Docstoc

EXAM REVIEW

Document Sample
EXAM REVIEW Powered By Docstoc
					EXAM REVIEW
            APOSTROPHE
Use an apostrophe and s („s) to form the
  possessive of a singular noun
Girl + „s= girl‟s James + James‟s

Use an apostrophe and s („s) to form the
  possessive of a plural noun that does not
  end in s
Men + „s = men‟s geese + geese‟s
Women + „s = women‟s

Use an apostrophe alone to form the
  possessive of a plural noun that ends in s.
Boys + „ = boys‟ judges + „ = judges‟
     Practice Apostrophes
1. The girls chorus and the boys glee club
   will sing at the nursing center on
   Saturday.
2. Ill tell Debbies father the news.
3. Someones history book is in the teachers
   workroom.
4. The dog put its head on my knee.
5. The childrens party will begin at one at
   our house.
6. Shell put everyones reports on the
   bulletin board.
7. The cars engine sputtered, and its
    frame shook.
8. That bicycle isnt yours.
9. It‟s a quarter to three, and
    nobodys parents have arrived to
    collect their children.
10. Youre in charge of the luncheon
    for the womens political club.
    Answers Apostrophes
1. The girls‟ chorus and the boy‟s glee
   club will sing at the nursing center
   on Saturday.
2. I‟ll tell Debbie‟s father the news.
3. Someone‟s history book is in the
   teachers‟ workroom.
4. Correct.
5. The children‟s party will begin at
   one at our house
6. She‟ll put everyone‟s reports on the
   bulletin board.
7. The car‟s engine sputtered, and its
   frame shook.
8. That bicycle isn‟t yours.
9. It‟s a quarter to three, and
   nobody‟s parents have arrived to
   collect their children.
10. You‟re in charge of the luncheon
   for the women‟s political club.
    Colon and Semicolon
1. Use a semicolon to join the main clauses
   of a compound sentence if they are not
   joined by a conjunction such as for,
   and, but, or, yet, so.
   I want ice cream for supper; she wants
   steak for dessert.
2. Use a semicolon even when you are
   using a “fanboy” if you have already
   used several commas and the two main
   clauses are long.
   Before the invention of the automobile,
   people rode horses, bicycles, or
3. Use a semicolon with conjunctive
  adverbs, such as consequently,
  furthermore, however, moreover,
  nevertheless, or therefore.

I started my homework immediately
   after school; consequently, I finished
   before dinner.
Only use the semicolon if there is a
   complete sentence on each side of
   the conjunctive adverb.
Otherwise, use commas - I want to go
4. Use a colon to introduce a list of items
   that ends a sentence. Use a word or a
   phrase such as these, the following, or
   as follows before the list.

I‟ll need these supplies for my project:
      newspapers, flour, water, string, and
      paint.
I participate in the following sports: softball,
      tennis, basketball, and swimming.
Do NOT USE A COLON AFTER A verb or a
      preposition
My subjects include reading, math, English,
      and science.
5. Use a colon to separate the hour
   and the minutes when you use
   numerals to write the time of day
The train left the station at 10:17 A.M.

