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Accessing the General Curriculum

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 35

									  Accessing the General
Curriculum the 4 Step Way
  Mike Burdge and Jean Clayton
 Keystone Alternate Assessment
           July 2010
Hitting a Dead End
 (Instruction not leading to general
        standards/curriculum)
     Bobbie
Following a Dead End
    Bobbie
Hitting a Dead End
  Following a False Lead

(Instruction not leading to general
       standards/curriculum)
        Berta
Following a False Lead
       Berta
Following a False Lead
Breaking the Code
 (Doing the same old thing with bits
        of access to general
       standards/curriculum.)
                           June
                   Breaking the Code

Today we did an activity on plot. June sat really well and looked
              at me. She is joy to have in class.
     June
Breaking the Code
Solving the Case
(Accessing general ed. standards
 and curriculum on routine basis)
     B.J.
Solving the Case
     B.J.
Solving the Case
                                                STANDARDS

General Education Teachers

                                  ASSESSMENT                CURRICULUM




                                                                            Special Education Teachers
                                               LESSON PLANS




                             ACTIVITY(IES)                 INSTRUCTIONAL
                                                               STRATEGIES
                                                  SKILLS
Step 1 – Identify the Standard for the
Instructional Unit
• State Standard
• Grade Level Standard - Determine what the standard is
  about




        Step 2


               Step 3

                    Step 4
Step 1 – Identify the Standard for the Instructional Unit
• State Standard
• Grade Level Standard - Determine what the standard is about




        Step 2 – Define the Outcomes for the
        Instructional Unit
        • Determine outcomes for all students
        • Prioritize outcomes for student with significant
          cognitive disabilities




                    Step 3




                          Step 4
           Your turn! (15 minutes)
1.   Select an instructional unit based upon the grade level benchmark
2.   Discuss the outcomes that have already been determined for all
     general education students.
3.   Determine prioritize outcomes for the student (see slides 24 – 28)
4.   Discuss the formative assessment(s) for all general education
     students.
5.   Determine if any changes are needed for the student.
6.   Complete the DOK sections of the DOK chart:
     – Briefly describe objectives at various DOK levels
     – List possible formative assessments at various DOK levels
                       Jean Clayton and Michael Burdge, Keystone Alternate               17
                                                                             July 2010
                                           Assessment
Step 1 – Identify the Standard for the Instructional
Unit
• State Standard
• Grade Level Standard - Determine what the standard is about


   Step 2 – Define the Outcomes for the Instructional Unit
   • Determine outcomes for all students
   • Prioritize outcomes for student with significant cognitive disabilities



     Step 3 – Identify the Instructional Strategies that
     Move the Students Towards Achievement of
     Standard
     • Instructional activities are planned for all students
     • Barriers that are keeping students with disabilities from
       accessing the same learning
     • Supports to reduce barriers and how they will be
       implemented


                            Step 4
Accessing instruction within the context
   of what all students are learning
1. Can the target student comprehend information
   shared during instruction using the materials
   provided?
2. Can the student interact with materials,
   communicate, and demonstrate knowledge?
3. Will the student be interested in the activity and
   remain engaged long enough to learn?
              Jean Clayton and Michael Burdge, Keystone Alternate               19
                                                                    July 2010
                                  Assessment
Identify Barriers Based on 3 UDL
            Principles
1. Can the targeted student comprehend
   information shared during instruction using
   the materials provided?
2. Can the student interact with materials,
   communicate, and demonstrate knowledge?
3. Will the student be interested in the activity
   and remain engaged long enough to learn?
                GSEG II: PAC6 Assessment Implementation
July 2009                                                 20
                                 Project
Perhaps there is no more
fundamental outcome of
education than the right
and the ability to
communicate.
Academic content is by
definition symbolic content –
access to the general
curriculum is only meaningful
if one can understand and
express that content.
Making content accessible requires
us to consider the student’s
communication/language capabilities
– Receptive abilities impact a student’s
  ability to process and make sense of
  instructional activities
– Expressive abilities impact a student’s
  ability to demonstrate what they have
  learned
What did a study of over 13,000
students involved in alternate
assessment in 7 states on the
mainland tell us about receptive
and expressive skills?
           Receptive Language
• 37-56% responded to 1-2 step directions via
  spoken, signed, or printed words without
  additional cues
• 34-51% required additional cues to respond to
  directions
• 7-13% alerted to sensory input from others, but
  required physical assistance to follow directions
• Across states, approximately 2-3% displayed an
  uncertain response to sensory stimuli
   Expressive Communication
• 61-79% of students across the states used true
  “language” in some form to communicate

