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Selling Smarter

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					Selling Smarter
Instructor Guide
Instructor Guide
Before the Workshop

Read through the instructor guide. This is intended as a “guide” and not a “Ramayana”. Be guided by your experience, the needs of the participants, and your own common sense, as well as the information in here. However, most of the suggestions and all of the information have been developed through research and hands-on, classroom experience. We recommend arriving at least one hour before the start of the session, particularly on Day One of working with a client. We suggest you shake hands with each participant as they come into the classroom and introduce yourself to them; it breaks the ice and sets the type of friendly atmosphere that is conducive to learning. Many of the flip charts can be prepared ahead of time. The first page should be set up like this:   Name of Workshop   Facilitated by (Your Name)   Your Organization’s Name Include in a different color, around the perimeter of the room, the words Courtesy, Participation, and Confidentiality. You might also want to add the words Exercises, Role Play, Learning, and Fun

Session One: Introduction and Course Overview (8:30-9:00)
Introduce yourself. Establish credibility, by giving examples of training experience, and Your own experiences with sales. Ask that participants respect confidentiality. “What we say in this room stays in this room.” Remind them that it was Mark Twain who said, “If two people have the same opinion, you don’t need one of them,” so we are at liberty to disagree with one another, and with the Instructor. However, respect other people’s opinions. Act courteously, to make sure we give other people their share of air time, and that we listen when other people are talking; and finally, we ask that you participate. You get out of a workshop just about what you put into it, and you will learn as much from sharing with others as you will from the concepts we bring you. Give the participants a chance to introduce themselves to you. You will probably want to know their name, their department, their position title and how they are involved in sales Address housekeeping items, like breaks (usually 10:15 and 2:15) and noon hour (12 to 1, go to lunch on their own). Give them info about washrooms, coffee, and cell phones. Remind the group that this is a “safe house,” the place where they can learn from their mistakes in a supportive atmosphere, rather than in the workplace where it can harm their credibility or their organization. Course Overview Ask students to turn to their workbooks and read the introduction with the overall objectives of the workshop (Session One). Then ask them to identify their own learning objectives. Turn to the agenda (on flip charts) and look at the topics you plan to cover. Go over these with the group and ask if there is anything there they didn’t expect to see, or something NOT there that they had been hoping for. For topics they don’t see:    Reassure group if a topic will be covered although it doesn’t appear in the Agenda. Opt to squeeze in something not covered if there is time, it’s appropriate, and if everybody is interested. For those things they feel are not of interest to the group, you have the option of touching it briefly and moving on. This doesn’t happen often, but these questions are your hip pocket needs assessments to make sure participants get what they expect, IF IT IS POSSIBLE.



Generally, topics not within the realm of this program must be dealt with at another time. Suggest other programs, or talk with the participant at end of day.

Learning Objectives
It’s no secret that selling has changed in recent years. This is an exciting and dynamic profession, yet it is one of the most underrated and misunderstood, at least in recent years. The back-slapping sleazy, joke-telling huckster has disappeared and in his place is a new generation of sales professionals—highly trained and groomed, with the characteristics of honesty, trustworthiness, and competence. Broadly defined, today’s top salespeople are in the business of identifying needs and persuading potential customers to respond favorably to an idea that will result in mutual satisfaction for both the buyer and the seller. At the end of today, participants will be able to:   Understand a wonderful paradox: helping other people get what they want gives us more of what we want. Use goal-setting techniques as a way to focus on what you want to accomplish and develop strategies for getting there.

 . 

Recognize the difference between features and benefits of products and services, and develop a plan for increasing product knowledge Identify and be able to better present the competitive strengths of your products and services, so that you can be proactive, in handling objections and more successful at asking for the business. Recognize the importance of effective communication in the sales process, so we enhance our ability to listen, ask questions, and send congruent body language messages.



Icebreaker: Puzzle

Once everyone is grouped, ask them to come up with three things they all want to get from the workshop.

Icebreaker Debrief
Now, bring the group back together and combine all the objectives gathered onto a flip Chart. What seems to be the conclusion?

