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					AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN –CALIFORNIA

Program Recognition Reference Manual
            2004 - 2006
Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 1
  AAUW CA RECOGNITION PROGRAM GUIDING PRINCIPLES & SUGGESTED OUTCOMES ................1
EDUCATION AS THE GATEWAY TO WOMEN’S ECONOMIC SECURITY ....................2
EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION (EF) EDUCATION AND FUNDRAISING ........................ 4
     Marjorie Wilkes, EF Career Grant Recipient on Starting a Charter School for African-
     American Children in West Oakland (Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette) .............................................4
     Festival of Women Authors (Laguna Beach) ..............................................................................4
     Focus on Fashion (Victor Valley) ............................................................................................... 4
EDUCATION EQUITY .................................................................................................................5
  SISTER-TO-SISTER PROGRAM .........................................................................................................5
    Auburn ........................................................................................................................................5
    Petaluma .....................................................................................................................................5
  GIRLS WHO BULLY GIRLS (REDDING) ............................................................................................ 5
  GIRLS CONFERENCE: FACING THE FUTURE WITH CONFIDENCE ...................................................... 6
  MENTORING PROGRAM FOR WOMEN STUDENTS AT SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE (CHULA VISTA) ...6
  WOMEN IN HISTORY ....................................................................................................................... 7
    La Mesa-El Cajon ....................................................................................................................... 7
    Brea-La Habra ........................................................................................................................... 7
  GIRL POWER (HEMET-SAN JACINTO VALLEY) ...............................................................................8
  CAREER DAY ..................................................................................................................................9
    Big Bear Valley ........................................................................................................................... 9
    Math/Science Career Day (Long Beach) ....................................................................................9
    Brighter Horizons (San Fernando Valley) ..................................................................................9
  MATH/SCIENCE ............................................................................................................................ 10
    Tech Trek & Julie Townsend, Member of the Mars Exploration Rover Engineering Team
    (Glendale) ................................................................................................................................. 10
    Tech Trek-Alhambra`-San Gabriel Joint Meeting with Montebello-Monterey Park ................ 10
    A Taste of Technology—Tea honoring students selected to participate in Tech Trek Science
    Camp at Stanford ...................................................................................................................... 11
    Tyke Trek –Science Camp for Third Grade Girls (Palm Springs) ............................................ 11
    15th Annual Math and Science Conference (West Contra Costa) ............................................ 12
    Unlimited Potential—Math/Science Conference (Whittier) ...................................................... 12
    Mother-Daughter Math Science Discovery Day (Fremont) ..................................................... 13
LEGAL ADVOCACY .................................................................................................................. 13
     AAUW California Legal Advocacy Fund Vice-President (Redding) ........................................ 13
COMMUNITY ACTION ............................................................................................................. 14
     Hope House (San Carlos) ......................................................................................................... 14
     Rebuilding Together (Palo Alto)............................................................................................... 15
     Volunteer Opportunities in the Community (Half Moon Bay) .................................................. 15
     Teen Basket Holiday Project (San Jose) ................................................................................... 16
PUBLIC POLICY ......................................................................................................................... 17
     Step Out for Pro-Choice Walk (Los Altos/Mountain View) ...................................................... 17
     Foreign Policy Expert Speaks about Year in Jordan (Healdsburg) ......................................... 17
     Teen Health Issues (Tustin) ...................................................................................................... 17
     Winds of Change (Palo Alto) .................................................................................................... 18
     GMO & November Election Concerns (Petaluma) .................................................................. 18
     Public Policy Program (San Jose) ............................................................................................ 19
     Women of Achievement Dinner (Laguna Beach) ...................................................................... 20
     Project Vote Smart and Ride to the Polls Project (Nevada County) ........................................ 20
     Come Meet the Press! Panel Discussion: Perspectives on the State of U.S. Journalism—Print,
     Radio & Television (Nevada County) ....................................................................................... 21
     Women in Government (Clayton and Concord) ....................................................................... 21
     Mayoral Forum (San Fernando Valley) ................................................................................... 22
     Have we got a Proposition for You! (Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette) ............................................ 22
     Woman-to-Woman Forum: Health Care--Access and Education (Placerville)........................ 23
     Candidate Forums (Pacifica) ................................................................................................... 23
     Title IX = Progress for Women (Gilroy)................................................................................... 24
     The Safety Net Undone? (Sunnyvale-Cupertino) ...................................................................... 24
MEMBERSHIP OUTREACH, RETENTION & COMMUNITY VISIBILITY..................... 25
  MEMBERSHIP RECRUITMENT .......................................................................................................... 25
    The ABCs of AAUW (Sunnyvale-Cupertino)............................................................................. 25
    Community Visibility and Membership Recruitment Program (Los Gatos-Saratoga) ............. 25
    Membership Outreach, Retention & Visibility (Monterey Peninsula Branch) ........................ 26
  FINANCIAL EDUCATION.................................................................................................................. 27
    Smart Women Finish Rich (Gilroy) .......................................................................................... 27
    Investment Fraud, Identity Theft, and Scams (Redding) ........................................................... 27
    Economic Well-Being (Chico) .................................................................................................. 27
    Building a Business (Lodi) ........................................................................................................ 27
    Financial/Economic Literacy (San Fernando Valley) .............................................................. 28
    Women’s Finances Matter! (Benicia-Vallejo) .......................................................................... 28
    Financial/Economic Literacy (Redlands) ................................................................................. 28
    Alternative Schools (Watsonville) ............................................................................................. 29
  HEALTH & WELL-BEING ................................................................................................................ 29
    Women’s Health Forum (Thousand Oaks) ............................................................................... 29
    Betty Auchard, Writer, Speaker, Humorist--Dancing in My Nightgown: The Rhythms of
    Widowhood (Redding) .............................................................................................................. 30
    Forum for Women’s Issues (Lompoc Vandenberg) .................................................................. 30
    Health Faire (Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette) ................................................................................ 30
    Stem Cell Research (Glendale & Pasedena) ............................................................................ 30
    Women’s Heart Issues (Lodi) ................................................................................................... 31
    Caring for Aging Parents (Lodi) .............................................................................................. 31
    Motherhood by Choice, Not Chance (Stockton) ....................................................................... 31
    Women Making a Difference (Stockton) ................................................................................... 31
  GENERAL....................................................................................................................................... 32
    Branch Program Planning (Lodi) ............................................................................................. 32
    Membership Tea (Pomona Valley) ........................................................................................... 33
    Celebrating Women with Paola Gianturco (Modesto) ............................................................. 33
  An Inside Look at Video and Computer Games (Oakland-Piedmont) ...................................... 34
  Evening of Phenomenal Women: Featuring Songs, Words of Wisdom, Humor, Poetry, Bubbly
  and Bon Bons (Thousand Oaks) ............................................................................................... 34
  Bring Color, Harmony and Butterflies to your Garden (Redding) ........................................... 34
  History—Art—Culture: The Life and Art of Mae Helene Bacon Boogs (Redding) .................. 35
  Authors Forum Luncheon (Santa Maria) ................................................................................. 35
  Hats Off to Women: Celebrating Women’s History Month (Pleasant Hill).............................. 35
INTERNATIONAL INTERESTS AND DIVERSITY .................................................................................... 36
  Art Therapy in Thailand: Post-Tsunami (Redding) .................................................................. 36
  Peace Corps in Surinam (Redding) .......................................................................................... 36
  Women in Islam (Oakland-Piedmont) ...................................................................................... 36
  UOP School of International Studies’ Great Issue Series (Stockton) ....................................... 36
  Malawi: A Focus on Women’s Conditions (Ventura County) .................................................. 37
  A Little Help (Sunnyvale-Cupertino) ........................................................................................ 37
  Basics of Islam and the month of Ramadan (Sunnyvale-Cupertino) ........................................ 37
  Funny in Farsi (Sunnyvale-Cupertino) ..................................................................................... 38
  International Women’s Issues Panel (Thousand Oaks) ............................................................ 38
  Cultural Exchange (Clayton) .................................................................................................... 38
CELEBRATIONS .............................................................................................................................. 39
  30 Year Anniversary Celebration: Thirty Years of Commitment to Education (Healdsburg) .. 39
  AAUW Awards, Scholarships and Installation of Officers (Redding) ...................................... 39
  50th Anniversary Celebration: Butter n’ Eggs Parade Float (Petaluma) ................................. 40
  50th Anniversary Celebration (San Carlos) .............................................................................. 41
  50th Anniversary Celebration: Honoring the Past and Building the Future (Victor Valley) .... 41
  50th Anniversary Celebration: Achieving the Gold and Beyond (Fullerton) ............................ 42
FUNDRAISING & VISIBILITY IN THE COMMUNITY ............................................................................. 43
  The Annual Wildflower Run (Morgan Hill) .............................................................................. 43
  ELF Market (Pacifica) .............................................................................................................. 43
  Voter Registration Form Distribution (Auburn) ....................................................................... 44
  Beer Sales at the Gold Country Fair (Auburn) ......................................................................... 44
  A Taste of Chocolate (Auburn) ................................................................................................. 44
  Tea at Two (Auburn) ................................................................................................................. 45
  Showcase of Homes (Redding) ................................................................................................. 45
  Annual Home Tour and Art Show (Redding) ............................................................................ 45
  Holiday Tea and Bazaar (Walnut Creek) ................................................................................. 45
  ―A Day of Giving‖ Telethon (Nevada County) ......................................................................... 46
  Appraisal Faire (Nevada County) ............................................................................................ 46
  AAUW Garden Tour (Danville-Alamo) .................................................................................... 46
  No Ball Game Day (Gilroy) ...................................................................................................... 47
  Art and Wine at the Theatre (Roseville-South Placer).............................................................. 47
  The Select Sorority (Palos Verdes Peninsula) .......................................................................... 48
  Children’s Theatre (Simi Valley) .............................................................................................. 48




                                                    AAUW CA
                                    P.O. Box 160067 • Sacramento, CA 95616-0067
                                   Phone 916.448.7795 • E-mail office@aauw-ca.org
Introduction
AAUW CA Recognition Program Guiding Principles & Suggested Outcomes




A
         AUW California‘s strategic plan should guide state and branch programs throughout the state. Branches
         that develop and expand programs that address any of the following guiding principles and have
         achieved the suggested outcomes are eligible for the AAUW CA Recognition Program.

               Guiding Principles                                    Suggested Outcomes
 Membership Outreach and Retention                     Develop an outreach and retention effort that is
                                                         infused into every activity and communication
                                                         of the organization
 Educational Foundation and Legal Advocacy             Implement a marketing and media strategy to
  Fund education and fundraising                         frame public recognition of the organization, its
                                                         mission and its accomplishments
 Public Policy Education                               Expand public policy education and advocacy
 Visibility within the community                       Collaborate with like-minded groups, especially
                                                         to co-sponsor events


This document reflects the 2004-2006 AAUW CA Recognition Program submissions by branch officers and
committee members. Use it as a guide to generate idea for your own branch programs. For further details on a
program, contact the branch. Chapters include programs for Educational Foundation, Education Equity, Legal
Advocacy, Community Action Programs, Public Policy, and programs for Membership Outreach, Retention &
Community Visibility, and Fundraising.

In April 2005, the AAUW Educational Foundation Board and the Association Board voted to approve a new
programmatic theme for AAUW: Education as the Gateway to Women’s Economic Security. The first chapter
gives background about this new theme so that your branch can incorporate it in your branch program planning.

Thank you to the following branches that submitted CA Recognition Program applications: Alhambra-San Gabriel,
Auburn, Big Bear Valley, Brea-La Habra, Clayton, Chula Vista, Danville-Alamo, Fremont, Fullerton, Gilroy,
Glendale, Half Moon Bay, Healdsburg, Hemet-San Jacinto, La Mesa-El Cajon, Laguna Beach, Lompoc-
Vandenberg, Long Beach, Los Altos-Mountain View, Los Gatos-Saratoga, Modesto, Montebello-Monterey Park,
Monterey Peninsula, Morgan Hill, Nevada County, Oakland-Piedmont, Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette, Pacifica, Palo
Alto, Palm Springs, Palo Alto, Palos Verdes Peninsula, Petaluma, Placerville, Pleasant Hill, Redding, Roseville-
South Placer, San Carlos, San Fernando Valley, San Jose, Santa Maria, Simi Valley, Stockton, Sunnyvale-
Cupertino, Thousand Oaks, Tustin, Ventura County, Victor Valley, Walnut Creek, West Contra Costa, and Whittier.

Thank you also to Jennifer Jay (Clayton), AAUW CA Program Development Committee Member 2004-06, for
compiling this document.


                                                           Lisa Newhall
                                                           AAUW California Program Vice President, 2004-2006




                                                       1
Education as the Gateway to Women’s Economic Security
In April 2005, the AAUW Educational Foundation Board and the Association Board voted to approve a new
programmatic theme for AAUW: Education as the Gateway to Women‘s Economic Security. This new theme
represents a shared commitment by both entities to build a coordinated, collaborative, and contemporary portfolio
of AAUW programs that will serve the mission of AAUW, support and engage members and prospective members,
and, in the process, move the organization forward in a focused and strategic manner.

Many of AAUW‘s most successful initiatives — such as the publicity and transformative impact of How Schools
Shortchange Girls: The AAUW Report (1992) and the implementation of Sister-to-Sister summits — were
developed as national undertakings that drew from both Foundation and Association resources and were
implemented by local branches and other community partners across the country.

With this best practice model in mind, the new theme was developed by a team of AAUW staff who collaborated
with board representatives from both the Educational Foundation and the Association.

Why Education as the Gateway to Women’s Economic Security?
According to research from a wide variety of sources, economic security is one of the top issues of interest and
concern for all women. This topic‘s crosscutting appeal transcends demographic differences with high interest
levels among AAUW members and nonmembers, spanning age, race, income, and regional differences.
Moreover, it is perceived as a broad and timely issue that engages a diverse population of women at the local level
with great potential for national and international results.

This theme has particular relevance for AAUW, as we reflect on and celebrate the tremendous progress of girls
and young women in education over the past 20 years — much of which has been directly influenced by the
research and advocacy work of the organization. Clearly, gender equity issues remain in the K-12 arena and into
the college level, including the pervasive problem of harassment in schools and the continued need to support girls‘
early participation and advancement in science and technology. The reality, however, is that girls are now faring as
well as boys by most measures of educational achievement. As the leader in education and equity for women and
girls, AAUW must refocus its efforts to play an integral role in ensuring that the school-based achievements of
recent decades translate into lasting, lifelong equity for women and their families.

As has become abundantly clear from recent research, including AAUW‘s Women at Work (2003) and the web-
based Gains in Learning, Gaps in Earning (2005), women today are working more than ever yet remain crowded in
undervalued, lower-paying occupations with fewer benefits for themselves and the children and elderly for whom
they often care. Ensuring equity for women and girls — from pre-K through retirement and at all points in between
— has become our greatest challenge.

What does this new theme mean for AAUW?
As a new programmatic theme for AAUW, Education as a Gateway to Women‘s Economic Security will serve as
the guide for new AAUW programs. It will provide a framework for the creation of focused and coordinated
programming for AAUW that will be developed at the national level and refined and implemented by states,
branches, and other institutional and community partners, in much the same way that many of our most successful
research and program initiatives have been structured in the past.

The new theme is intended to focus our work as the continued leader in equity and education for women and girls,
proving that for all of our accomplishments, equity is still very much an issue.

The Educational Foundation (including the AAUW Legal Advocacy Fund), the Association, and the Leadership &
Training Institute will collaborate to build a national platform of programs and initiatives that will concentrate on the
following theme-related issues:
        Access to high-quality education (pre-K through higher education) for all girls and women
        Access to high-quality professional training and development for women
        Opportunities to study and advance professionally in high-skill and high-wage fields, particularly science
         and technology



                                                           2
       Greater value for women-dominated fields, including education
       Fair wages, family-friendly benefits, and nondiscriminatory workplaces for all women
       Lifelong opportunities for literacy development and learning
       The status and progress of women and girls internationally and for different subgroups of women and girls
        in the United States (by age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, etc.) on the above issues

Education as the Gateway to Women‘s Economic Security will not diminish AAUW‘s commitment to key areas
(e.g., debates on single-sex public education, the future of Title IX, or sexual harassment in educational settings).
Likewise, this theme is not intended to change the directions and priorities of states and local branches. Rather, it
is intended to guide the development of programs and partnerships from the national office.
What happens next?
At the national level, conceptual planning for a platform of theme-related programs is already underway.
Meanwhile, there are many successful theme-related initiatives at the state and branch levels that already exist,
and we encourage you to share more information about these and other local efforts.
As we continue the program planning process at the national level, we also look forward to hearing about the types
of programs and initiatives that would best serve the needs of local branches and communities
Since 1881, AAUW has been immensely proud of its status as the defender of education and equity for women
and girls. We are excited to move forward with this theme as a way to prove that equity is still an issue both in the
United States and abroad. More important, AAUW will continue to be in the forefront of providing the research,
support, advocacy, and resources to energize the fight to reach our greatest potential and transform the world for
women and girls.
Go to www.AAUW.org for more information about this new theme. As well, AAUW‘s first program in support of the
new theme, ―Campus Action Project: Building a Harassment Free Campus‖, just closed its call for proposals. Look
for more information on the program and grant recipients around the first of the year. At the Association link, you‘ll
also find AAUW‘s recent research related to women and economic security.




                                                          3
Educational Foundation (EF) education and fundraising
Marjorie Wilkes, EF Career Grant Recipient on Starting a Charter School for
African-American Children in West Oakland (Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette)
Jan Coe, Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette Branch President 2005-2006

Marjorie Wilkes, Educational Foundation career development grant recipient in 2002 spoke of the need to establish
a school different from the public schools limited in interacting with students. She described the meager beginnings
of the school, the strict discipline enforced and the mandatory cooperation of parents. She has devoted much of
her career to improving educational opportunities for children of color residing in low income communities.

Her career development grant enabled her to achieve a Master of Theological Studies from the Pacific School of
Religion, where her studies focused on the role of urban churches in neighborhood revitalization and neighborhood
development. Marjorie was an excellent speaker and personified the value of contributing to the Educational
Foundation. Two prospective members joined at the conclusion of the program.

Festival of Women Authors (Laguna Beach)
Elaine Lawson, Laguna Beach Co-President Elect 2004-2005

Our annual Festival of Woman Authors luncheon celebrated its 17th year on March 27, 2004, with 160 guests.
This event, the first of its kind in Orange County, was conceived in 1987 with the aim of raising funds for the
Educational Foundation. The 2004 featured authors represented a wide diversity of women and included an
Afghan-American women, herself an activist and authority on Muslim-American relations; a woman born in
Durban, South Africa writing on apartheid; a poet from Oklahoma; a French woman‘s searching for self via travel in
America; and the heir to a box of letters written to the famous race horse, Seabiscuit. As with the dinner outlined
above, this event focuses on visibility within the community, as well as membership outreach and retention. Very
positive news articles were generated by the luncheon; subsequently, we enrolled several brand new members.

The Branch realized a profit of about $6,500 for the Educational Foundation and our local community outreach
programs. These programs include elementary school tutoring, high school scholarships for girls, the Tech Trek
Summer Science Camp for middle school girls, and co-sponsorship of community musical concerts. As of the end
of 2004, the Laguna Beach Branch had completed four AAUW-EF Research & Projects Endowments (one
$25,000 endowment and three $35,000 endowments) through the success of the annual luncheon.

Focus on Fashion (Victor Valley)
Jane Pace, Victor Valley Committee Member 2005-2006

―Focus‖ on Fashion‖, held at the Apple Valley Country Club on November 12, 2005, and raised approximately
$2000 for the Educational Foundation. Approximately 80 people attended and admired the attire for men and
women. Victor Valley branch has established an endowment in the name of Dr. Garrison, a retired geography
teacher, who supports education for women/girls to study math, science and technology. Tickets cost $25 per
person for lunch and show.

