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RFA-OAA-10-000001

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					Issuance Date:   December 22, 2009
Closing Date:    February 12, 2010
Closing Time:    12:00 Noon Eastern Standard Time

Subject: Request for Applications (RFA) Number#: RFA-OAA-10-000001
“Development and expansion of economic assistance programs that fully utilize
cooperatives and credit unions”

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) as represented
by the Office of Development Partners, Private and Voluntary Cooperation
Division (ODP/PVC) is seeking applications for an Assistance Agreement for
funding a program for “Development and expansion of economic assistance
programs that fully utilize cooperatives and credit unions”. The authority
for the RFA is found in the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended.

The Recipient will be responsible for ensuring achievement of the program
objective to significantly increase access to self-reliant cooperative
enterprises in USAID-assisted countries that meet the evolving needs of their
members, contribute to the quality of member lives, to their communities and
nations. The cooperative enterprises assisted should make direct, tangible
and significant contributions to one or more of the following USAID
priorities: Afghanistan and Pakistan, the President’s Global Engagement
Initiative, food security, global climate change, foundations of economic
growth, water, democracy and governance and global health. Please refer to
Section A for a complete statement of goals and expected results.

Pursuant to 22 CFR 226.81, it is USAID policy not to award profit under
assistance instruments. However, all reasonable, allocable, and allowable
expenses, both direct and indirect, which are related to the grant program
and are in accordance with applicable cost standards (22 CFR 226, OMB
Circular A-122 for non-profit organization, OMB Circular A-21 for
universities, and the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 31 for-profit
organizations), may be paid under the grant.

Subject to the availability of funds, USAID intends to provide approximately
$34.8 million in total USAID funding to be allocated over a five-year period.
USAID reserves the right to fund any or none of the applications submitted.

For the purposes of this program, this RFA is being issued and consists
of this cover letter and the following:

1. 	   Section A – Definitions and Acronyms, Program Background and
       Overview.
2. 	   Section B - Grant Application Instructions;
3. 	   Section C - Selection Criteria;
4. 	   Section D - Certifications, Assurances, and Other Statements of
       Applicant/Grantee;
5.     	 nnexes A-K
       A
For the purposes of this RFA, the term "Grant" is synonymous with
"Cooperative Agreement"; "Grantee" is synonymous with "Recipient"; and "Grant
Officer" is synonymous with "Agreement Officer".

If you decide to submit an application, it should be received by the closing
date and time indicated at the top of this cover letter at the place
designated below for receipt of applications. Applications and modifications
thereof shall be submitted in envelopes with the name and address of the
applicant and USAID RFA#: RFA-OAA-10-000001 inscribed thereon, to:

 (By U.S. Mail)
   Thomas R. Carter, Coordinator Cooperative Development, USAID/ODP/PVC
   Ronald Reagan International Trade Center (RRB)
   1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Room 6.7
   Washington, DC 20523-6700
   Email: thcarter@usaid.gov
   Fax:    (202) 216-3124

Applicants are advised that at the present time US Postal Service mail to
USAID does not always work expeditiously. You may not wish to rely on this
service if you wish to ensure timely delivery.

 (By All Other Means of Delivery)<
   USAID
   Attn: Thomas R. Carter, Coordinator Cooperative Development
   (202-712-5226)*
   Ronald Reagan International Trade Center (RRB)
   1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, 14th Street Entrance
   Washington, DC 20523-6700

* Please use guest phone at the USAID visitor desk.

In addition to delivery to USAID/ODP/PVC, each applicant must send a copy of
its application to the respective USAID country mission(s), regional
mission(s), or in the case of a USAID non-presence country(ies), to the
regional bureaus) where program activity is planned. Annex I, “USAID Mission
Addresses”, includes names and addresses for missions and contact persons.
However, mission mailing addresses are subject to change and applicants
should verify that the applications were received by the mission(s) and
applicable USAID/Washington bureaus. The full applications should be
received by the mission(s)/bureau(s) no later than February 12, 2010.
Applications should include technical and cost portions in one volume.

Following are the estimated dates of major procurement events:

Application Timeline

Date                                   Event
February 11, 2010                      Deadline for application receipt by
                                       USAID country/regional missions and/or
                                       regional bureaus
February 12, 2010                      Deadline for application receipt by
                                       USAID/ODP/PVC
March/April 2010                       If required to make a final
                                       determination on award/s, oral reviews
                                       and/or work plan submissions
March/April, 2010                      Applicants notified of decisions
May, 2010                              Cooperative Agreements signed


                                   Page 2
Issuance of this RFA does not constitute an award commitment on the part of
the Government, nor does it commit the Government to pay for costs incurred
in the preparation and submission of an application. In addition, final
award of any resultant grant(s) cannot be made until funds have been fully
appropriated, allocated, and committed through internal USAID procedures.
While it is anticipated that these procedures will be successfully completed,
potential applicants are hereby notified of these requirements and conditions
for award. Applications are submitted at the risk of the applicant; should
circumstances prevent award of a cooperative agreement, all preparation and
submission costs are at the applicant's expense.

The preferred method of distribution of USAID procurement information is via
the Internet. This RFA and any future amendments can be downloaded from the
Grants.Gov Web Site. The World Wide Web Address is http://www.grants.gov.
Select “Find Grant Opportunities” from the home page, then “Browse by
Agency”. Next select “Agency for International Development”. Then sort by
Opportunity Title (select “Cooperative Development Program”) or “Close Date”
(February 5, 2010). It is the responsibility of the recipient of the
application document to ensure that it has been received from the INTERNET in
its entirety and USAID bears no responsibility for data errors resulting from
transmission or conversion processes.

In the event of an inconsistency between the documents comprising this RFA,
it shall be resolved by the following descending order of precedence:

      (a) 	 Section C - Selection Criteria;
      (b) 	 Section B - Grant Application Instructions;
      (c) 	 Section A - Definitions and Acronyms, Program Background and
            Overview;
      (d) 	 This Cover Letter.

Any questions concerning this RFA should be submitted in writing to Mr.
Thomas R. Carter, via facsimile at 202-216-3124 or via internet at
thcarter@usaid.gov.

If there are problems in downloading the RFA from the INTERNET, please
contact support@grants.gov. Applicants should retain for their records one
copy of all enclosures which accompany their application.

Sincerely, 	                           Sincerely,




Karen D. Turner                        Portia Persley
Director                               Agreement Officer
ODP/OD                                 M/OP/ODP




                                   Page 3
                    SECTION A - GRANT APPLICATION FORMAT

A. 	   PROGRAM BACKGROUND AND OVERVIEW

The Office of Development Partners Private and Voluntary Cooperation Division
(ODP/PVC) has funded Private Voluntary Organizations including Cooperative
Development Organizations for close to three decades. This support has
contributed to creating and strengthening the policies, systems, techniques
and skills that enable these organizations to contribute to USAID’s
international development priorities. As these priorities have changed over
the years, and as the capacities of partner institutions have developed,
there has been an evolution in the partnership and the focus of ODP/PVC
support. These are reflected in the periodic strategic plans that guide
allocation of resources. The Office of Development Partners’ Strategic Plan,
and the USAID priorities referred to in the ODP plan, are the operative
documents for this RFA.

1. 	   ODP’s Strategic Plan

Derived from Agency and ODP experience, the Strategic Plan rests on the
following Development Hypothesis:

       A significant inflow of financial, intellectual and other capital
       from USAID-supported partnerships with key institutions outside
       the Agency will enhance the development outcomes USAID is able to
       achieve.

This Development Hypothesis leads to the ODP Assistance Objective:

       The use of strategic partnerships enhances USAID’s impact on
       achieving US Government foreign assistance priorities.

Strategic partnerships refer to formal linkages between USAID and a variety
of private and public sector entities that organize significant financial and
intellectual capital in ways that advance achievement of US foreign
assistance priorities. Among the strategic partners are U.S. Private
Voluntary Organizations as well as Cooperative Development Organizations.

Among seven Intermediate Results, five are of direct relevance to this RFA:

   (1)	   Increase in the cumulative number of new and continuing strategic
          partnerships that enhance development outcomes in USAID priority
          areas of focus.

   (2)	   Increase in the cumulative value of partner contributions from new
          and continuing strategic partnerships that enhance development
          outcomes in USAID priority areas of focus.

   (3)	   Expanded involvement of private sector and civil society actors in
          planning and executing actions that enhance development outcomes.

   (4)	   Improved development outcomes such as: the magnitude of benefits
          delivered, the number of beneficiaries reached, the geographic
          spread of the activity, a higher level of civil participation than
          planned, greater success in the level of behavioral change, and/or
          greater impact on legal or regulatory reform.



                                    Page 4
   (5)	   Sustainability, by improving the likelihood of future streams of
          revenue and other forms of support from private, as well as public,
          sources that will continue beyond the life of USAID-supported
          activity.

ODP’s Cooperative Development Organization partners have demonstrated the
ability to support achievement of USAID development priorities. This Request
for Application (RFA) will focus on enhancing achievement in several key
Agency priority areas. These are summarized below and appear in the order of
priority. Applications must respond to one or more of these priorities,
drawing a clear link between the priority objectives and the proposed program
of activities.

Global Engagement Initiative (GEI)

The Cooperative Development Program supports the President’s Global Engagement
Initiative as outlined in the President’s speech of June 4, 2009 in Cairo.
Through participating USAID Missions, the CDP will support the GEI through
greater outreach to civil society to engage and strengthen local cooperatives
and credit unions. The GEI principle that outreach emphasize listening,
rather than directing, applies broadly to the CDP objectives and this RFA.
CDP applicants are encouraged to fully engage previously neglected
communities to assess their needs in implementing programs and activities
that address priority USAID strategies as described below.

Food Security

Among Food Security goals are:

      Increased agricultural productivity (e.g., land and labor productivity,
       net incomes);
      Expanded value of trade of targeted agricultural commodities;
      Increased cash income of women and the very poor;
      Improved nutritional status of women and children;
      Expanded adoption of food production practices that conserve natural
       resources (soil, water, biodiversity, resilience to climate change);
       and
      Increased investment in research commensurate with the value of
       agriculture in GDP.

Among the Food Security strategy implementation considerations relevant to
the cooperative development program are:

      Country compacts that serve as common investment plans for host
       governments, donors, civil society and the private sector.
      Scale-up of private sector investment.
      Strengthened host country capacity in agriculture and nutrition program
       implementation at national, district, and local levels.

Food security investment will focus on 15 to 20 priority countries. While
these have yet to be identified, the selection criteria are likely to
include:

      A high prevalence of poverty and malnutrition;

      Current production far below sustainable agricultural potential; 




                                     Page 5
        A supportive policy environment for market-based agricultural growth,
         including trade;
        Importance of engaging regionally to meeting the food and economic
         opportunities in target countries;
        Opportunities to leverage multilateral partnerships with other donors,
         private sector, and civil society.

Although the countries have not been specified, according to the
Congressional Budget Justification, FY 2010 budgets for food security are as
follows:

                 Region                     FY 2010 ($)   FY 2010 (%)
                 Africa                    $524,888,000        38.22%
                 Asia & Middle East         $66,000,000         4.81%
                 Europe/Eurasia             $64,000,000         0.73%
                 Latin America/Caribbean   $100,000,000         7.28%

The balance of funding is divided amongst various Washington Bureaus.

Restoring the Foundations of Growth

Among the goals for economic growth are:

	   Improved climate for growth: sounder economic management supported by
     technical assistance to stimulate stronger recovery of economic growth.
     Emphasis will be placed on trade capacity building, financial market
     development, improved business enabling environments and enhanced private
     sector competitiveness.
	   Re-oriented public policy: governments move from fiscal crisis management
     to sound long-term planning incorporating effective participatory dialogue
     among stakeholders to build consensus and improve policy-making.
	   Economies more resilient to downturns: Strengthened economic policies
     build resilience; enhanced host country capacity to support innovative
     social protection mechanisms.
	   New resources and partners: expanded public-private partnerships,
     including with Diaspora populations, create new opportunities for local
     businesses to contribute to restored growth, particularly in workforce
     development, alternative energy and ICT, leveraged resources from new
     sources such as collective remittances or Diaspora direct investment,
     promoting synergies and scale to maximize development impact.

Among the anticipated results are:

	   Better Economic Growth policies and institutions: countries will improve
     their enabling environments to drive economic growth by removing costs and
     risks of commercial activity while emphasizing links to the overall
     development objectives in each country.
	   Resilience: Vulnerable populations will be better protected against
     adverse impacts of future economic dislocations as a result of sound
     economic policies, more efficient local markets, improved labor market
     flexibility and institutionalized social protection programs.
	   Poverty Reduction: EG program impact will be seen in indicators such as
     access to financial services by the poor and poverty reduction,
     emphasizing criteria such as the cost-effectiveness, scale and




                                      Page 6
     sustainability of impacts (see http://www.povertytools.org/tools.html for
     an inventory of poverty reduction tools.

Priority countries have yet to be identified.     Among the technical focus
areas will be:

	   Macroeconomic: funding will be allocated to reform-minded countries
     identified as vulnerable to the global downturn. Additional funds will
     provide technical assistance in public finance, public and private
     infrastructure, and other areas supportive of sustained broad-based
     growth.
	   Trade and Investment: funding for countries participating in special
     trade and investment arrangements with the United States. Funds will
     strengthen their regulatory regimes, build institutional capacity, and
     promote widely-shared benefits from trade. Latin American countries with
     or anticipating trade agreements will be a particular focus.
	   Financial Sector: investment in countries where financial sector weakness
     significantly impairs growth, particularly Eastern European countries.
     Funding will provide technical assistance to strengthen financial
     regulation and supervision and reduce lending risks through improved
     enforcement and risk management.
	   Private Sector Competitiveness: funding for countries with a business
     climate reform commitment. Funding will support sustainable access to
     business and workforce development services, and reforms to the business
     enabling environment.
	   Economic Opportunity: priority to countries with significant numbers of
     poor households. Technical assistance and other activities will help
     expand sustainable access to financial services among poor households and
     microenterprises; increase productivity among small and microenterprises;
     reduce barriers to the establishment and operation of small and
     microenterprises; and reduce the vulnerability of poor households to
     shocks.

Although the countries have not been specified, according to the
Congressional Budget Justification, FY 2010 budgets for economic growth are
as follows:


                 Region                   FY 2010 ($)   FY 2010 (%)
                 Africa                  $208,576,000        15.31%
                 Asia                     $59,915,000         4.40%
                 Middle East             $452,094,000        33.19%
                 Afghanistan/Pakistan    $350,574,000        25.74%
                 Europe and Eurasia      $125,989,000         9.25%
                 Latin America and       $113,582,000         8.08%
                 Caribbean

The balance of funding will be expended by USAID/Washington bureaus.

Climate Change

The four key components of USAID’s climate change program are clean energy,
sustainable landscapes, adaptation and the integration of climate responses
across the entire development portfolio.   Specifically relevant to
cooperative energy is the addressing the challenges involved in the



                                        Page 7
introduction and use of hybrid systems and renewable generation capacity as
well as introduction and expansion of transmission capacity that facilitates
access to cleaner energy. The following table summarizes goals, anticipated
results and measures of success:

Goal                     Result                 Illustrative Measures of
                                                Success
Increase access to       Greenhouse gas            Energy sector policy reform
clean, affordable, and   emissions reduced          in target countries and
safe energy sources                                 regions
for a low carbon
future                                             Greater access to clean
                                                    energy sources in rural and
                                                    urban environments
                                                   Clean energy capacity
                                                    established.
Expand land use and      Greenhouse gas            Soil organic carbon
forestry practices       sequestration              increased through
that sequester carbon    increased and              conservation agriculture
and avoid emissions      emissions avoided          practices on 50 million
while maintaining food                              hectares
production and other
environmental services                             $1 billion of carbon
                                                    finance initiatives
                                                    facilitated
Reduce vulnerability     Adaptation actions        Millions of individuals
to climate change        taken to ensure            with improved livelihoods
                         climate-resilient          because of climate risks
                         health, food, water,       avoided
                         and ecological
                         systems                   Seven new centers for earth
                                                    observation and early
                                                    warning systems established
Build a climate-         USAID’s work across       All infrastructure
resilient development    all sectors designed       investments incorporate
portfolio                and implemented to         best practices in climate
                         respond to climate         adaptation and mitigation
                         change
                         considerations            All technical staff trained
                                                    on integrating climate
                                                    adaptation and mitigation
                                                    into program design


Country priorities will be determined using the following focus areas:

	 Country vulnerability: USAID will focus efforts on countries and regions
   that are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, including least
   developed countries, small island developing states, countries lacking
   broad access to clean modern energy services, forested nations at high
   risk for loss of carbon sinks, and large emitters with untapped potential
   for low-carbon economic growth.
	 Maximum return on investment: USAID will prioritize countries that
   demonstrate political will to undertake the necessary policy, regulatory,
   and institutional efforts; provide opportunities for strategic
   partnerships; and where USAID has made significant investments in sectors
   vulnerable to climate change impacts.


                                    Page 8
	 Countries that pose significant potential for mitigation and emissions
   reduction.

