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					HOCKER GROVE MIDDLE SCHOOL

 MUSIC DEPARTMENT CONCERT




         OCTOBER 20, 2008

 Chorus directed by Ms. Jaime Scherrer
Orchestra directed by Mrs. Cecily Mahan
Band directed by Mrs. Jennifer Herrmann

   Principal, Mrs. Debbie Pfortmiller
 Associate Principal, Ms. Bonnie Welty
                                                      Chorus
With Songs of Rejoicing…………………………….J.S. Bach/ arr. Hal H. Hopson
Johann Sebastian Bach was born in March of 1685 to a church organist and his wife in Germany. While he
was never a renowned composer when he was alive, and even considered old-fashioned by fellow
composers and artists, it is now agreed upon that he is one of the greatest composers to ever live. During
his lifetime, he wrote a wide variety of repertoire for all instruments and voices, the great majority of it sacred
music. The reason for this is that during his lifetime, the only career a composer could have was to be
employed to write and direct music for a church. This selection was taken from the cantata Den du Wirst
with text adapted from Psalm 98.

Pete, Pete………………………..West African Folk Song/arr. Rosephanye Powell
                      Galen Gossman, Proshawn Jones, Shelby Pitts - drummers
  Taylor Daneke, Bianca Barajas, Mattie Matthews, Courtney Whaley, Ashley Sanders, Britnee Edelman,
                                        Lindsay Binder – soloists

This popular children’s folk song from Ghana is sung traditionally as a call and response. It is an Akan
playground song. “Pete” (which means “vulture”) is a nickname for children. It is reference to a child’s great
appetite. The call is sung by a small group of singers, and the response is sung by the rest of the choir.
Translation:
Vulture, vulture, your mother is calling you.
What does she want me to do?
She said the meal is ready.

The Not-So-Boring Minuet…………………………..J.S. Bach/arr. Phyllis Wolfe
                           Abby Zimmerman, student accompanist

To the tune of Bach’s famous Minuet in G, this song verbalizes the issues that modern society has with
many classical songs. Songs that are three hundred years old and have no drummer are “boring” and put
people to sleep. However, if you study and learn to appreciate classical music as well as modern and
popular music, as we have in class this first quarter, you will find that classical music is not so boring after
all.


                                            Orchestra II
Dance of the Tumblers…......………………….Rimsky-Korsakoff/Dackow
The Dance of the Tumblers was composed by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov, a strong Russian nationalist who
held a lifelong interest in the folk music of his native country. His opera The Snow Maiden was inspired by
Alexander Ostrovsky's fairy tale, a work rooted in folk poetry, and was completed in an apparent effortless
fashion in the summer of 1880. The Dance of the Tumblers takes place during an episode in Act III in which
acrobats dance for the Tsar, and the excerpt has sustained its popularity far beyond the opera itself.
                                             Orchestra I and II
Eleanor Rigby...………………………………………….Lennon/McCartney
"Eleanor Rigby" is a song by The Beatles, originally released on the 1966 album Revolver. The song was
primarily written by Paul McCartney, although John Lennon claimed that "the first verse was his and the rest
are basically mine." It remains one of The Beatles' most recognizable and unique songs.

Orpheus in the Underworld-Finale………...Jacques Offenbach/Dackow
Offenbach’s Orpheus in the Underworld is a burlesque of the familiar myth of the Greek musician Orpheus
who was able to win his wife back from the land of the dead through the beauty of his music. The legend
had served as the basis of many operas before Offenbach decided to treat it humorously, casting Orpheus
as the conductor of the local symphony orchestra. The opera’s finale, the famous “can-can” music, is a
popular favorite.

                                                 Band 1
Danse Macabre……………………..……….Camille Saint-Saens/arr. Henderson
Danse Macabre (Dance of Death) is traditionally an allegory that has origins thought to be from illustrated
sermon texts such as the ones found on tombs in Paris dating back to 1424. In this case, Saint-Saens wrote
his musical setting based on a poem by Henri Cazales. You may have heard this piece played on Buffy the
Vampire Slayer, Shrek the Third, or Jimmy Neutron.