The show started off with an introduction by branch president Donna Siegel, followed by music and vocals by Mike
Smith and Dahrl Swain. Caroll Yule was the Mistress of Ceremonies for the fashion show. The day‘s theme
focused on casual, career fashions plus some captivating evening wear. Fashions were supplied by the Dress
Barn and Jerschied‘s Mens Apparel with hats and accessories by Merle Norman. Program Vice President Donna
Mertens entertained attendees by reading some interesting excerpts from a book about the history of women in
America, and a little humor.

Focus on Fashion proceeds helped fund the Dr. J. Jeanne Garrison Research and Projects Endowment and a
one-time contribution to the American Endowment honoring AAUW-CA President Kathleen Cha.




                                                         4
Education Equity
Sister-to-Sister Program

Auburn
Susan Rushton, Auburn President 2005-2006

Sister-to-Sister is a biannual project conducted by Auburn AAUW over the past ten years. The event held on
January 28, 2006 was our fifth event for teen girls, and it was our biggest success. We have always had a goal of
a maximum of 100 girls, and this year, for the first time, we exceeded it.

Not a fundraiser, Sister to Sister instead aims to gather girls together for a day of education, help, fun, and
camaraderie. This year, workshops and activities for Sister to Sister 2006: Mind, Body, and Self focused on
College Planning and Preparation; Recognizing and Coping with Teen Depression; a craft activity; Self-Defense;
and Dramatic Improvisation Games. Folders given to every girl included a brochure on awareness of abuse and
the power of saying no.

In addition, speakers included Auburn‘s first female Chief of Police, just recently promoted; and a local college
instructor speaking on "How Mind Body and Self Interact with Each Other and with Community."

We had good publicity for this program, publicity that promoted the organization in the schools, in after-school
programs, and in the newspapers and on the radio.

Branch volunteers make the day possible. Working on Sister to Sister is an enriching experience: we know we‘re
helping to open doors for these girls, for one thing. We also enjoy a fulfilling day, helping each other help others. It‘s
wonderful. Finally, we plant our organization in the minds of the girls who participate – so that in four to ten years,
when they graduate from college, they‘ll remember this worthwhile organization.

Petaluma
Rory Keller, Petaluma President 2005-2006

The Petaluma Branch sponsored its fourth Sister-to-Sister Summit. The Summit was attended by 50 junior high
school girls, while the preparation by the high school students included over 30 young women, over a period of
period of 5 months.

The day long summit focused on the themes of Challenges, Choices, Connections, and Celebrations. It was
designed to give the junior high school students a preview of what to expect in high school, as well as a foundation
for making healthy decisions when they are faced with issues in high school.

Over 25 members of the branch were involved in the Summit as well, and the leadership development of the high
school young women was one of the major accomplishments of the summit.

Girls Who Bully Girls (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

A panel presentation by Frank Adelman, Superintendent, Columbia School District; Dr. Diane Kempley,
Superintendent Redding School District; Dr. Carol Whitmer, Superintendent Shasta County Office of Education
and Marcella Thompson, LCSW on the prevalence of bullying in our schools, programs the school districts use to
address the situations and the emotional and psychological effects on recipients of bullying.




                                                            5
Girls Conference: Facing the Future with Confidence
Mary Vossler, Lompoc Vandenberg Newsletter Editor 2005-2006
On February 25, 2006, the Lompoc Vandenberg branch held its sixth annual Girls Conference, Facing the Future
with Confidence. The event attracted approximately 50 girls from grades 6-11 from all local middle schools and
high schools. The event is offered free of charge and members‘ contributions cover the costs of the event. The
branch collaborates with several groups to present this event. These include the local school district that provide
the venue at one of the high schools; the local community college who provides a speaker, and even the local
military base who sends a nutritionist as a speaker.
The event consists of a large group morning session where branch members and participants have an ice-breaker
event based on ―Famous Women‖. The girls then attend three workshops. Topics for this year‘s event include:
―Getting Ready for High School‖, ―Getting Along with Your Parents‖, ―Bullying on the Middle School Campus‖,
Getting Ready for College, Good Nutrition, and Yoga for Good Health, and Inner Beauty.
At the luncheon, our Tech Trek winners from last year spoke about their experiences. We also have a keynote
speaker, a woman who is running for District Attorney in our area. A middle school folklorico dance group will also
perform. During the afternoon, we have large group sessions which include a dance lesson and a session on skin
care. The day closes with an evaluation and door prizes. This year, one of our local high school girls helped with
outreach and publicity as part of her senior project. She will also be moderating the session on ‗Preparing for High
School‖.
This event is very well received by both the girls that participate, the members that make the day so successful,
and the general public. We always get very good coverage in the local newspaper. The event supports our
branches‘ effort to support equity in education, part of the AAUW Public Policy.

Mentoring Program for Women Students at Southwestern College (Chula Vista)
Edwina Shell-Johnson, Chula Vista President 2005-2006
One of our members had taken part in a mentoring program and found it rewarding. She suggested that we
contact Diana Avila at Southwestern Community College to see if this was something that was needed there. Our
members were enthusiastic about this project so we formed a committee to meet with her.
Diana Avila is a counselor at the Center for Technical Education and Career Success at the college. She and
Sharon Adams of the Women's Resource Center and our committee of four members have been meeting each
month since August to plan programs that support women at Southwestern who come from a variety of
backgrounds.

At our first meeting, 'Got Mentor?', our members were able to acquaint the students with what the AAUW is, define
what mentors could do and collect information on what type of help the students could use. About 30 students
attended and participated in a lively discussion about mentoring possibilities. We collected and compiled data from
the students' questionnaires at our debriefing meeting afterward and used this to plan the next meeting. This
meeting which featured six professional women from non-traditional careers telling their stories was well attended.
Once again we collected information with a questionnaire.
 One of the problems we identified was a need for financial help to pay for tuition. The best way for us to help was
to encourage the students to apply for the many scholarships and grants that are offered by Southwestern and
other institutions. The most difficult part of the application is writing the personal narrative that must accompany
most scholarship applications. To help the students, we offered a program that used the computers in the
Women‘s Resource center and an English teacher to guide the students in pre-writing. Then the students wrote a
rough draft. Our members were available to read the material and make suggestions. They could save what was
written to a disc and take it with them for future use. Many students were able to complete their essay and found
the time spent to be worthwhile.
Our members are encouraged to get involved with individuals on a one-to-one basis. Some of them have already
established contact with a student. The information we complied at the first meeting is valuable in connecting
students with a mentor who can help them. Our branch hopes to continue this mentoring program through the end
of the school year and into the next year.



                                                         6
Women in History
La Mesa-El Cajon
Barbara Sorensen, La Mesa-El Cajon Recognition Chair 2005-2006

The La Mesa-El Cajon Branch of AAUW has celebrated Women in History month for 12 years by presenting
programs to 4th, 5th & 6th grade students in local schools. Presentations have also been made to adult groups
including such organizations as OASIS, P.E.O. and the Auxiliary for the Natural History Museum. Members
research the lives of women, both famous and relatively unknown, who have made a difference in their
communities, countries and/or worldwide. Dressed in appropriate clothing, they take on the persona of these
women and talk for 15 minutes about their lives. Three biographical sketches are given to each group, followed by
questions from the audience. The presenters emphasize how women from different backgrounds, and with a
variety of talents and interests, can achieve their goals and contribute to humanity.

In 2005, 14 members, depicting the lives of 16 different women, made 23 presentations in 13 schools (6 different
school districts), reaching about 1000 children. There were about 60 adults in the community groups and 40 or
more teachers in the schools. Some of the women portrayed include: Amelia Earhart, Beatrice Potter, Laura
Ingalls Wilder, Helen Keller, Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, Betty Friedan, Madam Curie, Clara Barton, Louisa May Alcott,
Olive Isbell Mann, Rachel Carson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Georgia O‘Keefe, Rosa Parks, Juana Machado y
Wrightington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Margaret Meade, and Sandra Day O‘Connor.

This project attracts the participation of old and new members. Students and the adults also learn, briefly, of
AAUW, which sends a message to girls that ―all things are possible and all careers are possible.‖ It also increases
visibility and public recognition and involves like-minded women, which encourages future membership. Implicit in
the presentations are the importance of education, public policy and legal advocacy.

Brea-La Habra
Carol Tarbell, Brea-La Habra Co-President & LAF VP 2004-2005

In order to make students aware of the importance of women in history, volunteers from the Brea-La Habra AAUW
Branch call themselves ―Women in History, ― and present vignettes of remarkable women. For the past twelve
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years, these programs have been performed for all 5 graders in public and private schools in the Brea-Olinda
Unified and La Habra School Districts, which means that over 10,000 students, have enjoyed the presentations. In
addition, the women perform for adult groups for a donation, which goes to the AAUW scholarship fund.

Some of the women the students have learned about are Sacagawea, Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, Martha
Washington, Amelia Earhart, Wilma Rudolph, Eleanor Roosevelt, Grace Murray Hopper, Rachel Carson, Minnie
Pearl, and Sally Ride. Costumes and props are used to provide visual interest. Each performance includes three
of these famous women and lasts from 30 to 45 minutes. When there are only one or two fifth grades in a school,
presentations are given in the classroom setting. Larger groups use the cafetorium.

Students‘ response has always been positive and has prompted students to ask insightful questions and continue
with further research. Teachers build writing and speaking assignments on the programs. Last March, after Grace
Murray Hopper told of her experience finding a bug in the computer, the program ―Who Wants To Be a
Millionaire?‖ asked ―What kind of bug stopped the computer?‖ Students came back the next day telling the teacher
they knew the answer to the Million Dollar question. Admiral Hopper had told them it was a moth!

In March of 2004, the group was honored for outstanding contributions to education in Orange County. A
certificate and plaque were presented by Superintendent William M. Habermehl and the Orange County Board of
Education in a formal ceremony.




                                                        7
Girl Power (Hemet-San Jacinto Valley)
Mary Jo Weyenberg, Past President

The Girl Power program of Hemet-San Jacinto Branch began in the fall of 1999 when a member of our branch
realized that the girls in her, mostly-minority population, K-8 school were at high risk for dropping out, or marrying
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early or settling for minimum-pay jobs, or becoming single moms. She started a 7 and 8 grade girls‘ club that
evolved into Girl Power, which focuses on the girls aptitudes and strengths, which shows them career opportunities
and choices and which raises their self-esteem. Another member, teaching in a different school started a parallel
program.

Branch members visited Girl Power meetings and shared their own educational and career experiences. We
sponsored and chaperoned bus trips to institutions of higher learning in the area. We invited the girls and their
families to a branch meeting to hear professional talk about their work and the paths they took to achieve their
career goals.

Other activities include luncheons and teas to teach the girls the social graces they are not provided at home; a
portfolio for each girl in which she keeps a resume, a cover letter, and letters of recommendation; researching job
opportunities using the computer lab at school. AAUW and the Girl Power girls have sponsored a career fair for
four years at one school.

When the girls visited local colleges, Hispanic and Black student tour guides on campus made a great impact.
When those ethnic students told the girls how to apply for scholarships and grants, the girls started to believe.

The two teachers who started the program were honored by our Hemet Unified School District Board with the
Governing Board Recognition Award which includes a gift and cash award for helping middle school girls make
wise choices.

The Educational Foundation awarded our program a Community Action Grant for $4180 several years ago. We
are using the grant money to pay for bus trips to local colleges. A third middle school in the district has come on
board this past year.

Although the school district doesn‘t release the figures, the sponsors estimate that 65% of minority girls do not
graduate from high school. Their goal is that 95% of the girls in the program will graduate, and 80% of those
graduates will seek some form of higher education.

Twelve Girl Power girls were our guests at our annual EF Fashion Show and Luncheon. The girls acted as junior
hostesses for the event.




                                                          8
Career Day
Big Bear Valley
Denise Westcott, Big Bear Valley President 2005-2006
The AAUW Big Bear Valley branch held its first Career Day for the 8th grade class of Big Bear Middle School on
April 18, 2005. There were 36 presenters representing a wide variety of careers. We had a prosecuting attorney,
fire fighters, video producer, photographer, chiropractor, therapist, education specialist, psychologist, botanist, just
to name a few. When possible, we recruited women presenters.
We worked with the 8th grade student body group and teacher to select presenters and organize the event. The
students picked their three preferred choices from the list of presenters. The presenters were scattered throughout
the school classrooms and gym and the 350+ students moved to their assigned presenter for each session. There
were three twenty-minute sessions and each presenter had 6 to 12 students per session. Overall the event went
smoothly and everyone felt that Career Day was a success. Our local television station filmed the event and aired
it several times during the following week. We look forward to repeating the event, with improvements, next year.

Math/Science Career Day (Long Beach)
Darlene Daclan, Long Beach Program Vice President 2004-2005
On January 8, 2005, our Long Beach branch hosted its 3rd annual Math/Science Career Day on the campus of
Long Beach City College. This exciting conference is open to middle school girls from the Long Beach area, and
provides opportunities for young girls to interact with and be inspired by women who work in the field of math and
science. All of our speakers are women who excel in a variety of interesting careers, such as forensics,
architecture, physical therapy, and marine biology.
Following a motivational opening session by Dr. Helen McBride of the California Institute of Technology, attendees
were able to select two workshops from a number of exciting choices. Preceding the closing speaker, Dr. Pauline
Merry, Provost of the PC
Campus of Long Beach City College, one of our former mentees and now AAUW Student Affiliate, Karintha
Marshall, led the wrap-up session and facilitated conference evaluations. Over 60 were received! Some of the
comments included:
        ―I learned that if you want to be something, be persistent.‖
        ―That jobs require many things and that it‘s fun to have a career.‖
        ―I enjoyed learning about what they do and how math is involved in their careers.

Many of our branch members were involved in the planning of this conference, as well as helping out during the
day with registration, refreshments, and facilitating workshops. A follow-up meeting was held recently and plans
are already underway for next year‘s Math/Science Career Day, providing even more opportunities for our middle
school girls to be inspired to pursue a career in the field of math and science. We have been very encouraged with
a continued increase in attendance (this year about 70 girls and some parents) and more cooperation with the
middle school principals and Math/Science school coordinators.

Brighter Horizons (San Fernando Valley)
Lynn Cummins, San Fernando Valley Co-President 2005-2006
This is a half-day program target middle school girls to expose them to non-traditional careers in math and science
and to encourage them to stay in school. It was held at a community college campus on a Saturday morning.
 Most of the time was spent in workshops, we had 3 sessions back-to-back with 10 workshops repeated each
time. Some were hands-on activities, one woman had an assortment of "bugs", and others had power-point
presentations. Each participant brought her own special equipment, but reimbursement for supplies was
available. The Girl Scouts co-sponsored and did major recruitment of students, although flyers were also
distributed at some schools. Unfortunately, we again had no media coverage. Expenses were covered by past
fund raising, primarily among local businesses. Scheduling was done by a member, using her own computer.
Cost items were supplies for hands-on activities, badges, food, goodie bags, signs. Follow up involves debriefing
for next time (this was our third almost-annual time). A Brighter Horizons chair coordinates this event.



                                                           9
Math/Science

Tech Trek & Julie Townsend, Member of the Mars Exploration Rover Engineering
Team (Glendale)
Elaine Smith & Clarli Wilson, Glendale Co-Program Vice Presidents 2005-2006
Our September branch meeting featured Julie Townsend, who left her hometown of Birmingham, Michigan in 1994
to study Aerospace Engineering. She received her bachelor‘s degree from MIT in 1998 and her Master‘s degree
from Stanford in 2000. We also heard from two of Glendale branch‘s four 2005 Tech Trek participants, Monica
Chaj and Cindy Ramirez. Monica and Cindy took part in science experiments, worked on mathematical problems,
took field trips and enjoyed a week of life in the Whittier college dorm. Each girl shared her journal about the
experience.
One program goal was to have the Tech Trek girls become even more excited about further studying math and
science by seeing the audio-visual presentation of the brilliant young engineer Julie Townsend. Another goal was
to retain branch members while increasing their enthusiasm for supporting the Tech Trek with financial
contributions or time. A third goal was to raise funds for Tech Trek from the Glendale business community.
Julie Townsend has been a member of the Mars Exploration Rover engineering team since 2001. She helped
design Spirit and Opportunity, watched as they were built and helped test their critical functions. When the rovers
were launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Julie was watching from the control station in Pasadena.
She prepared commands to shepherd the rovers through their 7-month journey to Mars and was in the control
room breathlessly watching as each rover landed and returned its first images of the Martian surface. For the next
year, Julie led a team of operators instructing Spirit and Opportunity to drive take pictures, and examine rocks.
Julie showed pictures of the Mars Rovers Spirit and Opportunity on the planet Mars. Julie‘s enthusiasm and
excitement for her Rover experience was inspiring.
One outcome has been the $1200 in financial support given by the California Credit Union for the 2006 Tech Trek
camp. The meeting was also attended by branch members who did not come to other meetings. Both Tech Trek
girls and their mothers were very positive about Julie Townsend‘s presentation.

Tech Trek-Alhambra`-San Gabriel Joint Meeting with Montebello-Monterey Park
Deanna Arthur, Alhambra-San Gabriel President 2004-2005
The September ‘04 joint meeting with the Montebello-Monterey Park Branch was the Alhambra-San Gabriel
Branch 2004-2005 program year kick-off. It highlighted the Tech Trek girls who attended the summer 2004 Tech
Trek session sent from both branches. Not only were prospective members invited to this meeting featuring our
Tech Trek campers, but also non-member who donated to Tech Trek through both branches as well as the
parents and teachers of the Tech Trek recipients.
We began working toward this program in the 2003-2004 program years. We joined the San Gabriel Chamber of
Commerce. Our president for 2003-2004 and our current Program VP gave a presentation to the San Gabriel
Rotary Club. Members of the Tech Trek committee, led by Janice Mangerino, spoke to and/or met with school
administrators from the Alhambra USD and the San Gabriel USD, and Garvey SD. Members also met with the
Coordinating Council of San Gabriel.
Members of our branch worked at the Pasadena Showcase House of Design to earn the money to send the girls
to Tech Trek. While working at the showcase house, members were often asked which group they were
supporting which provided multi-community visibility. Members of the Alhambra-San Gabriel Tech Trek committee
also supported the Whittier Tech Trek session where we sponsored the ―Build It Event‖. The branch members
supplied newspapers, prizes, and certificates for the event.
Our ‘04-‘05 Kick Off Meeting is a great example of having it all. We met with both of the communities we serve as
well as school administrators from the school districts. We placed articles in the San Gabriel and Alhambra
Chamber newspapers. The Tech Trek committee interfaced with girls from the school districts. We worked with
the Whittier Branch at the Tech Trek event. Finally, we celebrated our work with Montebello-Monterey Park. In
conclusion, we found a mechanism that can be embraced by our members and allows us to increase our
community visibility through Tech Trek.


                                                        10
A Taste of Technology—Tea honoring students selected to participate in Tech
Trek Science Camp at Stanford
Allyson Johnson, Los Altos/Mountain View Co President 2005-2006
We invited 2005 honorees and their parents, former honorees and their parents, current members of our branch‘s
Tech Times Science Club (co-sponsored with Girl Scouts), and former presenters at Tech Times. Many of the
parents and presenters are potential members. Speaker Danielle Feinberg is a computer animator at Pixar, a
great role model. (Also has presented at Tech Trek). She gave a presentation showing how animation was done
for then-newly-released Incredibles – parents at the end were clamoring to know how they could get their
daughters into the camp!

Tyke Trek –Science Camp for Third Grade Girls (Palm Springs)
Sarah Seils, Palm Springs Program Co-Vice President 2005-2006
Tyke Trek is an elementary school science program, for third grade girls, planned and put on by AAUW – Palm
Springs. This year it was held at Saul Martinez School in the farm community of Mecca, CA. The school contains
more than 90% Spanish speaking migrant students. English is the main course of study at Saul Martinez and as a
result there is little or no emphasis on math or science. Palm Springs AAUW saw this void as a perfect opportunity
to spin off of California‘s Tech Trek and offer a mini science camp to third grade girls. The Saul Martinez School
was approached and principal, Delia Alvarez, accepted our offer eagerly.