Although the countries have not been specified, according to the
Congressional Budget Justification, FY 2010 budgets for energy and climate
change are as follows:



        USAID                                                    FY10
                                      Budget area
        Africa                        Energy                      $25,300,000
                                      Sustainable   Landscapes    $26,000,000
                                      Adaptation                  $28,000,000
                                      Integration
                                      TOTAL                       $79,300,000
        Europe and Eurasia            Energy                      $28,800,000
                                      Sustainable   Landscapes
                                      Adaptation
                                      Integration
                                      TOTAL                       $28,800,000
        Asia                          Energy                      $22,500,000
                                      Sustainable   Landscapes    $10,900,000
                                      Adaptation                  $30,300,000
                                      Integration
                                      TOTAL                       $63,700,000
        Latin America and Caribbean   Energy
                                      Sustainable   Landscapes
                                      Adaptation
                                      Integration
                                      TOTAL                                $0
        Middle East                   Energy                       $6,000,000
                                      Sustainable   Landscapes
                                      Adaptation
                                      Integration
                                      TOTAL                        $6,000,000
        Global (EGAT & ODP)           Energy                      $14,750,000
                                      Sustainable   Landscapes    $20,000,000
                                      Adaptation                  $69,250,000
                                      Integration                          $0
                                      TOTAL                      $104,000,000


Water

USAID’s strategy for the water sector reflects an integrated approach that
emphasizes access to safe water supply and sanitation complemented by
improved water resource management and productivity. Resources requested will
also strengthen watershed and river basin management and increase water
productivity. The goal for 2011 is improved water supply for 17.0 million
and improved sanitation for 8.5 million during 2011 and 2012. Emphasis will
also be given to increasing community participation and the role of women in
planning and designing new water systems. USAID would complement this by



                                      Page 9
improving water productivity in agriculture and fisheries; and expanding and
strengthening sustainable water resources management, supporting trans-
boundary conflict resolution.

Among the key considerations related to the water strategy are:

   Focusing resources in countries with the greatest needs as well real
    opportunities to address them
   Undertaking activities that can show impact over the short term
   Simultaneously tackling the systemic issues of service delivery, cost
    recovery and governance that are required for large-scale sustained impact
   Emphasizing a multi-sectoral approach, drawing on sectors such as health,
    education, democracy and governance, food security and climate change; and
   Partnering with other multilateral and bilateral organizations and the
    private sector to leverage USAID resources, comparative advantage.

Country priorities for water supply, sanitation and hygiene activities will
be based upon standard indicators such as percent of population with access
to safe water and sanitation; number of deaths from diarrheal diseases in
children under age five; and per capita water availability. Sub-Saharan
Africa and Asia will continue to be high priority regions due to low water
supply and sanitation access coupled with poor child mortality and other
health indicators.

Foreign policy and strategic considerations are also relevant, and countries
are also prioritized due to water-related political instability or potential
for conflict. Trans-boundary and water resource allocation will become
increasingly important as water short countries face higher demands due to
population and economic growth.

Although the countries have not been specified, according to the
Congressional Budget Justification, FY 2010 budgets for water are as follows:


            Region                          FY 2010 ($)   FY 2010 (%)
            Africa                         $225,000,000        42.86%
            Asia                           $105,000,000        20.00%
            Middle East                    $106,000,000        20.19%
            Afghanistan/Pakistan          ($27,000,000)        -5.14%
            Europe and Eurasia               $2,000,000         0.38%
            Latin America and Caribbean     $40,000,000         7.62%


Global Health

USAID’s Global Health Initiative consists of five components: It will
continue support for the previous Administration’s health initiatives; it
will substantially increase funding for maternal and child health, family
planning and reproductive health; it will increase funding for eliminating
certain neglected diseases; it will increase resources to strengthen health
systems to ensure the sustainability of the progress in mortality and
morbidity rates after U.S. health initiatives have completed their
objectives; and it will give heightened attention to integration of health
programs across health elements, USG agencies, and other public and private
donors, as well as to integration with host country programs.



                                    Page 10
In many developing countries the private sector is a major source of service
delivery, often to the most vulnerable populations, and plays an important
role in building and sustaining functional health systems. Private sector
organizations can be effective partners in jointly defining health challenges
and by participating in the design and implementation of USAID-funded
assistance. When integrated into public-private partnerships and global
development alliances with USAID, private companies and foundations have
already shown they can complement USAID's strengths and make substantial
contributions in areas as diverse as funding, business expertise,
commodities, and access to supply chains.

Country priority selection focus areas include country health needs, host
government commitment, other donor activities, efficacy of USAID assistance,
and other foreign policy considerations. Health assistance will also be
provided in countries where USAID investments have achieved significant
progress, where needed to ensure the sustainability of that progress and of
overall health system performance.

The Global Health budget is constructed in a way that highlights regional
priorities only for Maternal and Child Health. Although the countries have
not been specified, according to the Congressional Budget Justification, FY
2010 budgets for global health are as follows:


Region                                                   FY 2010 ($)   FY 2010
                                                                           (%)
Maternal/Child Health, Family Planning/Reproductive   $1,209,805,000    45.41%
Health
  Africa                                                $445,620,000       16.73%
  Asia and Middle East                                  $455,220,000       17.09%
  Europe and Eurasia                                     $25,047,000         .94%
  Latin America and Caribbean                            $78,100,000        2.93%
HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria                              $1,126,412,000       42.26%
Other Public Health Threats, Neglected Diseases,        $327,880,000       12.31%
Avian and Pandemic Influenza and Social Services


Democracy and Good Governance

The goal of Democracy and Good Governance is to sustain and deepen democracy
and governance in new or fragile democracies, expand individual liberty and
political competition in authoritarian states, and encourage accountable
governance in crisis and rebuilding societies. Overall, these countries and
territories will expect to see a significant increase in the rate of
democratic progress as a direct result of this assistance. Key program
elements include: rule of law and human rights; accountable governance
including anti-corruption; fully competitive elections and representative
political parties; free media and vibrant civil society.

Among the central elements of the Democracy and Governance strategy are:

Sustain and Deepen Democracy and Governance in New or Fragile Democracies
    strengthen civil society to promote transparent and accountable
      governance;




                                   Page 11
Expand Freedom and the Potential for Political Liberalization in
Authoritarian States
    support NGOs to promote political participation, engage in advocacy and
      watchdog functions, and promote respect for human rights;

Encourage Accountable Governance in Crisis and Rebuilding Societies
    strengthen democratic institutions, processes and norms;
    support local capacity to provide vital services to citizens;
    encourage civil society’s constructive interaction with government.

Country priorities for DG programs will be determined, in part, by findings
of country-based strategic assessments that consider a country’s political
environment, core democracy and governance issues, as well as opportunities
and constraints for programming. Although the countries have not been
specified, according to the Congressional Budget Justification, FY 2010
budgets for democracy and governance are as follows:


                Region                                  FY 2010 ($)       FY 2010 (%)
                Africa                                 $264,673,000            10.26%
                Asia                                   $150,634,000             5.84%
                Middle East                            $499,342,000            19.35%
                Afghanistan/Pakistan                   $964,983,000            37.40%
                Europe and Eurasia                     $217,809,000             8.44%
                Latin America and Caribbean            $289,531,000            11.22%


Human and Institutional Capacity Development Policy

By Agency policy USAID must integrate organizational performance and human
capacity development to strengthen the abilities of its partners when
carrying out strategic planning and when designing new development
activities. 1 To appropriately address the Human and Institutional Capacity
Development (HICD) policy, the following considerations are central:

               Identification of potential institutional weaknesses that could
                limit intended development impact and steps to ensure that these
                weaknesses are addressed.

               For each new activity, identify the most significant HICD issues
                and incorporate performance measures and targets that address
                these.

The Cooperative Development Program has been and is inherently aligned with
this policy. Historically, U.S. cooperative development organizations (CDOs)
have only worked with partner cooperatives and cooperative promotional
organizations (CPOs), strengthening their ability to respond to the evolving
needs of their members. The underlying rationale of cooperation – joining
together to achieve collectively what is not possible individually – has led
to cooperatives of cooperatives, also known as federated and secondary
cooperatives, that serve the economic, educational and advocacy needs of
individual cooperatives and their members. As is elaborated below, as a

1
   Human and Institutional Capacity Development (HICD) Policy Paper, A Mandatory Reference for ADS Chapter
201.


                                               Page 12
response to the Support for Overseas Cooperative Development Act, 2000, the
Cooperative Development Program (CDP) has focused both on contributions to
major agency priorities as well as on wider and more effective learning and
dissemination of successful approaches to significant issues facing
cooperative development. This Request for Application (RFA) reflects these
emphases.


2.       Cooperative Development Program

Since its initiation, the Cooperative Development Program has been central to
USAID’s partnership with U.S. cooperatives and cooperative development
organizations. USAID resources invested in the CDP have contributed to the
building of the intellectual capital and institutional capacity that is
reflected in the substantial development contributions of cooperatives and
CDOs.

The CDP vision is partnerships that contribute to self-reliant cooperative
enterprises that, in turn, meet the evolving needs of their members,
contributing to the quality of their member lives, to their communities, to
economic sectors, and to nations. Specific CDP objectives include:

         Reform of cooperative law and regulation in those countries where these
          impede cooperative development;

         Effective governance models and training institutionalized as self-
          sustaining activities in all countries with reformed law and
          regulation;

         At least one demonstration per CDO of substantial, self-sustaining
          cooperative expansion within a sector, consistent with continued
          superior performance;

         Growth in bilateral, multilateral and foundation support commensurate
          with the pace of expansion of cooperative development and with the
          equivalent growth of members’ own funds;

         Initiation of significant U.S. cooperative investment in joint ventures
          and other alliances with developing and transition economy
          cooperatives;

         Diversification of CDO financing with significant increases in fees and
          related income from U.S. alliances and overseas partners.

This RFA seeks to encourage:

         Programs focused on producing significant results in support of major
          USAID strategic priorities and priority countries, especially those
          included within the Global Engagement Initiative, that offer
          significant contributions through cooperative development;

         Public-Private Partnerships, especially through direct U.S. cooperative
          engagement in cooperative development activities, consistent with
          mutual long-term benefit to members;




                                           Page 13
        Leveraging overall cooperative development quality and impact by

         financing learning and program innovation; 


        Greater donor, International Financial Institution, foundation,
         academic and opinion leader attention to, and support for, the high
         development returns achieved through cooperative development;

        Committed bilateral and multilateral support for reform of cooperative
         law and regulation;

        Alliances between U.S. CDOs and their international counterparts,
         academic institutions, cooperatives and like-minded agencies.


B.       COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION (CDO) ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must meet the following eligibility requirements:

     1.	 Be either a U.S. cooperative or an organization with substantial
         membership and/or financial links to recognized U.S. cooperatives
         and/or their associations;

     2.	 Demonstrate a track record of not less than five years in the

         planning, management, monitoring and evaluation of overseas

         cooperative development programs. 



C.       PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must:

     1.	 Provide a match equivalent to, or greater than 20 percent of the total
         project cost. The match may be in cash, in-kind, or a combination of
         both. All cash and in-kind contributions committed by partner
         cooperatives and CPOs must be documented;

     2.	 In collaboration with one or more other applicants, commit to develop,
         test and implement an approach to a USAID Agency priority and/or one
         of the major cooperative development challenges presented in this RFA;

     3.	 When proposing an alliance with a U.S. cooperative or other firm,
         provide a copy of agreements stipulating cash and in-kind
         contributions;

     4.	 Carry out field activities in a USAID-eligible country or countries;

     5.	 Provide a letter from the concerned Mission/s approving the proposed
         field activities.

ODP/PVC cannot finance programs that are:

     1.	 Pure academic research;

     2.	 Construction or commodity procurement;

     3.	 Not focused on development (e.g. short-term emergency relief);



                                      Page 14
     4.   In violation of the Establishment Clause.


D.    PROGRAM SUMMARY

1.    Background

Expanding on close to forty years of legislation that encourages the
participation of cooperatives in U.S. foreign assistance programs, the
Support for Overseas Cooperative Development Act, 2000 reinforced and
expanded Section 111 of the Foreign Assistance Act (“…high priority shall be
given to increasing the use of funds …for technical and capital assistance in
the development and use of cooperatives in the less developed countries….”)
through a declaration of a policy of support for the development and
expansion of development assistance programs that fully utilize cooperatives
and credit unions….”

The Support for Overseas Cooperative Development Act, 2000 required the
Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development to report to
Congress on the implementation of Section 111 of the Foreign Assistance Act,
as amended by that legislation. As part of the resulting “Report to Congress
on the Implementation of the Support for Overseas Cooperative Development
Act” (November 2001), a number of conditions for USAID investment in
cooperative development were elaborated. These were based on an assessment
of cooperative development experience conducted by the Agency and included a
description of the ways in which the Cooperative Development Program would
contribute:

     Given the importance and complexity of issues faced in overseas
     cooperative development, USAID central support to U.S. CDOs will be
     refocused on development, testing, evaluation, and dissemination of
     solutions. Among the issues that deserve attention are those
     related to cooperative law and governance, business strategy,
     leadership development, professional development, member education,
     resource mobilization, and business alliances with the U.S.
     cooperative and corporate sector. The goal of the central grants
     will be to encourage dissemination of lessons learned, both within
     the CDOs and to the broader development community. Using workshops,
     publications and the internet, CDOs will be encouraged to strengthen
     the intellectual foundation for cooperative development through
     dialogue engaging cooperative promoters, local partners, USAID
     missions, donors and NGOs.

2.    Program Evaluation

In FY 2009, a Program Evaluation was conducted in order to assess the
Cooperative Development Program. The evaluation has informed and helped
shape the CDP for the next five years. (Annex ‘B’ includes a description of
the Program Evaluation.) The issues identified in the Program Evaluation
form one basis for this RFA. Among the recommendations are the following
that bear on this RFA (full list annexed):

     	   Incorporate lessons that capitalize on the current CDP successes and
          address areas requiring improvement;




                                      Page 15
       	   Continue emphasis on practical collaboration among CDOs, both in the US
            and in field projects.

       	   Ensure continuation of CDP’s flexibility, experimentation and

            continuity, all of which have been essential to its success. 


       	   Include specific, concrete provisions for improved performance in
            learning and dissemination, tying CDP funding to credible initiatives
            in these areas.

       	   Balance emphases between basic research and practical activities.

       	   Mandate that CDOs take on critical issues.

       	   Strengthen interactions between CDP projects and USAID Bureau and
            Mission programs, activities and operations.

       	   Encourage experimentation, including research, with cooperative

            development in conflict and post-conflict countries. 


       	   Allow all CDOs presently participating in the current CDP, as well as
            new participants, to submit applications.


Each applicant for a CDP award is expected to:

(1)	        Address not less than one of USAID’s priority strategies with:

               a. A detailed analysis of the relevant sector/s in each country
                  where the applicant proposes to work;
               b. A rationale supporting the premise that cooperatives, and the
                  applicants support for cooperatives, can make a substantial
                  contribution to that sector;
               c. A strategy(ies) that include measurable objectives, description
                  of and rationale for implementation activities;
               d. Anticipated results and methods that will be used to measure
                  these.

(2)	        Related to the role of cooperatives in the Agency priority area,
            address one or more of key cooperative development issues with:

               a. A detailed analysis of the issue
               b. A rationale for selection of the issue specific to the Agency
                  priority (see 1 above)
               c. A strategy(ies) including objectives and implementation
                  activities;
               d. The anticipated results and methods of measuring these.

(3)	        A clear description of how the implementation results will be
            integrated within the CDO’s own program and disseminated within the
            broader cooperative and development communities; and

(4)	        Describe and provide evidence in support of what the CDO believes will
            be the impact of its successful strategy/ies on cooperative members,
            cooperatives and the sector;



                                         Page 16
(5)	     Describe the proposed approach to monitoring and mid-term and final
         evaluation of physical, institutional and financial results and impact
         including report outlines and tabular pro forma (applicants are
         referred to the OCDC cooperative evaluation framework as an
         illustration. See Annex ‘A’);

(6)	     Document the commitment to work with cooperatives – independent,
         private, member-owned and democratically-governed business enterprises,
         created with equity financed by members who invest in order to benefit
         through their patronage.

Each applicant, jointly with one or more other applicants, is expected to
propose an activity or activities that: (1) address a USAID Agency priority
as reflected in Bureau/Mission Operational Plans; (2) specify how the
activity/ies will contribute to the Agency priority/Bureau or Mission
Operational Plan; and (3) address one of the major cooperative development
challenges presented in this RFA.

Implementation activities may be carried out in any USAID-eligible country or
countries (See Annexes ‘H’ and ‘I’). The applicant may propose work in a
country/ies where it has already established a presence, in a new
country/ies, or in a combination. A rationale for the selection should be
provided.

3.     Key Issues

As presented in the Implementation Report to Congress, developing country
cooperatives, with support and assistance from US CDOS, have made significant
contributions to food security, energy and communications, housing, health
and a number of other sectors. However, the achievements fall well short of
the potential. This is largely due to problems related to cooperative law
and regulation, governance, management issues, scale and salience.

Therefore, in tandem with objectives related to a USAID priority, each
applicant is expected to address one or more of the key issues briefly
described below. Should the applicant choose to address two or more issues,
this can be done separately or, alternatively, two or more of the issues can
be addressed together provided that the logic for doing so is clearly and
convincingly presented. Please note that the issues are not listed in an
order that reflects priority; all should be considered equally important:




     A. 	 Principles of sound cooperative law and strategies to improve the
        legislative and regulatory environments

     Cooperators in many developing and transitional economies as well as many
     practitioners of cooperative development believe that archaic law and
     regulation are major obstacles to the success of cooperation. While
     successful cooperatives emerge in countries with unfavorable cooperative
     laws these, more often than not, are the exceptions that prove the rule.
     The broad question is: what are the legal and regulatory conditions that
     represent an essential minimum for cooperatives to succeed as
     cooperatives? The corollary is: where such conditions do not exist, what
     can be done to successfully promote a legal and regulatory environment in


                                      Page 17
which cooperatives can thrive? Successful approaches to creation of a
positive legislative and regulatory environment would potentially include
such elements as: identification of the basic legal and regulatory
principles essential to successful cooperation; identification of the
conditions that exist when a country is prepared to consider reform;
development of strategies that include identification of legislative
alternatives, constituency creation, alliances, use of the media.

The CLARITY initiative undertaken by participants in the previous CDP
award has made significant progress in defining the principles underlying
sound cooperative law and regulation. While initial steps have been
taken, there remains a significant challenge in developing strategies that
will result in broad-based support for cooperative legal and regulatory
reform.

Given the importance of this challenge, all applicants are encouraged to
address this issue. To ensure a cross-sectoral approach, each applicant
that chooses to address this issue is expected to do so in collaboration
with one or more other applicants.