6. Use a colon after the salutation of
   a business letter

Dear Editor in Chief:
Dear Professor Davis:
        Practice Colon &
           Semicolon
1. Night fell the moon rose.
2. Please do not bring any of the se
   items to the test site radios, pagers,
   food, beverages.
3. The three travelers looked at the
   object in amazement they had
   never seen anything like it.
4. It was 312 P.M. when I looked at
   the clock.
5. I have received pamphlets from
   Camp Lookout, Camp Dawn, and
   the Camp in the Pines however I
6. During the last two years, our family
   has traveled to Oregon,
   Washington, Idaho and Montana
   and in the next three months, we
   will see California, Arizona, and
   Mexico.
7. The departure time for our flight is
   1117 A.M. the plane lands in
   Houston at 104 P.M.
8. My favorite teams are the Bulls, the
   Cubs, and the Bears.
9. In the nineteenth century,
   Longfellow was a popular poet, a
   Answers Colons & Semicolons
1. Night fell; the moon rose. R - 1
2. Please do not bring any of these items
    to the test site: radios, pagers, food,
    beverages. R - 4
3. The three travelers looked at the object
    in amazement; they had never seen
    anything like it. R - 1
4. It was 3:12 P.M. when I looked at the
    clock.
    R-5
5. I have received pamphlets from Camp
    Lookout, Camp Dawn, and the Camp in
    the Pines; however, I have not yet made
6. During the last two years, our family has
   traveled to Oregon, Washington, Idaho
   and Montana; and in the next three
   months, we will see California, Arizona,
   and Mexico.            R-2
7. The departure time for our flight is 11:17
   A.M. the plane lands in Houston at 1:04
   P.M. R - 5
8. My favorite teams are the Bulls, the
   Cubs, and the Bears. - Correct
9. In the nineteenth century, Longfellow
   was a popular poet, a professor at
   Harvard University, and a loving
   husband; and his works include
   Evangeline, The Courtship of Miles
   Standish, The Song of Hiawatha, and
               Commas
1. Separate three or more words, phrases,
   or clauses in a series.
   Cars, buses, and trucks clog the streets.
2. Set off an introductory word such as yes,
   no, or well.
   Yes, we enjoyed your performance in
   the play.
3. Set off names used in direct address.
   Claire, have you ever traveled on a
   ship?
   I traveled to Alaska, Mr. Hess, on a ship.
4. Set off two or more prepositional phrases
    at the beginning of a sentence. Set off
    a single long prepositional phrase at the
    beginning of a sentence.
    In the fall of 1998, Frank Jordan ran for
    mayor. (2 short prepositional phrases)
    Beneath a dozen fluttering red and blue
    banners, he made his campaign
    speech. (1 long prepositional phrase)
5. Set off participles and participle phrases
    at the beginning of a sentence.
    Talking, we lost track of time.
    Talking on the telephone, we lost track
    of time.
Set off a participle phrase that is not
   essential to the meaning of a
   sentence.
The band, marching in formation,
   moves down the field.
Independence Day, celebrated on
   July 4, is a national holiday.
6. Set off words that interrupt the flow
   of thought in a sentence.
  Politicians, of course, sometimes forget
     their campaign promises after the
     election.
7. Use a comma after a conjunctive
   adverb, such as however,
   moreover, furthermore,
   nevertheless, or therefore
   The school district is growing;
   therefore, taxes will rise.
8. Set off an appositive that is not
   essential to the meaning of a
   sentence.
  The Titanic, a luxury liner, sank on its first
     voyage.
             COMMAS II
9. Use a comma before a coordinating
    conjunction ( fanboy) for, and, nor, but,
    or, yet, so that connects the two parts of
    a compound sentence.
    Steve opened the door, and the dog
    ran out.
10. Set off an adverb clause at the
    beginning of a sentence. Begins with a
    subordinating conjunction, such as
    after, although, as, because, before, if ,
    since, though, unless, until, when,
    whenever, where, wherever, while
Whenever I feel afraid, I whistle a happy
    tune.
11. Set off a nonessential adjective clause.
  Gives additional meaning and is not
  necessary to the meaning of the
  sentence. Usually begins with a relative
  pronoun, such as who, whom, whose,
  which, or that
My house, which has green shutter, is at the
  corner of Elm and Maple.
Do not set off an essential adjective clause
  because it is necessary to the meaning of
  the sentence.
The house that has green shutters is at the
  corner of Elm and Maple.
12. In a date, set off the year when it‟s used
    with both the month and the day. Don‟t
    use a comma if only the month and the
    year are given.
    The ship struck an iceberg on April 14, 1912,
    and sank early the next morning.
    The ship sank in April 1912 on its first
    voyage.
13. Set off the name of a state or country
    when it‟s used after a city. Set off the name
    of a city when it‟s used after a street
    address. Don‟t use a comma after the
    state if it‟s followed by a ZIP code.
    The ship was sailing from Southampton,
    England, to New York City.
    You can write to Lisa at 15 College Court,
    Stanford, CA 94305
14. Set off an abbreviated title or degree
    following a person‟s name
    Michelle Davis, Ph.D., will be the
    graduation speaker.
    Letisha Smith, M.D., is our family doctor.
15. Set off too when it is used in the middle
    of a sentence and means “also.” Don‟t
    set off too at the end of a sentence.
   Parents, too, will attend the ceremony.
   Parents will attend the ceremony too.