On January 6th, 2006, fifty three 3rd grade girls spent two hours participating in four science projects. The projects
selected by the Tyke Trek committee were: Insects are Not Icky!, The Special World of Butterflies, Let‘s Learn
About Static Electricity (Flea Circus Fun) and Bats are Oh So Interesting!

Laying the groundwork of the Tyke Trek program began early in the year and involved more people than just the
instructors who ultimately taught at the day of the event. A majority of the membership participated in some
capacity. In addition, Tech Trek graduates, from the most recent Tech Trek camp, volunteered to help at each
science project table…. setting up, passing out supplies, etc. Members with a background in elementary education
helped with the planning of each project. Another group of members assisted in getting the word out on the Tyke
Trek Science Camp, generating an interest in our AAUW mission, and reaching out via the media to as many
potential AAUW members as possible. This outreach to our members and to our Tech Trek girls resulted in a real
group effort and labor of love. We had a mission in mind…provide equity and life long learning for girls.

Time will tell how many new members we generated from the Tyke Trek program. The local newspaper gave us
wonderful coverage and, of this, we are very appreciative. Two large articles on two separate days greeted us as
we opened the morning paper to enjoy our first cup of coffee. One article was a part of the Desert Sun’s monthly
Snap Shot section. Our instructors, Tech Trek, and Tyke Trek girls composed a half page of snap shots showing
the event. Another article entitled ―Science fair used to give girls incentive for future‖ generated several calls from
area women with college degrees. Although none have officially joined, as yet, all have been invited to our annual
Membership Tea in March. An EF ―fellow‖ will be speaking at that event. The increase of our membership will be
a certainty on that day.

We in AAUW – Palm Springs have found that the Tyke Trek-Tech Trek-get involved-warm and fuzzy types of
programs are what many women are seeking. We enjoy making them available to the membership and to the
children of the community.




                                                          11
15th Annual Math and Science Conference (West Contra Costa)
Marilynn Bracelin, West Contra Costa Math/Science Conference co-chair 2004-2005
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The West Contra Costa Branch AAUW held their 15 annual Math-Science Conference for 7 to 11 grade young
women on March 24, 2004. The young women represent the 22 middle schools, high schools, and alternative
schools located in the cities of El Cerrito, Richmond, Kensington, San Pablo, El Sobrante, Pinole and Hercules
which make up the West Contra Costa Unified School District in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The Conference grows every year. In 2003, there were over 300 students in attendance and 2004 had many
more. Since we moved our location from Contra Costa Community College to the University of California Berkeley
four years ago, we have become very visible in our communities, as well as the University of California at Berkeley
community. The first ten years involved just the AAUW Branch and the school district. We now get financial
support from Chevron Research for lunches for the students and presenters and from Soroptimist International of
Richmond for snacks, some parking passes and some equipment. Soroptimist International of El Cerrito paid for
the large banner that hangs above the stage in the main hall and they supply the volunteer photographers. We get
a great deal of support from the West Contra Costa Unified School District in the form of buses, secretaries,
supplies (paper, printing costs), and a member of the Superintendent‘s cabinet as a liaison. The school district also
pays for the substitutes needed the day of the Conference to cover the classes of the teachers who are the
representatives from the schools and are responsible for the students. We get support from UC Berkeley in the
form of free classrooms, some equipment, 30 parking passes for presenters, and materials for students,
presenters, and volunteers, and books that are given away to students in a drawing at the end of the day.

The communities in the East Bay area supply the professional women who are the presenters. Last year there
were 36 women presenting 27 workshops that varied from a judge and attorneys, police officers, chemists,
contractors, a steamfitter, a landscape architect, financial consultants, medical researchers and practitioners, a
psychologist, culinary arts students, a dietitian, and a bilingual teacher. We also had a variety of keynote and
closing speakers from the communities. One year we had the book editor from the West County Times. Last year
we had a broadcast journalist and producer from KQED-TV. This year we are having the first woman Athletic
Director at a major university—Sandy Barbour from UC Berkeley. We usually get coverage in the local newspaper
and the newsletter that goes out to all the employees in the school district.

In addition to visibility in the community and beyond, the Conference has helped us recruit several new members
and retain many, especially the ones who participate every year. They hear about it at branch meetings or from
Conference participants and members and want to volunteer to help. Not only have we acquired new members,
but also some new presenters.

Unlimited Potential—Math/Science Conference (Whittier)
Gwen Woirhaye, Whittier President 2004-2005

2005 marked Whittier‘s twelfth annual Math/Science Conference for eighth-grade girls. We host 400 girls from
approximately 25 middle schools in the greater Whittier area for a morning conference at Whittier College. The
girls attend three sessions where they hear about careers in math and science from women who are successful in
those careers. Two presenters speak per session so each girl heard six presenters.

The girls are asked to submit and essay following the conference showing what they learned. We ask each school
to select the winning essay from that school and then we hold an Awards Ceremony on a Sunday afternoon and
each girl is introduced, given a certificate from the Branch, a certificate from the office of our local Congresswoman
Linda Sanchez, and a book about women in the sciences. Families are invited to attend, refreshments are served,
and our members mingle with the families, encouraging the girls to set goals for higher education. Over 4000 girls
have now had the advantage of our Conference and we were thrilled this year to have two former attendees as
presenters!




                                                          12
Mother-Daughter Math Science Discovery Day (Fremont)
Alison Kieft, Fremont Vice President Program 2005-2006

This event is held either once or twice a year to provide Community Visibility for our Fremont AAUW Branch and to
recruit new members. It was started in 1993 to answer the common need of creating interest in Math and Science
for girls in elementary schools.

The Director of the event for all these years is Miriam Keller, a community leader in her own right. The event is
advertised in the public and private elementary schools. Applications are brought to each school district to be
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distributed to 3 and 4 grade science teachers for the spring Discovery Day and 5 and 6 grade science
teachers in the fall. The application lists about eight workshop choices. The girls may choose four. Some of the
workshops over the years have included titles such as Kitchen Chemistry, Make your own Kaleidoscope, and
Investigate through Fingerprinting. Hopkins Junior High has a planetarium show and this is always a popular
choice. All of the presenters are career women.

The event always takes place on a Saturday morning beginning at 8:30 am and ending at 12:30. The daughters
and mothers start at a registration table where they receive a schedule of their workshops and a Science ―Goodie‖
Bag, filled with items such as pencils, handouts, rulers, stickers and other items. They partake in a light breakfast
snack of juice, coffee, team, mini muffins, fruit and bagels.

The event is called to order and it is explained that the Mothers and Daughters will go to their first two workshops
and then meet back for a break. They will hear a bell ring to designate when to move from activity to activity.
When they convene after the first two workshops, they meet back for more refreshments. After the last two
workshops, the group meets together and closing remarks are made. The participants are requested to fill out
evaluations. Door prizes that have been donated by local business pertaining to science and math are given
away. Membership folders are available for interested, eligible mothers. Our branch has recruited and gained new
AAUW members through Mother Daughter Math Science Discovery Day.




Legal Advocacy
AAUW California Legal Advocacy Fund Vice-President (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

Carlynne McDonnell, AAUW-CA LAF VP, spoke on local, state and national level work within the AAUW Legal
Advocacy Fund. She discussed the current cases, the financial and emotional support given by AAUW to women
seeking redress in the courts for sex discrimination in academia, and the state of California‘s contributions. We
have consistently led the country with our financial aid to these women. Baskets were provided by sections for a
silent auction to benefit LAF.




                                                         13
Community Action
Hope House (San Carlos)

Establishing Hope House—Ann Barnes, San Carlos Branch Archivist
In 1988, women serving time in San Mateo County jail on drug and alcohol charges were routinely released at
12:01 a.m. Many had nowhere to go but the streets or back to the living conditions that had gotten them in trouble
in the first place. This situation deeply concerned Deputy Sheriff John Edmonds who had worked with these
women in jail. After the Service League of San Mateo County decided to establish Hope House, John spoke to our
branch members urging our support. At the time, we were looking for a branch community action project and this
seemed an ideal choice. Association rules prevented us from fundraising directly in the name of AAUW but we
could and did provide individual donations of money, furnishings, and hours of volunteer time.

We participated with the Friends of Hope House in planning the first major fund raiser, ―The Victorian Hope Chest
Luncheon and Auction.‖ It was to have been held at Ralston Hall on October 19, 1989, but the Loma Prieta
earthquake on October 17 required an emergency change of plans and the event was relocated to the hall of the
Belmont Greek Orthodox Church. Branch members contributed items for the auction, assisted in various ways
and at least 20 attended.

Meanwhile, the Service League had rented a house on the Alameda in San Carlos where they hoped to open
Hope House late in 1989. An open house was held on October 29 but soon after, neighborhood activists became
vocal in their opposition and took their complaint to City Hall. Several branch members attended the meeting with
city officials and expressed their support for the Service League and the project. In spite of this, a decision was
made not to proceed with the Alameda site and the opening of Hope House was delayed. As a direct result of this
crisis, AAUW was invited to join the Hope House steering committee, where the branch has been represented ever
since.

Hope House eventually opened at its present location in Redwood City in December 1990. Before the first
resident arrived, our members led by Marguerite Guild joined other volunteers in preparing the house for
occupation—cleaning, painting, washing bed linens and blankets, and procuring donations of furniture and all other
necessary items.

AAUW continues to support Hope House by providing mentors a variety of services both to program participants
and to women exiting the program.

A New Year Hope House Celebration Brunch—Eloise Mayo San Carlos President 2005-2006
                                                                           th
On January 21, 2006, the San Carlos branch gathered to celebrate the 15 Anniversary of Hope House. The
emphasis of this celebration was the relationship between our AAUW Branch and Hope House from its earliest
beginnings. Hope House was our Branch‘s Community Action Program for the years 1988 and 1989, when Hope
House was in its early stages of development. With the help of our archivist, a review of this activist history was
presented. Then various members shared anecdotes about their Hope House experiences; some funny, some
very moving. Our closing speaker was Hope House Director Karen Francone, who spoke of all the ways she felt
Hope House had benefited from this long AAUW-Hope house partnership.

Several activities happened in addition to speakers. One of our members teaches cooking at Hope House and
under her sponsorship; the women made and sold $700 worth of Christmas cookies. A $75 basket of cookies
were sold at this meeting, in anticipation of Valentines Day, when several hundred dollars worth of cookies are
hopefully going to be sold to benefit Hope House. Because many of the women do not have Christmas or other
cards or stationary, another one of our members who teaches at Hope Hose requested our members bring any of
their unused surplus cards and stationary. The response was huge. The purpose of this meeting was not just to
celebrate, but to give many of our newer members a sense of our history with Hope House, and thus increase their
sense of ownership and participation.




                                                        14
Rebuilding Together (Palo Alto)
Gwen Woirhaye, Whittier President 2004-2005

Rebuilding Together is a non-denominational organization that builds volunteer partnerships to rehabilitate homes
and community facilities of low-income, elderly, and/or disabled neighbors so they can live in warmth, safety and
independence. Rebuilding Together is a program initially called Christmas in April. This is a national program with
a visible local impact. Low income homeowners who need, but can‘t afford, significant home repair and or
refurbishment are referred to the local office by pastors, social workers, and other community agencies; shelters for
battered women or pre-schools for low income children. In 2003, AAUW members of the Palo Alto Branch joined
in this effort and helped to prepare and pain a Millbrae home for a low-income senior. In 2004, we worked with
another project team in Menlo Park.

All Palo Alto Branch AAUW members, spouses and friends are invited to join in this annual project. Special skills
are welcomed, but not required. We have scraped, sanded, painted, cleaned, plumbed, gardened, torn down an
old garage, built a fence and plastered walls. The on-site leadership of the House Captain arranges to have the
supplies we need to do the jobs at hand. We all agree that there is great joy to be found in helping others.

In 2004, I was able to participate early in the process, reviewing six different sites in East Palo Alto and providing
the written assessments and digital photographs to the site selection committee in December 2003. There were
over 750 potential work sites to be visited, critically reviewed on a prescribed form before the site selection
committee could do their work in January and February. After that, the House Captains chose sites from the
candidates, make additional site visits, and began the work of fundraising and the gathering of donated materials
and skilled labor. They are truly the heroes of the Rebuilding Together program.

The Rebuilding Together project is a worthwhile community event which offers us two opportunities to participate:
the preparation day on Saturday, April 17 and the actual work day/project completion day on Saturday, April 24.
Members choose to work either day or both days. In 2004, we worked with Mike Merrymee, an experienced
house captain on a home in Menlo Park, where the family has lived for 48 years! The team painted, remodeled
and landscaped.

Across America since 1988, 59,950 homes and non-profits were repaired by 1,542,750 volunteers, generating
$482,000,000 worth of repairs. In 2004, the Rebuilding Together Peninsula renovated 125 facilities in 19 local
cities, where 51,800 volunteers improved those sites with $17,625,000 worth of market value repairs. For more
information, go to their website: www.rebuildingtogether.org.

Volunteer Opportunities in the Community (Half Moon Bay)
Shirley Leick, Half Moon Bay Co-Vice President Program 2005-2006

The Half Moon Bay chapter of AAUW organized a panel discussion of eight Coastside women, discussing their
experiences in volunteering for local organizations. This is a way of identifying AAUW as an organization that
wants to promote volunteer work. The panel members discussed their experiences in the particular venue with
which they volunteer, and add how and why they got involved. They also talked about the scope of their particular
volunteer ―jobs‖ and point out opportunities that may exist in their organizations for others to get involved. The
discussion was facilitated by AAUW member Mary Vargas, who generated questions for the speakers and fielded
audience questions as well. The branch recruited and gained new AAUW members at this program.

The speakers included: Avis Boutell of Half Moon Bay, who volunteers with an organization that preserves,
protects and studies the snowy plover on Francis Beach; Vicky Cormack of El Granada, who recruits volunteers for
Senior Coastsiders; Cheri Parr, who volunteers with the Coastside Opportunity Center; Shirley Leick of Half Moon
Bay, who volunteers with Filoli on the Peninsula; Katie Murdock of El Granada, who volunteers Coastal Repertory
Theatre; Valerie Powell of Half Moon Bay, who volunteers as a docent with Ano Nuevo State Reserve; Joan Ross
of Half Moon Bay, who volunteers with the Red Cross; Nancy Struck of El Granada, who volunteers with the
Ronald McDonald House and the Lucille Packard Children‘s Hospital (working with newborns) on the Peninsula;
and Julie Gerth of Half Moon Bay, who volunteers with the Tech Trek program working with junior-high school girls.



                                                         15
Teen Basket Holiday Project (San Jose)
Cynthia Ptacek, San Jose President 2004-2005

The AAUW San Jose Branch has organized a Teen Basket gift give-away for disadvantaged youth in our
community for over eight years. This Community Action Project was initiated after discovering that there are few
holiday gift donations specifically for inner-city teenagers. What started out as 21 gift baskets has grown today to
924 stuffed baskets, gym bags and gift bags that are distributed to needy teenagers through a local service
agency.

AAUW San Jose members through the interest group, Neighbors Helping Neighbors, and other community
volunteers purchase gifts, donate cash and work two days in December to sort items and stuff the baskets. Ninety
helpers worked during two days to assemble the gift baskets for girls and gym bags for boys. Over a four month
period, the Teen Basket Committee recruited sponsorships in the form of hundreds of beach towels from Potter
Barn Teen, movie tickets from Cinelux Theaters, gym bags from Cisco Systems, watches and radios, duffel bags,
new clothes, jewelry and candy. Generous regular members and past-presidents, knitters from Arts and Crafts
interest group, board members, and non-AAUW individuals donated time and money to this event. Each basket,
gym bag or gift bag is stuffed to the brim with cool items for teens. Each year, our gift baskets are the most sought
after items among underprivileged teens!

Recruitment of members is a component of the project since not all of the approximately 300 individuals directly
involved are AAUW members. Program information and letters soliciting donations always identify AAUW‘s
involvement. Branch members‘ participation and interest is quite high, so member retention is fostered through this
very popular branch activity.

This event provides AAUW with great visibility in the community allow us to reach a large group of potential
members and to promote AAUW‘s equity mission. The Project was featured in local newspaper articles including
the San Jose Mercury News, the Almeden Times, the Willow Glen Resident, the Cambrian Times and our
newsletter, the Bonfire. KRON TV, San Francisco, and several radio stations aired news spots featuring the
AAUW-San Jose Teen Holiday Basket Project. Additional recognition was an award from Sacred Heart
Community Service, where, President Cynthia Ptacek, explained the organization and AAUW‘s mission during her
acceptance remarks. To market and promote the teenage gift project, a colorful brochure mentioning AAUW, is
being produced.

The Basket Project serves disadvantaged teens of diverse ethnicity that, along with their families, receive housing
assistance, homework assistance, job search help, and food and clothing through the service agency, Sacred
Heart Community Service. Since its inception, the Project is designed to address AAUW Public Policy Principles,
including supporting the reduction of poverty, promoting equitable employment opportunities, quality dependent
care, decent housing, and a strong education system.

This project has expanded over the years to involve many community members outside of AAUW. We are
honored to collaborate with the Girl Scouts, San Jose State sorority women, school students, and local and
national businesses. The Teen Basket project has allowed our members to be role models for girl scouts and
sorority sisters from San Jose State University.

We are very proud of this highly visible accomplishment within the community and our successful collaboration with
other like-minded groups. Most of all, our hearts are filled with joy when we think of the 924 happy teens who
received gift baskets. This program is a community action project that impacts inner-city teenage recipients and
their families, as well as AAUW volunteer workers, and area business and donors. Additionally, this event
promotes branch goals and increases our visibility.




                                                         16
Public Policy
Step Out for Pro-Choice Walk (Los Altos/Mountain View)
Allyson Johnson, Los Altos/Mountain View Co President 2005-2006

The fourth annual ―Step Out for Pro-Choice! Walk was held the day after the33rd anniversary of Roe v. Wade, on
January 23 2006, at the Los Altos Youth Center. The walk was very successful. Staff members representing
State Senator Joe Simitian and State Assemblyman Ira Ruskin attended. Santa Clara County Supervisor Liz
Kniss attended. Also, approximately 105 walkers, including 15 members of the Los Altos-Mountain View branch
participated. This was a significant increase over the 2003 walk. In 2005, the walk was not held in Los Altos, but
some members participated in a large walk in San Francisco.

Pro-choice walkers met at the Los Altos Youth Center for a box lunch and brief presentation. Becky Morgan,
former CA State Senator, was the guest speaker. She gave a great presentation and participated in the walk.
Chris Winter, AAUW CA Choice chair, also gave brief remarks.

Channel 2 KTVU News covered the walk, and included a segment on the 5 and 6 PM news that evening. Channel
4 KRON-TV also covered the event on the 6 PM news. Emy Thurber and Vicki Reeder were both interviewed in
the Channel 2 segment. The Palo Alto Daily News ran photos of the AAUW walk and the Catholic ―prayer walk‖ on
the front page the next day. Patty Fisher of the San Jose Mercury News attended both events and wrote a column
in the January 25 paper.

Foreign Policy Expert Speaks about Year in Jordan (Healdsburg)
Suzanne Pfau, Healdsburg President 2005-2006

Chris O‘Sullivan, political historian, adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco who recently returned from
a Fulbright year of university teaching of history and U.S. Foreign policy in Amman, Jordan, presented a program
on the Middle East and what it was like to teach in this area. Dr. O‘Sullivan, who is a sought after speaker and
teacher brings to his listening audience a rich background in travel and the study of world problems and the U.S.
political scene as it relates to the world at large. He is the author of ―United Nations, a Concise History‖ and was
invited to be a keynote speaker at the UN‘s 60th Anniversary celebration.

He received a Ph.D. from the University of London: London School of Economics and he wrote the book, Sumner
Wells, Postwar Planning and the Quest for a New World Order. He is an extremely approachable teacher and for
perhaps a third of his time he fielded questions with simple yet erudite answers. In previous years he taught a
Current Events class at the Healdsburg Senior Center and is an advocate of life-long learning.