March Slav……………………………… ...Peter Ilyich Tschaikowsky/arr. Ployhar
In June 1876, Serbia declared war on Turkey their soldiers killed a large number of Christian Slavs
Russians sympathized with Serbia, and sent volunteer soldiers to assist with the war against Turkey.
Tschaikowsky was asked to compose a piece for a concert benefiting the wounded Russian soldiers. He
patriotically composed March Slav, originally known as the "Serbo-Russian March," in only five days. He
used two Serbian folk songs, hints of the Russian national tune “God Save the Tsar.”

                                                     Band 2
Mobbusters!…………………..………………..……………………David Holsinger
David Holsinger is a native of the Kansas City area. Holsinger attended CMSU and the University of
Kansas. Holsinger has been a church music director and now is on faculty at Lee University in Tennessee.
A highlight of his family’s annual summer trips between Dallas and the family farm in Kansas City has been
listening to recordings of the old radio shows of the 1940’s and 50’s. “Our favorites were the radio mysteries
like Boston Blackie P.I., Dick Tracy, Lux Mystery Theater, and Police Blotter.” The inspiration for
Mobbusters! was provided by these colorful old radio shows.

Ballymore Down…………………………….………………….. …..Carl Strommen
This piece is written in the style of traditional Irish folk songs. There are three sections in this piece, and you
may be reminded of music such as that in Riverdance or Lord of the Dance.
                    What have these Soaring eagles been doing
                                      First Quarter?




The music students have been using math, science, social studies, language and reading. They have been
learning about caring for their specific instruments, how to read, sing and play new notes, how to tune their
instruments, and how to make music as a team. They have been learning how to work together, how to
problem-solve, how to give effective criticism to self and others, how to praise and celebrate when
deserved, and how to have fun playing music.


*We learn responsibility when we learn how to care for the many band and orchestra instruments, the
music rooms and equipment in them, and the building.
*We use math when working on reading rhythms including whole notes and rests, half notes and rests,
quarter notes and rests, eighth notes and rests, sixteenth notes and rests, various time signatures such as 3/4,
4/4, 2/2, 6/8.
*We use our social studies skills when we learn about composers and their music, the geographical location
they lived in, and the historical information of the period during which the music was written.
*We use reading and language skills when identifying a composer (equivalent to an author), a title, and
reading the printed music and text. We extend our knowledge of our own language when we incorporate
musical vocabulary for expression in other languages, such as marcato (accented), legato (smooth),
andante (moderately slow), crescendo (gradually increasing loudness), decrescendo (gradually decreasing
loudness), divisi (divided parts), ritardando (gradually slowing the pace), forte (loud), fortissimo (very
loud), piano (soft), pianissimo (very soft).
*We use science when tuning instruments and when learning about air flow, bow pressure and speed, tone
quality, and dynamics.
                    What have these Soaring eagles been doing
                                      First Quarter?




The music students have been using math, science, social studies, language and reading. They have been
learning about caring for their specific instruments, how to read, sing and play new notes, how to tune their
instruments, and how to make music as a team. They have been learning how to work together, how to
problem-solve, how to give effective criticism to self and others, how to praise and celebrate when
deserved, and how to have fun playing music.


*We learn responsibility when we learn how to care for the many band and orchestra instruments, the
music rooms and equipment in them, and the building.
*We use math when working on reading rhythms including whole notes and rests, half notes and rests,
quarter notes and rests, eighth notes and rests, sixteenth notes and rests, various time signatures such as 3/4,
4/4, 2/2, 6/8.
*We use our social studies skills when we learn about composers and their music, the geographical location
they lived in, and the historical information of the period during which the music was written.
*We use reading and language skills when identifying a composer (equivalent to an author), a title, and
reading the printed music and text. We extend our knowledge of our own language when we incorporate
musical vocabulary for expression in other languages, such as marcato (accented), legato (smooth),
andante (moderately slow), crescendo (gradually increasing loudness), decrescendo (gradually decreasing
loudness), divisi (divided parts), ritardando (gradually slowing the pace), forte (loud), fortissimo (very
loud), piano (soft), pianissimo (very soft).
*We use science when tuning instruments and when learning about air flow, bow pressure and speed, tone
quality, and dynamics.

				
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