  16. Set off a direct quotation
  Mom asked, “Have you finished your work?”
  “I did it,” I replied, “in study hall.”
17. Use a comma after the salutation of a
    friendly letter and after the closing of
    both a friendly letter and a business
    letter.
    Dear Dad, Your loving daughter,
    Yours truly,
18. Use a comma to prevent misreading
    Instead of two, five teachers made the
    trip.
    In the field below, the brook gurgled
    merrily.
     PRACTICE COMMAS I
1. Strolling through the mall Amy spotted
   her aunt Marge outside the bookstore.
2. Jim Wong our best pitcher has injured
   his arm; furthermore Rocky Solo our best
   hitter has the flu.
3. In the heat of the moment Mother I lost
   my temper.
4. That home run by the way was Rocky‟s
   twenty-fifth of the season.
5. The children ran out the door across the
   lawn and into the woods behind the
   house.
6. The puppy wrapped in an old blue bath
   towel shivered in my arms.
7. Are you going to the Toads concert Ali?
8. Yes Dad I will do my homework clean
    my room and wash the dishes while
    you‟re gone.
9. Fro many years after the war there was
    bad feeling between the two nations;
    nevertheless they maintained courteous
    public relations.
10. Among the green blue and yellow lawn
    chairs the baby sat in her stroller.
       Answers Commas I
1. Strolling through the mall, Amy spotted
    her Aunt Marge outside the bookstore. R
    -5
2. Jim Wong, our best pitcher, has injured
    his arm; furthermore, Rocky Solo, our
    best hitter has the flu.
   R -7 & 8
3. In the heat of the moment, Mother, I lost
    my temper. R - 3
4. That home run, by the way, was Rocky‟s
    twenty-fifth of the season. R- 6
5. The children ran out the door, across the
    lawn, and into the woods behind the
    house. R- 1
6. The puppy, wrapped in an old blue
    bath towel, shivered in my arms. R -5
7. Are you going to the Toads concert, Ali?
    R-3
8. Yes, Dad, I will do my homework, clean
    my room, and wash the dishes while
    you‟re gone. R‟s 2, 3, 1
9. For many years after the war there was
    bad feeling between the two nations;
    nevertheless, they maintained
    courteous public relations. R - 7
10. Among the green, blue, and yellow
    lawn chairs the baby sat in her stroller. R
    -1
       USING COMMAS II
1. Will your dad drive us to the museum or
   shall we take a bus?
2. After I had scraped the mud from my
   shoes I went indoors.
3. The principal entered the room and the
   students became silent.
4. Jamaica Hightower who will be sixteen
   soon is learning to drive.
5. I have already read the book that you
   chose for your report.
6. Please don‟t leave until I‟m ready.
7. Although the sun was shining the air was
   cold.
8. I took my umbrella with me for it
    was raining hard.
9. Margarine has less animal fat but
    butter tastes better.
10. The dingo which is a wild dog is a
    native of Australia.
      Answers Commas II
1. Will your dad drive us to the
   museum, or shall we take a bus? R -
   9
2. After I had scraped the mud from
   my shoes, I went indoors. R - 10
3. The principal entered the room,
   and the students became silent. R -
   9
4. Jamaica Hightower, who will be
   sixteen soon, is learning to drive. R -
   11
5. I have already read the book that
6. Please don‟t leave until I am ready.
    Correct
7. Although the sun was shining, the air
    was cold. R - 10
8. I took my umbrella with me, for it
    was raining hard. R - 9
9. Margarine has less animal fat, but
    butter tastes better. R- 9
10. The dingo, which is a wild dog, is a
    native of Australia. R - 11
    PRACTICE COMMAS III
1. “Mrs. Roberts” I told Mom “is moving to
   Atlanta Georgia in June.”
2. Sweet potatoes too are high in vitamin
   C.
3. An assassination in Sarajevo Bosnia-
   Herzegovina in June 1914 set the stage
   for World War I.
4. “Gettysburg Pennsylvania was the
   scene of a major battle of the Civil War”
   said Serena.
5. The Carters left Los Angeles California
   on Thursday and arrived in Orlando
   Florida a week later.
7. John commented “Robert E. Lee
    surrendered at Appomattox Virginia on
    April 9 1865 to Ulysses S. Grant.”
8. The address on the envelope was 1234
    Oak Street Houston TX 77032
9. Soon after they immigrated to the
    United States.
10. Write the following message, adding
    commas where needed.
    Dear Aunt Julia
      Thanks for the book. Camp is great.
    Scott too is enjoying himself.
                  Your nephew
                  David
      Answers Commas III
1. “Mrs. Roberts,” I told Mom, “is moving to
    Atlanta, Georgia in June.” R‟s 16 & 13
2. Sweet potatoes, too, are high in vitamin
    C. R - 15
3. An assassination in Sarajevo, Bosnia-
    Herzegovina in June 1914 set the stage
    for World War I. R - 13
4. “Gettysburg, Pennsylvania was the
    scene of a major battle of the Civil
    War,” said Serena.
    R - 13 & 16
5. The Carters left Lost Angeles, California
    on Thursday and arrived in Orlando,
6. Sam Lee, Ph.D., has written a book
   on the environment of the
   Everglades. R - 14
7. John commented, “Robert E. Lee
   surrendered at Appomattox,
   Virginia on April 9, 1865 to Ulysses S.
   Grant.”
   R - 13 & 16
8. The address on the envelope was
   1234 Oak Street, Houston, TX 77032
   R- 13
9. Soon after, they immigrated to the
   United States. R - 18
10. Dear Aunt Julia,

     Thanks for the book. Camp is great.
     Scott, too, is enjoying himself.

               Your nephew,
               David
             USAGE
1. A, an = Use a before words that
   begin with a consonant sound. Use
   an before words that begin with a
   vowel sound.
   a poem, a house, a yacht, a union
   an apple, an icicle, an honor, an
   umbrella, an only child
Accept, except = Accept is a verb
 that means “to receive” or “to
 agree to” Except is a preposition
 that means “but.” Except may also
 be a verb that means “to leave out
 or exclude.”

Please accept this gift.
Will you accept our decision.
Everyone except you.
Some students may be excepted from
  taking the physical exam.
Affect, effect = Affect is a verb that means
  “to cause a change in” or “to influence
  the emotions of.” Effect may be a noun
  or a verb. As a noun, it means “result.” As
  a verb, it means “to bring about or
  accomplish.”

The mayor‟s policies have affected every
  city agency.
The mayor‟s policies have had a positive
  effect on every city agency. (noun)
The mayor has effected positive change in
  every city agency. (verb)
» A lot - Is always written as two
  words.

» Awhile and a while
» Use a while after a preposition and
  use awhile as an adverb.
» She read for (preposition) a while.
» She read awhile. (as an adverb -
  modifies the verb read)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:35
posted:6/5/2011
language:English
pages:40