His very relative topic addressed the AAUW guiding principles of Public Policy Education and the program
addressed visibility within the community and the outcomes as outlined were met since many of our members and
the community of men and women alike attended the lecture. This was the second time the American Association
of University of Women Healdsburg Branch has enjoyed Dr. O‘Sullivan as a speaker.

Teen Health Issues (Tustin)
Shannell Sedgwick, Tustin 2005-2006

Linda Kearns and Lynn Posey, two educators from the Orange County Dept. of Education presented the program.
The two have a combined 30 years experience working with youth and training teachers, administrators, and other
school personnel on HIV/AIDS, sex, alcohol, drugs, and tobacco. Ms. Posey, a Prevention Specialist for the
Community Challenge Teen Prevention Program, and Ms. Kerns, a trainer for teen pregnancy prevention called,
"Postponing Sexual Involvement," spoke on subjects that affect our children or our grandchildren and gave us
some insight into the issues faced by teenagers today. A discussion and question and answer period followed the
presentation. It was well attended and feedback was that most attendees felt the program addressed concerns or
questions they'd had. This program was particularly timely because it was just before the election which involved
our opposition to Proposition 73.



                                                         17
Winds of Change (Palo Alto)
Gail Schubert, Palo Alto President 2005-2006

―Winds of Change‖ brought together people from a variety of organizations on the San Francisco Peninsula who
are addressing the challenges of our changing economy, demographics and environment.

Planning for the event began at our July 2005 board planning meeting. Our Public Policy Co-chair, Carroll
Harrington, had been one of the authors of the Palo Alto Branch‘s If You Want to Save Your Environment …
START AT HOME! (1970), a small handbook which was sold to more than 85,000 people in all 50 states and more
than 35 countries around the world. The board decided that now was the time for the Palo Alto Branch to renew its
commitment to environmental health publicly through a community meeting.

The program featured speaker Don Weden, retired Principal Planner for the Comprehensive Planning (i.e., long-
range planning) Section of the Santa Clara County Planning Office and manager of the most recent
comprehensive revision of the County‘s General Plan. He discussed land use policies and their impact on the
environment. Longer commutes, the lack of ―walkable‖ communities resulting in greater use of automobiles, the
lack of local housing for police officers, fire fighters, nurses and teachers with the resultant problems in responding
quickly to natural disasters and problems of retention, the physical and emotional isolation experienced by some
senior citizens and disabled persons, sprawl and other challenges in a state with an increasing population. He
proposed the creation of LEDs, areas of higher-density housing with retail and other community-serving
businesses, encouraging seniors and others to walk.

Because the Palo Alto Weekly, a local newspaper, was one of our sponsoring organizations, we had coverage of
the event beforehand and an editorial afterwards. Between 275 and 300 people attended. Our corporate sponsor,
Hewlett Packard, provided its auditorium free of charge (and even provided coffee!). Co-sponsors were: Acterra;
Avenidas; Canopy; City of Palo Alto Planning and Community Environment Department; Committee for Green
Foothills; ECHO Fair Housing/Mid-Peninsula Citizens for Fair Housing; Family Resources; Housing Action
Coalition; League of Conservation Voters; League of Women Voters of Palo Alto; Mid-Peninsula Regional Open
Space District; PAGE (Palo Altons for Government Effectiveness); Palo Alto Adult School; Palo Alto Chamber of
Commerce; Palo Alto Housing Corp.; Palo Alto Council of PTAs; PLAN (People for Land and Nature); Sierra Club;
Silicon Valley Leadership Group.

―Winds of Change‖ was attended by many public officials, including City Council members from Menlo Park, Palo
Alto and Santa Clara and half of the Menlo Park Housing Commission. There has been a continuing flurry of
letters to the editor and Palo Alto City Council members have circulated a colleagues‘ memo on the need to study
housing growth. The Palo Alto Mayor, Judy Kleinberg, introduced Don Weden at the meeting. The meeting has
been a springboard to action. Palo Alto Branch is currently planning a follow-up meeting to keep interest high and
to promote action.

Several attendees expressed interest in AAUW and took home membership materials.

GMO & November Election Concerns (Petaluma)
Rory Keller, Petaluma President 2005-2006

A number of community events were part of the programs developed for this year, in an effort to raise visibility of
AAUW within the community, and reach out to potential new members. One program was a forum held to allow
both members and others interested community members an opportunity to become informed on a local county
wide proposition on the November, 2005, ballot. GMO crops were the issue, and the proposition called for a 10-
year moratorium on allowing them to be grown within the county. The forum presented both sides of the issue.
We had a standing room only crowd, and the debate was covered in the local newspapers, resulting in publicity for
AAUW, and recognition of AAUW members as leaders in the community.




                                                          18
Public Policy Program (San Jose)
Brenda Ladewig, San Jose President 2005-2006

The Public Policy Program at AAUW San Jose has been a major focus of the branch throughout the history of the
organization. At the 2005-2006 Strategic Planning Meeting, it was the consensus of the branch leaders that a
major goal would be to expand the public policy program to promote the principles of AAUW in the local community
of the San Jose Branch. The program was to include the guiding principles of AAUW California in membership
outreach and retention, public policy education, and visibility within the community. Another result of the Strategic
Planning Meeting was formation of a younger member focus group to understand their needs and interests in
joining AAUW. One of the findings was that younger members were attracted to a strong public policy program.
The Public Policy Program included:

―Health Care Accessibility for Women and Their Children‖ was a community-wide program held at the new
Technology Center at San Jose City College. The panel of speakers included the CEO, Leona Bulter, of Santa
Clara Family Health Plan, Co-Chairs of Health Care for All Californians (SB840), and a policy aide to Supervisor
Jim Beall. Representatives from local legislators‘ offices were in attendance as well as AAUW members and
community agency representatives.

AAUW San Jose is a member of the Equal Pay Coalition and participated in local observances of Equal Pay Day.
This included a press conference at the County offices and writing to the California State Senate requesting a
resolution observing Equal Pay Day. An educational article appeared in the branch newsletter.

Due to branch partnership with the Commission on the Status of Women and the Office of Women‘s Advocacy in
Santa Clara County, members of AAUW are invited to the annual Woman‘s Equity Breakfast. San Jose branch
promotes at least one table of AAUW members so that we can staff an AAUW information table at the door of the
banquet room. At this table AAUW signage, brochures and interest sign-up sheets are available to attendees.

The theme of this year‘s Membership Brunch was ―Women Making a Difference‖ and the impact of women on
public policy issues. The speaker was San Jose City Councilmember Judy Chirco, who spoke to us on
―Volunteering Your Way Into Office‖. Councilmember Chirco advised us of the need to mentor and support women
who are considering running for office so we can have a voice in public policy. This meeting was used to distribute
information about the upcoming election and AAUW California‘s position on Propositions 73, 74 and 76 & SB 840.

Focusing on the upcoming election, AAUW San Jose collaborated with the League of Women Voters to present a
program on the ballot propositions. The event was held at the Campbell Library and was widely publicized
throughout surrounding communities. The turnout was excellent and feedback from attendees was very positive.
There was a membership outreach table at the event.

The days leading up to the election of November 2005, and particularly the campaign to defeat Proposition 73,
were busy with educational articles in newsletters, phone bank volunteering (in collaboration with Planned
Parenthood) and written information distribution within the community.

Throughout the month of January 2006, members of the Public Policy Committee conducted interviews with
California legislators. The Public Policy Program for 2005-2007 was discussed during the legislator visits and a
copy of the brochure left at each district office. Results of the interviews will be forwarded to AAUW California
Public Policy Chair. Also in January 2006, AAUW San Jose hosted, in collaboration with the Pro-Choice Coalition
of Santa Clara Valley, a reception to celebrate the 33rd anniversary of Roe v. Wade. The principal speaker was
Assembly member Sally Lieber; Assembly member Ira Ruskin also spoke and numerous public officials were in
attendance. The event was well attended and offered an opportunity for visibility in the community to AAUW.

Health issues, including stroke awareness, were discussed at the general meeting in February 2006. A member of
the Public Policy Committee gave a presentation on SB840. Brochures and facts sheets about SB840 were
distributed to those in attendance.

The year-long Public Policy Program of AAUW San Jose met its goals of education, advocacy, collaboration,
visibility, recruitment and retention of members and we are well-pleased with the outcomes.



                                                         19
Women of Achievement Dinner (Laguna Beach)
Elaine Lawson, Laguna Beach President 2004-2005

Our annual Women of Achievement dinner was initiated in 1999 to increase our visibility in the community and
recognize and promote leadership within the city. A Branch committee, using the AAUW mission statement as
criteria for inclusion, selects the women to be honored. In these six years, we have honored over 40 outstanding
women in the fields of education, environment, public policy, community, diversity, equity, and positive societal
change. Our October 25, 2004 dinner raised $2000 to fund our community outreach programs. Approximately
170 community leaders were in attendance. The women were recognized in the local newspapers and were
presented with AAUW ―Stars‖ specifying the special field of their involvement:

   Laura Davick, Environment — saved historical beach cottages from demolition.
   Vera Martinez, Community — in charge of facilities for Head Start Orange County; former president of Santa
    Monica and Fullerton colleges.
   Lucinda Prewitt, Arts — founder of the Laguna Beach Live Sunday concert series; work with first community
    service program youth shelter in Laguna,.
   Jean Raun, Public Policy Advocate — long time president of the League of Women Voters; many years effort
    in getting out the vote.
   K Turner, Education — outstanding contribution in education; 10 year school board member.
   Natalie Zucker, Community Service — work with HIV/Aids sufferers; art museum docent.

The dinner has proven to be a ―must attend‖ event for Laguna Beach citizens. It has fostered membership
outreach and retention (some of our busier members attend as their one Branch function of the year). The visibility
we have engendered within the community is amazing – now people know who we are, why we exist, what we do.
This leads to additional financial support for our community outreach programs, as well as the Educational
Foundation and Legal Advocacy Fund. Our public policy stance becomes better known with this public recognition
of our organization, its mission and its accomplishments.

Project Vote Smart and Ride to the Polls Project (Nevada County)
Cheryl Morris, Nevada County President 2004-2005

Project Vote Smart was a nonpartisan voter education event co-sponsored by a number of groups. In addition to
our branch, the League of Women Voters, Superintendent of Schools Office, Peace Center of Nevada County,
United Methodist Church, and Unitarian Universalist Community of the Mountains, plus the local newspaper and
radio stations, joined forces to host the community event.

Project Vote Smart is a nationwide program whose President and Co-Founder, Richard Kimball, was present to
kick off the evening. In addition to gathering, in one place, a great deal of information for voters, featured
attractions were a presentation on Candidates, Campaigns, and Tactics in 2004; a video of ―outrageous‖ political
commercials; and the results of the 2004 Presidential National Political Awareness Test.

As always at such events, AAUW information and position papers were available, and our members engaged in
informal dialogue with attendees, explaining our organization and our stands on various issues.

We followed up our participation in Project Vote Smart by offering rides to the polls on election day in November.
This was publicized as an AAUW community project in the newspaper, on the radio, and on flyers distributed
through the home-delivered meals program and other services to seniors and disabled citizens who might
otherwise be unable to get to the polls.




                                                        20
Come Meet the Press! Panel Discussion: Perspectives on the State of U.S.
Journalism—Print, Radio & Television (Nevada County)
Pat Bendigkeit, Palo Alto Co-Vice President Program 2004-2005

On Saturday, February 5, 2005, the Palo Alto branch of the AAUW presented a public forum featuring three
journalists who were awarded John S. Knight Fellowships at Stanford University for the 2004-05 academic year.

        Philip Davis, Miami correspondent for National Public Radio whose work covers immigration, international
         trade and the environment.
        Julia Powell, freelance television and documentary producer for PBS Frontline and ABC News. Her most
         recent work ―Ghosts of Rwanda‖ aired in April 2004 on the 10th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide,
         received the Alfred I duPont Silver Baton award in broadcast journalism given by Columbia University.
        Frances Robles, Bogotá bureau chief, Miami Herald. Her work includes the role of amnesty in conflict
         resolution. She was on two teams at the Herald that won Pulitzer prizes.

Moderator for the panel discussion was Professor James Bettinger, Knight Program Director.

The panel discussion centered on ―perspectives on the State of U.S. Journalism: Print, Radio, and Television.‖
Prof. Bettinger posed 3 major questions:

       What do you see as the biggest challenge to doing good journalism in your medium — newspapers, radio,
        and television — in the next few years?
       What is the U.S. news media doing right?
       What is the one realistic change – that is, something feasible – that would improve journalism in your
        medium?

The Journalists‘ responses were thoughtful and, judging from audience responses in Q & A session, thought
provoking.

Our Publicity team gathered an outstanding group of co-sponsors: Gradethenews.org (consumer report on Bay
Area news media, Stanford University), California Women‘s Agenda, League of Women Voters –Palo Alto, Palo
Alto Adult School, Palo Alto Chamber of Commerce, Palo Alto Online, Palo Alto Weekly, Stanford Center on
Ethics, Women‘s Action Network, Women‘s Intercultural Network. Approximately 200 people from the community,
including journalism students from local colleges and high schools, attended. After the event 14 women expressed
their interest in joining AAUW to our President.

The panel discussion heightened audience awareness of issues and obstacles faced by journalists today.:
Confidentiality, Freedom of the Press, Self-censorship, and The importance of ratings/business over news. The
Media have been called the watchdog of Democracy whose greatest obligation is to empower all citizens. The
panel revealed their commitment to truth, fairness and accuracy and, to paraphrase Walter Cronkite, reflected the
ideals of integrity and responsibility of journalism.

Women in Government (Clayton and Concord)
Luz Argyriou and Jeanne Boyd, Clayton Program Co-Vice President 2005-2006

Two distinguished female public servants spoke about their careers as elected and appointed public officials and
answered the following questions: What prompts somebody to look for a career in public service? What are the
political pitfalls? What are the personal and financial costs of running for office? What fulfillment and rewards are
received?

This meeting was a great opportunity for those interested in public service to find out how to start and what to
expect as they follow this path. It was also interesting also for those who admire public servants, but would not like
to join their ranks.




                                                         21
Mayoral Forum (San Fernando Valley)
Virginia Hatfield & Marge McGregor, San Fernando Valley Co-Program Vice Presidents 2004-2005
March 8th, 2005 was an important date for the citizens of Los Angeles as it was the date of our municipal elections,
and among the three or four offices we were filling was that of Mayor of Los Angeles. Even though our incumbent
Mayor, James Hahn, was running for another term, this race proved to be a hotly contested election. There was a
field of 12 candidates but six rose to the top and were considered the major candidates: Mayor James Hahn;
former Assembly Speakers Antonio Villaraigosa, and Bob Hertzberg; former Police Chief and now City
Councilmember Bernard Parks; State Senator Richard Alarcon; and Walter Moore, an attorney and businessman.
The make or break issues had become the ―pay to play‖ scandal surrounding the Mayor, the breakup of the LA
Unified School District, the hiring of additional police officers, and the transportation gridlock that now threatens Los
Angeles commuters.
As Program Chair for our branch, I felt it was important to educate our members as to the candidates‘ positions on
the above issues, particularly with respect to the LAUSD breakup. The planning for this forum—not debate—
evolved over a three month period during which time our branch enlisted the sponsorship of one of our local
colleges, Pierce College, who agreed to host the forum. We also partnered with the Women‘s Organization
Coalition, (WOC), a consortium of women‘s organizations in the San Fernando Valley of which AAUW is a part.
The partners included the League of Women Voters, Business & Professional Women, National Organization of
Women, National Women‘s Political Caucus, and Women in Animation. The auditorium on campus held seating
for 350 persons and we managed to fill the venue with students and members of the public at large. We sent
invitations to all six major candidates and three of the six attended. In between opening and closing statements,
the candidates responded to a series of questions that had been formulated by WOC. We provided an opportunity
for each candidate to display literature about their campaigns and meet with the public on a one-to-one basis. In
addition, each WOC partner was afforded space to display literature about its organization and to answer
questions about membership. The Political Activities Club at the college hosted refreshments and also provided
voter registration services.
The event proved to be highly successful from several standpoints. It provided an informative and civil discussion
of issues central to the LA mayor‘s contest; it provided a highly visible format to highlight the work and mission of
AAUW; it helped to recruit membership; and it reached out to community organizations and developed long-lasting
partnerships.

Have we got a Proposition for You! (Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette)
Jan Coe, Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette President 2005-2006
The OML branch celebrated its 50th year in 2005! To kick off its anniversary year, Contra Costa County
Supervisor Gayle Uilkema, a former OML president and Distinguished Woman, was invited to be the guest
speaker. Supervisor Uilkema spoke about her experiences with the branch and how it shaped her own leadership
aspirations. Round table discussions about the propositions on the November ballot followed. Each proposition
was discussed by a group of seven to ten people; then a ―straw poll‖ was taken and a report made to the entire
gathering. Groups identified pros and cons for each proposition and gained a deeper understanding of what their
vote meant. Attendees were armed with knowledge to bring into conversations with friends and family members.
These informed voters were also given handouts to acquaint them with AAUW‘s Public Policy and to encourage
them to be active participants in lobbying for issues of importance to the organization. Copies of the AAUW Public
Policy brochure, the AAUW resource list/voter resource list, and an AAUW Action Network subscription form
completed each attendee‘s voter information packet. The Branch recruited and gained new AAUW members at
this program.




                                                           22
Woman-to-Woman Forum: Health Care--Access and Education (Placerville)
Nancy Campbell, Placerville President 2004-2005

The purpose of the Woman-to-Woman Forum was to: 1) Enhance AAUW‘s and our branch‘s visibility in the
community as a vital organization of committed women who ―gets lots of significant things done.‖ 2) Retain and
increase membership as we reach out to the community. 3) Form a coalition with other local service organizations
(League of Women Voters El Dorado County, Federated Church, El Dorado Women‘s Center and Soroptimists
International of Placerville). 4) Provide everyone in the community, including low-income women—a venue in
which they could become informed, involved and encouraged to advocate for themselves on the subject of health
care. 5) Promulgate a public policy issue supported by AAUW CA—Senator Sheila Kuehl‘s single-payer-health
insurance legislation and explore the implementation of SB71, sexuality education legislation (as a health issue) in
El Dorado County.

The focus of the day was to include the concerns of all age groups: Adolescents, Women in the Middle and Mature
Women. Each co-sponsoring organization made a commitment to hold follow-up meetings as requested and
feasible.

The format was similar to the Woman-to-Woman Summit at the AAUW CA convention. For a minimal $12
luncheon fee, participants were seated at 10 tables of 7. After hearing from keynote speaker, Sara Rogers—
health specialist from Sen. Kuehl‘s office and a panel of local authorities: Director of El Dorado County Health
Dept., Superintendent of the El Dorado County Office of Education, Community Education Coordinator for El
Dorado Women‘s Center and the local representative of the National Caregiver Support Program, time was
provided for a discussion at each table. As the moderators at each table reported, their points were recorded on a
flip chart. Table reports were followed by a question/comment/answer period for the whole group. The afternoon
concluded with 30 minute small-group discussions led by health professionals. Topics were Mental Health,
Menopause, Domestic Violence, Women‘s Heart Health, Elder Care, Finding Affordable Health Care and Teen
Dating Violence.

The event exceeded our expectations. 70 people registered in addition to the 5 speakers. Validating our decision
about age groups, the questions and comments showed that age range of interest. About 90% of the evaluations
indicated a rating of 5 (excellent), the remainder were 4.5 or 4 (good). Many wanted us to do the program again.
We obtained a list of e-mail addresses to contact for future plans and have promised to report to them the main
ideas recorded on the flip chart. The health community in general showed great support in their attendance,
cooperation and participation.