• Between 13-26% used understandable modes such as
  gestures, point, objects, etc., to express intents
  (illocutionary/emergent symbolic)

• 7-17% used cries, facial expressions, change in muscle
  tone, etc., to communicate, but no regularized
  gestures, pictures, etc.
Students at Pre and Emerging
 Expressive Symbolic Levels
Elementary School: 32.8%
  • 20.3% “emerging symbolic”
  • 12.6% “pre-symbolic”
Middle School: 25.5%
  • 17.6% “emerging symbolic”
  • 7.9% “pre-symbolic”)
High School: 22.7%
  • 13.2% “emerging symbolic”
  • 9.5% “pre-symbolic”)
Students who are unable to use
oral speech have no way of
displaying their actual level of
cognitive and academic
achievement if no AAC has been
offered or established.
 Collaboration is essential for
 effective communication in
the classroom, and each team
  member has a unique role.


    Hurd, Robin. (2009). AAC and the IEP. Perspectives on Augmentative and
    Alternative Communication, 18: 65-70.
So, what can teachers do to
 help these students with
 expressive and receptive
language issues access the
       curriculum?
                    Receptively
•   Provide simplified input
•   Pre-teach vocabulary
•   Break complex directions down into simple forms
•   Use signs or symbols in addition to speech for input
•   Provide multiple repetitions of content vocabulary
•   Check comprehension
•   Do not assume that a student who doesn’t use symbols
    can’t understand
                 Expressively
• Provide alternate systems for the student to respond
  (e.g. signs, objects, symbols, communication
  boards, voice output communication aids)
• Model expressive use of the sign/gesture/symbol
  system the student is using
• WAIT – provide the student adequate time to
  formulate a response
• Learn to recognize and respond appropriately to
  student’s unconventional communication
Increasing Classroom Participation
• Develop an “Ecological Inventory” of the students
  favorite things, greatest needs, etc. INVOLVING
  FAMILY INPUT!!!!!
• Display a Daily Schedule for each student
• Identify what communication adaptations the student
  may need in order to participate in the
  classroom/curriculum
• Develop a matrix of the student’s day which includes
  how he/she will participate in each class and what
  means of communication he/she will utilize
       Classroom Activity Analysis
Classroom Routine/                          Appropriate for the Student?              What Adaptations?   Alternative Activities
Activity/ expectations


                                AS IS       Materials   Goals          Personal
Activity                                                               Support


                                 Y      N     Y     N     Y      N         Y      N


Keep a science journal

Conduct experiments with
group

Develop vocabulary


Formulate inquiry for
science fair


Write a report about an earth
science video

Monitor the Weather Station


Conduct internet search with
key vocabulary
Step 1 – Identify the Standard for the Instructional Unit
• State Standard
• Grade Level Standard - Determine what the standard is about


    Step 2 – Define the Outcomes for the Instructional Unit
    • Determine outcomes for all students
    • Prioritize outcomes for student with significant cognitive disabilities



           Step 3 – Identify the Instructional Strategies that Move the
           Students Towards Achievement of Standard
           •Instructional activities are planned for all students
           •Barriers that are keeping students with disabilities from accessing the same learning
           •Supports to reduce barriers and how they will be implemented




      Step 4 - Target specific IEP objectives and foundational
      skills that can be addressed during the unit
      • Embedding IEP skills ensures instructional opportunities on
        essential skills while providing access to the general curriculum
      • Allows for a “seamless transition”

								
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