B.   Change strategies

The fundamental role of Cooperative development organizations is as agents
of change. Change – the adoption of innovation – is best approached in a
systematic and thoughtful way. Effective change strategies often draw on
the substantial body of academic and professional work in the field,
recognizing: the stages of adoption; the characteristics of innovations;
and the ways that innovations move through a community or population.

Many of the interventions employed by CDOs – workshops, consultants,
technical manuals, training, visits to the U.S. and other countries, are
all potentially contributive to a change strategy. However, if carried
out in the absence of a strategy, their impact is likely to be more a
matter of chance than choice. The challenge is to develop a strategic
approach that aligns interventions with an analysis of innovations and the
change process.

C. 	 Addressing HIV/AIDs, Tuberculosis, Malaria and other Endemic diseases
      and their impact on cooperatives and their members

In much of Africa today, HIV/AIDs is a grave and rapidly advancing threat
to the cooperative movement: employee turnover because of illness and
death disrupts the continuity of management. Members who cease to be
producers or consumers, savers and borrowers can leave a cooperative in
financial distress. The same is true of other endemic diseases including
but not limited to tuberculosis and malaria, in Africa and in other parts
of the developing world.

The large numbers of members, wide penetration and positive image that
cooperatives enjoy in much of Africa as well as in other countries such as
India, Nepal, Honduras, Haiti and other Caribbean nations, render them a
potentially significant vehicle for education as well as a point of
contact for counseling and delivery of medical supplies and services.

There are also impressive examples of cooperatives that deliver health
insurance and/or quality health services in ways that are financially
sustainable for both the cooperative and the member.


                                Page 18
The challenge is to develop strategic approaches that either: (1) draw on
the significant motivation that cooperatives have to deal with endemic
disease threats, taking advantage of their potential roles in education
and service delivery, and the availability of the resources needed to
realize that potential; and/or (2) that provide affordable health
insurance or result in financially viable cooperative services that offer
quality health care at prices affordable for their members.

D.   Strengthening cooperative participation and governance

Most would agree that successful cooperatives are characterized by high
levels of member patronage, financial contribution and participation in
the democratic process. These high levels appear associated with good
governance and management. Without high levels of member patronage,
financial commitment and participation in democratic processes, the
cooperative may be at risk. There can be a number of reasons for weakness
in the intricate links between membership, leadership and management
responsibility and accountability. A variety of conceivable strategies
and approaches could potentially eliminate the weaknesses. An
illustration might be the promoting and inhibiting roles played by values:

Successful cooperation – governance, management and member participation –
rests on values that may or may not be prevalent/dominant in some of the
settings where cooperative development takes place. Drawn from a Typology
of Progress-Prone and Progress Resistant Cultures, a fusion of the ideas
of Mariano Grondona, Lawrence Harrison, Irakli Chkonia, Matteo Marini, and
Ronald Inglehart developed in connection with the Culture Matters Research
Project currently underway at the Fletcher School at Tufts University (See
Annex K), some illustrative antipodal values are:

Value Category              Progress-Prone             Progress Resistant
Radius of identification    Stronger identification    Stronger
and trust                   with the broader society   identification with
                                                       the narrow community

Association                 Trust, identification      Mistrust breeds
                            breeds cooperation,        excessive
                            affiliation,               individualism, anomie
                            participation

Authority                   Dispersed; checks and      Centralized;
                            balances; consensus        unfettered, often
                                                       arbitrary

If, in fact, values play a role in the success of cooperation and if,
hypothetically, successful experience in cooperation can contribute to a
“progress prone” society, one in which the social contract is
strengthened, the challenge is to find effective ways to identify and
address/modify the role of values in cooperative governance, management
and patronage.

It is noted that the International Finance Corporation Corporate
Governance Forum, a number of US University Cooperative programs as well
as private firms have developed considerable expertise in developing
effective approaches to corporate governance. Applicants are encouraged
to explore collaborations that take full advantage of this body of


                                 Page 19
experience and knowledge.


E.   Planning and information systems

Planning and information systems are important elements in building and
maintaining a successful cooperative business; these systems are just as
important for cooperative development organizations.

Planning provides an important basis for measurement of progress.   It can
cover a number of time horizons and areas of operation.

Planning can contribute to accelerating progress to financial, management
and technological self-reliance. The challenge is to integrate the
demands of short-term project design/planning with the need to plan over a
reasonable time frame.

Strategic planning can be an instrument both of achieving a strong
competitive position as well as uniting a cooperative’s members,
leadership and staff in a concerted effort to reach important goals.

Institutional development planning can play a significant role in
systematically addressing the organizational and governance weaknesses
that may retard progress.

Financial planning (including capitalization strategies), management and
accounting systems are often closely associated with the success of a
cooperative enterprise. An important element of financial planning is
raising capital – from members and from others. Self-reliance – or
“financial sustainability” – is more likely to be achieved when there is a
long-term financial plan, one that incorporates donor and other
concessional finances within a strategy to progressively rely on member
and borrowed funds.

Financial management is necessary to ensure that the objectives of a
financial plan are met, adjusting to changes in the operating assumptions
as needed while keeping the cooperative focused on those objectives.

Information systems that are based on performance-based plans, are the
major means of assessing progress in all critical areas of organizational
performance and in achieving positive impact on member lives.

The challenge is not simply to develop planning systems, but to do so in
such a way that they become central to the work of cooperative boards and
management.

F.   Replication, scale and salience

“Replication” is the alchemist’s gold of development: transplanting a
successful experience from one environment into another, with equal
success or repeating a single success multiple times.

When replication is focused on a specific form or model, different
variables, whether environmental or organizational, may lead to failure.
The challenge appears to be moving beyond the specifics of an individual
success to the underlying principles that explain why it was successful,
from form to substance. The notion of “tipping points” may be relevant.


                                 Page 20
A cooperative’s success is often related to salience: the importance of
the role played by the cooperative in the lives of its members, in its
community and in the sector of the economy in which it works. Scale –
achieving a size and reach that allows influence on social, economic and
political issues – is interrelated with salience.

Some cooperatives achieve considerable local success, but have a limited
impact on the environment beyond their specific locales. As previously
isolated economies become integrated regionally, nationally and
internationally, it becomes increasingly difficult for stand-alone
cooperatives to remain successful. The costs of competing in a market
economy can rapidly exceed the resources of an individual cooperative.

Achieving salience appears related to the qualities of leaders and
management, the potential competitive advantage of a cooperative dealing
in specific types of business, actual performance, linkages to other
cooperatives or businesses that provide market influence.

Attempts to achieve scale, like replication, alter the conditions related
to success: governance, planning, management, service delivery,
evaluation, anticipation and adaptation to change all require
exponentially greater dexterity. The timing for developing these
capacities also appears related to successful achievement of scale.

G.   Alliances in support of cooperative development objectives

There are increasing instances of CDO, cooperative and third-party
alliances that support cooperative development in a variety of ways. The
paradigm of cooperative development is a self-reliant cooperative in a
developing or transitional economy entering into the same types of
business relationships – including alliances – that developed economy
cooperatives pursue in the interest of their members. Today there are
instances of CDO-cooperative partnerships that have attracted the
participation of international and domestic firms. Those partnerships can
involve market access, financing, technical support, provision of
technology. They succeed when there is strong mutual interest and results
that confirm that interest.

The challenge is to engage U.S. cooperatives, investor- and privately-
owned enterprise, foundations, PVOs and others in alliances that
contribute to the long-term benefit of both the cooperative and its
alliance partners.

Recognizing that experience in engaging U.S. cooperatives in development
alliances has been mixed, reflecting the primary responsibility of
cooperative boards and management to provide value to their members,
applications will be entertained that propose two phases: (1) exploration
of the factors that promote and inhibit engagement of U.S. cooperatives in
development leading to strategies that increase the promise of success in
attracting such involvement; and (2) pilot projects to involve U.S.
cooperatives in joint ventures and other alliances that contribute to
development outcomes in any of the USAID priority areas.

Fair Trade has the goal of ensuring a greater return to producers by
encouraging imports with cooperative origin. There are several examples
of US CDOs supporting cooperatives that, in turn, benefit from the Fair


                                 Page 21
  Trade system. While these focus on exporting by and through cooperatives,
  they seldom involve purchasing cooperatives in the U.S., whether worker,
  consumer or supermarket. Applications that develop and strengthen such
  linkages will be considered.


  H. 	 Avoiding dependency:   accelerating progress from donor support to
     commercial operations

  While CDOs are committed to their partner developing and transitional
  economy cooperatives achieving success as economic enterprises, close
  association with these emerging cooperatives can contribute to financial,
  managerial and/or technological dependencies.

  A variety of factors can conceivably contribute to dependency: the
  initial design and whether it does/does not specifically target and
  incorporate elements that promote financial, managerial and technological
  independence; the degree of external funds in proportion to member funds,
  both initially and over time; the responsibilities and accountabilities of
  cooperative boards and management in relation to project managers; the
  balance between institutional building and service objectives; the time
  frame of the basic planning.

  The challenge is to identify design, planning and management principles
  that significantly accelerate progress toward self-reliance while, at the
  same time, minimizing the possibilities of creating dependency.


  I. Design

  Many of the issues and challenges described in the preceding discussion
  are encountered in the course of project implementation. The design of
  projects can hypothetically exacerbate or ameliorate their impact. Sound
  design anticipates and addresses critical issues. Design represents a
  strategic response to a development problem or problems and, if well
  crafted, provides a working hypothesis that is tested through
  implementation.

  The challenge is to develop and document an approach to design of
  cooperative development projects that creates a useful set of working
  hypotheses that are based on identification of critical issues, the
  collection of data that is appropriate to those issues, and the rigorous
  analysis of information leading to an integrated set of solution
  strategies: the right interventions sequenced in the right order to
  produce significant and positive results.

It is essential to recognize and reflect the fact that solution of the issues
and meeting the challenges presented to cooperative development are not ends
in themselves: they are actions that should result in tangible improvements
in the performance of cooperatives and the lives of their members. To the
extent these two goals are achieved, broader and deeper contributions will be
made to the sectoral and national goals that are reflected in USAID priority
strategies. As a part of your application you should stipulate the physical,
financial, technical and institutional results that you believe are likely to
take place as a consequence of successfully addressing an issue or issues and
how these results will be assessed and documented.



                                    Page 22
E. 	 SUBSTANTIAL INVOLVEMENT UNDERSTANDINGS

ODP/PVC will be substantially involved during the period of the cooperative
agreement. Specifically, the Agreement Officer’s Technical Representative
(AOTR) will:

   1.	 Verify that any work plans, or work plan amendments, submitted by the
       awardee/s are consistent with the purpose of the award, support the
       achievement of the goals, objectives and results proposed by the
       awardee/s.

   2.	 Review the documented achievements of key personnel appointed during
       the life of the award and verify that these achievements appear
       consistent with the requirements of the position.

   3.	 Concur with the outlines and pro forma statements proposed by the
       awardee/s to measure progress against any physical, financial,
       institutional development and learning objectives.

   4.	 With advance notice and specification of the purpose/s, visit selected
       sites.

   5.	 Verify that the scope/s of any mid-term and/or final evaluations are
       consistent with the awardee’s proposed objectives and that the
       qualifications of nominated evaluator/s are consistent with meeting
       the requirements of the scope.

   6.	 Concur with any sub-awards (cooperative agreements, grants, endowments
       or contracts).

   7.	 Request such other reports, returns or information that may reasonably
       be construed as necessary to meeting USAID’s internal and/or external
       reporting requirements or as may be necessary to inform responsible
       USAID officials of the progress of the Cooperative Development
       Program.

Note that each award recipient is expected to provide copies of all work
plans, reports and evaluations to the appropriate member of Mission staff and
to respond to requests for any other reports, returns of information that may
reasonably be construed as necessary to meeting the Mission’s internal and/or
external reporting requirements.


F. 	 KEY PERSONNEL

The following positions have been designated as key to the successful
completion of the objectives of awards under this RFA:

   1.	 Headquarters and field: individual/s responsible for project

       monitoring, evaluation and project reports. 


   2.	 Mid-term and Final Evaluation:   team leader/s.

The AOTR must verify that replacement or diversion of these personnel is
consistent with the purposes, objectives and results proposed by the awardee.



                                   Page 23
G.     REPORTS

On receipt of an award, the recipient will be responsible for submission of
the following reports to the AOTR:

           Report                                                      	 ue
                                                                       D
1. 	       Annual Work Plan                                            Two months prior to the start
                                                                       of each award year, beginning
                                                                       with Year II.

2. 	       Semi-Annual Reports 2                                       Within one month of the end
                                                                       of each award semester

3. 	       Quarterly financial reports (SF269,                         Within 45 days of the end of
           269A and or 272)                                            each FY quarter

4. 	       Interim evaluation                                          At such time as may be
                                                                       mutually agreed, but not
                                                                       later than 18 months after
                                                                       the project start.

5. 	       Final evaluation                                            Not later than one year of
                                                                       the completion of the award

6.         Assessments, evaluations, manuals, 	                        As mutually agreed
           training plans and materials, etc.
                                                                       Not later than ten days
7. 	       Accrual Reports                                             before the end of each
                                                                       financial quarter.
8.         Reports of achievements against 	                           As requested by AOTR and
           standard and/or customized indicators 	                     consistent with USAID
                                                                       reporting requirements




2
   Applicants should bear in mind that reporting and evaluation should be viewed as opportunities to learn and to
document that learning. Lengthy narratives that chronicle events are far less useful in this regard than analysis of
successes and failures, lessons learned and identification of principles applicable to other programs.


                                                    Page 24
SECTION B – APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

A. 	 GENERAL

PREPARATION GUIDELINES

All applications received by the deadline will be reviewed for responsiveness
to the specifications outlined in these guidelines and the application
format. Section III addresses the technical evaluation procedures for the
applications. Applications that are submitted late or that are incomplete
run the risk of not being considered in the review process. Late
applications will be considered for the award if the Agreement Officer
determines it is in the Government’s interest to do so.

Technical and cost applications shall be submitted in one volume. The
applicant should submit one original unbound application and three bound
copies as well as submitting the full application electronically on a CD ROM.
Text should be in a recent Windows-compatible version of MS Word.
Spreadsheets may be in a recent version of MS Excel or Lotus 1-2-3.

The application may be prepared in the structure that the applicant feels
will best express its intent with the provision that an index must be
provided cross-referencing the items called for in the suggested outline and
selection criteria with the appropriate page and paragraph numbers. To
facilitate this, it may be useful to serially number paragraphs in the
application. Applications must be submitted no later than the date and time,
and to the location/s, indicated in the cover letter to this RFA.

Technical applications should be specific, complete and the applicant should
strive for concision, clarity and brevity. The application should provide
evidence of the capability and expertise that directly relates to the
applicant’s proposed objectives. The applicant should carefully review and
attempt to fully meet the selection criteria presented in Section C.

In addition to the preceding guidelines, the applicant is requested to take
note of the following:

Unnecessarily Elaborate Applications are neither required nor desired.

Acknowledgement of Amendments to the RFA – the applicant shall acknowledge
any amendments to this RFA in the application.

Preparation of Applications:

   1.	 Applicants are expected to review and comply with all aspects of this
       RFA. Failure to do so is at the applicant’s risk. Specific attention
       is drawn to eligibility requirements.

   2.	 Each applicant shall furnish the information required by this RFA.
       The applicant shall sign the application and print or type its name on
       the Cover Pages of both the technical and cost sections of the
       application. Applications signed by an agent shall be accompanied by
       evidence of that agent’s authority, unless that evidence has been
       previously furnished to the issuing office.




                                   Page 25
   3.	 Applicants who include data that they do not want disclosed to the
       public for any purpose or used by the U.S. Government except for
       evaluation purposes should:

         a. Mark the title page with the following legend:

            “This application includes data that shall not be disclosed
            outside the U.S. Government and shall not be duplicated,
            used, or disclosed – in whole or in part – for any purpose
            other than to evaluate this application. If, however, a
            grant is awarded to this applicant as a result of – or in
            connection with – the submission of this data, the U.S.
            Government shall have the right to duplicate, use, or
            disclose the data to the extent provided in the resulting
            grant. This restriction does not limit the U.S.
            Government’s right to use the information contained in this
            data if it is obtained from another source without
            restriction. The data subject to this restriction are
            contained in sheets; and

         b. Mark each sheet of data it wishes to restrict with the following
            legend:

            “Use of disclosure of data contained on this sheet is
            subject to the restriction on the title page of this
            application.”


Submission of Applications:

   1.	 Applications   and modifications thereof shall be submitted in sealed
       envelopes or   packages (a) addressed to the office specified in the
       cover letter   to this RFA, and (b) showing the time specified for
       receipt, the   RFA number, and the name and address of the applicant.

   2.	 Applications sent by fax or through the internet will not be
       considered; however, applications may be modified by written, faxed or
       e-mailed notice, if that notice is received before or by the time
       specified for receipt of applications.

   3.	 A CD ROM, with text in a recent MS Word (not earlier than MS Word 97)
       version and spreadsheets in a recent version of MS Excel or Lotus 1-2­
       3, should be submitted along with the original unbound and three bound
       copies.

   4.	 Text should be presented using a 10 pitch font. Top and bottom

       margins should be 1 inch; left and right margins should be 1.25

       inches. 



Receipt of Applications – Applications must be received at the designated
place and by the date and time specified in the cover letter to this RFA.

Explanation to prospective applicants – Any prospective applicant
desiring an explanation or interpretation of this RFA must request it
in writing within three weeks of the posting date (January 12, 2010)
allow a reply to reach all prospective applicants before the submission


                                     Page 26
of their applications. Oral explanations or instructions given before
the award of a Grant will not be binding. Any information given to a
prospective applicant concerning this RFA will be furnished promptly to
all other prospective applicants as an amendment of this RFA, if that
information is necessary in submitting applications or if the lack of
it would be prejudicial to any other prospective applicants.

Applicants should retain one copy of their application for their
records. USAID will consider applications that conform to the format
prescribed below.