Candidate Forums (Pacifica)
Janice Dutton, Pacifica Communications Chair 2004-2005

For about 20 years, Pacifica AAUW has joined with Pacifica Community Television to present candidates forums.
Television provides camera operators, floor managers, and other tech people. AAUW sends out invitations,
provides signs, water, time keepers, and most importantly moderators. In October 2004, we set up meetings with
the Pacifica City Council candidates, and the candidates for the North Coast County Water Board. We use the
Pacifica City Council Chambers which are equipped for telecasting.

The invitations to each candidates spell out the rules: Opening statement (5 minutes); answers to questions and all
questions asked of all the candidates (2 minutes); closing statements (2 minutes). The candidates draw numbers
for seats on the rostrum and the order of speaking is rotated. The moderator asks all of the questions so that the
atmosphere is neutral. The Saturday telecast is live and PCT repeats them often during the weeks before the
election.

The moderator, in her opening remarks, explains who we are, both AAUW and PCT, and the opening usually
spotlights THE POWER OF ONE with the Ballad of Pearly Sue playing. It is gratifying when participants are
recognized by voters. The Vice President of the Chamber of Commerce stopped holding forums because
AAUW‘s were so informative and fair.




                                                        23
Title IX = Progress for Women (Gilroy)
Margaret Enger, Gilroy Program Co-Chair 2004-2005
On November 16, 2005, the Gilroy branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) in
conjunction with Gavilan Community College, hosted a community forum to discuss Title IX, focusing on athletics.
The 1972 law, Title IX, states ―No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from
participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity
receiving federal financial assistance.‖ Since its inception, the law has had a profound impact on helping to change
attitudes, assumptions, behavior, and, consequently, our understanding about how sexual stereotypes can limit
educational opportunities.
Title IX strongly reflects the mission of AAUW to promote equity for all women and girls, lifelong education, and
positive societal change. Although the law applies to all facets of education, it was decided to limit the review.
Athletics is an area that easily lends itself to accountability based on separate gender needs. Therefore, the goal of
the program was to familiarize the community and AAUW members with Title IX and learn how the local schools
are meeting the challenge to comply with the law.
The presentation consisted of a panel of individuals affiliated with local athletic programs, Gloria Nevarez, Assistant
Commissioner/Senior Women‘s Administrator, West Coast Athletic Conference, Ron Hannon, Director of Physical
Education and Athletics at Gavilan College, and Jack Daley, Director of Athletics at Gilroy High School. The
program was divided into three sections.
Initially, Nevarez presented a history on the adoption of the law, Title IX, and its language. She then put the law into
common terms defining the requirements for compliance. She addressed the practical difficulties and limitations
schools have in meeting the requirements. The slide presentation had statistics on the past and present impact the
law has had on women‘s involvement and performance in sports.
Next Hannon and Daley presented information about the athletic programs at Gavilan College and Gilroy High
School, respectively. They discussed the current programs in place presenting the issues of recruitment of staff
and teams, budget, participation, equipment, and facilities. They related how current practice equates with Title IX
compliance. They then both addressed their hopes for the future of the girls‘ athletic programs.
Lastly, the panel was opened for audience questions. Members, educators, school trustees and staff posed
interesting questions. Issues such as sharing playing fields, distribution of funds within the department (high
exposure sports versus less known or popular sports), and designing sport magnet schools within a city were
discussed. These types of questions and more were expertly answered by the panel with compliance of the law as
focus.
All that attended seemed pleased with the presentation having gained a better understanding of Title IX and an
appreciation of the difficulties schools face in meeting compliance. The event received positive news media
coverage from the college and two local community newspapers. The success of the forum provided a wonderful
opportunity for AAUW visibility and community involvement in issues the organization supports.
As follow-up, the experience has opened a good relationship with Gavilan College and AAUW. Recently, AAUW
members were invited and attended the first Annual Gavilan College Girls Athletic Luncheon fund raiser. This
program presentation is submitted to the memory of Ruth Sletcha, Gilroy Program Co-Chair, who initially organized
the forum. Ruth passed away on February 5, 2005, after a valiant fight against cancer.

The Safety Net Undone? (Sunnyvale-Cupertino)
Margaret Maletis, Sunnyvale-Cupertino Program Co-Chair 2004-2005
Congresswoman, Anna Eshoo was the featured speaker at our meeting on October 16, 2004. She was part of a
panel, which included AARP representative, Wally Ebright, and Dr. McCane from the California Physican‘s
Alliance. The Panel centered on the changes in Medicare and Social Security, and how these changes affect us.
They shared information and answered questions. They encouraged members and guest to become educated
and proactive about issues of public policy. The program was advertised in the local media, in other branch
newsletters, and by flyers to local churches and community centers. This program gave AAUW increased visibility
in our community as about 120 people attended, including various branch members, people from mobile home
communities and retirement centers.



                                                          24
Membership Outreach, Retention & Community Visibility
Membership Recruitment

The ABCs of AAUW (Sunnyvale-Cupertino)
Jodi Gordon, Sunnyvale-Cupertino Branch President 2005-2006
This traditional early fall meeting lets our branch reach out both to our continuing members and potential new
members with information on branch activities and information on how we relate to our community and our
organization. The speaker for the day was Debra Watkins, the recipient of our first Educational Foundation
endowment in honor of our 25th anniversary. We have now completed four endowments, are working on a fifth,
and will celebrate 45 years as a branch in May, 2007. We educated everyone, including Debra in how
endowments work.
Tables were set up around the room with members at each one to explain all the activities of our branch and ask
those interested to sign up for notices of upcoming events. The LAF Vice President sold Entertainment Books
which help with our branch contribution and raised $125 for the Legal Advocacy Fund.
Almost 60 people attended this meeting and three joined the branch that day. The meeting was advertised in the
local papers The Sunnyvale Sun and the Cupertino Courier.

Community Visibility and Membership Recruitment Program (Los Gatos-Saratoga)
Sharon Kelkenberg, Los Gatos-Saratoga President Elect & Membership VP 2005-2006
At the October 2005 board meeting of the Los Gatos / Saratoga Branch of AAUW, it was determined that we
needed to increase our visibility in the community and recruit new members. Specific objectives for the
membership drive were adopted at our November meeting. Our overall goal was to recruit 20 new members to the
branch by June 30, 2006. We have completed the following to date:
   Announcements and displays of new AAUW Membership criteria at all of our Branch meetings
   Articles in the Grapevine, our monthly newsletter about our membership drive, the new criteria and how
    members could help recruit new members
   A new Branch Brochure that described our local activities was developed. It has been placed in pamphlet
    racks at the library, community colleges, senior centers and other community sites by board members.
   Open houses for new and prospective members have been held at:
       San Jose AAUW House. This was designed to reach younger, working women .It was co-sponsored with
        the San Jose Branch and held in the evening at their meeting house. Twenty five women attended.
       Saratoga Retirement Community (SRC). This is a new development that opened in December 2005 Many
        AAUW members from areas have moved here from other areas of California and have been members of
        AAUW in the past. Community members were invited by listing the event on the calendars of local
        newspapers. The SRC hosted the tea and refreshments. Thirty seven women attended with 50% of them
        from the retirement community and 50% from our general community.
       West Valley College Reception. We held a reception at our local community college for students, staff,
        faculty, and community members. The event is being publicized as part of Women‘s History Month and is
        cosponsored by the education transition program at the college. We focused on 1) our local AAUW
        scholarship, 2).EF fellowships, 3).membership for those with AA and AS degrees and 4) Associate
        membership for students pursuing associate or bachelor degrees. Our members who portray famous
        American women will also appear. AAUW members who have retired from West Valley College sent e-
        mails about the event to retired and active faculty and staff.
Through these programs, we have increased our visibility in the community, made important media contacts for
publicizing branch events and have recruited 12 new members. With more visibility and contacts, we expect to
reach our goal of 20 new members by June 30 and continue to have more new members in 2006 and 2007.




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Membership Outreach, Retention & Visibility (Monterey Peninsula Branch)
Judith Cunningham, Monterey Peninsula Co-President 2004-2005

   General meetings open to public and advertised in local newspapers, community information television, and
    community links websites.
   Branch brochures containing schedule of events placed in local libraries.
   Branch newsletter, The Messenger, mailed to members and on line at www.aauwmpb.org.
   Board members conduct events each spring to recruit/orient new members.
   2005 program, Women Making a Difference, included sessions on international relations, ocean conservancy,
    international volunteerism, legal advocacy and education.
   Evening events encourage attendance of those who work.
   The branch program recognizes women in our organization who have contributed to societal change and/or
    equity for women and girls.
   Our nine interest groups meet on a monthly basis to address members‘ special interests.
   An ―Angel Fund‖ supports members with difficulty meeting financial obligations for membership or events.

Visibility/Collaboration with Other Groups
 Branch is a member and active participant in the following community organizations:
          o Reproductive Rights Coalition—activities included: manning RRC booth at the Monterey County Fair;
             collaborating with CSUMB for a viewing of ―Motherhood by Choice‖, and supporting RRC‘s traditional
             signature ad, appearing in four local newspapers.
          o Coalition of Minority Organizations—Branch sends a representative to all COMO meetings and rep
             reports issues and events to board members.
 Branch is a member of the AAUW Interbranch Council. Branch collaborated on IBC luncheon with LAF
    attorney, Dan Siegel, speaker.
 Branch provided publicity for IBC event in local Monterey Peninsula newspapers as well as Santa Cruz and
    Watsonville.
 Branch Evening Book Group sponsored ―A Book in Every Home Project. Books, provided in English and
    Spanish, given to third graders at New Republic Elementary School in Salinas.
 Branch manned an official polling location in Pacific Grove for a full day, providing AAUW visibility in that
    community.
 Branch representative at a booth for AAUW at Monterey Peninsula College Women‘s Conference in March.
 Branch supported Reproductive Rights Coalition with public awareness and education on reproductive health
    at the Monterey County Fair.
 Public Policy Chairperson presentation to the board on Proposition 72. Board endorsed letter in support of
    Proposition 72 sent to Monterey Herald.
 EF & LAF brochures available at general meetings and events. EF and LAF presentations at selected general
    meetings.
 Results of recent collaborative EF & LAF fundraiser exceeded previous year‘s about by 50%.




                                                      26
Financial Education

Smart Women Finish Rich (Gilroy)
Margaret Enger, Gilroy Program Co-Chair 2005-2006

On Thursday, October 27, 2005, the Gilroy branch of AAUW in conjunction with Edward Jones, an investment firm,
presented a luncheon seminar for women at a local restaurant. The goal of the program was to provide a
presentation designed specifically for women to raise their awareness of the need to be an active participant in
securing their economic independence. The program focused on women's ability to attain financial stability through
education, the development of a reasonable approach and the power of compound growth. Individual invitations
were mailed prior to the event requesting a RSVP no later than two days before the program. A fee of $15 was
requested from attending AAUW members to defray expenses.

The program was based on the book Smart Women Finish Rich by David Bach. The author defines seven steps to
living and finishing rich. Practical examples are used to reinforce each step. Deanna Nichol, an Edward Jones
representative, gave a power point presentation on a large screen. Pamphlets containing AAUW and Edward
Jones information were distributed along with a tablet workbook for taking notes and calculating an individual's
personal financial status. The presentation was targeted for women of all ages in various life circumstances, both
planned and unexpected. Time was not allocated and the setting was not conducive to have this hands on
workshop. However, the workbook provided an excellent home tool.

An evaluation was not provided. It would have been a good idea to provide a short sliding scale evaluation to see if
the program met the attendees‘ needs. My own evaluation was that this is an excellent basic educational
presentation and not a sales pitch. Women were informed of facts designed to encourage them to be empowered
and take an active role in their family and personal financial health. All attendees received a long-stemmed rose at
the conclusion of the program. A very nice touch!

Investment Fraud, Identity Theft, and Scams (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

Fraud is an illegal activity that is intentional and designed to convince you to part with something of value.
Deliberate deceit, misrepresentation and concealing of pertinent information are indicators. Personal information is
used to defraud you via the telephone, mail, internet, and door-to-door solicitation. This is a state-wide program,
developed by the California Department of Corporations, with ―the mission of teaching Californians over age 50 to
recognize, report and avoid telemarketing scams and investments scams‖.

Economic Well-Being (Chico)
Michelle Rasmussen, Chico President 2005-2006

Chico branch collaborated with other organizations for two programs in 2005 – 2006 related to the economic
security theme: 1) Representatives from Catalyst, a domestic violence shelter, and North Valley Catholic Social
Services spoke on what we can do to help low income and abused women to become more independent. 2) Kate
Martin from the Little Hoover Commission spoke on women in prison and on parole and the effects on their
children and our community.

Building a Business (Lodi)
Suga Moriwaki, Lodi Program Vice President 2005-2006

An AAUW member opened a coffee business on Highway 88. She learned the coffee business from scratch, built
a landmark structure, and made a financial success of this new business. She presented the story of this success.




                                                        27
Financial/Economic Literacy (San Fernando Valley)
Lynn Cummins, San Fernando Valley Co-President 2005-2006
Most of San Fernando Valley Branch programs' speakers have been related to Education as the Gateway to
Women's Economic Security. 2005-2006 programs included:
Social Security Reform. Intended to increase awareness of specific proposals being presented for reform of
Social Security, this was a presentation by one expert, identified by the Program Chair as having credibility in the
area. The speech followed lunch in a hotel banquet room. Since we wanted to attract adults of the community, in
addition to our own members, publicity flyers were distributed at women's meetings in the months preceding the
event, and were available in several branch libraries. Fax releases were sent to the local press; no articles
resulted. There were no illustrations, so only a microphone and podium were needed.
Identity Theft. We are in the early stages of planning a program on Identity Theft. In the summer, Program co-
vice presidents attended an event sponsored by a local assembly member. There was a panel of speakers on the
problem and what consumers could do to protect themselves. We are trying to use contacts in the member's staff
to reach the presenters and do a limited version of the program for ourselves. Speakers in the summer were from
the state Dept. of Consumer Affairs, Office of Privacy Protection and the LAPD (a detective working on this kind of
fraud).

Women’s Finances Matter! (Benicia-Vallejo)
Joan Eignor, Benecia-Vallejo President 2005-2006
Grossman Financial Management and the Benicia-Vallejo Branch of the American Association of University
Women (AAUW), in response to AAUW‘s National and State goal of financial literacy, offered a six-month series of
financial seminars called ―Second Tuesdays with Frances Harkins‖ at the Benicia Chamber of Commerce building.
Long-time AAUW Branch member Frances Harkins, MA Economics - Financial Planner & Registered Investment
Advisor Representative, presented these seminars. Frances is an associate with Grossman Financial
Management of Benicia, CA. (Her firm is fee for service; they do not sell financial products.)
Topics included:
 Investments – Practical Help for Investors (Guest Speaker: Larry Grossman: MBA, CFP, AIF, Registered
    Investment Advisor)
 Achieving YOUR Financial Goals & Tips for Tax Savings (Guest Speaker: Jenny Davis, Registered Tax
    Preparer with CTEC)
 New Year‘s Money Resolutions, Estate Planning & College Savings (Guest Speaker: Michael Kerner, JD –
    Janin, Morgan & Brenner)
 Retirement – The Changing Face of Retirement
 Insurance – Minding Your Financial Security
 Avoiding Financial Pitfalls, Course Review, Wrap Up
AAUW Members (all Branches) were charged $89. Non-AAUW Members were charged $129. All net proceeds
were donated to the Benicia Vallejo AAUW TECH TREK Program.

Financial/Economic Literacy (Redlands)
Jane Dill, Lodi President 2005-2006
Redlands Branch fulfilled AAUW National call this year for financial/economic literacy through the following:
    One interest group explored the theme: "What should we know about globalization?"
    General Meeting: "Social Security: Will the Money Be There?"
    For the theme of education as a gateway to women's economic security we had speakers discussing
           o A+ and F- of California Public Education
           o Are the Gadgets Smarter Than You Are
           o Successes as a Woman in Higher Education




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Alternative Schools (Watsonville)
Audie Henry, Watsonville Co-President 2005-2006
Watsonville branch held a program that concerned young women dropouts, "Who, Why and What is Being Done".
The goal was to inform the audience of what is happening in the homes and community and how the alternative
schools help kids refocus and move on to complete their education. The event took place in a classroom.
Presentation was by two teachers from two different alternative schools and their students.
The person in charge of this branch program is a member who is school board president of this district.
Newspapers, flyers to schools and school board president input were all used to promote this program. Our target
group was AAUW and community educators. A committee was formed to meet with the teachers of the programs
to plan how AAUW can help.

Health & Well-Being

Women’s Health Forum (Thousand Oaks)
Shirley Morris, Thousand Oaks Committee Member 2005-2006

The Women‘s Health Forum theme was Preventive Maintenance: Living Longer and Healthier. The keynote
presentation was given by Dr. Rukhsana Arastu, Nutrition Research & Labeling Manager, Dole Nutrition Institute.
She spoke on the benefits of good nutrition. After the keynote, attendees attended their choice of three workshops
from ten workshops offered. Workshop topics were: Acupuncture & Its Use in the treatment of Women‘s Health
Issues; Osteoporosis, Taking Care of Your Bones; What You Should Know about Parkinson‘s; Transplant & Organ
Donation – Give & Let Live; Yoga: Opening the Body, Mind, & Spirit; Preventive Dentistry for You and Your Child;
General Foot Problems – Causes & Treatments; Pediatrics: Ounces of Prevention for the Pint-Size; Massage for
Health & More; and Women & Heart Disease: New Wives Tales. A copy of the program is attached for information
and reference.

The forum was planned by the Women‘s Health Interest Group of the branch, which is comprised of member
doctors and others interested in health. Chair of the group is Dr. Kari Foster, who is a dentist. Interest groups are a
major tool in our attracting and retaining members.

There were numerous vendor tables with products and handouts featuring nutrition and exercise topics and free
products. The vendors rented tables and the money earned from that paid for most of the forum and also left us
with an amount of money to use for future health events. AAUW tables featured information about AAUW which
enabled us to sign up 12 new members. We sold products to benefit EF and branch membership.

There was a lot of media exposure so AAUW, the branch, and nutrition were given a lot of play in the local media.
Our branch president, Andrea Wharton, gave the history and current status of AAUW as part of her welcoming
remarks.

We had many branch and other volunteers, so the event also provided a bonding mechanism among members,
which always results in renewed interest in being a member. We had 8 male volunteers who relieved members at
the AAUW tables so they could attend the workshops. In addition, the men acted as traffic directors and as guides
to classrooms. Invitations to the forum were sent to the other branches in the Interbranch group to which
Thousand Oaks belongs. The university was very supportive of the event and we got to work with school officials
and students. One of our male volunteers was a photographer. Attendees and vendors were excited about having
their pictures taken, so this proved to be a very positive element of the forum.

The bottom line is that events such as the forum, to which we invite the public, always gain substantial numbers of
new members, and increase interest in AAUW and our branch as well. They serve as revitalizing mechanisms
within the branch.




                                                          29
Betty Auchard, Writer, Speaker, Humorist--Dancing in My Nightgown: The Rhythms
of Widowhood (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

―After my husband Denny died, writing on anything that would take the mark of a pencil became my tool for
healing. I grieved, I laughed, and I wrote so I wouldn‘t forget what it was like. I had to find out how to put gasoline
in our car, I was not freeway or computer literate and income taxes were what other people did. The road to
recovery and self-sufficiency has been as filled with laughter, creativity, connection, and transformation as it has
tears, self-doubts, and lonely nights. Now I‘m doing so well I sometimes feel guilty.‖ This presentation reached
everyone and was thoroughly enjoyed by all.