Session Two: Essential Selling Skills (9:00-11:00) Selling Skills (9:00-9:15)
Ask participants to start thinking about what you, personally, want from this course. In other words, what will success look like to you? Ask group what they believe are the important characteristics of a successful sales person and put responses on flip chart. Answers will likely include the following:  Energy  Good talker  Organized  Motivation  Knowledge about product/service  Persistent  Enthusiasm  Good listener Selling skills take weeks, months, and even years to learn. It isn’t that they are that difficult, but they have to be practiced sufficiently to make them second nature. To sell is simple. To sell under adverse or competitive situations, not just once but again and again, is an incredibly complex and demanding task. Here are the basic skills of selling. If you don’t have them, you need them. They are your future, your rock, your foundation, your equity increase. You can double your sales by mastering each skill by itself and using them all in strategic harmony.       Rapport skills: Recognizing and adjusting for the needs of others. Observation skills: Reading body language and the subtleties of non-verbal language. Interrogation skills: Uncovering and implanting expectations, needs, desires, motives, and parameters. Commitment skills: Growing purchasing commitment and orchestrating tension controlled sale from beginning to end. Negative response skills: Interpreting, responding to, and reversing negative opinions, actions, or events. Presentation skills: Making your solution sound attractive, exciting, and complete to the prospective client.

      

Expectation skills: Exposing, implanting, and fulfilling client expectations. Communication skills: Facilitating the transfer of information from you to your client. Organization skills: Operating your sales management system efficiently, effectively, and profitably. Strategic skills: Evaluating selling situations, planning tactics, and actions that result in bigger, faster sales. Technology skills: Rising beyond the sales support boundaries that may eventually hold you back. Training skills: Provide added value to your customers and your selling team. Product knowledge application skills: Positively affecting your customers through your personal knowledge of your product and interpreting your product/service features into advantages/benefits. Motivation skills: Positively motivating individuals and groups during sales presentations. Attitude-adjusting skills: Repositioning your personal attitude quickly when depressed or de-motivated.

 

Skill Analysis (9:15-9:45)
Divide group into teams of three to four people and give each team three to four characteristics to work on. There should be three items for each characteristic: 1. Description 2. Example of what the skill would look like 3. A way to gain or improve that skill if an entrepreneur felt it was lacking in his/her bag of skills

Give each group a sheet or two of flip chart paper and ask them to appoint a note taker who will record ideas and a spokesperson who will share the team’s work with the entire group at the end of the exercise. There are 15 skills in the list. Take the first one and make an example of it.

Rapport Skills
Description: being able to understand the other person’s point of view, and making allowances for it. Example: If we had rapport with a person who was having a bad day, we would be able to understand their frustration. You might acknowledge they are having a bad day, let the client reschedule, let them explain what is happening, let them vent a bit, try some humor, and offer some examples that his/her frustration is shared by others. Don’t push for a sale today if you sense resistance. Improving : Building your rapport skills takes practice. Practice at home and with friends as well as with clients. Many of us do not automatically understand another’s feelings. Ask yourself: “How is this person feeling?” and take your cue from your answer

Debrief (9:45-10:00)
Have each group present their findings.

The Power of the Mind (10:00-10:15)
Discuss the further characteristics of a successful sales person. Read the quote, “The ability to control what you think about from minute to minute and from day to day is the first great wonder of the mind.” Give examples of the mind’s power, as in the lemon exercise. Imagine yourself going to the supermarket and purchasing the largest, plumpest lemon you can find. This lemon will have a cool dimpled skin, bright lemony color, and feel heavy as you hold it. You bring it home and put it on a cutting board in the kitchen. Get a sharp knife out of the drawer and cut the lemon in half. Watch the juice ooze from the lemon onto the board. Now take one half of the lemon and cut it again, so you have a juicy quarter-lemon. Take that quarter lemon and put it to your lips and suck the tart juice from it. You don’t have a lemon of course, but what was happening to you as you imagined the activity I was describing? Answers can include: making a face, saliva flowing. We didn’t have any lemons. The mind was doing its own thing. You see, the mind is very powerful, but it can’t tell the difference between what is real and what we imagine. So if we imagine negative thoughts, how will our mind react? We will get depressed, become convinced we can’t do anything, feel negative, and give up. If we give ourselves positive messages, the reverse can happen. We can gain energy and enthusiasm, and see the world as a better, brighter place. Optimism is a learned skill. Is this important for sales people and entrepreneurs to remember why? Responses can include: because this helps us realize how much we have control of our future, because we can actively try to stay optimistic, because as sales people it is easy to get depressed and feel rejected.