B.     TECHNICAL APPLICATION GUIDELINES

A complete application must address the elements from the outline presented
below. The application need not follow the outline. However, each applicant
must provide documentation that cross-references the outline elements and
selection criteria (see Section III) with the relevant pages and paragraphs
of their application. Serial numbering of paragraphs may facilitate such
cross-references.

There is no limit to the number of pages that may be included in an
application. Applicants are advised, however, that brevity, concision and
clarity will reflect positively on the application.

The following elements should be addressed:

1.0	     Cover Page (See Annex C, “Technical Application Summary Format”) 3

2.0	     Summary

         2.1	     The Development Challenge

                  2.1.1 Statement of the development challenge/s, opportunity/ies
                        or problem/s

                  2.1.2 How meeting the challenge/s will contribute to USAID Agency
                        strategic priorities and to concerned Mission Operational
                        Plans.

                  2.1.3 How meeting the challenge will substantively benefit
                        cooperatives and their members including a gender analysis
                        that suggests the different impact the project may have on
                        men and women members, if any.

         2.2	     Plan

                  2.2.1 What are the intended results? 	 These should be stated in
                        terms that are observable and measurable. Examples are
                        provided in Annexes F1 and F2.

                  2.2.2 What strategies and activities are essential to achieve the
                        results?

3
         If application is organized in a different way than reflected in this outline, please prepare a table cross-
referencing the outline and the paragraph numbers in your application.


                                                    Page 27
3.0     Detailed Program Description 


        3.1      Development Challenge Expanded 4


                 3.1.1 What political, social, economic and environmental

                       condition(s) require change? How was this determined? 


                 3.1.2 Why is it important to bring about these changes? 


                 3.1.3 How does achieving these changes contribute to USAID

                       strategic priorities and to USAID country Mission

                       Operational Plans. 



        3.2      Plan to Achieve Results 


                 3.2.1 What is the development hypothesis? 


                 3.2.2 What are the intended results? 


                 3.2.3 How are these results interrelated? 


                 3.2.4 How are these results related to the development challenge? 


                 3.2.5 What are the external factors and other assumptions that

                       will impact the achievement of results? 


                 3.2.6 How will achieving these results benefit cooperatives and

                       their members, and on what scale? 


                 3.2.7 How will achieving these results contribute to USAID

                       strategic priorities and USAID country Mission Operational

                       Plans. 


        3.3      Strategies and activities 


                 3.3.1 How will the applicant and its partners work

                       collaboratively? 


                 3.3.2 What are others (USAID, CDOS, governments, NGOs, etc.)

                       doing to address the same issue/s? 


                 3.3.3 What are the critical elements of the strategy:

                       interventions, sequences, resources? 


                 3.3.4 Why will the planned work lead to the intended results? 


                 3.3.5 What alternative strategies were considered; why were they

                       rejected and the chosen strategy selected? 


        3.4      Program Management 


                 3.4.1 What is the applicant’s plan for management of the project? 


4
        Please note that Appendix ____ includes a description of one approach to problem analysis to illustrate a
systematic approach to problem statement, analysis, strategy development, implementation and evaluation.


                                                  Page 28
                 3.4.2 What are the respective roles, responsibilities and
                       accountability of the applicant and its partners/allies?

                 3.4.3 What are the respective roles, responsibilities and
                       accountability of the applicant’s and its partners’/allies’
                       staff (key positions)?

                 3.4.4 What are the management systems in place?

                 3.4.5 Does the planning matrix accurately reflect the essential
                       design relationships?

                 3.4.6 Is there a risk management plan to ensure the security of
                       personnel and assets?

        3.5	     Monitoring and evaluation

                 3.5.1 What is the performance indicator for each result? 	 What is
                       the baseline? What is the performance target? What is the
                       timetable? 5

                 3.5.2 For each indicator, what is the definition and unit of
                       measurement? What is the source of data? How will the
                       data be collected and analyzed?

                 3.5.3 What is the acceptable variation from the standard?

                 3.5.4 What are the plans for reporting and using performance
                       information?

        3.6	     Institutional capability

                 3.6.1 Has the applicant done this or similar work before and what
                       is the evidence that it can achieve the proposed results?

                 3.6.2 If the applicant was a participant in the FY2004-2010 CDP,
                       did its CDP evaluation include a clear statement of
                       corrective actions taken/to be taken?

                 3.6.3 If the applicant was a participant in the FY2004-2010 CDP,
                       what were the lessons learned and how will these be applied
                       in the forthcoming CDP and other cooperative development
                       projects?

        3.7	     Resources

                 3.7.1 What is the total estimated amount of the activity?

                 3.7.2 How much financial/other contribution is needed?

                 3.7.3 How much will be borne by the CDO?

                 3.7.4 What local resources will be available?

5
         Please see Annex F2 for listing of standardized and custom indicators that should provide the basis for
objectives and reporting.


                                                  Page 29
              3.7.5 What will alliances contribute?

4.0	   Cost Application (See below for elaboration)

       4.1	   SF 424 and 424A

       4.2	   Detailed budget and budget narrative (please provide for a final
              program review with external participants and, if you feel it
              would be useful, provide for an interim review).

       4.3	   Certifications and representations

       4.4	   Letters of commitment


C. 	 Cost Application

The cost application is to be submitted in the same volume as the technical
application. It should include budget information as well as other
documentation needed to support a determination of responsibility.

   1.	 Include a budget with detailing of the line items and with an
       accompanying budget narrative that provides, in detail, the total
       costs for implementation of the proposed program. The budget should
       be submitted using Standard Form 424 and 424A which can be downloaded
       from: http://www.usaid.gov/procurement_bus_opp/procurement/forms/SF­
       424/

   2.	 The budget narrative must provide the basis for cost estimates among
       the four major budget categories: 1) Program; 2) Procurement; 3)
       Training and 4) Indirect costs. These should be supported by detailed
       breakdowns of each major line item.

        Note: The Agreement Officer may request additional detailed budget
        information, particularly for responsibility determination, following
        notification to an applicant that it is under consideration for an
        award. If necessary, the Agreement Officer may conduct discussions to
        verify cost data, evaluate specific elements of costs and examine data
        to determine the necessity, reasonableness and allocability of the
        costs reflected in the budget and their allowability pursuant to the
        applicable cost principles. The Agreement Officer may require other
        information to determine responsibility and cost efficiency.

   3.	 Each of the four line item totals must include costs taken from the
       Object Class Category line item letter(s) from Section B “Budget
       Categories” on the SF 424 and must be presented as follows:

          a. Program – total dollar amount taken from SF 424 lines a+b+c+h;
             any sub-awards must be shown separately;

          b. Procurement – total dollar amount taken from SF 424 lines d+e+f
             (please note that financing of contraceptives will not be
             provided for under the award);

          c. Training – total dollar amount taken from SF 424 line h



                                      Page 30
         d. Indirect costs – total dollar amount taken from SF 424 line j

   4.	 A current Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA)

   5.	 Required certifications and representations

   6.	 Your cost share must be 20 percent or more of the award and may be in
       cash, in kind or a combination of both. Applicants must demonstrate
       their ability to provide the proposed match via letters of commitment
       for all non-USAID or private organizations involved in implementing
       the award. Such cost shares should be specified in terms of the total
       dollar amount and the specific amount per participant.

   7.	 Applicants who do not currently have a NICRA from their cognizant
       agency shall also submit the following information:

         a. Copies of the applicant’s financial reports for the previous 3­
            year period, which have been audited by a certified public
            accountant or other auditor satisfactory to USAID;

         b. Projected budget, cash flow and organizational chart.


D.	 Grant Award

   1.	 The Government may award one or more cooperative agreements resulting
       from this RFA to the responsible applicant/s whose application/s
       conform to this RFA. The Government may (a) reject any or all
       applications; (b) accept other than the lowest cost applications; (c)
       make awards in a manner proportional to the scores received by
       applicants; and (d) waive informalities and minor irregularities in
       applications received.

   2.	 The Government may award one or more cooperative agreement(s) on the
       basis of initial applications received, without discussions.
       Therefore, each initial application should contain the applicant’s
       best terms from a cost and technical standpoint.

   3.	 Neither financial data submitted with an application nor
       representations concerning facilities or financing, will form a part
       of the resulting cooperative agreement/s.


E.	 Authority to Obligate the Government

The Agreement Officer is the only individual who may legally commit the
Government to the expenditure of public funds. No costs chargeable to the
proposed Grant may be incurred before receipt of either a fully executed
Grant or a specific, written authorization from the Grant Officer.

The applicant is reminded that U.S. Executive Orders and U.S. law prohibit
transactions with, and the provision of resources and support to, individuals
and organizations associated with terrorism. It is the legal responsibility
of the applicant to ensure compliance with these Executive Orders and laws.
This provision must be included in all subcontracts/sub-awards issued under
any agreement resulting from an award under this RFA.



                                   Page 31
Page 32   

                         SECTION C - SELECTION CRITERIA


SECTION C – SELECTION CRITERIA

The criteria presented below have been tailored to the requirements of this
particular RFA. Applicants should note that these criteria serve to: (a)
identify the significant matters which applicants should address in their
applications; and (b) set the standard against which all applications will be
evaluated. To facilitate the review of applications, applicants should
provide a cross reference showing the page(s) and paragraph(s) in the text of
their application that refer to: (a) specific sections in the outline
(Section II); and (b) the selection criteria (below). Serial number of
paragraphs may facilitate this.

The technical applications will be evaluated in accordance with the Technical
Evaluation Criteria elaborated below. If deemed necessary to the evaluation
of applications, the applicants may be asked to: (a) participate in
discussions to provide clarification of information or substantiate the
logical arguments contained in their applications; and/or (b) prepare a
detailed work plan elaborating on their application.

USAID Mission comments on the applications will be solicited and considered
by the Technical Evaluation Committee.

A.   Technical Review Process:

The applications will be judged by a Technical Review Committee composed of
USAID officers using the criteria presented below. The Committee may be
supported by a technical reviewer with expertise in cooperation, and by non­
voting USAID personnel with subject matter expertise, and/or individuals with
knowledge of foundation or other grant making in similar fields.

Please note that failure to provide specific parts of the application (see
below) will be penalized by a reduction in points.


Category                                                                                     Priority          #6
Logical relationships                                                                           15            1.0
   Project objectives are consistent with and support USAID
   Agency and Country Mission Operational Plan and overall                                                    1.1
   program.
   Project objectives are clearly derived from/linked to CDP
   Program evaluation and, if relevant, specific CDO program                                                  1.2
   evaluation results
   Analysis of cooperative development problem/s includes
   both factors contributing to as well as those that                                                         1.3
   inhibit achievement of the solution/s. (See Annex E)
   Project objectives represent solution/s to cooperative
                                                                                                              1.4
   development problem/s
   As presented in text, planning matrix and performance
   plan, project strategy is consistent with analysis of                                                      1.5
   Agency priority and cooperative development problem/s.

6
  When preparing a table to cross-reference your application text with the criteria, please use the reference numbers
provided and cross-reference each to the numbered paragraph/s that address that criterion.


                                                    Page 33
   As presented in text, planning matrix and performance
   plan, sequence of activities/events to achieve project           1.6
   activities represents clear cause-effect relationships
   Proposed activities appear necessary and sufficient to
                                                                    1.7
   achievement of project objectives.
   Achievement of project objectives is necessary to produce
                                                                    1.8
   indicated changes in cooperative performance
   Accomplishment of project objectives is necessary to
   achieve significant, specified physical, financial or
                                                                    1.9
   economic results that contribute to USAID Agency
   Priorities and Country Mission Operational Plans.
   There is a clear, explicit identity between project
                                                                    1.10
   objectives and results to be measured
Factual Basis of Application                                   13   2.0
   Presentation of the problem/s addressed is based on
   documented country and sector data, cooperative
   development studies, relevant literature and other               2.1
   empirical data. All documentation is supported by
   complete references.
   All sector-specific information is detailed and supported
   by sufficient data to support assertions regarding need,
   comparative advantage, the competitive position of
   cooperative/s, potential impact on members, communities,         2.2
   sectors, and USAID priority strategies/Mission
   objectives. All data is supported by complete
   references.
   All assertions of fact are backed by documented evidence
   or relevant authority. (Assertions may relate to
                                                                    2.3
   achievements during current CDP, capabilities, personnel
   assignments, commitments of funds, alliances, etc.)
Measurement                                                    10   3.0
   All statements of results or impacts presented in the
   text, planning matrix and activity plan are in terms that
   are subject to measurement (terms like “improved”,
                                                                    3.1
   “strengthened”, “enhanced”, etc. are unacceptable unless
   supported by descriptions of the performance, capacity,
   etc.)
   Qualitative results are stated in terms of performance
                                                                    3.2
   and/or the outcome of performance
   Quantitative results are stated in terms of area,
   currency, numbers of participants, etc. Percentages in           3.3
   the absence of a baseline are unacceptable
   Baseline data is provided for all key qualitative and
   quantitative results [an exception may be made if the
   result is clearly the consequence of an innovation where         3.4
   it would not have been possible to carry out a baseline
   study in the time available]
   Application includes pro forma report formats that
   specify the physical, financial and economic results that
   will be measured, the units of measurement, the sources          3.5
   of data, and the methods of collecting and analyzing
   data.
   Application includes a detailed description of how
   monitoring information will be used to inform project            3.6
   implementation.




                                   Page 34
Impact                                                                                            11           4.0
   Application includes measurable statements of anticipated
   physical and financial results for a specified number of
   individual cooperative members including gender analysis                                                    4.1
   to suggest the different impact the project may have on
   men and women members, if any.
   Application includes measurable statements of anticipated
   performance and financial results for participating                                                         4.2
   cooperative/s
   Application includes measurable statements of anticipated
   physical, economic and technological changes in the
                                                                                                               4.3
   sector (e.g. employment, production, units constructed or
   repaired, infrastructure efficiency, etc.)
   Methods used in formulating anticipated impact are
                                                                                                               4.4
   explicitly presented.
   All physical, financial and economic projections are
                                                                                                               4.5
   subjected to sensitivity analyses 7.
   Provision is made for a mid-term and final evaluation and
   the application includes specific descriptions of the                                                       4.6
   methods and use for measurement and analysis the results.
Innovation                                                                                         4           5.0
   Proposed strategy/approaches/methods not previously
                                                                                                               5.1
   employed by the CDO
   Proposed strategy/approaches/methods not previously
                                                                                                               5.2
   employed by other cooperative development organizations
   Proposed strategy/approaches/methods not previously
                                                                                                               5.3
   employed by other development organizations
   Anticipated risks in relation to expected benefits of
                                                                                                               5.4
   innovation/s are presented
Strategy Effectiveness, Efficiency and Economy 8                                                   6           6.0
   Application strategy/design is clearly linked to
   diagnosis of needs, USAID priorities and Mission                                                            6.1
   Operational Plans.
   Application includes specific, measurable standard/s
   against which to assess effectiveness and reasoning as to
                                                                                                               6.2
   why that standard is likely to be achieved by the
   selected strategy
   Application includes specific, measurable standard/s
   against which to assess efficiency and reasoning as to
                                                                                                               6.3
   why that standard is likely to be achieved by the
   selected strategy
   Application includes specific, measurable standard/s
   against which to assess economy and reasoning as to why
                                                                                                               6.4
   that standard is likely to be achieved by the selected
   strategy
   Where alternative strategies, approaches or methods have
   been considered, they are described along with reasons                                                      6.5
   why they were not selected.
Management and personnel                                                                           5           7.0
   Application specifies the responsibility and                                                                7.1

7
           What is required is a modest exploration of the impact of altering key variables. For example, if financial
viability is premised on a profit of 5% on 10,000 transactions of an average value of $5, a sensitivity analysis would
test the effect of reducing the percentage, number and value.
8
           US GAO Yellow Book standards should be considered.


                                                     Page 35
   accountability of all personnel specifically in relation
   to project objectives
   For all key personnel specific examples of achievements
   are provided as evidence of their ability to promote                                                        7.2
   accomplishment of project objectives 9
Dissemination                                                                                      7           8.0
   Application includes specific objectives and strategy/ies
   for dissemination of lessons learned within the CDO as
                                                                                                               8.1
   well as within the cooperative development and broader
   development communities
   Application identifies the anticipated adoption of
   methods/new methods resulting from dissemination and
                                                                                                               8.2
   estimates the impact on cooperatives, their members and
   the economic sector.
Evaluation 10                                                                                      5
   Evaluation is complete: all annual work plan objectives
   were identified and actual achievements presented
   Documentation: assertions regarding performance,
   external conditions, corrective actions, etc., must be
   documented with clear references to source documentation
   or records.
   Identification of reasons for success and reasons for
   shortcoming should include analysis of: (a)
   design/strategy; planning assumptions; personnel
   performance; foreseen/unforeseen factors; other
   Clear statement of corrective actions taken/to be taken
   Clear statement of lessons learned and how these were
   applied to the project, to other cooperative development
   projects
   How evaluation findings have been applied to the present
   application.
Alliances                                                                                         10           9.0
   An alliance or alliances are proposed, application
   indicates the respective responsibilities and
   accountabilities of the alliance partners as well the                                                       9.1
   quantum and value of their financial 11, technological,
   managerial, marketing and/or other contributions
   Application includes a significant activity with one or
   more other CDOs to address one or more of the key issues                                                    9.2
   undertaken.
Budget                                                                                             3          10.0
   Budget and budget notes are complete, meet the standards
   described in 22 CFR 226, OMB Circular A-122 for non­
                                                                                                              10.1
   profit organizations, and conform with applicable U.S.
   Government and USAID regulations.
   Proposed outlays are consistent with the resource
                                                                                                              10.2
   decisions implicit in the proposed strategy



9
          Please note that a resume will not be considered adequate to meeting this requirement. What should be
presented is a listing of the position responsibilities and, for each, descriptions of the nominee’s achievements that
specifically demonstrate competence in meeting that responsibility.
10
          In the case of participants in the FY 2004-2010 CDP, the end-of-project evaluation should be submitted; in
the case of other applicants, an analogous evaluation of a program, project or activity, completed by a competent
external evaluator, should be provided.
11
          The relative value of contributions will not be used as a criterion in assessing applications.


