that the relationship between parenting knowledge and disruptive child behavior was
moderated by the level of parenting dysfunction. Parenting knowledge and reported frequency
of disruptive behavior were positively related when the level of dysfunction was low, but were
unrelated when it was high. Conclusions Parents with low levels of knowledge and confidence in
their parenting may be at greater risk of dysfunctional parenting and might benefit from
interventions designed to enhance both knowledge and confidence. Results are interpreted in
relation to inconsistencies with previous research and implications for future methodologies.

Skinner, E., Johnson, S., & Snyder, T. (2005). Six Dimensions of Parenting: A Motivational
       Model. Parenting: Science & Practice, 5(2), 175-235.

       A motivational conceptualization provided the basis for identifying 6 core features of
   parenting style (warmth, rejection, structure, chaos, autonomy support, and coercion) and
   constructing 2 measures to assess them (1 for parents and 1 for children). Design. Self-report
   data were collected from independent samples of parents (N = 1212, 645 mothers and 567
   fathers) and adolescent children (N = 3,752). Results. Models of multiple (unipolar)
   dimensions provided a significantly better fit than traditional models of bipolar dimensions.
   Moreover, correlations among dimensions suggested that dimensions can be aggregated in
   several ways. Conclusion. The conceptual framework and measures can contribute to future
   work on parenting, including research designed to map the many constructs that describe
   parenting, and studies that explore how parenting style shapes child and adolescent
   outcomes.
Smith, R. (2010). TOTAL PARENTING. Educational Theory, 60(3), 357-369.

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-
modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly
monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded
instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins to cast
being a parent as a matter of ―parenting,” a technological deployment of skills and
techniques, with the loss of older, more spontaneous and intuitive relations between parents
and children. Smith examines this phenomenon further through a discussion of how it is
captured to some extent in Hannah Arendt's notion of ―natality‖ and how it is illuminated by
Charles Dickens in his classic novel, Dombey and Son.




Weisskirch, R. (2009). Parenting by Cell Phone: Parental Monitoring of Adolescents and
   Family Relations. Journal of Youth & Adolescence, 38(8), 1123-1139.
   doi:10.1007/s10964-008-        9374-

     In the article it talks about how cell phones provides the means for parents to monitor
where their children are at and what they are doing. Also, adolescents can do the same and
communicate back with the parents. Cell phones may seem to be a great thing but it can also
lead to bad things. Greater frequency in parental calls also was associated with less
adolescent-reported truthfulness. From multiple regression analyses, for parents, calls when
upset were associated with less parental knowledge and poorer family relations. For
adolescents, the same was true; however, adolescents who made calls seeking social support
and to ask and confer with parents reported greater perceived parental knowledge and better
family relationships.
Standard III:
  Student
  Learning
             10 Language Arts Homework Assignments for First Grade Students

1-     Build me a Sandwich.

       The students will be given directions on how to make a sandwich and students must draw
       the sandwich as directed in the instructions. The parents can help by being the ones that
       read the instructions on how to make a sandwich.

       Barriers

       A barrier that may occur with single-parents is that they might not have enough time in
       the day to sit with their child and do the homework with them. One thing that can be done
       is give that students more time so that they can do it with the parent on the days they have
       off from work or have time. The students could also ask a grandparent or aunt or uncle to
       help.

2- Read with a parent

       Student take twenty to thirty minutes to sit down with their parent or guardian and read to
       them. The student could read to the adult for the full time or they can switch back and
       forth, taking turns in reading.

       Barriers

       A barrier that might occur when doing this assignment is that not all children live with
       their parents. Some students might live with the grandparents, aunts or uncles. Make sure
       to let the students know that they can read to whoever is home with them so they do not
       feel bad.

3- Identify that punctuation

       The students will be given a passage to read to the parent or any family member. When
       the student gets to a punctuation mark they must stop, identify the punctuation maker and
       tell what it does. The parents must check the students if they get it wrong or right and
       they will write down the results. In doing this it will let me see what punctuation marks
       the students are struggling with.

       Barriers

       A barrier that might occur when doing this assignment is that not all children live with
       their parents. Some students might live with the grandparents, aunts or uncles. Make sure
       to let the students know that they can read to whoever is home with them so they do not
       feel bad.
4- Count the Name

   The students will get all the names that are in their household and count the syllables that are
   in the name. Record the findings. Have the students count the syllables to the parents, the
   parents can check if they are doing it correctly.