Selling Smarter
Student Workbook

Session One: Course Overview

It’s no secret that selling changed in recent years. This is an exciting and dynamic profession, yet it is one of the most underrated and misunderstood, at least in recent years. The back-slapping sleazy, joke-telling huckster has disappeared and in his place is a new generation of sales professionals—highly trained and groomed, with the characteristics of honesty, trustworthiness, and competence. Broadly defined, today’s top salespeople are in the business of identifying needs and persuading potential customers to respond favorably to an idea that will result in mutual satisfaction for both the buyer and the seller.  At the end of today, participants will be able to:    

Understand a wonderful paradox: helping other people get what they want gives us more of what we want. Use goal-setting techniques as a way to focus on what you want to accomplish and develop strategies for getting there. Recognize the difference between features and benefits of products and services, and develop a plan for increasing product knowledge. Identify and be able to better present the competitive strengths of your products and services, so that you can be proactive, in handling objections and more successful at asking for the business. Recognize the importance of effective communication in the sales process, so we enhance our ability to listen, ask questions, and send congruent body language messages.



Session Two: Essential Selling Skills Selling Skills

1) What will success look like to you?

2) What are the important characteristics of a successful sales person?

Selling skills take weeks, months, and even years to learn It isn’t that they are that difficult, but they have to be practiced sufficiently to make them second nature. To sell is simple. To sell under adverse or competitive situations, not just once but again and again, is an incredibly complex and demanding task. Here are the basic skills of selling. If you don’t have them, you need them. They are your future, your rock, your foundation, your equity increase. You can double your sales by mastering each skill by itself and using them all in strategic harmony. 1. Rapport skills: Recognizing and adjusting for the needs of others. 2. Observation skills: Reading body language and the subtleties of non-verbal language.

3. Interrogation skills: Uncovering and implanting expectations, needs, desires, motives, and parameters. 4. Commitment skills: Growing purchasing commitment and orchestrating tension controlled sale from beginning to end. 5. Negative response skills: Interpreting, responding to, and reversing negative opinions, actions, or events. 6. Presentation skills: Making your solution sound attractive, exciting, and complete to the prospective client.

7. Expectation skills: Exposing, implanting, and fulfilling client expectations. 8. Communication skills: Facilitating the transfer of information from you to your client. 9. Organization skills: Operating your sales management system efficiently, effectively, and profitably. 10. Strategic skills: Evaluating selling situations, planning tactics, and actions that result in bigger, faster sales. 11. Technology skills: Rising beyond the sales support boundaries that may eventually hold you back. 12. Training skills: Provide added value to your customers and your selling team. 13. Product knowledge application skills: Positively affecting your customers through your personal knowledge of your product and interpreting your product/service features into advantages/benefits. 14. Motivation skills: Positively motivating individuals and groups during sales presentations. 15. Attitude-adjusting skills: Repositioning your personal attitude quickly when depressed or de-motivated.

Skill Analysis
Our skill:

Description

Example of what the skill would look like:

Ways to gain or improve that skill if an entrepreneur felt it was lacking:

The Power of the Mind

“The ability to control what you think about from minute to minute and from day to day is the first great wonder of the mind.” The mind is very powerful, but it can’t tell the difference between what is real and what we imagine.

If we imagine negative thoughts, how will our mind react?

If we give ourselves positive messages, the reverse can happen. We can gain energy and enthusiasm, and see the world as a better, brighter place.

Optimism is a learned skill. Is this important for sales people and entrepreneurs to remember? Why?


				
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