                                                     Page 36
   CDO, partner cooperatives/promotional organization and
   alliance partner (if any) contributions are clearly                                               10.3
   specified 12
Concurrences                                                                                   11    11.0
   Evidence of transmittal to relevant USAID Missions is
   included. Mission concurrence, if available, should be                                            11.1
   provided with application or when received.
   A letter of agreement/understanding from each proposed
   partner cooperative or promotional organization is
   included and confirms that the partner has participated
                                                                                                     11.2
   in developing and concurs with the implementation plan as
   well as specifying the financial and in-kind resources
   that it has committed to the partnership.
   A letter of agreement/understanding from any proposed
   alliance partners confirming that the partner has
   participated in developing and concurs with the
                                                                                                     11.3
   implementation plan as well as specifying the financial
   and in-kind resources that it has committed to the
   alliance.
                                                       TOTAL                                   100

In addition to points awarded in part, or whole, for satisfaction of the
criteria elaborated above, up to a total of 33 points may be deducted for
failure to provide the elements specified below:

Application Elements                                                                      Priority     #
   Applications should include:
     A summary including a statement of the development
                                                                                               -1    12.0
     challenge and the plan to meet that challenge
     A detailed program description including an elaboration
     of the development challenge, strategy, approach to                                       -3    12.1
     monitoring and evaluation and resources to be employed
     A Planning Matrix                                                                         -3    12.2
     An Activity/Implementation Plan                                                           -1    12.3
     A collaborative plan with one or more other CDOs to
                                                                                               -5    12.4
     address one or more key issues
     Key personnel including statement of their
     responsibilities and clear evidence of their ability to                                   -2    12.5
     meet those responsibilities
     Form 424 (application for federal assistance)                                             -1    12.6
     Detailed budget breakdown                                                                 -1    12.7
     A tabulation of CDP extension objectives, status at the
     time of preparing the application and anticipated
                                                                                               -2    12.8
     status by completion of the extension period (June,
     2010)
     Listing of all externally funded activities undertaken
     during the previous three years, with references who                                      -2    12.9
     can provide assessment of performance
     Clear cross-referencing of application with outline and
                                                                                               -2    12.10
     these criteria
Gender                                                                                         -5
   Application fails to include analysis of how gender
   relations affect the achievement of sustainable results                                           12.11
   and how proposed results will affect the relative status

12
     Assessment is based on the inclusion of the information, not the value of contributions


                                                 Page 37
     of men and women.

Conflict                                                         -5
   Application specifically references any ways in which
   implementation may contribute to conflict as well as
   steps that will be taken to minimize those consequences              12.11
   and/or to mitigate conflict situations through project
   activities

                                                                -33


B.    Selection

Approximately six (6) to twelve (12) awards will be made from among eligible
applicants whose applications satisfy the criteria and who receive not less
than 60 points. Awards will be made in relative proportion to the degree to
which applications satisfy the criteria of this RFA.




                                   Page 38
                                   SECTION D

                   U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

      CERTIFICATIONS, ASSURANCES, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF RECIPIENT [1][2]

A.   BRANDING

Effective January 2, 2006, all USAID-sponsored assistance awards are required
to adhere to branding policies and revised marking requirements for grants
and cooperative agreements in accordance with ADS 320. This includes visibly
displaying the USAID Standard Graphic Identity that clearly communicates
assistance is, “From the American people” on all programs, projects,
activities, publications, public communications, and commodities provided or
supported through USAID assistance awards. ADS 320 requires that, after the
evaluation of the applications, the USAID Agreement Officer will request the
Apparently Successful Applicant to submit a Branding Strategy that describes
how the program, project, or activity is named and positioned, how it is
promoted and communicated to beneficiaries and cooperating country citizens,
and identifies all donors and explains how they will be acknowledged. USAID
will not competitively evaluate the proposed Branding Strategy. ADS 320 may
be found at the following website:
http://iapp1.usaid.gov/notices/LoadAttachmentFileName.cfm?Attachment=3626

B.   MARKING UNDER ASSISTANCE INSTRUMENTS

(a) Definitions

Commodities mean any material, article, supply, goods or equipment, excluding
recipient offices, vehicles, and non-deliverable items for recipient’s
internal use, in administration of the USAID funded grant, cooperative
agreement, or other agreement or sub-agreement.

Principal Officer means the most senior officer in a USAID Operating Unit in
the field, e.g., USAID Mission Director or USAID Representative. For global
programs managed from Washington but executed across many countries, such as
disaster relief and assistance to internally displaced persons, humanitarian
emergencies or immediate post conflict and political crisis response, the
cognizant Principal Officer may be an Office Director, for example, the
Directors of USAID/W/Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and Office of
Transition Initiatives. For non-presence countries, the cognizant Principal
Officer is the Senior USAID officer in a regional USAID Operating Unit
responsible for the non-presence country, or in the absence of such a
responsible operating unit, the Principal U.S Diplomatic Officer in the non­
presence country exercising delegated authority from USAID.

Programs mean an organized set of activities and allocation of resources
directed toward a common purpose, objective, or goal undertaken or proposed
by an organization to carry out the responsibilities assigned to it.

Projects include all the marginal costs of inputs (including the proposed
investment) technically required to produce a discrete marketable output or a



                                    Page 39
desired result (for example, services from a fully functional water/sewage
treatment facility).

Public communications are documents and messages intended for distribution to
audiences external to the recipient’s organization. They include, but are not
limited to, correspondence, publications, studies, reports, audio visual
productions, and other informational products; applications, forms, press and
promotional materials used in connection with USAID funded programs, projects
or activities, including signage and plaques; Web sites/Internet activities;
and events such as training courses, conferences, seminars, press conferences
and so forth.

Sub-recipient means any person or government (including cooperating country
government) department, agency, establishment, or for profit or nonprofit
organization that receives a USAID sub-award, as defined in 22 C.F.R. 226.2.

Technical Assistance means the provision of funds, goods, services, or other
foreign assistance, such as loan guarantees or food for work, to developing
countries and other USAID recipients, and through such recipients to
subrecipients, in direct support of a development objective – as opposed to
the internal management of the foreign assistance program.

USAID Identity (Identity) means the official marking for the United States
Agency for International Development (USAID), comprised of the USAID logo or
seal and new brandmark, with the tagline that clearly communicates that our
assistance is “from the American people.” The USAID Identity is available on
the USAID website at www.usaid.gov/branding and USAID provides it without
royalty, license, or other fee to recipients of USAID-funded grants, or
cooperative agreements, or other assistance awards

(b) Marking of Program Deliverables

(1)   All recipients must mark appropriately all overseas programs, projects,
activities, public communications, and commodities partially or fully funded
by a USAID grant or cooperative agreement or other assistance award or sub-
award with the USAID Identity, of a size and prominence equivalent to or
greater than the recipient’s, other donor’s, or any other third party’s
identity or logo.

(2)   The Recipient will mark all program, project, or activity sites funded
by USAID, including visible infrastructure projects (for example, roads,
bridges, buildings) or other programs, projects, or activities that are
physical in nature (for example, agriculture, forestry, water management)
with the USAID Identity. The Recipient should erect temporary signs or
plaques early in the construction or implementation phase. When construction
or implementation is complete, the Recipient must install a permanent,
durable sign, plaque or other marking.

(3)   The Recipient will mark technical assistance, studies, reports, papers,
publications, audio-visual productions, public service announcements, Web
sites/Internet activities and other promotional, informational, media, or
communications products funded by USAID with the USAID Identity.

(4)   The Recipient will appropriately mark events financed by USAID, such as
training courses, conferences, seminars, exhibitions, fairs, workshops, press
conferences and other public activities, with the USAID Identity. Unless
directly prohibited and as appropriate to the surroundings, recipients should


                                      Page 40
display additional materials, such as signs and banners, with the USAID
Identity. In circumstances in which the USAID Identity cannot be displayed
visually, the recipient is encouraged otherwise to acknowledge USAID and the
American people’s support.

(5)   The Recipient will mark all commodities financed by USAID, including
commodities or equipment provided under humanitarian assistance or disaster
relief programs, and all other equipment, supplies, and other materials
funded by USAID, and their export packaging with the USAID Identity.

(6)   The Agreement Officer may require the USAID Identity to be larger and
more prominent if it is the majority donor, or to require that a cooperating
country government’s identity be larger and more prominent if circumstances
warrant, and as appropriate depending on the audience, program goals, and
materials produced.

(7)   The Agreement Officer may require marking with the USAID Identity in
the event that the recipient does not choose to mark with its own identity or
logo.

(8)   The Agreement Officer may require a pre-production review of USAID
funded
public communications and program materials for compliance with the approved
Marking Plan.

(9)   Subrecipients. To ensure that the marking requirements “flow down'' to
subrecipients of sub-awards, recipients of USAID funded grants and
cooperative agreements or other assistance awards will include the USAID-
approved marking provision in any USAID funded sub-award, as follows:

“As a condition of receipt of this sub-award, marking with the USAID Identity
of a size and prominence equivalent to or greater than the recipient’s,
subrecipient’s, other donor’s or third party’s is required. In the event the
recipient chooses not to require marking with its own identity or logo by the
subrecipient, USAID may, at its discretion, require marking by the
subrecipient with the USAID Identity.”

(10) Any ‘public communications’, as defined in 22 C.F.R. 226.2, funded by
USAID, in which the content has not been approved by USAID, must contain the
following disclaimer:

“This study/report/audio/visual/other information/media product (specify) is
made possible by the generous support of the American people through the
United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are
the responsibility of [insert recipient name] and do not necessarily reflect
the views of USAID or the United States Government.”

(11) The recipient will provide the Cognizant Technical Officer (CTO) or
other USAID personnel designated in the grant or cooperative agreement with
two copies of all program and communications materials produced under the
award. In addition, the recipient will submit one electronic or one hard copy
of all final documents to USAID’s Development Experience Clearinghouse.

(c) Implementation of marking requirements.
(1)   When the grant or cooperative agreement contains an approved Marking
Plan, the recipient will implement the requirements of this provision
following the approved Marking Plan.


                                   Page 41
(2)   When the grant or cooperative agreement does not contain an approved
Marking Plan, the recipient will propose and submit a plan for implementing
the requirements of this provision within 45 days after the effective date of
this provision. The plan will include:

(i)   A description of the program deliverables specified in paragraph (b) of
this provision that the recipient will produce as a part of the grant or
cooperative agreement and which will visibly bear the USAID Identity.


(ii) The type of marking and what materials the applicant uses to mark the
program deliverables with the USAID Identity,

(iii) When in the performance period the applicant will mark the program
deliverables, and where the applicant will place the marking,

(3)   The recipient may request program deliverables not be marked with the
USAID Identity by identifying the program deliverables and providing a
rationale for not marking these program deliverables. Program deliverables
may be exempted from USAID marking requirements when:

(i)   USAID marking requirements would compromise the intrinsic independence
or neutrality of a program or materials where independence or neutrality is
an inherent aspect of the program and materials;

(ii) USAID marking requirements would diminish the credibility of audits,
reports, analyses, studies, or policy recommendations whose data or findings
must be seen as independent;

(iii)       USAID marking requirements would undercut host-country government
“ownership” of constitutions, laws, regulations, policies, studies,
assessments, reports, publications, surveys or audits, public service
announcements, or other communications better positioned as “by” or “from” a
cooperating country ministry or government official;

(iv)    USAID marking requirements would impair the functionality of an item;

(v)   USAID marking requirements would incur substantial costs or be
impractical;

(vi) USAID marking requirements would offend local cultural or social norms,
or be considered inappropriate;

(vii)         USAID marking requirements would conflict with international law.

(4)   The proposed plan for implementing the requirements of this provision,
including any proposed exemptions, will be negotiated within the time
specified by the Agreement Officer after receipt of the proposed plan.
Failure to negotiate an approved plan with the time specified by the
Agreement Officer may be considered as noncompliance with the requirements is
provision.

(d) Waivers.

(1)   The recipient may request a waiver of the Marking Plan or of the
marking requirements of this provision, in whole or in part, for each


                                     Page 42
program, project, activity, public communication or commodity, or, in
exceptional circumstances, for a region or country, when USAID required
marking would pose compelling political, safety, or security concerns, or
when marking would have an adverse impact in the cooperating country. The
recipient will submit the request through the Cognizant Technical Officer.
The Principal Officer is responsible for approvals or disapprovals of waiver
requests.

(2)   The request will describe the compelling political, safety, security
concerns, or adverse impact that require a waiver, detail the circumstances
and rationale for the waiver, detail the specific requirements to be waived,
the specific portion of the Marking Plan to be waived, or specific marking to
be waived, and include a description of how program materials will be marked
(if at all) if the USAID Identity is removed. The request should also provide
a rationale for any use of recipient’s own identity/logo or that of a third
party on materials that will be subject to the waiver.

(3)   Approved waivers are not limited in duration but are subject to
Principal Officer review at any time, due to changed circumstances.

(4)   Approved waivers “flow down” to recipients of subawards unless
specified otherwise. The waiver may also include the removal of USAID
markings already affixed, if circumstances warrant.

(5)   Determinations regarding waiver requests are subject to appeal to the
Principal Officer’s cognizant Assistant Administrator. The recipient may
appeal by submitting a written request to reconsider the Principal Officer’s
waiver determination to the cognizant Assistant Administrator.

(e) Non-retroactivity. The requirements of this provision do not apply to any
materials, events, or commodities produced prior to January 2, 2006. The
requirements of this provision do not apply to program, project, or activity
sites funded by USAID, including visible infrastructure projects (for
example, roads, bridges, buildings) or other programs, projects, or
activities that are physical in nature (for example, agriculture, forestry,
water management) where the construction and implementation of these are
complete prior to January 2, 2006 and the period of the grant does not extend
past January 2, 2006.




                                   Page 43
C. USAID DISABILITY POLICY
The objectives of the USAID Disability Policy are (1) to enhance the
attainment of
United States foreign assistance program goals by promoting the participation
and
equalization of opportunities of individuals with disabilities in USAID
policy, country and sector strategies, activity designs and implementation;
(2) to increase awareness of issues of people with disabilities both within
USAID programs and in host countries; (3) to engage other U.S. government
agencies, host country counterparts, governments, implementing organizations
and other donors in fostering a climate of nondiscrimination against people
with disabilities; and (4) to support international advocacy for people with
disabilities. The full text of the policy paper can be found at the following
website:
http://pdf.dec.org/pdf_docs/PDABQ631.pdf.

USAID therefore requires that the recipient not discriminate against people
with
disabilities in the implementation of USAID funded programs and that it make
every effort to comply with the objectives of the USAID Disability Policy in
performing the program under this RFA. To that end and to the extent it can
accomplish this goal within the scope of the program objectives, the
recipient should demonstrate a comprehensive and consistent approach for
including men, women and children with disabilities.

D. CERTIFICATIONS
The following certifications are required for full application submissions
and can be found below:

NOTE: When these Certifications, Assurances, and Other Statements of
Recipient are used for
cooperative agreements, the term "Grant" means "Cooperative Agreement".

PART I - CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES

1. ASSURANCE OF COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS AND REGULATIONS
GOVERNING NON-DISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED
PROGRAMS

Note: This certification applies to Non-U.S. organizations if any part of the
program will be undertaken in the United States.

      (a) The recipient hereby assures that no person in the United States
shall, on the bases set forth below, be excluded from participation in, be
denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under,
any program or activity receiving financial assistance from USAID, and that
with respect to the Cooperative Agreement for which application is being
made, it will comply with the requirements of:

(1) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. L. 88-352, 42 U.S.C. 2000­
d), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national
origin, in programs and activities receiving Federal financial assistance;

(2) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), which
prohibits



                                   Page 44
discrimination on the basis of handicap in programs and activities receiving
Federal financial assistance;

(3) The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended (Pub. L. 95-478), which
prohibits
discrimination based on age in the delivery of services and benefits
supported with Federal funds;

(4) Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681, et seq.),
which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and
activities receiving Federal financial assistance (whether or not the
programs or activities are offered or sponsored by an educational
institution); and

(5) USAID regulations implementing the above nondiscrimination laws, set
forth in Chapter II of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

      (b) If the recipient is an institution of higher education, the
Assurances given herein extend to admission practices and to all other
practices relating to the treatment of students or clients of the
institution, or relating to the opportunity to participate in the provision
of services or other benefits to such individuals, and shall be applicable to
the entire institution unless the recipient establishes to the satisfaction
of the USAID Administrator that the institution's practices in designated
parts or programs of the institution will in no way affect its practices in
the program of the institution for which financial assistance is sought, or
the beneficiaries of, or participants in, such programs.

      (c) This assurance is given in consideration of and for the purpose of
obtaining any and all Federal grants, loans, contracts, property, discounts,
or other Federal financial assistance extended after the date hereof to the
recipient by the Agency, including installment payments after such date on
account of applications for Federal financial assistance which was approved
before such date. The recipient recognizes and agrees that such Federal
financial assistance will be extended in reliance on the representations and
agreements made in this Assurance, and that the United States shall have the
right to seek judicial enforcement of this Assurance. This Assurance is
binding on the recipient, its successors, transferees, and assignees, and the
person or persons whose signatures appear below are authorized to sign this
Assurance on behalf of the recipient.




                                   Page 45
2. CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING

The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief,
that:

(1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on
behalf of the
undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an
officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or
employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection
with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal
Cooperative Agreement, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of
any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal,
amendment or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or
cooperative agreement.

(2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will
be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer
or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of
Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this
Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, the undersigned
shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, "Disclosure of Lobbying
Activities," in accordance with its instructions.

(3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be
included in the award documents for all subawards at all tiers (including
subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under grants, loans, and cooperative
agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose
accordingly. This certification is a material representation of fact upon
which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into.
Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making or entering
into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, United States Code.
Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a
civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each
such failure.