Forum for Women’s Issues (Lompoc Vandenberg)
Panelists included representatives from Rape Crisis Center, Domestic Violence Solutions, County Mental Health,
and Planned Parenthood

Health Faire (Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette)
Jan Coe, Orinda-Moraga-Lafayette President 2005-2006

Branch member Iris Hillman has organized a Health Faire for our branch for the past 3 years. In the past, our
Health Faire has been about western medicine and familiar subjects such as cholesterol checks, blood pressure
and bone density, with massage and healthy foods to sample. This year‘s Health Faire explored some alternative
and holistic approaches to health. Guest speaker, Dr. Len Saputo of the Health Medicine Institute in Lafayette
spoke to us about ―Conventional and Alternative Medicine.‖ A recent issue of Diablo magazine said that, ―Health
Medicine Institute (HMI) blends the best of conventional and alternative medicine to find the ideal solution for each
patient. HMI offers internal medicine, endocrinology, cosmetic dermatology, acupuncture/Chinese medicine,
chiropractic, bodywork, psychology, guided imagery, homeopathy, and nutritional medicine – all under one roof.‖
Dr. Saputo believes that the HMI ―high-tech, high touch style treats human beings, not just diseases.‖

In addition to the speaker there were 14 vendors and service providers offering everything from supplements to
information on hypnosis for stress management & weight gain, to holistic nutrition, acupuncture, the environment
and pesticides. Two massage therapists were on hand as well as representatives from Curves, the Alzheimer‘s
Association and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

Flyers for the Health Faire were produced* and distributed throughout the community to encourage public
attendance at this informative, community service event. Other AAUW branches were invited to attend as well.

Stem Cell Research (Glendale & Pasedena)
Elaine Smith & Clarli Wilson, Glendale Co-Program Vice Presidents 2005-2006

On Saturday, February 18, 2006, Dr. Carolyn Lutzko, stem cell research scientist at Children‘s Hospital Los
Angeles, spoke to the combined gathering of the Glendale and Pasadena AAUW branches. Her stimulating slide
presentation was well received by more than sixty-five members gathered at the Women‘s City Club in Pasadena,
California.

Although stem cell research is a political hot potato, it has recently become clear that stem cells in the marrow can
help to rebuild organ tissues that can‘t heal themselves. This means that easily accessible marrow cells may some
day be used to rebuild human organs. Dr. Lutzko‘s hope is to use these cells for a treatment of the deadly lung
disease, cystic fibrosis. She has received numerous grants for her work including one from the National Institute of
Health. Due to legislation restricting the use of stem cells, Lutzko warns that U.S. research lags behind research in
Canada and the United Kingdom. She also explained the difference between adult stem cells and embryonic
stem cells and possible uses in research.




                                                          30
Women’s Heart Issues (Lodi)
Suga Moriwaki, Lodi Program Vice President 2005-2006

The American Heart Association presented the latest research on women‘s heart issues. For example, women
have more heart problems than men as women reach menopause. This event included a potluck soup and salad
dinner, which is a fundraiser for LAF.

Caring for Aging Parents (Lodi)
Suga Moriwaki, Lodi Program Vice President 2005-2006

The Director of the Adult Day Care Center of Lodi Memorial Hospital discussed understanding aging parents‘
needs, taking care of yourself as a care provider, and how and when to choose appropriate help. She explained
the different services available in this community and how to access them. Many AAUW members are current
care providers of their aging parents.

Motherhood by Choice, Not Chance (Stockton)
Joan Erreca, Stockton Director-at-Large 2004-2005

In June 2004, AAUW Stockton Branch collaborated with Planned Parenthood and the University of the Pacific to
co-sponsor a screening Motherhood by Choice, Not Chance, as well as discussion with Emmy-winning, Oscar-
nominated filmmaker Dorothy Fadiman. Ms. Fadiman‘s appearance in Stockton was part of her nationwide road
trip. This film brings together the strongest moments in Fadiman‘s award winning trilogy: From the Back-Alleys to
the Supreme Court & Beyond, which received the Corporation for Public Broadcasting‘s Gold Medal.

Since 1976, Fadiman, a strong advocate for reproductive choice, has produced award-winning documentary
media with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. This new documentary includes personal stories
which bring alive the history of the struggle for women‘s reproductive rights in the United States. Intimate
interviews reveal the passion of the people whose dedication led to a massive shift in public opinion, paving the
way for women to have the right to make safe, legal choices. Meet those who are now stepping forward and
speaking out about the current threat to women‘s rights. This film is not about whether abortion is right or wrong; it
is about what happens when safe, legal choices are not available.

Women Making a Difference (Stockton)
Carol Brown, Stockton Membership Vice Presidents 2004-2005

As I write this, it is the day after the elections, and the morning television news has just featured a young college
student who said she didn‘t vote because ―it wouldn‘t have made any difference anyway.‖

I‘m reminded of another student I met recently when Stockton AAUW branch joined 22 other organizations for a
one-day opportunity at San Joaquin Delta College to acquaint students with our goals and activities. The college
held an ambitious month-long Cultural Awareness Program called ―Uncross the XX: Women‘s Bodies; Women‘s
Culture.‖ When I asked about her educational plans, the young woman said she would transfer to the University of
California, Davis, in the fall to complete pre-med courses. She hoped to become a virologist and assist in HIV
research, specifically with Dr. Carol Mandell, whose published works she‘d read.

Dr. Mandell is the former UCD professor who is litigating against the University of California with the assistance of
the AAUW Legal Advocacy Fund. Isn‘t it tragic that the work of this gifted brilliant doctor is compromised while she
battles in the courts against discrimination? It‘s my hope that AAUW‘s contributions and support will help restore
Dr. Mandell to her critically needed work in time for this student to assist her.

Unlike the young woman I watched on television, the day after the elections, Dr. Mandell and the student that I met
at Delta College are examples of women who are making a difference.




                                                         31
General

Branch Program Planning (Lodi)
Suga Moriwaki, Lodi Program Vice President 2005-2006

Lodi AAUW membership numbers a little less than 100 members who live in the rural/suburban Central Valley
town of Lodi CA. Lodi is located near a small liberal arts college and about an hour‘s drive to the San Francisco
Bay Area and about an hour‘s drive in another direction to Sacramento. Usually 30 – 50 people regularly attend
the meetings.
The two AAUW Vice Presidents begin program planning in January, as soon as they accept the position and well
before being installed at the May meeting. The program schedule is in place before the May meeting so it can be
announced at the installation dinner. The deadline for printing the program in the Yearbook is in July. In January,
the members provide program suggestions by completing a small questionnaire and then the vice presidents
attend many meetings of other organizations or of other public events to preview speakers. Presenters are willing
to speak when given plenty of time to place the date on their crowded calendars.
The goal of the programs is to keep the members informed about major issues as they affect the membership
locally. The patterns for programs have evolved over several years and can be classified as falling into the
following categories: AAUW concerns, local government, conservation, education, business, and health.
A centrally located church and the local public library provide the meeting places. Both facilities can provide many
amenities including tables, microphone, screen, kitchen, lavatory, and clean up. The church requires a $75 fee for
each meeting. The library does not require a fee, but is also heavily booked, and difficult to calendar. We ask
presenters to bring their own audiovisual equipment as well as whatever extension cords as they need. The
August brunch and May dinner are held at local golf /country clubs.
We tell presenters from the initial contact that no remuneration is available but that Lodi AAUW will donate a book
for the Lois Borchard Elementary School Library in their or their organization‘s name. Lois Borchard was a past
president and charter member of the Lodi AAUW.
While the programs are branch driven, presenters often represent other community organizations, and in that way,
co-sponsor our meetings. All meetings are open to the public and notices appear in the local paper.
The Vice Presidents receive informal feedback from the members who indicated the programs are informative and
well received.
The Lodi branch 2005-2006 program schedule included:
       August: Tech Trekkers provided a report on their recent Tech Trek Camp.
       September: Newly appointed City Manager, Blair King, shared his life journey, as an orphan in Korea to
        Lodi city manager with a passion for helping cities become better places to live and work. He talked about
        Lodi‘s assets, and its quest for solutions to an expensive water pollution lawsuit, lower energy costs,
        balance between development and rural identity, and economic growth.
       October: Mountain lions have been seen in the city of Lodi as well as in the rural areas around Lodi. The
        Mountain Lion Foundation, centered in Sacramento, presented a program describing the mountain lion‘s
        life history and behavior. They explained the reasons why mountain lions are coming into conflict with
        people and also provided suggestions for the increasingly mixed use habitat.
       November: The San Joaquin Historical Society provides many enrichment resources to the schools of the
        county. These services include taking artifacts from the 1890‘s to schools, providing 1890‘s one room
        school house lessons, and hands on learning stations of tasks children would have completed in the
        1890‘s. Fundraisers such as the seasonal Festival of Trees as well as a cookbook compiled by county
        residents fund the education programs. AAUW members are very active in this community resource.
       December: Fundraiser/holiday party for the AAUW Scholarship Program.




                                                        32
       January: An AAUW member opened a coffee business on Highway 88. She learned the coffee business
        from scratch, built a landmark structure, and made a financial success of this new business. She will
        present the story of this success.
       February: The American Heart Association presented the latest research on women‘s heart issues. For
        example, women have more heart problems than men as women reach menopause. The evening
        included a potluck soup and salad dinner, which is a fundraiser for LAF.
       March: The Lodi Public Library Director provided a status report of the services and changes talking
        place at the library. This library offers a major adult literacy program, numerous children‘s programs,
        technology and small business classes, resources/archives for the business community, and a joint
        transportation program with the Lodi Transportation Services for school age youth. A major building
        program will occur in the future. AAUW members are very active in this community agency.
       April: The Director of the Adult Day Care Center of Lodi Memorial Hospital discussed understanding aging
        parents‘ needs, taking care of yourself as a care provider, and how and when to choose appropriate help.
        She explained the different services available in this community and how to access them. Many AAUW
        members are current care providers of their aging parents.
       May:   The installation dinner for the new board is held at a local country club and the EF Gift Honoree is
        announced.

Membership Tea (Pomona Valley)
Joanne Wagoner, Pomona Valley Co-President 2005-2006

The Pomona Valley AAUW Branch held its second annual Fall Membership Tea. We began our membership tea
last year and gained some new members so felt it was worth repeating. The 100+ invitations for the tea were
beautifully and individually hand made. We held the tea at a local church where we set up round tables, used cloth
tablecloths and decorated abundantly. Our lace covered "tea table" was set with silver serving pieces, cookies,
cheeses and fruit.

The girls we sponsored for Tech Trek each gave a brief speech on their experience last summer. Afterwards,
police officer Brenda Southerland, our main speaker, provided lots of good information to help prevent identity
theft. We gained three members at the tea, but memberships are still coming in and often take months for some
people to really to decide to join our organization. We lay the ground work at the tea, and keep in contact with
those who attended the tea and others that we believe have indicated some interest, but were unable to attend the
tea.

The membership tea is planned by our membership co-chairs and co-vice presidents. However, many members
helped with phone calls, decorating and refreshments. We phoned most everyone on our list, members and
nonmembers to encourage them to attend the tea. A notice was also places in a local newspaper.

Celebrating Women with Paola Gianturco (Modesto)
Kristi Rodehorst, Modesto Leadership Team 2004-2005
On December 4, 2004, Paola Gianturco spoke to the Modesto and Calaveras County branches of AAUW and
showed slides that were from her book, Celebrating Women. This book was chosen to be the subject of first
exhibit done by the new International Museum of Women. It demonstrated the vision and unique contribution that
will be made when the museum moves into its permanent home on Pier 26 in San Francisco in 2008. The
Celebrating Women program presented information about festivals from around the world that were richly
documented by Gianturco in her book. Every year there are hundreds of festivals occurring around the world that
celebrate aspects of feminine identity. Some of the festivals are very well known, others are known only to regional
participants.
Paola Gianturco has worked as a photojournalist for the last ten years. She has documented women's lives in
forty countries. Her photographs have been exhibited at the Field Museum in Chicago, the United Nations, the
United States Senate, and the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival in Washington D.C. She graduated from Stanford in
1961, and was truly a memorable and inspirational speaker.


                                                        33
An Inside Look at Video and Computer Games (Oakland-Piedmont)
Helen Bersie & Nancy Adams, Oakland-Piedmont Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006
Oakland-Piedmont Branch member Gen Katz, a reviewer of computer and video games on her websites
www.games4girls.com and www.games4women.com, presented an initial overview of games through an
illustrated tour, identifying what the different genres are all about. She discussed the controversial issues
surrounding games and gave guidelines in knowing how to critique and select them appropriately. More
specifically, she shared her insights into games that appeal especially to girls and women, illustrating these in her
program. Games for women and girls have not been given priorities in developing and women game designers
have difficulty in getting their games recognized.

The program was intended to address a broad AAUW objective of improving aspects of education for women and
girls. The program was open to the public in the community room of a local library. The advertising that we and the
library did gained visibility for us in the community. Attendees included several women who are joining the branch.
The program was also part of a series this year showcasing our own members as presenters; we developed this to
aid our branch in becoming better acquainted with each other and to recognize the talents and expertise we have
among our members. We believe this to be an integral part of our retention efforts.

Evening of Phenomenal Women: Featuring Songs, Words of Wisdom, Humor,
Poetry, Bubbly and Bon Bons (Thousand Oaks)
Shirley Morris, Thousand Oaks Committee Member 2005-2006
On February 10, 2006, AAUW –Thousand Oaks branch - Dramatic Reading group, presented an ‗Evening of
Phenomenal Women‘. This program presented a selection of the writings of unique women who have influenced
our society through their work and talents. Here is the program outline.

       Readers: Peggy Johnson, Wendy Hoffman, Andrea Milton Wharton, Sadhana Neurgaonkar, Betsy Berry,
        Nancy Russell, and Carol Stanley.
       Technical Support was provided by : Bev Khoshnevisan
       Script was written by: Carol Stanley and Sadhana Neurgaonkar

Various themes were presented. For each theme, selections of writings, poetry, jokes, and quotes were chosen.
Popular songs were interwoven throughout the program.

Theme 1—Beauty                                                Theme 4: Achievement
      Song: I Am a Woman                                            Song: She Works Hard for the Money
      Phenomenal Woman by Maya Angelou                              Helen Hays Quote
                                                                     Speech by Barbara McClintock
Theme 2—Love and Marriage:
      My Rules by Shel Silverstein                           Theme 5—Coping Skills
      Song: Man Smart, Women Smarter                               Expect Nothing by Alice Walker
      Variations of the Word Love by Margaret Atwood               Jokes
                                                                    Every Woman Should -from the Internet
Theme 3—Motherhood
                                                                    Maya Angelou Interview
      Selection from Founding Mothers by Cokie
       Roberts
      Speech by Sojourner Truth, ―Ain‘t I A Woman?‖
This program empowers the readers and the audience by honoring women‘s struggles and their accomplishments.

Bring Color, Harmony and Butterflies to your Garden (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006
We welcomed in spring with premier horticulturalist Ricardo Montenegro, former curator and senior horticulturalist
of Turtle Bay Museum Arboretum. Rico‘s wealth of experience includes being a consultant to Sunset Magazine
and he is currently an instructor at Shasta College. He also works as a private consultant for habitat analysis and
restoration and highlighted native plants and trees for our area.




                                                         34
History—Art—Culture: The Life and Art of Mae Helene Bacon Boogs (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006
We celebrated Women‘s History Month with a presentation by Janet Howard of the Old Shasta Museum featuring
the art collection and life of Mae Helene Bacon Boggs, an historically significant woman whose youth was spent in
Shasta County. As a San Francisco socialite, she was an activist, an avid woman‘s rights advocate and the driving
force for the founding of the Shasta State Historic Park in Old Shasta, California. Her dream was to preserve the
history of Shasta County and leave her outstanding collection of California artists and other personal items to the
park to be displayed and enjoyed by the public.

Authors Forum Luncheon (Santa Maria)
Harriet Tower, Publicity Chair 2004-2005

The annual Authors Forum Luncheon has greatly increased Santa Maria Branch‘s visibility in our community. Held
each year since 1999, the successful event features several authors and their books, usually a mix of various types
of work by a range of authors from the local area and farther away. As we planned the 2004 Authors Forum, we
observed that the local community looked forward to this opportunity to meet and dine with these interesting
authors. We were pleased that authors were very receptive to our event, and eager to participate. In addition to
providing their lunch, we presented each of them with a bottle of wine from a local winery.

For an hour or so before lunch, the authors manned tables, visiting with the guests and autographing books. We
partnered with a local independent bookseller to order the books from the publishers, bring them to the event, and
handle sales. The bookseller graciously donated a small percentage of the sales to our branch. During lunch each
author was seated with a group of guests, giving them time to visit in a relaxed setting. Our guests loved this
opportunity to get to know the authors. The personal connection benefited the authors by creating fans for life. The
authors were given time after lunch to address the entire group briefly and take questions from the audience. This
informal exchange was fun for the guests and authors alike. When the talks concluded there was a drawing for
prizes, autographed books donated by each of the authors.

Articles about the Authors Forum appeared in several area newspapers and magazines, as well as spots on local
radio and television calendars of events. This publicity increased community awareness of AAUW. Each press
release contained a tag paragraph about AAUW as well as the URL for our branch website, which provided an
instant link to information about AAUW at the local, state and national level. The branch has come to think of our
Authors Forum as the centerpiece of our marketing strategy. It attracts new and prospective members and, as it
takes place annually, keeps our branch in the local news.

Hats Off to Women: Celebrating Women’s History Month (Pleasant Hill)
Gayle Garrison, Pleasant Hill Program Vice Presidents 2005-2006

In Gail Sheeley‘s book Passages, we read about women and different stages in their lives. Because AAUW is an
organization of women in many different stages of life, our program featuring Dorothy Ligda, was very interesting.
Dorothy Ligda, an AAUW member who at ninety years of age has seen many passages in her life. Several years
ago, she went to a writing class and decided to write her memoir Back When was Then. She has been married,
divorced, remarried, and now a widow of many years. Her son was killed tragically at age twelve. In her early
forties, she gave birth to her younger daughter shortly after her husband had died. As a single parent, she raised
her daughter, through her job as a teacher and school librarian. Dorothy has overcome many health difficulties,
including cancer. Her life is an example of how she overcame many difficulties in her life and has lived a very full,
useful life. She stressed the value of her education and how she was able to provide for her family. She said even
at her advanced years, she enjoys life and is planning to write a history of her neighborhood where she has lived
for many years.

Our members were greatly impressed by Dorothy‘s experiences. Because AAUW is interested in the betterment
of women‘s lives through education, it was wonderful to hear of the value of her college education. She has
continued to learn and lead an active life. The theme of our March Women‘s History even, was ‗Hats off to
Women‘. Members were asked to wear a hat, and after hearing Dorothy‘s story of her life, our hats were surely off
to her.


                                                         35
International Interests and Diversity
Art Therapy in Thailand: Post-Tsunami (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006
Darcie Henning received her Bachelor of Social Work with a minor in Child Psychology in 1988. In 1992 she
received her master‘s as a combined degree in Social Work and Public Administration. Her diverse and extensive
experience has been concentrated on helping those in need. Following the December 26, 2004 tsunami, Darcie
and her partner Toni-Lyn Pelosi (Art Therapist) spent a month in Thailand. They created a memory box program
for the children in three small villages on the island of Koh Pra Thong, Thailand and worked with approximately 150
children whose lives and families had been directly impacted by the tsunami.
Donations of gift cards from local businesses were also collected to assist the Women‘s Refuge in providing for
women and children who are the victims of abuse.

Peace Corps in Surinam (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006
Our speaker Danika Swanson, daughter of a Redding branch member, spent the last two years living and working
in Suriname as a Peace Corps Volunteer. She shared what life is like in a third world country, offered reflections
on Peace Corps service, and showed a slide presentation of her experiences. We also had a brief presentation by
our 2005 summer Tech Trek participant.