   Barriers

   A barrier that might occur when doing this assignment is that not all children live with their
   parents. Some students might live with the grandparents, aunts or uncles. Make sure to let the
   students know that they can read to whoever is home with them so they do not feel bad.

5- Interactive language arts skill builders

   Give the students a website online where they can go and practice language arts skills. Make
   sure to tell the students to go online with their parents or guardians.

   http://www.internet4classrooms.com/skill_builders/alphabetize_language_arts_first_1
   st_grade.htm

   http://www.tickettoread.com/

   Barriers

   Sometimes students live with their grandparents and their grandparents do not know much
   about technology so they cannot help the students on the computer. Let those student know
   that they can have their cousin or someone that they know is good on the computer to help
   them.

6- Book reports

   Have the students pick a book that they would like to do a book report on. Give them ideas
   that they could use and have the students work together with their parents to think of a
   project that they could do for the book report.

   Barriers

   Sometimes students have only one parents and that one parent does not have enough time
   because they are working. One thing that can be done is I would ask the parent it they would
   like me to take time after school or before school to help this student with the book report.
7- Spelling

   Have the students practice their spelling for that week by writing them three times or having
   them do practice spelling with their parents or guardian. The adult in the household can
   administer a practice test to the child and then correct it after that.

   Barriers

   A barrier that may occur with single-parents is that they might not have enough time in the
   day to sit with their child and do the homework with them. One thing that can be done is give
   that students more time so that they can do it with the parent on the days they have off from
   work or have time. The students could also ask a grandparent or aunt or uncle to help.

8- Label it

   Have the students label things around the house. Parents or guardians should help the
   students with spelling of the words and reaching high places if the students cannot reach.

   Barriers

   A barrier that might occur when doing this assignment is that not all children live with their
   parents. Some students might live with the grandparents, aunts or uncles. Make sure to let the
   students know that they can read to whoever is home with them so they do not feel bad.

9- Parent editor

   When students need to write a paragraph or a few sentences. I would like the parent to be the
   editor and read through the paragraph and mark any errors that they might see and write me a
   note telling me what they see.

   Barriers

   A barrier that may occur with single-parents is that they might not have enough time in the
   day to sit with their child and do the homework with them. One thing that can be done is give
   that students more time so that they can do it with the parent on the days they have off from
   work or have time. The students could also ask a grandparent or aunt or uncle to help.
10- ABC books

   Students will create an ABC book with the help of their parents or family member. They will
   make the ABC book out of whatever material they want and then bring it back to class so that
   we will have a collection in our classroom library.

   Barriers

   A barrier that might occur when doing this assignment is that not all children live with their
   parents. Some students might live with the grandparents, aunts or uncles. Make sure to let the
   students know that they can read to whoever is home with them so they do not feel bad.
Standard IV:
Volunteering
Two ways to make classroom welcoming
   When opening the door for the students, stand by the door and greet each student
     with a smile and a hand shake and make sure to tell them that you are happy that
     they came to class today. Also, greet the parents as they drop of the students.

      Have a wall in the classroom that is all about the families of the students. The wall
       can consist of pictures that have been brought in by the students. When it comes to
       parent-teacher conference you can show the wall to the parents. Decorate the class
       in a way that you believe would make someone feel welcomed.


Barriers

A barrier that might occur with students who are living in poverty is that they might not have a
camera to take pictures of their families for the family wall. The way this barrier can be
overcome is having the teacher go and take pictures of the parents, so that everyone’s picture can
be included on the wall.




Five ways to solicit and invite parents to volunteer
    In the weekly news paper announce signup for parent volunteers.

      Have the students ask the parents to help

      Give the parents a phone call telling that you would appreciate help in the
       classroom.

      At Open House have a signup sheet for the parents to sign up to volunteer

      Email


Barriers

For the parents who live in poverty it might be hard for them to find a time to volunteer because
they are working all the time. A thing that can be done to still include these parents is tell them
that they can volunteer anyway that they can even if they can’t come to the classroom.
Two ways you will involve parents in the classroom
   Ask the parents to do presentations about their family of what they do to the class.
     In doing this the class will get to know the parents of their classmates and also make
     the parents feel welcomed and cared for in that class.

