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PSE Module 1 Introduction

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PSE Module 1 Introduction Powered By Docstoc
					     Designing Roads for
Multimodal Safety & Access




     Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-1
         Context - Stakeholders
   All users of the transportation system
   Caltrans District Bike & Ped Coordinators
   Caltrans Advisory Groups
   Advocacy Groups
   Emergency Providers
   Legislature (AB 1358 – Complete Streets)




            Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-2
  Overview of pedestrian safety problem
 Nationwide:
 In 2005, 4,881 pedestrians were killed in
  traffic crashes, representing 11% of all
  fatalities (increase of 4.4% over 2004)
 Approximately 64,000 pedestrians were
  injured




           Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-3
  Overview of pedestrian safety problem
 California:
 17% of all crash fatalities are pedestrians.
 14% of all crash injuries are pedestrians.




          Caltrans’ Strategic Highway Safety Plan


           Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-4
  Overview of pedestrian safety problem
 Most pedestrian crashes occur when the
  pedestrian crosses a road
 Most fatalities and serious injuries occur
  on roads designed with little attention for
  pedestrian safety.
 Pedestrians are rarely killed in walkable
  environments.



           Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-5
         Presentation Outcomes
 Describe that people belong in all
  geometric design, operations and safety
  considerations, no matter their mode of
  travel
 Describe resources for information on
  scoping and designing for all modes
 Describe some measures to increase safe
  interaction between all road users


          Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-6
         Why is it important to accommodate
                     pedestrians?




                 To reach Caltrans’ Mobility Goal
Minneapolis MN    Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-7
Why is it important to accommodate
            pedestrians?




     Because many cannot drive
      Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-8
         Why is it important to accommodate
                     pedestrians?




         Because other modes depend on walking
Madison WI     Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-9
          Why is it important to accommodate
                      pedestrians?




                Because it’s good for business
Stillwater MN     Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-10
         Why is it important to accommodate
                     pedestrians?




 Because it will make roads safer for all road users
Portland ME    Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-11
             Why is it important to accommodate
                         pedestrians?




 AASHTO: “Because of the demands of vehicular traffic in
 congested areas, it is often extremely difficult to make adequate
 provisions for pedestrians. Yet this must be done, because
 pedestrians are the lifeblood of our urban areas…” (1994 ed, p 97)
Sisters OR         Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-12
Design information & guidance can be
found in established, respected documents:




Institute of Transportation            AASHTO:
Engineers (ITE):                         www.transportation.org
www.ite.org
              Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-13
Design information & guidance can be
found in established, respected documents:



     HDM                  PDPM                     MUTCD




Highway Design     Project Development             Manual for Uniform
    Manual         Procedures Manual             Traffic Control Devices
                                                   + Cal Supplement


            Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction    1-14
Design information & guidance can be found
in established, respected documents:




FHWA
www.walkinginfo.org

              Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-15
 AASHTO Strategic
 Safety Plan
 Guidebooks
 Website for NCHRP
 Report 500:
http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/nchrp/nchrp_rpt_500v10.pdf




                Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-16
US Congressional Legislation/US DOT Policy

TEA-21 (1999):
 “The non-motorized modes are an integral part
  of the mission of FHWA and a critical element of
  the local, regional, and national transportation
  system.”
 “… mainstreaming of bicycle and pedestrian
  projects into the planning, design, and operation
  of our Nation‟s transportation system.”




            Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-17
        US Congressional Legislation

Americans with Disabilities Act:
 “No qualified individual with a disability shall, by
  reason of such disability, be excluded from
  participation in or be denied the benefits of the
  services, programs, or activities or a public
  entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any
  such entity.”




            Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-18
US DOT Policy (1999 and 2000)
FHWA Program Guidance on Bicycle and Pedestrian
  Provisions of Federal-Aid Program:
 “… bicycle and pedestrian improvements can be
  routinely included in federally funded transportation
  projects and program.”
 “… bicycling and walking facilities will be
  incorporated into all transportation projects
  unless „exceptional circumstances‟ exist.”
 “… FHWA will encourage the development and
  implementation of bicycle and pedestrian plans as
  part of the overall transportation planning process.”


             Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-19
   California Vehicle Code Section 21949

“…it is the intent of the Legislature that all
  levels of government in the state,
  particularly the Department of
  Transportation, work to provide
  convenient and safe passage for
  pedestrians on and across all streets and
  highways…”




           Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-20
   California Vehicle Code Section 21949

“It is the policy of the State of California that
   safe and convenient pedestrian travel and
   access, whether by foot, wheelchair,
   walker, or stroller, be provided to the
   residents of the state.”




           Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-21
   California Vehicle Code Section 21200
 “Every person riding a bicycle upon a highway
  has all the rights and is subject to all the
  provisions applicable to the driver of a
  vehicle…except those provisions which by their
  very nature can have no application”
 All roads where bicycling is not prohibited
  should be designed for their use




            Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-22
  Streets & Highways Code Section 888,
       PDPM Chapter 31, Section 2

“ The Department shall not construct…a
   freeway that will result in the severance
   or destruction of an existing major route
   for non-motorized transportation traffic
   unless it provides a reasonable, safe, and
   convenient alternate route or such a route
   exists.”



          Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-23
  Rule on. . . …
  WORK ZONE
  ……Safety and Mobility
         23 CFR 630 Subpart J




Developing and Implementing
Transportation Management Plans
for Work Zones Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction
           Designing                                          1-24
     Deputy Directive (DD)-64
  Complete Streets – Integrating the
      Transportation System

 “ The Department views all
  transportation improvements as
  opportunities to improve safety,
  access, and mobility for all travelers
  in California and recognizes bicycle,
  pedestrian, and transit modes as
  integral elements of the
  transportation system.”
         Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-25
Planning and street design elements
that affect bicyclist & pedestrian safety:
     Land use
     Connectivity
     Access management
     Site design
     Level of Service (LOS)
      standards

         Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-26
Post WW2
  development
  patterns favor:
 Segregated Land Uses
 Long travel distances
 Commercial activities
  concentrated in auto-
  dominated corridors.
 Not very nice for
  walking or biking!




              Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-27
                         Generica




Missoula MT   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-28
               Connectivity

                                                  You live here, your
                                                 child wants to visit a
                                                 friend who lives not
                                                far away; how do you
                                                       get there?




         Cul-de-sac patterns increase walking distances
                 & increase reliance on arterials
Phoenix AZ       Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-29
High Connectivity                        Travel Lanes Required




Moderate Connectivity




  Low Connectivity




           Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-30
  Access
Management


 Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-31
                    Access Management:
             Every driveway is a potential conflict
Atlanta GA        Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-32
  Drivers and pedestrians must make choices:
  Walk in front or in back? Pull forward or back up?
Portland OR   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-33
Site Design


Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-34
               Principles:
Access for each mode should be:
  • Direct
  • Safe
  • Convenient




        Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-35
   Level of Service (LOS)
         standards:
Their impact on street design
   and pedestrian safety
Rethinking the role of urban
           streets

      Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-36
    A “complete street” accommodates many uses;
    Pedestrians are at low risk in this environment
Portland OR   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-37
      How have we built our highway system?




           To facilitate travel over longer distances
Las Vegas NV      Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-38
The various purposes
for roads:
 To move from A
  to B
 For mobility
 To access our
  homes,
  businesses,
  schools & other
  community
  centers
 To walk or bike:
  access & mobility
                                      Sidewalks provide
                                       both access and
                                           mobility
Washington DC   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-39
A multi-modal street can meet these
   needs, with some tradeoffs
      Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-40
            Auto-oriented street: high risk
Albuquerque NM   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-41
       What is the core safety issue?
    Pedestrians and drivers must use the streets
                     together


    On-street parking
    Narrow cross-section
    Buildings close to street
    Sidewalks
    Crosswalk
    People!

             Discussion: what does the driver see that says
                 “slow down, watch for pedestrians”?

              Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-42
Why are pedestrians are at high risk on this
street?
Multi-lane roadway, high speeds


Las Vegas NV   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-43
           Reinventing the roadway:
    Transform a 5-lane commercial strip to …

Portland OR   Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-44
…a safer road for everyone
   Discussion: 1. What changed?
   Discussion: 2. What didn’t change?
 Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-45
Next:
 Crash Reduction Factors




    Designing Streets for Pedestrian Safety - Introduction   1-46

				
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