Women in Islam (Oakland-Piedmont)
Nancy Adams, Oakland-Piedmont Program Co-Vice President 2005-2006
The Oakland-Piedmont Branch met on Saturday, February 11, 2006, at the Islamic Cultural Center of Northern
California in Oakland for a meeting jointly sponsored by the Branch, the Islamic Cultural Center of Northern
California, and the Council for American-Islamic Relations. The program began with a welcome by the Cultural
Center‘s director and a tour led by members of the Center, including their Saturday School, prayer room, wedding
room, and meeting rooms. We listened to a panel of four women, who gave us an overview of Islamic history and
beliefs, followed by a more detailed description of women and their place in Islam, including aspects of dress,
education, family relationships, and economic and political rights. We learned, among other interesting things, that
only 22% of Islamic believers are Arabic, and that the largest Islamic populations live in Indonesia and India.
All four women currently live and work or study in the Santa Clara area, but their origins is as diverse as the current
practitioners of Islam. Safaa Ibrahim is the Executive Director of CAIR and emigrated from Egypt with her family as
a child. Christine Chase, a systems administrator at a large government agency, converted to Islam 25 years ago
when she married. Bhawana Kamil‘s parents came from India to study in California; she graduated from UC
Berkeley and is currently pursuing an advanced degree in philosophy. Dian Alyan worked for a large US company
in Indonesia, and is now heading an organization that is building orphanages for children in her home country.
The women helped the audience understand the differences between the religious beliefs and codes of Islam,
which support women in education, careers, inheritance, and political rights, and the customs and cultures of
countries which restrict those rights. A lively question-and-answer session followed the presentations.

The program was open to the public, and a number people not affiliated with AAUW attended. The speakers,
none of whom were aware of AAUW, were given membership information and invited to contact the branches
closest to their homes.

UOP School of International Studies’ Great Issue Series (Stockton)
Joan Erreca, Stockton Director-at-Large 2004-2005

The University of the Pacific (UOP) School of International Studies presented the UOP Great Issues Series, which
included discussion about the media and how the United States is perceived in foreign countries. This series is
sponsored by AAUW Lodi and Stockton branches, League of Women Voters, Metro Ministry, San Joaquin Delta
College, United Nations Association, Peace & Justice Network, and School of International Studies at Pacific. In
Fall 2004, the series was held on Mondays for six weeks. Topics included: Economy/Jobs, Immigration, Health
Care, America‘s Role in the World, Civil Liberties, and Podesto/Machado Debate.


                                                          36
Malawi: A Focus on Women’s Conditions (Ventura County)
Martha Flenzel-Smith, Ventura County EF/LAF Vice President 2005-2006

On October 29, 2005, Ventura County AAUW collaborated with Oxnard and local Interbranch Council, to hear a
presentation by Amy Pandya, AAUW International Fellowship Recipient and UCLA PhD candidate. Amy
presented a dynamic look at her native home, Malawi, in South Africa, with a Power Point presentation, which
included maps of geography, statistics on infant mortality and life expectancies and barriers in education.

The geography alone is cause for hardship in Malawi. Mountains, lack of transportation, and poor growing
conditions create economic problems, since what is produced cannot make it to newer far reaching markets.
Women spend hours a day walking to haul water containers on their heads. Hours they could use to gain
education, or work to earn a living. A vicious circle of poverty continues.

Language barriers inhibit communication and production. There are many tribal dialects. The younger children,
who are learning English, are not skilled enough to assist adults in understanding healthcare instructions and other
communications reliably. While progress is being made, Malaria and HIV-AIDS are prevalent causes of death at
all ages. The life expectancy is only 37 years.

Amy‘s parents are medical professionals. Her father is a physician; her mother is a nurse, who is currently
teaching children English and good health techniques. Amy also plans to have an active role in promoting equity,
health and education for women.

This was a wonderful day of fantastic dialogue. Our small attendance afforded us the opportunity to share
information. Many of our members have long histories of involvement with AAUW, teaching, and community
outreach projects. For Amy, we defined what the Educational Foundation and Legal Advocacy Funds are doing for
women. It was a treat to meet Amy, as she is interested in AAUW and will be a good ambassador as she steps
out into the world.

A Little Help (Sunnyvale-Cupertino)
Margaret Maletis, Sunnyvale-Cupertino Program Co-Chair 2004-2005

On September 11, 2004, we held our annual Fall Membership Brunch. We presented our AAUW missions,
objectives and activities to guests and prospective members. We also presented a program highlighting our theme
of diversity for this year‘s programs. Our speaker was Rosemary Stasek, a member of the Mountain View City
Council, who spoke about conditions for women in Afghanistan. Ms. Stasek has funded many small projects for
women and girls in Afghanistan through her foundation, ―A Little Help‖. It was inspiring to see how one person
could pull together resources to be so effective in influencing the lives of women and girls during such a time of
transition for their country. Advertising this program gave us public visibility and opportunity for outreach in our
community.

Basics of Islam and the month of Ramadan (Sunnyvale-Cupertino)
Margaret Maletis, Sunnyvale-Cupertino Program Co-Chair 2004-2005

At our November, 10, 2004 program, we heard a presentation about the basics of Islam and the month of
Ramadan given by Bilge Ozaydin, who is a PhD student in Molecular and Cell Biology at UC Berkeley. She has
served on the Interfaith Dialogue Committee of the Bay Area Cultural Connections (BAYCC) since 2002. She
spoke on the social, physical, and spiritual aspect of Ramadan, as well as the basic tenets of the Islam Faith. She
gave personal experiences of how Ramadan affects the daily lives of Muslims living in the United States, and how
these practices compare with Muslim observances in the Islam World.

This program was advertised in the local media, and our audience included our branch members, members from
the BAYCC Muslim community, and others from the Sunnyvale community. This gave us an opportunity to speak
about AAUW and its missions to people who were not familiar with our group. This program supported our theme
of diversity for this year.




                                                        37
Funny in Farsi (Sunnyvale-Cupertino)
Margaret Maletis, Sunnyvale-Cupertino Program Co-Chair 2004-2005
On January 13, 2005, Sunnyvale-Cupertino branch organized and co-sponsored the presentation of author
Firoozeh Dumas, with the Sunnyvale Public Library. Ms. Dumas wrote Funny in Farsi: a Memoir of Growing up
Iranian in America as a gift for her children. It was published in 2003 and was on the San Francisco Chronicle’s
and the Los Angeles Times’ best sellers lists.
Ms. Dumas told stories about her family and her life in California as an immigrant child from Iran. The audience of
about 120 people included 35 of our branch members. This presentation gave us the opportunity for AAUW to
have more visibility in our community as it was advertised widely in the library newsletter, the local Sunnyvale
newspaper, and to the Iranian community. It was also a membership outreach as we were able to present the
mission and goals of AAUW to a wide audience, and to provide materials for people who might be interested in
joining AAUW. We have successfully collaborated with the Friends of the Sunnyvale Library in presenting other
programs, thus bringing more public recognition of AAUW as an organization. This was one of our programs this
year to encourage diversity.

International Women’s Issues Panel (Thousand Oaks)
Shirley Morris, Thousand Oaks Committee Member 2005-2006

The International Women‘s Issues Panel was the idea of the Programs Co-Chairs, Betsy Berry and Bev
Khoshnevisan. They enlisted the assistance of the Thousand Oaks Branch Geography Interest Group, who
developed the event. Several members of this interest group are also members of the weekly Walking Interest
Group, and it was during those weekly walks that most of the planning was accomplished. The panel was open to
members and non-members, and was a no-cost event. The event was publicized in the local media and a
substantial number of people attended after having read about the panel in the papers. The net cost of the event
was $100, which was funded from the branch Programs budget account.
The composition of the panel was a moderator and five panelists representing important countries around the
world: China, France, India, Iran, and Mexico. The moderator and three of the panelists are members of the
Thousand Oaks Branch. The event theme was: Women in Our World, and the discussions covered Education,
Career/Business, and Government/Politics. Questions were solicited from attendees and answered during the
concluding Question & Answer period. The most impressive part of the panel was the depth of knowledge of the
women panelists. It was very evident that the education and professional level of women around the world has
progressed to a wide degree. It was also evident that job opportunities have not yet caught up for all women.
Each attendee was presented with a folder that contained the program and bios of the moderator and panelists. An
evaluation sheet was included, and 28 attendees completed the form to provide data for future similar events. Of
the 80 people attending the panel, 72% were members and the other 28% non-members. A membership
application was included in the folder, and two people joined at the event, and several others indicated their
intention to do so later. The folder also contained various flyers advertising branch events and products for sale,
including Poinsettias being sold for LAF, the Women‘s Profiles Series which supports EF, and used books which
are sold to defray member dues and fund member outreach. Various branch products were sold before and after
the panel. The tables were decorated with authentic serapes and the facility was lovely. Complimentary water and
international food items were available for attendees. This also contributed to what was a very successful event
and one which has provided community attention to AAUW and women in general.

Cultural Exchange (Clayton)
Luz Argyriou, Clayton Program Co-Vice President 2005-2006
Americans travel a great deal, and come back home with entertaining stories about the cultural differences they
encountered. In this General Meeting, the shoe, as they say, will be on the other foot, where a friendly dialog with
immigrant women, who are successfully living in the United States. They spoke about their first impressions at
arrival, their surprise, confusion and evaluation of how things are done. And, they spoke on how they made their
adjustment to a different culture. The panelist all live and work in this community and came from Lebanon, Iran,
Philippines and Greece.




                                                        38
Celebrations

30 Year Anniversary Celebration: Thirty Years of Commitment to Education
(Healdsburg)
Suzanne Pfau, Healdsburg President 2005-2006

In 1975 several college-educated women decided to start a branch of AAUW in Healdsburg, CA. Other branches
did not encourage them much since Healdsburg was such a small town and were instead invited to join with
another branch. These women, many of whom were in their thirty‘s with young children were dedicated to their
task and became chartered in September. On September 25th, 2005 we celebrated thirty years with a potluck
lunch in the beautiful outdoor setting of Healdsburg Country Gardens. A former member donated this very special
venue which is popular for weddings for use.

All charter members, past presidents, past, present and future members and their families and members from
surrounding branches were invited to attend. Several old scrapbooks were on display and one of our women made
display boards with pictures of events of 30 years of various activities, activism, educating our own and fundraising.
Speakers representing the three decades talked of such things as how they started the branch and became a 5
star branch. We honored the oldest charter member, past presidents and life members as well as some women for
their work in the past few years.

Our scholarship and the Educational Foundation program, fund raising events such as our seven author‘s
luncheons or teas, garden tours and parties, and our Historic Homes Tour which we co-sponsor with the
Healdsburg Education Foundation and our ongoing Scrip program have going through various transitions. They
spoke of activism with our past Visions‘ program in the high school, our Westside School mentoring program, our
work with the Science Fair and Exploring your Horizons as well as a former baby-sitting service and a service
which offered students rides home from parties.

As a result of this event we have developed an extensive outreach program. A newspaper article preceded and
followed the event. We advertised with a large banner on the highway hill outside of town. That same banner hung
at another location for a month following. New members were gained at this program. We continue near 90
members and hope that our new web site may entice even more as well as keep present members informed. We
will be linked to state and Association AAUW so can keep better informed of Public Policy issues.

Joyce Farruggia, AAUW CA North Coast District Director attended with her husband and read a proclamation from
Kathleen Cha. The Healdsburg High School Jazz Band entertained us and thus we saw some fruits of our
commitment to education.

AAUW Awards, Scholarships and Installation of Officers (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

State President, Kathleen Cha attended the final meeting of the year. We presented Martha Hamon with the
Branch Woman of Achievement award and Superior Court Commissioner Cara Beatty with our Community
Woman of Achievement award. Four of our members received their Fifty Year Honorary Life Membership
certificates. Bea Currie, our EF Honoree, was introduced. This is the meeting where we introduce those who have
been awarded scholarships for attending Tech Trek and continuing on from Shasta College to a four-year school.
The meeting ended with a lovely installation of new officers.




                                                         39
50th Anniversary Celebration: Butter n’ Eggs Parade Float (Petaluma)
Rory Keller, Petaluma President 2004-2005

The Petaluma has implemented a strategic plan that infuses membership goals, including member participation in
Branch activities, reaching out to prospective members, and community visibility into its programs,
communications, and publicity.

Membership Outreach and retention – visibility within the community
Our participation in Petaluma‘s historic Butter & Eggs Day Parade kicked off more than a full year of integrating our
anniversary theme into programs and communications. Our entry in the parade in April 2004, after an absence of
more than 25 years, required volunteer participation to plan, design and build the float showing that Petaluma
AAUW is one of the ―Treasures of Petaluma.‖ There were members who participated in this and were a part of the
parade who don‘t participate in any other branch programs or activities. There was 100% retention of these
members. The community visibility – over 10,000 parade attendees – was enormous, and we know one new
member who joined after learning about us from the float and our handouts during the parade. We will participate
again this April, marking the branch‘s 50th anniversary.

Our float celebrated our programs and reached new segments of the community, as did our work with youth:
Sister-to-Sister, Tech Trek, and our sponsorship of a girls‘ softball team. Each of these programs has brought new
members (usually mothers) into the branch. Our float also promoted EF, LAF, Public Policy, sections and the
various community projects accomplished over the years such as Discovery Days and the School Art Show.

In April 2004, we also presented the authors of Not your Mother‘s Mid-Life Crisis in a performance open to the
public – benefiting our 50th anniversary celebration and our Sister-to-Sister program. A large section of the
audience was from the community not familiar with AAUW. At the ticket table, we also had members and
membership packets available, and garnered accolades for bringing this program to Petaluma.

The 50th Anniversary of the Branch has driven our 2004-2005 year, and will culminate in a Celebratory Luncheon
Program in May. We‘ll receive a proclamation from the City honoring Petaluma AAUW, with a good deal of
publicity surrounding it, our mission and accomplishments. The celebration was a new reason to reach out to
lapsed members, several of whom have rejoined! Membership, as of this writing, stands at 201. We have sent
several membership packets to prospective members just this past week!

Public Policy education and advocacy and collaboration
Our Public Policy was promoted (on the float as well as in programs and newspapers) through a Candidate‘s
Forum (Oct. 2004) that was not only well attended by the public, but also televised and co-sponsored with both the
League of Women Voters and our local newspaper; a Get-Out-the-Vote campaign (Oct. 2004); and The
Community Listening Project – Essence of Acceptance program in February 2005. We also partnered with the
Redwood Health Library in Petaluma (Sept. 2004) to show the documentary film Motherhood by Choice, Not
Chance to the community, and partnered again in January 2005 to bring a program - with a standing room only
crowd - regarding Alzheimer‘s Disease: Overview, Therapies, Services and Personal Stories to the community.
Monthly articles in our branch newsletter kept members informed of AAUW policies, the 2-minute activist, and
various web sites. We received cooperation from the schools in presenting the County Superintendent addressing
the topic of ―Education vs. Teaching to the Test.‖

Co-sponsor groups: League of Women Voters, Redwood Health Library, the Argus Courier, and The Community
Listening Project.

The 50th Anniversary Celebration will recap Petaluma AAUW‘s accomplishments over the years, and our parade
float publicizes it: from the Sister-to-Sister Summit to College Night to Candidate Forums to Community
Listening/Oral interviews to Health Forums to Authors to Discovery Days summer




                                                         40
50th Anniversary Celebration (San Carlos)
Barbara Carmody, San Carlos Recording Secretary 2004-2005

Over one hundred people gathered on Sunday, September 25, 2004, just one day short of its actual founding date,
in the historic Ralston Hall on the campus of Notre Dame de Namur University for a celebration dinner honoring the
San Carlos Branch of the American Association of University Women on the Fiftieth Anniversary of its Charter.
The dinner was the annual September Event and a most joyous beginning to an historic year. Enhancing the
historic nature of the event were displays of events throughout the past 50 years that were prepared by Archivist
Ann Barnes. As an historical marker of the branch‘s activism Branch President Eloise Mayo read a letter dated
February 25, 1959 from State Assemblyman Carl A. Britschgi commending the Branch for its significant help when
he requested assistance for a research project. NDNU President, John B. Oblak spoke about the University‘s new
Center for Social Justice, whose program is closely allied with the goals and commitments of AAUW. He also
spoke of the University‘s participation in the AAUW Partnership Program. State AAUW President Kathleen Cha
spoke of the branch‘s history of community involvement and presented an award which read

―In appreciation of your significant contributions to the American Association of University Women and in
recognition of 50 years of community achievements and service in Belmont, San Carlos and Redwood City.‖

Extensive press coverage in newspapers and through Chamber of Commerce Newsletters was responsible for
San Carlos Branch, AAUW becoming more visible. Active participation of a majority of branch members was a
highlight of the event and led to the enjoyment of each person who attended. A rolled scroll was presented to
each person in attendance along with a special bookmark on which were the names of eleven charter members,
six of whom were in attendance!

This event embodied the following guiding principles:
     Membership outreach and retention
     Public Policy education
     Visibility within the community
As well as these outcomes:
     Outreach and retention efforts that is infused into every activity and communication
     Marketing and media strategy to frame the organization, its mission and its accomplishments
     collaboration with other Branches or like-minded groups (Notre Dame de Namur University)

50th Anniversary Celebration: Honoring the Past and Building the Future (Victor
Valley)
Jane Pace, Victor Valley Committee Member 2005-2006
                                                             th
On May 7, 2005, the Victor Valley Branch celebrated their 50 Anniversary at a gala luncheon ―Honoring the Past
and Building the Future.‖ Members from other branches were invited to attend as well as past presidents, charter
members and city dignitaries. The mayor of Apple Valley attended, extended greetings and presented a
proclamation honoring AAUW and their contribution to the community. Judy Horan, Association Educational
Foundation committee member presented Dr. J. Jeanne Garrison a certificate recognizing the full funding of the
$35,000 research and project endowment in her name that had just been completed by the branch and other
donations. Anne Henke, Southeast district director also attended as well as other dignitaries from the community.
                                 th
One new member joined at the 50 Anniversary Celebration. Membership flyers are on display at all of our special
events.




                                                        41
50th Anniversary Celebration: Achieving the Gold and Beyond (Fullerton)
In 2004, over 100 people celebrated the 50 year anniversary of the Fullerton Branch AAUW fostering community
programs for women and girls. Guests came from over 300 miles and included charter members, past presidents
and friends. Other branch achievements and programs that occurred in March 2004 to February 2005 year
include:

   EF Fullerton Golden Fund American Endowment completed in the amount of $100,000. In May 2005,
    Nancy Segal, an EF Fellowship recipient spoke about her dissertation ―Twins – Heredity or Environment.‖

   September Coffee. 72 attendees, 8 of whom became new members, signed up for Interest and Social
    groups, renewed friendships and heard CSUF President Milton Gordon and Southern Calif. College of
    Optometry President Les Walls enlightened us about the expansion at their respective colleges and the new
    state-of-the-art equipment.

   For the 21st year, the Math Science Conference held at Fullerton College was sponsored by the Fullerton,
    Brea-La Habra, and Placentia Yorba Linda branches. 750 students attended, 45 outstanding professionals
    spoke, and 35 volunteers assisted.

   LAF WALK-A-THON with Brea-La Habra and Placentia-Yorba Linda branches was held at Tri City Park to
    raise money for LAF. Walkers were sponsored by a $5.00 donation.

   Candidates Forum held at City Hall was Co-hosted by Fullerton AAUW and League of Women Voters.

   Resolution Committee formatted and submitted to Association a request to revisit the $2.00 incremental
    dues at the 2005 Convention. Fullerton Branch feels the increase puts our Branch in a much higher dues
    bracket than any other community organization.

   Holiday Tea and Fashion Show featured our own members as models. Boutique items were available for
    purchase.

   Three Authors Luncheon sponsored with Brea-La Habra highlighted the secrets of getting published and the
    future of publishing e-books. Authors‘ books were available for purchase & autographing.

   Pat Morrison, Los Angeles Times columnist & Life and Times hostess, spoke of Women‘s Achievements.
    Largest attendance.

   Habitat for Humanity slide presentation focused on the contributions made by women.

   Installation of Officers all of whom use email and computer.




                                                      42
Fundraising & Visibility in the Community
The Annual Wildflower Run (Morgan Hill)
Lorrie Scott, Morgan Hill Co-President 2005-2006

The interests of Morgan Hill AAUW are as diverse as its 135 members. As an element of a national organization,
its members support the core concepts on which AAUW is based - equity in education for women and girls. The
Board of Directors dedicates funding each year for Educational Foundation, but education, at both the national and
local level remains the primary focus of Morgan Hill's fundraising efforts. Its dedicated fundraising effort, the
Wildflower Run, now in its 23rd year, has become an annual event in this city of 36,000. Its participants come from
all over Northern California and run the gamut from political leaders to moms with babies in strollers.