      When doing centers in the class, ask parents if they would like to come help and be
       in charge of one of the centers. Also, you could have the parents help with
       decorating the classroom so that they feel more connected to their child’s class.


Barriers

For the parents who live in poverty it might be hard for them to find a time to volunteer because
they are working all the time. A thing that can be done to still include these parents is tell them
that they can volunteer anyway that they can even if they can’t come to the classroom. It could
be that the teacher sends a note home talking about how their child is doing and you can ask the
parent to write back.
Standard V:
  School
 Decision
Making and
 Advocacy
                      Involving Parents in Developing the Classroom Policies



        When coming up with the procedures or classroom policies of the class, I would like the

parents of the students to be involved so I would do a couple to things to make sure that I get

their input when making these decisions. I want the parents to know how I expect the students to

behave so that they will not have any surprises when their students get in trouble or do not follow

the policies.


        One thing that I would involve the parents in developing the policies and procedures is

when I send a letter to my students welcoming them to my classroom I will send a letter

explaining to the parents that I would like them to list some classroom policies that they think I

should have in my classroom. I will give them my address so that they can send the letter back

before that school year starts. When I have received the lists and have seen the things that the

parents have written I will pick then ones that were most popular. After I have chosen the

policies at Open House I will present them the policies that I have chosen, and if there are any

questions or concerns I will answer them then. A barrier that I might have when doing this is

that I might have parents that are ESL. It will not matter I will write them in Spanish or whatever

language they speak and I will tell them to write me in their native language and I will translate

it. Also, when I present to the parents at Open-House I will translate what I am saying for them

or have a translator if I can get one.
Standard VI :
Collaborating
    with
 Community
Children’s Justice Center

Contact Number: (435)634-1134

Address: 463 East 500 South, St. George, UT 84770
Web Site: http://www.cjcwc.org/index.php




Purpose of Agency:

The Children’s Justice Center is a homelike facility which serves children and families who are
experiencing the crisis and chaos that comes with the disclosure of significant physical or sexual
abuse of a child. The Center is designed to help children feel safe and comfortable so that they
may begin to deal with the difficult and often frightening issues that surround abuse.

Traditionally, Investigation of child abuse required multiple interviews of the child victim by the
police, social services, medical personnel, psychologists and attorneys. Each interview occurred
at a different place and rarely in a setting that was familiar or comfortable for the child. The
Children’s Justice Center is place for the child with a homelike environment, where the
necessary interviews can occur in an atmosphere that is non-threatening to the child.

The goal is to produce a comprehensive response in exploring allegations, to provide
recommendations to parents regarding the safety or treatment needs of the child, and to stabilize
the crisis often experienced by the family.




Target Clients:

      serves children and families
Divisions of Children and Family Service

Contact Number: (435) 862-652-2960

Address: 359 E Riverside Dr ,Saint George, UT 84790
Web Site: http://www.dcfs.utah.gov/index.htm the link to
http://www.dspd.utah.gov/docs/agency%20overview.pdf



Purpose of Agency:

Our goal is to have communities where children grow up safe from abuse, neglect, and
dependency, where adults are protected from domestic violence, and where parents can be
strengthened in their capacity to keep their family safe.



The Mission of Child and Family Services is to protect children at risk of abuse, neglect, or
dependency. We do this by working with families to provide safety, nurturing, and permanence.
We lead in a partnership with the community in this effort.




Target Clients:

      Children dealing with abuse in the home.
Head Start

Contact Number: 435-628-5641

Address: 494 E 900 S ,Saint George, UT 84790
Web Site: http://www.headstartwashco.org/



Purpose of Agency:

The overall goal of head Start is to increase social competence of young children in low income
families. Social competence takes into account the social, emotional, cognitive and physical
development of children and leads to effectiveness in dealing with the present environment and
later responsibilities in school and life.



Target Clients:

      Pregnant women, children age 0-5, and their families
D.S.P.D ( Department of services for people with disabilities)

Contact Number: (435) 647-3961

Address: 377 E Riverside Dr ,Saint George, UT 84790
Web Site: http://www.dspd.utah.gov/index.htm#




Purpose of Agency:

We promote opportunities and provide support for persons with disabilities to lead self-
determined lives. We oversee home and community-based services for more than 4,000 people
who have disabilities. Support includes community living, day services, supported employment
services, and support for people with disabilities and their families.