Statement for Loan Guarantees and Loan Insurance

The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:
If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or
attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of
Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of
Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States
to insure or guarantee a loan, the undersigned shall complete and submit
Standard Form-LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with
its instructions. Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making
or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S.
Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement shall be subject to
a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each
such failure.




                                      Page 46
3. PROHIBITION ON ASSISTANCE TO DRUG TRAFFICKERS FOR
COVERED COUNTRIES AND INDIVIDUALS (ADS 206)

USAID reserves the right to terminate this Agreement, to demand a refund or
take other
appropriate measures if the Grantee is found to have been convicted of a
narcotics offense or to have been engaged in drug trafficking as defined in
22 CFR Part 140. The undersigned shall review USAID ADS 206 to determine if
any certifications are required for Key Individuals or Covered Participants.

If there are COVERED PARTICIPANTS: USAID reserves the right to terminate
assistance to or take other appropriate measures with respect to, any
participant approved by USAID who is found to have been convicted of a
narcotics offense or to have been engaged in drug trafficking as defined in
22 CFR Part 140.




                                   Page 47
4. CERTIFICATION REGARDING TERRORIST FINANCING
IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13224

By signing and submitting this application, the prospective recipient
provides the
certification set out below:

1. The Recipient, to the best of its current knowledge, did not provide,
within the
previous ten years, and will take all reasonable steps to ensure that it does
not and will not knowingly provide, material support or resources to any
individual or entity that commits, attempts to commit, advocates,
facilitates, or participates in terrorist acts, or has committed, attempted
to commit, facilitated, or participated in terrorist acts, as that term is
defined in paragraph 3.

2. The following steps may enable the Recipient to comply with its
obligations under paragraph 1:

      a. Before providing any material support or resources to an individual
      or entity, the Recipient will verify that the individual or entity does
      not (i) appear on the master list of Specially Designated Nationals and
      Blocked Persons, which list is maintained by the U.S. Treasury’s Office
      of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and is available online at OFAC’s
      website : http://www.treas.gov/offices/eotffc/ofac/sdn/t11sdn.pdf, or
      (ii) is not included in any supplementary information concerning
      prohibited individuals or entities that may be provided by USAID to the
      Recipient.

      b. Before providing any material support or resources to an individual
      or entity, the Recipient also will verify that the individual or entity
      has not been designated by the United Nations Security (UNSC) sanctions
      committee established under UNSC Resolution 1267 (1999) (the “1267
      Committee”) [individuals and entities linked to the Taliban, Osama bin
      Laden, or the Al Qaida Organization]. To determine whether there has
      been a published designation of an individual or entity by the 1267
      Committee, the Recipient should refer to the consolidated list
      available online at the Committee’s website:
      http://www.un.org/Docs/sc/committees/1267/1267ListEng.htm.

      c. Before providing any material support or resources to an individual
      or entity, the Recipient will consider all information about that
      individual or entity of which it is aware and all public information
      that is reasonably available to it or of which it should be aware.

      d. The Recipient also will implement reasonable monitoring and
      oversight procedures to safeguard against assistance being diverted to
      support terrorist activity.

3. For purposes of this Certification

  a. “Material support and resources” means currency or monetary instruments
or financial securities, financial services, lodging, training, expert advice
or assistance, safe houses, false documentation or identification,
communications equipment, facilities, weapons, lethal substances, explosives,



                                   Page 48
personnel, transportation, and other physical assets, except medicine or
religious materials.”

 b. “Terrorist act” means-

      (i) an act prohibited pursuant to one of the 12 United Nations
Conventions and
      Protocols related to terrorism (see UN terrorism conventions Internet
site:
      http://untreaty.un.org/English/Terrorism.asp); or

      (ii) an act of premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated
      against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine
      agents; or

      (iii) any other act intended to cause death or serious bodily injury to
      a civilian, or to any other person not taking an active part in
      hostilities in a situation of armed conflict, when the purpose of such
      act, by its nature or context, is to intimidate a population, or to
      compel a government or an international organization to do or to
      abstain from doing any act.

  c. “Entity” means a partnership, association, corporation, or other
organization, group or
   subgroup.

 d. References in this Certification to the provision of material support
  and resources shall not be deemed to include the furnishing of USAID funds
  or USAID-financed commodities to the ultimate beneficiaries of USAID
  assistance, such as recipients of food, medical care, micro-enterprise
  loans, shelter, etc., unless the Recipient has reason to believe that one
  or more of these beneficiaries commits, attempts to commit, advocates,
  facilitates, or participates in terrorist acts, or has committed,
  attempted to commit, facilitated or participated in terrorist acts.

 e. The Recipient’s obligations under paragraph 1 are not applicable to the
  procurement of goods and/or services by the Recipient that are acquired in
  the ordinary course of business through contract or purchase, e.g.,
  utilities, rents, office supplies, gasoline, etc., unless the Recipient
  has reason to believe that a vendor or supplier of such goods and services
  commits, attempts to commit, advocates, facilitates, or participates in
  terrorist acts, or has committed, attempted to commit, facilitated or
  participated in terrorist acts.

  This Certification is an express term and condition of any agreement
  issued as a result of this application, and any violation of it shall be
  grounds for unilateral termination of the agreement by USAID prior to the
  end of its term.




                                   Page 49
5. CERTIFICATION OF RECIPIENT

By signing below the recipient provides certifications and assurances for (1)
the Assurance of Compliance with Laws and Regulations Governing Non-
Discrimination in Federally Assisted Programs, (2) the Certification
Regarding Lobbying, (3) the Prohibition on Assistance to Drug Traffickers for
Covered Countries and Individuals (ADS 206) and (4) the Certification
Regarding Terrorist Financing Implementing Executive Order 13224 above.

RFA/RFA No. ________________________________ 


Application No. ______________________________ 


Date of Application ______________________________ 


Name of Recipient _______________________________ 


Typed Name and Title __________________________________ 


Signature _____________________________________ 


Date _______________ 





                                   Page 50
PART II - KEY INDIVIDUAL CERTIFICATION NARCOTICS OFFENSES AND DRUG
TRAFFICKING

I hereby certify that within the last ten years:

  1. I have not been convicted of a violation of, or a conspiracy to violate,
any law or regulation of the United States or any other country concerning
narcotic or psychotropic drugs or other controlled substances.

  2. I am not and have not been an illicit trafficker in any such drug or
controlled substance.

  3. I am not and have not been a knowing assistor, abettor, conspirator, or
colluder with others in the illicit trafficking in any such drug or
substance.

Signature:   ____________________________

Date:             ____________________________

Name:             ____________________________

Title/Position: ____________________________

Organization: ____________________________

Address:     ____________________________

                  ____________________________

Date of Birth: ____________________________

NOTICE:

  1. You are required to sign this Certification under the provisions of 22
CFR Part 140, Prohibition on Assistance to Drug Traffickers. These
regulations were issued by the Department of State and require that certain
key individuals of organizations must sign this Certification.

  2. If you make a false Certification you are subject to U.S. criminal
prosecution under 18 U.S.C. 1001.




                                    Page 51
PART III - PARTICIPANT CERTIFICATION NARCOTICS OFFENSES AND DRUG TRAFFICKING

1. I hereby certify that within the last ten years:

   a. I have not been convicted of a violation of, or a conspiracy to
violate, any law or regulation of the United States or any other country
concerning narcotic or psychotropic drugs or other controlled substances.

   b. I am not and have not been an illicit trafficker in any such drug or
controlled substance.

   c. I am not or have not been a knowing assistor, abettor, conspirator, or
colluder with others in the illicit trafficking in any such drug or
substance.

2. I understand that USAID may terminate my training if it is determined that
I engaged in the above conduct during the last ten years or during my USAID
training.

Signature:   ___________________________________

Name:             ___________________________________

Date:             ___________________________________

Address:     ___________________________________

                   ___________________________________

Date of Birth: ___________________________________

NOTICE:
1. You are required to sign this Certification under the provisions of 22 CFR
Part 140,Prohibition on Assistance to Drug Traffickers. These regulations
were issued by the Department of State and require that certain participants
must sign this Certification.

2. If you make a false Certification you are subject to U.S. criminal
prosecution under 18 U.S.C.1001.




                                    Page 52
PART IV - CERTIFICATION OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE STANDARD
PROVISIONS ENTITLED “CONDOMS” AND “PROHIBITION ON THE

PROMOTION OR ADVOCACY OF THE LEGALIZATION OR PRACTICE OF
PROSTITUTION OR SEX TRAFFICKING.”

Applicability: This certification requirement only applies to the prime
recipient. Before a U.S. or non-U.S. nongovernmental organization receives
FY04-FY08 HIV/AIDS funds under a grant or cooperative agreement, such
recipient must provide to the Agreement Officer a certification substantially
as follows:

“[Recipient's name] certifies compliance as applicable with the standard
provisions entitled “Condoms” and “Prohibition on the Promotion or Advocacy
of the Legalization or Practice of Prostitution or Sex Trafficking” included
in
the referenced agreement.”

RFA/RFA No.       _______________________________

Application No.   _______________________________

Date of Application    _______________________________

Name of Applicant/Subgrantee _______________________________

Typed Name and Title _______________________________

                                   _______________________________

Signature         _______________________________




                                   Page 53
PART V - SURVEY ON ENSURING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY FOR APPLICANTS

Applicability: All RFAs must include the attached Survey on Ensuring Equal
Opportunity for Applicants as an attachment to the RFA package. Applicants
under unsolicited applications are also to be provided the survey. (While
inclusion of the survey by Agreement Officers in RFA packages is required,
the applicant’s completion of the survey is voluntary, and must not be a
requirement of the RFA. The absence of a completed survey in an application
may not be a basis upon which the application is determined incomplete or
non-responsive. Applicants who volunteer to complete and submit the survey
under a competitive or non-competitive action are instructed within the text
of the survey to submit it as part of the application process.)




                                   Page 54
PART VI - OTHER STATEMENTS OF RECIPIENT

       1. AUTHORIZED INDIVIDUALS

The recipient represents that the following persons are authorized to
negotiate on its behalf with the Government and to bind the recipient in
connection with this application or grant:

Name          Title             Telephone No.     Facsimile No.

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

       2. TAXPAYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (TIN)

If the   recipient is a U.S. organization, or a foreign organization that has
income   effectively connected with the conduct of activities in the U.S. or
has an   office or a place of business or a fiscal paying agent in the U.S.,
please   indicate the recipient's TIN:

TIN: ________________________________


       3. DATA UNIVERSAL NUMBERING SYSTEM (DUNS) NUMBER

      (a) In the space provided at the end of this provision, the recipient
should supply the Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number applicable to
that name and address. Recipients should take care to report the number that
identifies the recipient's name and address exactly as stated in the
application.

      (b) The DUNS is a 9-digit number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet
Information Services. If the recipient does not have a DUNS number, the
recipient should call Dun and Bradstreet directly at 1- 800-333-0505. A DUNS
number will be provided immediately by telephone at no charge to the
recipient. The recipient should be prepared to provide the following
information:

(1) Recipient's name.
(2) Recipient's address.
(3) Recipient's telephone number.
(4) Line of business.
(5) Chief executive officer/key manager.
(6) Date the organization was started.
(7) Number of people employed by the recipient.
(8) Company affiliation.
      (c) Recipients located outside the United States may obtain the
location and phone number of the local Dun and Bradstreet Information
Services office from the Internet Home Page at
http://www.dbisna.com/dbis/customer/custlist.htm. If an offeror is unable to
locate a local service center, it may send an e-mail to Dun and Bradstreet at
globalinfo@dbisma.com.



                                     Page 55
The DUNS system is distinct from the Federal Taxpayer Identification Number
(TIN) system.

DUNS: ________________________________________


      4. LETTER OF CREDIT (LOC) NUMBER

If the recipient has an existing Letter of Credit (LOC) with USAID, please
indicate the LOC number:

LOC: _________________________________________


      5. PROCUREMENT INFORMATION

   (a) Applicability. This applies to the procurement of goods and services
planned by the recipient (i.e., contracts, purchase orders, etc.) from a
supplier of goods or services for the direct use or benefit of the recipient
in conducting the program supported by the grant, and not to assistance
provided by the recipient (i.e., a subgrant or subagreement) to a subgrantee
or subrecipient in support of the subgrantee's or subrecipient's program.
Provision by the recipient of the requested information does not, in and of
itself, constitute USAID approval.

   (b) Amount of Procurement. Please indicate the total estimated dollar
amount of goods and services, which the recipient plans to purchase under the
grant:

$__________________________

   (c) Nonexpendable Property. If the recipient plans to purchase
nonexpendable equipment which would require the approval of the Agreement
Officer, please indicate below (using a continuation page, as necessary) the
types, quantities of each, and estimated unit costs. Nonexpendable equipment
for which the Agreement Officer's approval to purchase is required is any
article of nonexpendable
tangible personal property charged directly to the grant, having a useful
life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per
unit.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION(Generic)     QUANTITY           ESTIMATED UNIT COST


   (d) Source, Origin, and Componentry of Goods. If the recipient plans to
purchase any
goods/commodities which are not of U.S. source and/or U.S. origin, and/or
does not contain at least 50% componentry, which are not at least 50% U.S.
source and origin, please indicate below (using a continuation page, as
necessary) the types and quantities of each, estimated unit costs of each,
and probable source and/or origin, to include the probable source and/or
origin of the components if less than 50% U.S. components will be contained
in the commodity. "Source" means the country from which a commodity is
shipped to the cooperating country or the cooperating country itself if the
commodity is located therein at the time of purchase. However, where a
commodity is shipped from a free port or bonded warehouse in the form in
which received therein, "source" means the country from which the commodity


                                   Page 56
was shipped to the free port or bonded warehouse. Any commodity whose source
is a non-Free World country is ineligible for USAID financing. The "origin"
of a commodity is the country or area in which a commodity is mined, grown,
or produced. A commodity is produced when, through manufacturing, processing,
or substantial and major assembling of components, commercially recognized
new commodity results, which is substantially different in basic
characteristics or in purpose or utility from its components. Merely
packaging various items together for a particular procurement or relabeling
items do not constitute production of a commodity. Any commodity whose origin
is a non-Free World country is ineligible for USAID financing. "Components"
are the goods, which go directly into the production of a produced commodity.
Any component from a non-Free World country makes the commodity ineligible
for USAID financing.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION   QUANTITY   ESTIMATED GOODS     PROBABLE GOODS
PROBABLE
(Generic)   UNIT COST    COMPONENTS SOURCE        COMPONENTS ORIGIN

(e) Restricted Goods. If the recipient plans to purchase any restricted
goods, please indicate below (using a continuation page, as necessary) the
types and quantities of each, estimated unit costs of each, intended use, and
probable source and/or origin. Restricted goods are Agricultural Commodities,
Motor Vehicles, Pharmaceuticals, Pesticides, Rubber Compounding Chemicals and
Plasticizers, Used Equipment, U.S. Government-Owned Excess Property, and
Fertilizer.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION    QUANTITY     ESTIMATED    PROBABLE   INTENDED USE
(Generic)                      UNIT COST     SOURCE ORIGIN


   (f) Supplier Nationality. If the recipient plans to purchase any goods or
services from suppliers of goods and services whose nationality is not in the
U.S., please indicate below (using a continuation page, as necessary) the
types and quantities of each good or service, estimated costs of each,
probable nationality of each non-U.S. supplier of each good or service, and
the rationale for purchasing from a non-U.S. supplier. Any supplier whose
nationality is a non-Free World country is ineligible for USAID financing.


TYPE/DESCRIPTION   QUANTITY     ESTIMATED      PROBABLE SLUPPIER
NATIONALITY RATIONALE

(Generic)          UNIT COST (Non-U.S. Only)             for NON-US


   (g) Proposed Disposition. If the recipient plans to purchase any
nonexpendable equipment with a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or more,
please indicate below (using a continuation page, as necessary) the proposed
disposition of each such item. Generally, the recipient may either retain the
property for other uses and make compensation to USAID (computed by applying
the percentage of federal participation in the cost of the original program
to the current fair market value of the property), or sell the property and
reimburse USAID an amount computed by applying to the sales proceeds the
percentage of federal participation in the cost of the original program
(except that the recipient may deduct from the federal share $500 or 10% of
the proceeds, whichever is greater, for selling and handling expenses), or



                                     Page 57
donate the property to a host country institution, or otherwise dispose of
the property as instructed by USAID.

TYPE/DESCRIPTION(Generic) QUANTITY ESTIMATED UNIT COST PROPOSED
DISPOSITION

6. PAST PERFORMANCE REFERENCES
On a continuation page, please provide past performance information requested
in the RFA.


7. TYPE OF ORGANIZATION

The recipient, by checking the applicable box, represents that -

  (a) If the recipient is a U.S. entity, it operates as [ ] a corporation
incorporated under the laws of the State of, [ ] an individual, [ ] a
partnership, [ ] a nongovernmental nonprofit organization, [ ] a state or loc
al governmental organization, [ ] a private college or university, [ ] a
public college or university, [ ] an international organization, or [ ] a
joint venture; or

  (b) If the recipient is a non-U.S. entity, it operates as [ ] a corporation
organized under the laws of _____________________________ (country), [ ] an
individual, [ ] a partnership, [ ] a nongovernmental nonprofit organization,
[ ] a nongovernmental educational institution, [ ] a governmental
organization, [ ] an international organization, or [ ] a joint venture.




8. ESTIMATED COSTS OF COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTS

The following are the estimate(s) of the cost of each separate communications
product (i.e., any printed material [other than non- color photocopy
material], photographic services, or video production services) which is
anticipated under the grant. Each estimate must include all the costs
associated with preparation and execution of the product. Use a continuation
page as necessary.