Upon completion of a $100,000 American Endowment in the early 2000's, Morgan Hill sought to expand its
fundraising efforts to permit donations to local educational efforts while continuing to contribute to EF. Not unlike
any marketing decision, discussions about how to effect the desired changes came down to increasing Wildflower
Run revenues or holding additional fundraisers. The decision was made to capitalize on the success of our run
model with increased emphasis on sponsorships as well as increased run participation. To that end, an informative
presentation was designed that was used to share information about AAUW and the Wildflower Run with potential
sponsors. The sponsorship committee compiled a listing of potential sponsors, contacted each to set up
appointments, and with glossy brochures in hand; they met with representatives of companies throughout the City.

A total of 30 businesses were approached in the inaugural year, an increase of 10 over prior years. The increased
number of contacts met and exceeded the committee's objective, resulting in increased sponsorship dollars that
equaled a 53.6 % increase over the previous year. This increase allowed AAUW-MH to increase its EF
contribution by 34.1% over previous year.

Morgan Hill has developed a fundraising module that works well. Carrying out the multi-faceted 10k, 5k, 2k walk
and run is a fundraiser that requires preparation. Some Run tasks begin six to eight months ahead, but most of the
more intense efforts occur in the three months prior to the Run date. And, always conscious of the wishes of
participants, individual elements are tweaked each year. Several over age 70 runners wanted to continue
competing in their own age category, so a separate category was added in 2005. Reaching added potential
participants and reducing cost are important, but happy participants help insure a profitable bottom line.

AAUW garners significant visibility in surrounding communities through the Wildflower Run publicity. Local print
media carries before-and-after event articles. Posters and registration flyers carry the stated purpose of the Run
and are distributed throughout the county. Run information is available on AAUW-MH web site and on
http://www.active.com./. Morgan Hill collaborates with many local groups to carry out the Run. Active.com.
maintains an online site that advertises the Run and allows runners to pre-register, and prepay so that on Run day,
they just check in and receive their numbered bibs.

A new tee shirt, featuring "wild" flowers and AAUW logo is designed each year; shirts go to all runners and
contributors at the $500 and over level. Tech Trek participants, GEMS after-school science club girls, and local
scholarship winners present ribbons and prizes at Run awards ceremony. AAUW-MH employs the Run tee shirts
to publicize not just the Wildflower Run but also to recruit members - at Chamber of Commerce mixers and public
events like the Taste of Morgan Hill, an annual street fair that draws more than 60,000 people. AAUW-MH
participates in the annual Fourth of July Parade that is filmed and rebroadcast several times throughout the
summer on MHAT, Morgan Hill's community television station. The Wildflower Run is a win-win for AAUW-Morgan
Hill - increasing membership and funding for E.F.

ELF Market (Pacifica)
Janice Dutton, Pacifica Communication Chair 2004-2005

Each December, the City of Pacifica holds a city wide craft sale. AAUW Pacifica branch makes jelly and other
holiday items in support of the city‘s efforts, in which AAUW also gains visibility.




                                                         43
Voter Registration Form Distribution (Auburn)
Susan Rushton, Auburn President 2005-2006

For years, the Auburn Branch has contracted with Placer County to distribute voting registration forms. The branch
receives $1,500 yearly for this service. The County pays the branch in two increments. A minimum of ten
volunteers covers hundreds of square miles to make sure that each of the approximately100 sites always has its
display folder full.

This labor ensures several things: first, that anyone who wants to register to vote has that option immediately
available. Second, the labor is patriotic and community-oriented. Third, we can be guaranteed of $1,500 in our
coffers. Although the folders holding the forms don‘t refer to AAUW, every time a member approaches a business
or a post office, she indicates that she‘s from the organization, thus promoting visibility within the community.

Beer Sales at the Gold Country Fair (Auburn)
Susan Rushton, Auburn President 2005-2006

Every year as the Auburn Fair approaches in September, local service groups are invited to enter a lottery to see
which groups will have the opportunity to sell beer at the several locations on the fairgrounds. The Auburn Branch
has entered this lottery for several years, and in 2005 we won the opportunity to sell at the entrance of the arena,
where musical groups would perform.

Selling beer at the Gold Country Fair in the September heat of the Sierra Nevada Foothills is a great way to make
money – and it‘s a great way to promote ourselves. Plus, it‘s a wonderful way for the group to work together, since
we all must take turns at the spigots, the change boxes, and serving. Time goes by very quickly.

The Auburn Branch uses the funds received from the beer sales for local scholarships. Over four days, Sept. 8-11
2005, we raised $3,589.85 for this very worthy cause.

There may be other, more sedate ways of raising money for a good cause, but we certainly have a good time
greeting and serving the fairgoers. And nobody‘s ever unhappy, whether they‘re coming or going. Its great public
relations for AAUW.

A Taste of Chocolate (Auburn)
Susan Rushton, Auburn President 2005-2006

For several years, Auburn branch of AAUW held an annual chocolate tasting event that included donated
chocolate from area merchants as well as dishes made by members. We scheduled the event to coincide with
Valentine‘s Day, usually the Sunday before Feb. 14. We chose one location – a restaurant, a meeting hall, a
church, or the court house – and served everyone at that one location. The charge was $5 for 10 tastes.

For the past couple of years, we haven‘t done this event. But this year, our members decided to get it rolling again
on Feb. 12, 2006, with some changes. We collaborated with the merchants association in the historic shopping
district and charged $20 for 10 tastes. The other big change was that 22 of the merchants made their shops
available as tasting stations, which meant considerable foot traffic from shop to shop. Some of the merchants
supplied their own chocolate; AAUW members also contributed their own dishes.

The result, because of the hard work, camaraderie, wonderful publicity, and great weather, was a tremendous
success. We brought in $3,200 before minimal expenses, which the two organizations will split. AAUW Auburn will
deposit the money we see from this event into our Educational Foundation account. At the three ticket-purchasing
locations, we had AAUW brochures visible and available.




                                                        44
Tea at Two (Auburn)
Susan Rushton, Auburn President 2005-2006

The Auburn Branch raised $199.35 for LAF and our EF Endowment at the Tea at Two fundraiser on Sunday, Nov.
13, 2005. Held in elegant surroundings, this High Tea included good food, beautiful tea cups of members,
interesting stories about the cups, and a talk about tea – its history, different kinds of tea, what constitutes a good
cup, and how to make it. Pleasant, delicious events like this one help retain members – as well as attract new
ones, since many members invited friends to join them.

Showcase of Homes (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

AAUW-Redding Branch collaborated with North State Symphony, North Valley Catholic Social Services, Turtle Bay
Museum and the Shasta Regional Library Foundation to man the ticket gate, supervise in the four houses, staff a
raffle and implement a gala opening night event. AAUW‘s portion was almost $14,000. Our working members
wore badges, had AAUW literature available and generally promoted AAUW during this two week event. AAUW
donated over 800 hours to this event and approximately 110 members, spouses, and friends participated.

Annual Home Tour and Art Show (Redding)
Gail O’Brien, Redding Program Co-Vice Presidents 2005-2006

Our 35th annual AAUW Home Tour and Art Show is used as our major fund raiser for EF and local scholarships.
Member art-for-sale is hung in a contractor‘s new home. A wide-ranging sweepstakes was held and this year
brought in approximately $3000. On Friday evening a preview of the art show is held for member with wine and
hors d‘oeuvres. Saturday is the day of the tour. Three private homes, as well as the contractor‘s home, are open
to the public. Our members staff all rooms and describe and highlight features from 10 to 3:30. Tickets cost $20
and include all homes as well as light refreshments at the art home. $24,000 was raised by our 2005 Home Tour.

Holiday Tea and Bazaar (Walnut Creek)
Karen Abu-Hamdeh, Walnut Creek President 2005-2006

The AAUW Walnut Creek Holiday Tea and Bazaar was a festive, fundraising event held on the first Saturday in
December, 2005. The goal of the event was to engage our membership, raise funds in a novel and fun way for EF
and LAF, and enhance the visibility of AAUW Walnut Creek in the community to recruit new members.

In early September, our co-chairs, Judy Finch and Diane Stangel, worked hard to communicate to our membership
to commit to making a holiday item or foodstuff to sell and to inviting friends, neighbors, and prospective members
to attend. Follow-up phone calls were made to members who had not responded. Each of our 6 Interest Groups
prepared a specialty basket for the Silent Auction.

The Holiday Tea and Bazaar was held in a church and even attracted members of the public from the Saturday
morning church activities. A publicity listing appears in our local newspaper. AAUW branch members brought
their friends and neighbors, shopped among the lovely array of hand-made gift items and baked goods, enjoyed a
delicious "tea plate" with beverage and sang-along to the holiday music played by two of our members who are
pianists.

Several of the guests were keenly interested in knowing more about the mission and activities AAUW. Association,
LAF, EF and AAUW WC literature was available. Our Membership Vice President, Hazel Chappell, is following up
with all the guests who attended, sending them our newsletter and inviting them to our next meeting.

With 55% of our members participating by contributing and/or attending, the event made $2,000 in gross proceeds
in support of the Legal Advocacy Fund and the Educational Foundation. Our members felt excited and energized
and plan to hold the Holiday Tea and Bazaar annually.




                                                          45
―A Day of Giving‖ Telethon (Nevada County)
Cheryl Morris, Nevada County President 2004-2005

―A Day of Giving‖ Telethon was an ambitious undertaking put on by the local community television station. It was
an entire day of programming devoted to educating the community about, and raising money for, local nonprofits.
Over 30 nonprofit groups took part, and our branch was among them.

Each group had twenty minutes to introduce itself to the community. Using a panel discussion format, I (as
President) and two of our wonderful Tech Trek girls were interviewed by another AAUW member who produces a
regular program for the television station. I covered the 3 nonprofit arms of AAUW for which our branch raises
money: Education Foundation, Legal Advocacy Fund, and the Nevada County Local Scholarship Trust, which
funds our local scholarships and Tech Trek. I was able to discuss all three in some detail, as well as explaining our
public policy and educational functions. (The interviewer and I also made it clear that we have a lot of fun and
mentioned some of our interest groups.) But the stars of the show, of course, were the Tech Trek girls who were
real-life examples of what we are all about.

Although we did not receive any pledges during the program, the visibility factor was well worth the time and effort
involved. Not only was the program seen by viewers, the planning meetings in which we interacted with other
nonprofits were still more opportunities for us to introduce people to AAUW. We also have a DVD of our segment
that can be used in the future, such as at a new member event, and copies were also given to the Tech Trek girls
and the Local Scholarship Chair for her use in educating local schools, parents, etc. about our programs.

Appraisal Faire (Nevada County)
Cheryl Morris, Nevada County President 2004-2005

The annual Appraisal Faire (2004 was our fourth) is our big EF fund-raiser and has also become known as ―the
AAUW event‖ in this community. Modeled loosely after Antiques Roadshow (but we are careful not to use the
name!), the Appraisal Faire brings together local experts in a wide variety of fields to provide appraisals for a small
fee. The appraisers donate their time, and attendees pay a fee for each item to be appraised.

In 2004 we scheduled 18 appraisers in specialty areas such as quilts, Native American arts, books, jewelry, clocks,
dolls, military and old west items, as well as general appraisers who could evaluate many types of antiques. We
also had great raffle baskets, donated by our interest groups, and we sold homemade cookies. Coffee and tea
were free. We also had a membership table and AAUW literature available. We gained several new members
specifically from this event.

Included in all publicity (among other things, we had a full-page feature with a picture on the food page of the local
newspaper, the tie-in being our homemade cookies) is an explanation of AAUW and, of course, the Educational
Foundation. Recognition of AAUW has grown through our annual hosting of this event as reflected in the
appraisers and attendees who return each year and the merchants who remember us and the Appraisal Faire
when we approach them to display information about it in their place of business.

This is an event, which draws wide participation from our branch membership and builds relationships internally as
well as externally. It is fun, different, and a great way to get the AAUW name ―out there‖ each year as well as
fundraising for EF.

AAUW Garden Tour (Danville-Alamo)
Anne Long, Danville-Alamo President 2004-2005

Danville-Alamo AAUW‘s annual Garden Tour was a great success. Nine gardens were featured with a variety of
types from eye-popping floral displays to breathtaking views to really unique architecture to truly creative art
sculptures. Light refreshments were served at one of the homes and a most creative hat contest ended the day
with additional fun. Receipts in May 2004 totaled approximately $7,200 and with expenses of approximately $300,
Danville-Alamo made a profit of $6,900 for the Educational Foundation. The annual Garden Tour has proved to be
a wonderful outreach to our community and has received excellent publicity.



                                                          46
No Ball Game Day (Gilroy)
Suzanne Barrett, Gilroy Fundraising Chair 2004-2005

On February 5, 2005, Gilroy AAUW held their second annual ―No Ball Game‖ Day, offering an opportunity for
attendees to play every kind of game, as long as there is no ball involved. This event is a fundraiser for the AAUW
Educational Foundation Scholarship Fund, the Legal Advocacy Fund, and the Gavilan College Scholarship Fund.

Each participant pays $25 to attend, and they receive a table to play the game which they bring. Snacks and soft
drinks, lunch, door prizes, and an opportunity to purchase raffle tickets, and bid on silent auction items are also part
of the day.

Our usual bridge players and game board players attended. However, adding some competition to the day, one
member organized a ―Texas Hold ‗Em‖ poker tournament. There were 40 attendees who participated in the
tournament, with the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners going home with great prizes donated to AAUW. The poker
tournament was such a popular segment of the day, a reporter from the Gilroy Dispatch, the local newspaper,
asked to be allowed to attend and cover the event. She wrote a great article and included a picture in the
newspaper.

The event expanded the attendees with the poker players. Most of those players were not AAUW members, had
never attended an AAUW event, and did not even know what AAUW was. Their participation allowed the Gilroy
chapter to introduce them to AAUW and explain our purpose and goals, while having fun. The event also
introduced the Chapter to a different revenue source, other than looking to our members to contribute all of the
money we ultimately give away. The chapter was able to concentrate their energies on giving time to the project,
and didn‘t feel so pressed to dig into their own pockets.

A total of 72 people attended No Ball Game Day, which cleared $2,806.60 for Gilroy AAUW. This is considered a
very successful event by the Gilroy chapter.


Art and Wine at the Theatre (Roseville-South Placer)
Anne Oney, Roseville-South Placer President 2004-2005

The Roseville-South Placer Branch of AAUW held a fundraiser, ―Art and Wine at the Theatre: A Benefit for
Scholarships‖, on January 15, 2005. The fourth annual theater event was held at the Magic Circle Theater in
Roseville, California. This successful event succeeded in accomplishing its goal of raising enough money to send
eight 7th Grade girls to Tech Trek at Stanford University. Additionally, two scholarships are awarded to re-entry
women at Sierra Community College. The branch members were very supportive of this event and gave many
hours of time and talent to make it both successful and enjoyable. As well, this event provides a lot of visibility
within the community.

The most important part of any successful fundraiser is organizing and scheduling the event. The General
Chairperson, Dona Louzader, begins a year before the event, coordinating it with the Program VP as to the month
and time. Ms. Louzader also is our branch‘s liaison with the theater manager, and selects the performance having
the broadest interest for the general audience. This year the play was Annie, which coincidently starred the
granddaughter of one of our branch‘s new members. Once the time, date, and place is finalized, this can be
incorporated into the coming year‘s program and organizing the committees can begin.

The General Chairperson for ―Art and Wine at the Theater‖ begins by finding chairpersons for each section of the
event: Art, Donations for the Silent Auction, Food, Greeters, Wine servers, and Business Managers. The Business
Managers are the silent heroes who make it all really happen. Ticket sales, publicity, and writers that develop
letters for solicitation for charity events and thank you notes to the sponsors that support the event do a
tremendous amount of work. Once the time, date, and place are determined, the largest jobs are those of soliciting
donations of art works and other silent auction items, and wine. We have found it best not to have too many very
expensive items, but many items overall.




                                                          47
The Select Sorority (Palos Verdes Peninsula)
Jacky Mason, Readers Theater Director 2004-2005
The Select Sorority is a completely factual and entertaining reading chronicling the lives of eight First Ladies. It
was written by two AAUW members from Palos Verdes Peninsula Branch: Jacquiline Mason and Pam Gershkoff.
Pam and Jacky wrote it with the goals of AAUW in mind. It reflects the importance of education for women and
girls and the progression of their political rights.
The script is written in two acts. Each act runs about 45 minutes, and each can stand alone. The first act covers
the era from the beginning to the Civil War; the second picks up after the war and culminates with the ratification of
      th
the 19 amendment. In the first act, the interviewer ―talks‖ with Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Dolly Madison,
and Sarah Polk. The ladies discuss the status of women in those early years and their hopes for the future. The
second act includes Lucy Hayes, Frances Cleveland, Helen Taft, and Edith Wilson. The lives of the eight First
Ladies featured in the script reflect the societal and political changes in the status of women from the beginnings of
our country to the twentieth century. The reading is completely factual and very entertaining.
The Palos Verdes Peninsula Branch‘s Readers Theater group has performed this play over two dozen times since
it was first presented to the branch in April 2003. The subsequent performances have been for a variety of
community organizations, women‘s clubs, schools, public libraries, and other AAUW branches around the
Southern California area. A fee for each performance is charged and all profits go to EF. Informational programs,
as well as a brochure, have been created to advertise AAUW and to explain EF. Valuable newspaper publicity
mentioning AAUW often accompanies the performances.
The enthusiastic reception of The Select Sorority has given the Palos Verdes Branch extensive visibility not only in
its own community, but also in the surrounding area. Several new members have been drawn to the branch as a
result. Because it is a Readers Theater production, the players read the script rather than memorize it. The
reading requires a very minimal set, and although period costumes enhance a performance, they are not
necessary. The script is available to other AAUW branches for a small fee. When presented by a cast of readers,
The Select Sorority can be utilized as an effective fundraiser and/or community education project. For further
information, contact Jacky Mason at (310) 377-3896 or jackyandbill@yahoo.com.

Children’s Theatre (Simi Valley)
Bakula Maniar, Simi Valley President 2004-2005
April 2005 was the 35th year of the Simi Valley Branch of AAUW presenting our ―Children‘s Theatre‖ musical
production to the community. Two of our members, Kay Barker and Lynn O‘Hanlon, have been the backbone of
this endeavor. Many of our members and members of the community, young and old, have participated as
directors, actors, musicians, and hostesses. One of our members has even written two of the musicals. In this
huge community outreach, our goal has always been to present an opportunity for local children and adults to
experience a live musical stage production. We have presented Hansel and Gretel, Peter Pan, Alice in
Wonderland, and Snow White, to name a few of our productions.
Although our main purpose of this project has always been to encourage children to participate and enjoy live
theatre, it has been a tremendous vehicle for raising money for local scholarships, gaining new members, and
visibility in the community. All proceeds go to local scholarships. Since 1975, our branch has given three to seven
scholarships a year, one of which is a re-entry scholarship for women desiring to further their education.
We have also benefited member-wise through these productions. Many interested budding ―actors‖ hear about
our production and through their participation, learn about the mission and accomplishments of AAUW. They
become members, and promote our mission to others. We also have gained many new members from parents of
young cast members and of course from those attending the performances. Through the promotion and
advertising in the community, throughout the Simi Valley Unified Schools, and the private school sector, AAUW
and its goal of education and equity for women is given much public recognition. Our literature and goals are
prominently displayed at every performance, on advertisements and flyers. Every year the newspaper does a full
page article about the play. In June, we are also given the opportunity to promote our mission, when we present
the scholarships to the recipients at three local high schools and at Moorpark Junior College.
Through this project we have gained a high visibility in the community and people look forward to our presentation
every year. It is certainly a labor of love and commitment for our branch.


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