We also provide services to about 250 people at the Utah State Developmental Center (USDC), a
state operated Intermediate Care Facility for people with Mental Retardation (ICF/MR).




Target Clients:

      Children and adults with specific disabilities
Southwest Center ( Mental Health Services)

Contact Number: (435) 634-5600

Address: 474 West 200 North Suite 300 ,Saint George UT 84770
Web Site: http://www.southwestcenter.com/



Purpose of Agency:

The mission of Southwest Center is to promote, restore, and maintain well being by providing
treatment, education, and advocacy services appropriate to the mental health and substance abuse
needs of our communities. All services will be consumer oriented, collaborative and performed
in a quality manner.



Target Clients:

      Everyone in general
Hope Pregnancy Center

Contact Number: (435)- 652-8343

Address : 427 West 100 South, Suite B, St. George, UT 84770

Web Site: http://hopepregnancyutah.org/



Purpose of Agency:

Hope Pregnancy Care Center is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to helping women in
the Washington County area who are facing a crisis pregnancy. The purpose of Hope is to
counsel and educate girls and women who are facing a crisis pregnancy, or who think they may
be pregnant. All of our services are free and confidential. At Hope we provide pregnancy tests,
peer counseling, complete information on options, abstinence presentations, community
referrals, post-abortion support, material resources, and parenting programs.



Target Clients:

      Women
      Teenage mothers
Dixie Care and Share

Contact Number: (435) 628-3661

Address: 131 N 300 W, St George, UT 84770
Web Site: http://dixiecareandshare.org/




Purpose of Agency:

Dixie Care & Share, a 501(c)(3) charity based in St. George Utah, is an organization of
community, an idea created to help those who need help. The facility creates a way to bring
together community resources to operate food banks and emergency shelters in St. George and
Hurricane. It also helps those who need education about how to work with others, those who
need to be healed, and those who need to learn about a new job or a new path in life.



Target Clients:

      All those who need food, shelter.
      Families and individuals
Erin Kimball Foundation

Contact Number: (435) 6730-1659

Address: 321 N. Mall Drive, Suite M-102, St. George, UT 84790
Web Site: http://www.erinkimball.org/



Purpose of Agency:

According to its mission statement, the H.O.M.E. program is intended to those fleeing domestic
violence, abuse and polygamy. In the time that the H.O.M.E. program has been operating, all
program participants have been women. All have minor children living with them, and all have
experienced domestic violence, either recently or in the past.



Target Clients:

      Almost all of the families we serve are homeless, or at risk of becoming homeless
Child Care Resource Center

Contact Number: (435) 628- 4843

Address: 1070 West 1600 South, Building B, St. George, UT 84770
Web Site: http://www.childcarehelp.org/contact.htm

Purpose of Agency:

To improve the quality of life for the children in Southern Utah who are enrolled in child care
programs and provide support for their families and child care providers.

Offer the following services:

Services for Families

      Free referrals to and information about child care programs, tailored to meet families'
       specific child care needs
      Free information on how to choose quality child care, given over-the-phone, through-the-
       mail and on-line
      Free child care data and contact information to programs that support families

Services for Providers

      Start-up support, including grants, for new child care providers
      Free listings on our referral database
      Low- or no-cost training to instruct and encourage providers and center staff in offering
       quality child care
      Unlimited access to curriculum lending library and children's books
      Free quarterly newsletter featuring upcoming training, grant opportunities, and activities
       for children

Services for Community and Business Partners

      Useful data about child care services in local areas
      Collaboration with a variety of agencies interested in family and child care issues,
       including a yearly early childhood conference
      Employer presentations on work-life policies, including ways to support employees with
       their child care needs, as well as brown-bag seminars for employees on a variety of
       topics.

Target Clients

      Parents and their children that need help with child care.
United Way

Contact Number: 435-674-5939

Address: 1070 W. 1600 S., Building B ,Saint George, UT 84770


Web Site: http://www.dixieunitedway.org/



Purpose of Agency:

        United Way works every day to solve the most pressing problems facing residents by
attending community meetings and sitting on local councils to find out where the areas of need
are the greatest.




Target Clients:

      Residents of the city in which they live in.