                                   Page 58
Annexes

Annex A    Program Review: Analysis of U.S. Cooperative Development Experience

Annex B    Cooperative Development Program Evaluation - Executive Summary

Annex C    Technical Application Summary Format

ANNEX D    Planning Matrix

Annex E    Problem Solving

Annex F1    Measurable Outcome Statements

Annex F2    Standard and Custom Indicators

Annex G    Work Plan

ANNEX H    ODP/PVC PRIORITY COUNTRY LIST

ANNEX I    USAID MISSION ADDRESSES

Annex J    Cover Sheet for Submitting Application to Mission

Annex K    Typology of Progress-Prone and Progress Resistant Cultures




                                     Page 59
                                                                       Annex A

                             Program Review:

           Analysis of U.S. Cooperative Development Experience 



The “Support for Overseas Cooperative Development Act, 2000,” legislation
expanded the mandate for overseas cooperative development. The law defines
cooperatives and directs the U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID) to promote all types of cooperatives including credit unions, rural
electric and telecommunications cooperatives, shelter and insurance
cooperatives. The Agency’s Implementation Report to Congress, mandated by
the Act, set a new agenda for cooperative development that included:

      Developing and testing cooperative solutions to current problems such
       as rebuilding HIV/AIDS devastated communities in East Africa,
      Seeking and disseminating improved methods to adapt Western cooperative
       approaches to emerging market economies,
      Developing strategies that target assistance to cooperatives in ways
       that achieve greater scale and impact,
      Strengthening networks of cooperatives to solve multiple economic and
       social challenges, and advance specialized coops in agriculture,
       financial systems, community-owned infrastructure and community
       services, and
      Developing new analytical tools on the strengths and weaknesses of
       coops to promote them within multilateral institutions to reach areas
       that lack or cannot attract private investment.

Framework for Cooperative Development. As a result of the legislation,
USAID’s Office Development Partners Private and Voluntary Cooperation
(ODP/PVC), working with members of the Overseas Cooperative Development
Council (OCDC), have implemented a learning agenda including the development
of a method for measuring cooperative success. The participating U.S.
cooperative development organizations (CDOs) concur in the need to employ a
basic checklist to assess cooperative performance, with focus on sound
business practices, strong member participation, support of apex
organizations and encouraging a facilitating economic environment. This work
is presented in “Measuring Cooperative Success”. John Mellor, the eminent
economist, served as the lead researcher and authored the publication.

All award Cooperative Development Program award recipients will be encouraged
to use “Measuring Cooperative Success”, with such adaptations as may be
required to account for sectoral differences, both to develop a baseline and
to track implementation progress.




                                    Page 60
Part I:       Cooperative Assessment Tool

METRICS (Measurements for Tracking Indicators of Cooperative Success)
addresses the question: What characteristics produce the greatest probability
of a cooperative surviving and thriving in the challenging marketplace?
METRICS was developed by eight U.S.-based cooperative development
organizations representing various sectors of the economy, guided and
assisted by the Overseas Cooperative Development Council (OCDC).

The purpose of the METRICS questionnaire is to gather information about a
cooperative and collate it with information about other cooperatives,
including those from other countries and other sectors of the economy. After
tabulating all data, a combined report using statistical methods can be
produced and an in-depth analysis prepared to point to those characteristics
which generate the greatest probability of success. This information will be
shared with participating cooperatives.

I. The Cooperative
For the person filling out the questionnaire:
1.    	 ame_________________________________
      N
      Title___________________________________
      Contact address_________________________
      Contact e-mail___________________________
      Date__________________________________

2. 	   Name of the cooperative

3. 	   Is this cooperative a primary ( ) or apex organization ( )?

4.    Town, district, state/province and country where the cooperative is
located.

5. 	   In what year was the cooperative established?

6.    _Name of all organizations, if any, that provide oversight and/or
assistance to the cooperative (i.e., apex organization, cooperative union(s),
national association(s), government bodies, or international organization(s):




7. 	   What is the current exchange rate: Currency name Rate in USD__________

II. Financial-Profitability
8.    State the total gross annual sales for the following years (or
revenues, billings, loans, premiums):

a.     2009                      f.    2004


                                      Page 61
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

9.    _What is the current rate of inflation of the consumer price index for
your country? (percent per year)_______________

10.   State the total expenses for the following years:

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

11.   Total administrative/operating costs (normally all the office costs
including labor and other items):

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999


III. Financial-Capital

12.   State the total assets for the following years:

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

13.   State the total debt for the following years:

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

14.   State the total reserves for the following years:

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001



                                     Page 62
e.   2005                       j.    2000
                                k.    1999

15.   Was a professional analysis of reserve requirements performed last
year? Yes/ No

IV Financial-Management

16. 	 Is the bank account in the cooperative’s name? Yes___/No___

17. 	 Is an annual audit provided by an outside agency? Yes___/No___

18. 	 Is the audit by a registered auditor? Yes___/No___

19. 	 Do the members vote on the choice of auditor? Yes___/No___

20. 	 If yes, is that during the annual meeting? Yes___/No___

21. 	 Does the board choose the auditors? Yes___/No___

V. Governance-Membership

22. 	 How many registered members are in the cooperative?

a.   2009                       f.    2004
b.   2008                       g.    2003
c.   2007                       h.    2002
d.   2006                       i.    2001
e.   2005                       j.    2000
                                k.    1999

23. 	 What percent of members are women? _____% (Don’t know )

24.   What percent of persons voting at the annual meeting are women?_____%
(Don’t know )

25. 	 What percent of members are under age 30?____% (Don’t know )

26. 	 How many members in the most recent year participated in the business
      (i.e. sold, purchased, borrowed, paid premiums)?______

27. 	 How many members (or delegates) attended the last annual meeting?______

28. 	 What is the stated quorum (minimum for doing business) for annual
      meetings? State as percentage of members._____%

29.   Does the cooperative offer annual training/information services to
members? Yes___/No___


VI. Governance-Management

30.   Are the by-laws and changes in the by-laws reviewed at the annual
meeting? Yes___/No___

31. 	 Is the board elected by members? Yes___/No___



                                     Page 63
32. 	 Is the manager selected by the board? Yes___/No___

33. 	 Is the manager a government official? Yes___/No___

34. 	 Is there clear division of responsibility between board and manager?
      • The manager determines and implements day-to-day management.
      Yes___/No___
      • The board determines and enforces basic policy.     Yes___/No___

35. 	 _For at least half of the board positions open in the past two years,
      two or more persons ran for the position. Yes___/No___

36. 	 Board members cannot serve for more than two terms.   Yes___/No___

37. 	 At the time of elections, information is provided to members about
      board nominees and issues facing the cooperative.     Yes___/No___

38.   Is there a written business plan or annual work plan for the
cooperative? Yes___/No___

39. 	 The business plan or other document includes a manager succession plan.
      Yes___/No___

40. 	 The business plan or other document includes a risk analysis.
      Yes___/No___

41. 	 Has there been at least one management training program within the last
      two years? Yes___/No___

VII. Apex Organization, Cooperative Federation or
Cooperative Union

These questions refer to any body or authority that provides supervision,
oversight or services to the cooperative.

42. 	 Is there an apex cooperative/organization in your system? Yes___/No___

43. 	 Is the board of the apex organization elected by the boards of the
      primary cooperatives or directly by the members of the primary
      cooperatives?
      • Elected by the board
      • Elected directly by the members of the primary cooperative

44. 	 Is the apex organization provided by foreign assistance, e.g. a foreign
      contractor or NGO? Yes___/No___

45. 	 Is the apex organization a government body, e.g. department of
      cooperatives? Yes___/No___


46. 	 If yes to question 44 or 45, is there a plan to transform into an apex
      cooperative with a board elected by the primary cooperatives?
      Yes___/No___

47. 	 Does the apex organization offer the following services?



                                   Page 64
      a. 	     Training Yes___/No___
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      b. 	     Intermediation services Yes___/No___
               (obtains loans and relends to the primary cooperative.)
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      c. 	     Services with scale economies, e.g. wholesales fertilizer,
               marketing services etc. Yes___/No___
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      d. 	     Auditing services Yes___/No___
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      e. 	     Is your cooperative graded by standards set by the apex
               organization? Yes___/No___

      f. 	     Does the apex organization assist in rebuilding failing
               cooperatives Yes___/No___
               If yes, are they used by your cooperative? Yes___/No___


VIII. Business Environment

48.   _State the principal lines of business activity for your cooperative.
For some cooperatives these will be commodities, e.g. fruits and vegetables,
dairy products, grain, and for others it will be a service, e.g. credit,
insurance, housing. Rough approximations are acceptable. Fill in the name of
the type of business, then estimate what percent that line is of the
cooperative’s revenues.
a. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
b. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
c. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
d. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
e. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%

49.   Is the principle business activity of your cooperative currently
growing in your area?

      a.     Faster than the overall economy. Yes___/No___
      b.     Slower than the overall economy. Yes___/No___
      c.     About the same as the overall economy. Yes___/No___
      d.     Do not know.

50. 	 What is the most important source of income for your members?


51. 	 Is that source of income growing? Yes___/No___

52. 	 Is the most important source of income the same for the members as for
      the cooperative? Yes___/No___
      (Skip if not relevant, as for housing, electrification and several
      other types of cooperatives.)

53. 	 Is the status of roads in your area a disadvantage to making your
      cooperative profitable? Yes___/No___


                                      Page 65
54. 	 Is the status of electrification and power supply a disadvantage to
      making your cooperative profitable? Yes___/No___

55. 	 Is the status of information and communications technology a
      disadvantage to making your cooperative profitable? Yes___/No___

56. 	 Is your cooperative fully integrated (perhaps through other
      cooperatives) from the producer to the ultimate consumer? Yes___/No___

57. 	 Does your cooperative work regularly with a service provider? A service
      provider is any institution providing business training, technical
      services, financial services, or other business support. (Examples
      include a government extension or research organization, bank or
      microfinance institution, a vocational school that trains people in
      technical trades, a seed seller who teaches farmers how to plant new
      seed varieties, a veterinarian or agronomist who teaches disease
      prevention, an NGO that provides business training.) Yes___/No___

58. 	 Is the provider effective? Yes___/No___


These materials are then evaluated by a tabulator in the manner indicated
below:

METRICS (Measurements for Tracking Indicators of Cooperative Success)
addresses the question: What characteristics produce the greatest probability
of a cooperative surviving and thriving in the challenging marketplace?
METRICS was developed by eight U.S.-based cooperative development
organizations representing various sectors of the economy, guided and
assisted by the Overseas Cooperative Development Council (OCDC).

The purpose of the METRICS questionnaire is to gather information about a
cooperative and collate it with information about other cooperatives,
including those from other countries and other sectors of the economy. After
tabulating all data, a combined report using statistical methods can be
produced and an in-depth analysis prepared to point to those characteristics
which generate the greatest probability of success. This information will be
shared with participating cooperatives.

I. The Cooperative

For the person filling out the questionnaire:

1.     	 ame_________________________________
       N
       Title___________________________________
       Contact address_________________________
       Contact e-mail___________________________
       Date__________________________________

2. 	   Name of the cooperative

3. 	   Is this cooperative a primary ( ) or apex organization ( )?

4.    Town, district, state/province and country where the cooperative is
located.



                                    Page 66
5.    In what year was the cooperative established?

6.    _Name of all organizations, if any, that provide oversight and/or
assistance to the cooperative (i.e., apex organization, cooperative union(s),
national association(s), government bodies, or international organization(s):




7.    What is the current exchange rate: Currency name Rate in USD__________

II. Financial-Profitability
8.    State the total gross annual sales for the following years (or
revenues, billings, loans, premiums):

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

• Convert most-recent year to USD._______________________________
• Calculate the least squares growth rate.__________________________
• Calculate the sales per member.________________________________
• If less than 5 years’ data, calculate compound growth rate between first
and last year.
___________________________________________________________

9.    _What is the current rate of inflation of the consumer price index for
your country? (percent per year)_______________

• Subtract the inflation rate from the calculated growth
rate________________________

10.   State the total expenses for the following years:

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

• For each year, subtract expenses from sales to provide net profit, and:
• ♦ For most-recent year, state as percent of sales.




                                     Page 67
• ♦ Calculate average sales and average profit; calculate average profit as a 

percent of sales. 

• ♦ Calculate the least squares trend for profit. 


11.   Total administrative/operating costs (normally all the office costs
including labor and other items):

a.    2009                        f.    2004
b.    2008                        g.    2003
c.    2007                        h.    2002
d.    2006                        i.    2001
e.    2005                        j.    2000
                                  k.    1999

• Calculate 11a as a percent of 1a (most-recent admin cost as a percent of
most-recent sales.)
• Calculate the least squares growth rate of administrative costs.
• Calculate the least squares growth rate of administrative costs as a
percent of sales.




III. Financial-Capital

12.   State the total assets for the following years:

a.    2009                        f.    2004
b.    2008                        g.    2003
c.    2007                        h.    2002
d.    2006                        i.    2001
e.    2005                        j.    2000
                                  k.    1999

13.   State the total debt for the following years:

a.    2009                        f.    2004
b.    2008                        g.    2003
c.    2007                        h.    2002
d.    2006                        i.    2001
e.    2005                        j.    2000
                                  k.    1999

• Calculate   equity (difference between total assets and total debt for each
year.)
• Calculate   the least squares growth rate in equity.
• Calculate   most-recent equity as a percent of sales.
• Calculate   most-recent equity as a percent of debt.
• Calculate   the average for equity as a percent of the average for sales and
for debt.

14.   State the total reserves for the following years:

a.    2009                        f.    2004


                                       Page 68
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

• Calculate the trend in reserves._____________________________________
• Calculate the reserves for the most-recent year, also average for the
period, as a percent of debt, and of
sales._________________________________________

15.   Was a professional analysis of reserve requirements performed last
year? Yes/ No

IV Financial-Management

16.   Is the bank account in the cooperative’s name? Yes___/No___

17.   Is an annual audit provided by an outside agency? Yes___/No___

18.   Is the audit by a registered auditor? Yes___/No___

19.   Do the members vote on the choice of auditor? Yes___/No___

20.   If yes, is that during the annual meeting? Yes___/No___

21.   Does the board choose the auditors? Yes___/No___

V. Governance-Membership

22.   How many registered members are in the cooperative?

a.    2009                      f.    2004
b.    2008                      g.    2003
c.    2007                      h.    2002
d.    2006                      i.    2001
e.    2005                      j.    2000
                                k.    1999

• Calculate least squares growth in membership.

23.   What percent of members are women? _____% (Don’t know )

24.   What percent of persons voting at the annual meeting are women?_____%
(Don’t know )

25.   What percent of members are under age 30?____% (Don’t know )

26.   How many members in the most recent year participated in the business
      (i.e. sold, purchased, borrowed, paid premiums)?______

• Calculate the percent of members

27.   How many members (or delegates) attended the last annual meeting?______

• Calculate the percent of members



                                     Page 69
28. 	 _What is the stated quorum (minimum for doing business) for annual
      meetings? State as percentage of members._____%

29.   Does the cooperative offer annual training/information services to
members? Yes___/No___

VI. Governance-Management

30.   Are the by-laws and changes in the by-laws reviewed at the annual
meeting? Yes___/No___

31. 	 Is the board elected by members? Yes___/No___

32. 	 Is the manager selected by the board? Yes___/No___

33. 	 Is the manager a government official? Yes___/No___

34. 	 Is there clear division of responsibility between board and manager?
      • The manager determines and implements day-to-day management.
      Yes___/No___
      • The board determines and enforces basic policy.     Yes___/No___

35. 	 _For at least half of the board positions open in the past two years,
      two or more persons ran for the position. Yes___/No___

36. 	 Board members cannot serve for more than two terms.   Yes___/No___

37. 	 At the time of elections, information is provided to members about
      board nominees and issues facing the cooperative.     Yes___/No___

38.   Is there a written business plan or annual work plan for the
cooperative? Yes___/No___

39. 	 The business plan or other document includes a manager succession plan.
      Yes___/No___

40. 	 The business plan or other document includes a risk analysis.
      Yes___/No___

41. 	 Has there been at least one management training program within the last
      two years? Yes___/No___

VII. Apex Organization, Cooperative Federation or
Cooperative Union

These questions refer to any body or authority that provides supervision,
oversight or services to the cooperative.

42. 	 Is there an apex cooperative/organization in your system? Yes___/No___

43. 	 Is the board of the apex organization elected by the boards of the
      primary cooperatives or directly by the members of the primary
      cooperatives?
      • Elected by the board
      • Elected directly by the members of the primary cooperative



                                   Page 70
44. 	 Is the apex organization provided by foreign assistance, e.g. a foreign
      contractor or NGO? Yes___/No___

45. 	 Is the apex organization a government body, e.g. department of
      cooperatives? Yes___/No___


46. 	 If yes to question 44 or 45, is there a plan to transform into an apex
      cooperative with a board elected by the primary cooperatives?
      Yes___/No___

47. 	 Does the apex organization offer the following services?

      a. 	     Training Yes___/No___
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      b. 	     Intermediation services Yes___/No___
               (obtains loans and relends to the primary cooperative.)
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      c. 	     Services with scale economies, e.g. wholesales fertilizer,
               marketing services etc. Yes___/No___
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      d. 	     Auditing services Yes___/No___
               If yes, did your cooperative use such assistance? Yes___/No___

      e. 	     Is your cooperative graded by standards set by the apex
               organization? Yes___/No___

      f. 	     Does the apex organization assist in rebuilding failing
               cooperatives Yes___/No___
               If yes, are they used by your cooperative? Yes___/No___


VIII. Business Environment

48.   _State the principal lines of business activity for your cooperative.
For some cooperatives these will be commodities, e.g. fruits and vegetables,
dairy products, grain, and for others it will be a service, e.g. credit,
insurance, housing. Rough approximations are acceptable. Fill in the name of
the type of business, then estimate what percent that line is of the
cooperative’s revenues.
a. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
b. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
c. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
d. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%
e. __________________________________; percent of gross revenue_________%

49.   Is the principle business activity of your cooperative currently
growing in your area?

      a.     Faster than the overall economy. Yes___/No___
      b.     Slower than the overall economy. Yes___/No___
      c.     About the same as the overall economy. Yes___/No___
      d.     Do not know.



                                      Page 71
50. 	 What is the most important source of income for your members?


51. 	 Is that source of income growing? Yes___/No___

52. 	 Is the most important source of income the same for the members as for
      the cooperative? Yes___/No___
      (Skip if not relevant, as for housing, electrification and several
      other types of cooperatives.)

53. 	 Is the status of roads in your area a disadvantage to making your
      cooperative profitable? Yes___/No___

54. 	 Is the status of electrification and power supply a disadvantage to
      making your cooperative profitable? Yes___/No___

55. 	 Is the status of information and communications technology a
      disadvantage to making your cooperative profitable? Yes___/No___

56. 	 Is your cooperative fully integrated (perhaps through other
      cooperatives) from the producer to the ultimate consumer? Yes___/No___

57. 	 Does your cooperative work regularly with a service provider? A service
      provider is any institution providing business training, technical
      services, financial services, or other business support. (Examples
      include a government extension or research organization, bank or
      microfinance institution, a vocational school that trains people in
      technical trades, a seed seller who teaches farmers how to plant new
      seed varieties, a veterinarian or agronomist who teaches disease
      prevention, an NGO that provides business training.) Yes___/No___

58. 	 Is the provider effective? Yes___/No___




                                   Page 72
                                                                      Annex B

               Cooperative Development Program Evaluation

                            Executive Summary 


                                 Prepared by

                               Lowell E. Lynch 


                              EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND
One of the ways in which the United States Agency for International
Development (USAID, or “the Agency”) provides support to U.S.-based
cooperative development organizations (CDOs) is through a series of multiyear
grants-in-aid from USAID headquarters. The most recent grant, the FY 2004­
2009 Cooperative Development Program (CDP), totals $29 million, including a
$2 million supplemental appropriation in FY 2007. The CDP provides only a
small portion of the USAID funding available to the CDOs. The CDP's
importance both to those organizations and the Agency is
disproportionately great, however, because of its focus on improving the
CDOs' performance in delivering cooperative development services,
particularly through building their intellectual capital.
Eight CDOs receiving the FY 2004-2009 CDP funding are:
     Americas Association of Cooperative and Mutual Insurance Societies

      (AAC/MIS);

     Agricultural Cooperative Development International/Volunteers in

      Overseas Cooperative Assistance (ACDI-VOCA);

     Communications Cooperative International (CCI);

     Cooperative Housing Foundation International (CHF);

     Land O’Lakes International (LO’L);

     National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA);

     National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA); and

     World Council of Credit Unions (WOCCU). 


Current CDP projects that the CDOs are implementing include the insurance,
telecommunications, housing and community services, agribusiness, rural
electrification, health, and business sectors.

USAID’s stated mission for the CDP is to “deliver the quality and magnitude
of support necessary for CDOs to attract the human, institutional and
financial resources necessary to significantly enhance their impact on
cooperative development worldwide.” The CDP has six strategic objectives:
reform of cooperative law and regulation; institutionalization of effective
governance and training; expansion in good-performing, self-sustaining
cooperatives; growth in other-donor support for cooperative development;
initiation of significant US cooperative investments in joint ventures with
developing and transition economy cooperatives; and diversification of CDO
financing. The CDP also has five strategy components: leverage overall
cooperative development quality and impact by financing CDO learning and
innovation (intellectual capital); focus development community attention on
cooperative development’s potential; catalyze support for legal and
regulatory reform; create incentives for US cooperative engagement in



                                   Page 73
cooperative development activities; and encourage alliances between US CDOs
and like-minded organizations.
The request for application (RFA) for the current CDP calls for the CDOs to
focus on developing, testing, evaluating, and disseminating solutions to key
problems (or “issues,” to quote the RFA) that impede the success of
cooperative development efforts.   Those problems are:
      principles of sound cooperative law and strategies to improve the
       legislative and regulatory environments;
      organizational change strategies;
      addressing HIV/AIDS, its impact on cooperatives and their members;
      strengthening cooperative participation and governance;
      planning and implementation systems;
      replication, scale, and salience of successful cooperative development
       efforts;
      alliances in support of cooperative development objectives;
      avoiding dependency—accelerating progress from donor support to
       commercial operations; and
      design (of cooperative project interventions and research activities).


EVALUATION PURPOSE
The specific purpose of the evaluation is twofold: to assess whether the
performance and results of the 2004-2009 CDP justify a new one; and to tap
the lessons learned from the current program for purposes of applying them
to a successor. In assessing the program’s performance and results,
including the lessons-learning and dissemination processes, the evaluation
is to examine USAID’s central support to U.S. CDOs in the development,
testing, evaluation and dissemination of solutions to the key cooperative
development issues specified in the RFA. In particular, the evaluation is
to assess the degree to which the CDP has met its goal of encouraging the
learning of lessons through an applied-research orientation and the
dissemination of those lessons, both among the CDOs and to the broader
development community. Any indicated improvements resulting from that
assessment are to feed into the design and development of the prospective
new program.

OVERALL FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS
The 2004-2009 Cooperative Development Program has been quite successful
overall. The program’s accomplishments, in strengthening cooperative
development in low-income countries, transitioning nation-states, and
emerging democracies, have been impressive.
The improved performance in cooperative development has taken place primarily
through CDO-managed projects, which the current CDP has underwritten, in over
30 countries during the past five years. Those projects have bolstered
broad-based, participatory, member-owned enterprises that generate economic
and social development, relieve poverty, and underpin community self-help and
democratic governance. At the same time, they have often served as learning
laboratories that have yielded lessons for improved cooperative development
interventions that the CDOs have then disseminated widely.
In addition to funding the CDOs’ in-country projects, the CDP has also
provided highly useful financial support for programmatic initiatives, in the
form of research studies that are not field-project specific. The eight CDOs


                                    Page 74
have collaborated on initiatives to address two challenges confronting
cooperative development. The Cooperative Law and Regulation Initiative
(CLARITY) is successfully tackling the constraints that the legal and
regulatory environment often creates for cooperative development. The other
initiative is identifying a set of key indicators of long-term viability and
sustainability of cooperatives as businesses in a developing country context.

SPECIFIC FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Finding 1: This evaluation has found that the performance of the current CDP
justifies the development of a new one.   The learning and dissemination
emphases, combined with programming flexibility, are essential ingredients of
the current CDP that clearly deserve inclusion in a new one.
   Recommendation 1. USAID should proceed with a new five-year Cooperative
   Development Program patterned after the 2004-2009 CDP.
Finding 2: The level of funding for the CDP is modest in relation both to
the needs of cooperative development and to the amounts of money flowing into
the sectors in which cooperatives operate. The CDP funding level is limited
even in relation to the budgets of many of the CDOs. Even so, given the way
in which USAID’s Office of Development Partners (ODP) has strategically
programmed the money, the CDOs have been able to use it in ways that realize
benefits for cooperate development that far outweigh the meager costs.
Recommendation 2.   USAID should increase the level of effort and funding for
    the new CDP.

Finding 3: The CDP’s success has yielded a number of positive lessons for
the new program, including: the desirability of mandating collaboration on
additional basic research projects such as CLARITY; the effectiveness of
invoking scale and salience considerations for cooperatives in pursuing
sectoral expansion; and the value of promoting an organizational learning
orientation in innovative project activities.
Performance has been mixed in the case of certain CDP objectives: fostering
appropriately paced growth in other-donor support for expansion of
cooperative development; initiating significant US cooperative investments in
joint ventures; and diversifying CDO financing. The prospects for the
achievement of these important objectives in a new CDP could be significantly
enhanced by certain improvements in aspects of program design and
development, CDO implementation arrangements, and interactions between USAID
and the CDOs.
Recommendation 3. Experience with the current CDP has yielded specific
    lessons both about capitalizing on successes (in learning and innovation,
    collaborative research, and replication, scale and salience, in
    particular) and about improving the program’s performance (especially in
    pursuing other-donor support for cooperative development, joint ventures,
    and diversification of CDO financing); ODP should incorporate those
    lessons in the new program.

Finding 4. CDP-induced collaboration among the CDOs has been instrumental in
the development of CLARITY and other initiatives important to improving
cooperative development. Expanding collaboration support to cover other
important issues in the next CDP would undoubtedly enhance the effectiveness
of this special feature of the program.




                                    Page 75
   Recommendation 4. The emphasis on practical collaboration among the CDOs
   should continue in the new CDP.
Finding 5. In addition to collaboration, there are three other special
features of the current CDP that have proven extremely important to its
success. They are flexibility, experimentation, and continuity.
The flexibility the CDP allows the CDOs, in responding nimbly and effectively
to changing conditions as the action research unfolds during project
implementation, has proven crucial, for both improving project performance
itself and strengthening the lessons-learning process. An important
component of the CDP’s flexibility is the fact that ODP has been willing and
able to grant the CDOs considerable freedom of action. This evaluation has
found that the Agency, in the person primarily of the cognizant technical
officer, has overseen the CDOs responsibly and effectively.
The experimental approach the CDP embodies – developing, testing, evaluating,
and disseminating solutions to cooperative development problems – has enabled
the CDOs to use the resources effectively in two ways that have proven
instrumental for cooperative development. It has allowed the funding of key
innovations that spell the difference at the margin between project (and
cooperative development) success or failure. It has also permitted the
luxury of exercising the kind of risk-taking that is essential for a
learning-based organization.
The Agency’s central support for cooperative development, of which the CDP is
the latest manifestation, has evolved significantly over the course of its
three-plus decades. Even so, the relatively high degree of consistency in
the nature and magnitude of that support has been invaluable for a program
that focuses on institutional development, which inherently demands long-term
commitments. The continuity feature of the CDP has allowed many of the CDOs
to build on and enhance accomplishments from earlier programs.
   Recommendation 5. The Agency should ensure that the CDP’s special
   features, of flexibility, experimentation, and continuity, which have been
   essential to its success, are incorporated in the new program.
Finding 6. Although most of the CDOs agreed that learning and dissemination
are central to the CDP’s primary purpose, the degree to which the CDOs’
implementation of these two pivotal processes has been accomplishing the
desired results has varied widely among CDOs and projects. Overall, there is
room for more systematic, rigorous, explicit learning and dissemination
components in the various projects.
The CDO community could benefit significantly from support in carrying out
the learning and dissemination agenda more fully. Such help might include
funding, perhaps from a central CDP account, for training and technical
assistance for CDP staff in incorporating an operations-research like
component in projects.
Recommendation 6. The new CDP should incorporate specific, concrete
    provisions for improving performance in the learning and dissemination
    components of projects, including possibly tying CDP funding to credible
    initiatives in this regard.

Finding 7. There seems to be a distinct appetite among the CDOs for
additional work on the more “basic,” non-experimental research initiatives,
such as CLARITY, and more recently the sustainability indicators project.
Such activities could usefully consume sizable amounts of CDP resources, a



                                   Page 76
fact that constitutes part of the case for a higher funding level in the new
CDP. However, the current CDP’s support for the more operations-oriented,
applied research, in which the projects are partly experiments with solutions
to key cooperative development problems, is also quite important to the CDO
community. That kind of project-based, experimental research helps the
community improve its cooperative development capabilities, by learning
through doing and by sharing – through concerted, goal-oriented dissemination
regimens – experience-based lessons learned.
   Recommendation 7. In the process of developing the RFA, ODP should
   organize an effort to sort out how much emphasis the new CDP should put on
   “basic” research, such as that represented by the CLARITY and
   sustainability indicators activities, versus the more applied, project-
   based experimentation.

Finding 8: The RFA for the current CDP recognized that the issue of legal
and regulatory reform was important enough to require that the CDOs mount a
collaborative effort (CLARITY) to address it. Certain other issues are of
such priority to the achievement of the CDP’s objectives that the CDOs should
be strongly encouraged, if not required, to address them. Such issues
include: change strategies; replication, scale and salience; strengthening
cooperative participation and governance; alliances in support of cooperative
development objectives; and avoiding dependency.
ODP should conduct a review, in consultation with the CDOs and OCDC, of the
list of key issues, to determine whether any changes are necessary, including
any further prioritization. ODP should then devise a means of ensuring that
the CDOs’ applications and projects tackle the most critical issues on the
list.
Recommendation 8. After carrying out a review of the list of key issues,
    revising and prioritizing them as necessary, ODP should ensure that the
    RFA for the new CDP accounts for the fact that certain key issues are
    clearly critical to the success of the program, by mandating that the
    CDOs’ applications take on those critical issues.

Finding 9.   A substantial diversity of interpretations and understandings
exists among the CDOs about what key aspects of the RFA mean. Those aspects
include, most importantly, the nature and role of the learning-based approach
to CDP activities and of the dissemination of proven solutions to key CDP
issues. However, they also extend to: the operational distinctions among
alliances, joint ventures, and other-donor, foundation, academia, and related
organization involvement with the CDP; and the relationship between change
and innovation processes. A tighter, simpler, and conceptually cleaner RFA
for the new CDP would almost certainly help improve the CDOs’ applications
and implementation performance.
Recommendation 9. ODP should see that the RFA or other competitive
    assistance instrument for the new CDP contains a simple, straightforward,
    tightly reasoned enunciation of the goals, objectives, issues, and other
    key elements of the assistance being solicited of the CDOs.

Finding 10. Although the CDP, being a centrally funded program, is not an
integral part of USAID mission and bureau program portfolios, CDP project
activities can furnish significant benefits to USAID’s country development
efforts.. Similarly, missions and regional bureaus can contribute




                                   Page 77
importantly to CDOs’ project work, by facilitating access to policymakers and
coordinating other USAID programs with CDP activities, for example.
Recommendation 10. ODP should pursue means of strengthening the interactions
    between CDP projects and USAID mission and bureau programs, activities,
    and operations. Such means could include: establishing cooperative
    development (liaison or program) officer positions in missions and
    bureaus; assigning the CTO responsibility and authority for keeping
    concerned mission and bureau staff informed about CDP activities in their
    countries and regions; ensuring that the CTO has funding for several CDP
    country visits annually; and stipulating in the RFA that CDO staff, on a
    regular, frequent basis, provide reports to mission and bureau personnel
    and have consultation meetings with them.

Finding 11. A strong field presence tends to make a major positive
difference in CDP project performance. If the head of the CDO’s operation in
the country is not just a technician or administrator but is, instead, the
CDO’s country representative able to carry out the entire range of in-country
program management duties, the performance of the CDP project is likely to
improve greatly.
Recommendation 11. For the new CDP, ODP should provide inducements for the
    CDOs to enhance their in-country staffing and project management by, for
    example, incorporating in their application a country representative,
    chief of party, or project manager position; the inducements could include
    such provisions as additional funding for field staff or extra points in
    the scoring of the applications that effectively addressed the field
    presence issue.

Finding 12. Linking in-country interventions in, for example, rural
electrification, rural credit, and agricultural production presents obvious
possibilities for creating synergy that benefits rural development. If the
CDP were to offer incentives to CDOs for capitalizing on such linkages
through formal in-county project collaboration, an added benefit might be
that a concentration of two or more CDOs in one country could facilitate
economies of scale in program and project management (if, for example, the
CDOs were to share staff).
   Recommendation 12. The new CDP should promote collaboration among CDOs at
   the field level and on specific projects, particularly where the linking
   of sector interventions can contribute to development.
Finding 13. There is some sentiment, although no consensus, within the CDOs
and USAID for a funding and procurement instrument other than the cooperative
agreement. Some expressed an interest in an IQC-like acquisition or
assistance instrument for facilitating USAID mission and other donor buy-in
to innovative cooperative development activities. Others suggested a leader­
with-associates grant as an alternative procurement and funding mechanism.

   Recommendation 13. ODP should explore alternative procurement and funding
   mechanisms for the new CDP.

Finding 14. There is a widely    shared opinion within the CDO community that
cooperative development can be   an effective tool for promoting both economic
growth and democracy but there   is not enough documentation as to how to work
via cooperatives in crisis and   post-crisis environments. The role of


                                     Page 78
cooperative development models in aiding democratization and governance
reform in a wide range of transition countries offers fertile ground for
research, of both a basic and an applied nature, in the new CDP.   More
resources for such work are warranted, given all that the cooperative
development model has to offer especially to transition assistance.

Recommendation 14. The new CDP should promote further experimentation with
    cooperative development in conflict and post-conflict countries, as part
    of transition assistance programs; ODP should also consider funding
    research into cooperative development’s relationship to the field of
    democracy and governance, including interactions with economic
    stabilization and growth.

Finding 15. Questions have arisen about both potential new applicants to the
CDP and those CDOs that have been grant recipients long enough to be ready,
at least arguably, to “graduate” from the program. The graduation argument
is not compelling in the case of the CDP.
There are other cooperative development organizations that have the potential
to participate in the CDP. Whether there is an increase in funding for the
next CDP or not, additional CDOs beyond the current eight should be invited
to submit applications.
Recommendation 15.   All of the CDOs participating in the current CDP should
    be allowed to submit applications for the new one, and new CDOs should
    also be permitted to apply.




                                   Page 79
                                                                         Annex C
Technical Application Summary Format

FY 2009 ODP/PVC – Cooperative Development Program Application Summary

1.   Organization Name:                 _____________________________________
2.   Contact Person:                    _____________________________________
3.   Address:                           _____________________________________
4.   Telephone:                         _____________________________________
5.   E-mail address:                    _____________________________________
6.   Program Period:                                     5 Years
7.   Proposed Start and End Dates:
                                        _____________________________________
8.   Name/s and position/s of USAID     _____________________________________
     Mission or Central Bureau          _____________________________________
     Office representative/s with       _____________________________________
     whom the proposed program has      _____________________________________
     been discussed:                    _____________________________________
                                        _____________________________________
9.   Principal author/s of this
     document:                          _____________________________________

10. Requested First Year vs. Life of Program (LOP) Funding Distribution
                   USAID $ Request                  Program Match
                                             In-Kind                $
FY 2004
Life of Project

11. Requested Life of Program Funding Distribution by Country:
Location           USAID $ Request                Program Match                 Total $
                                            In-Kind             $
Country (list)




Total (Direct
Costs)
Indirect Costs
Life of Project

12. Annual Expense Distribution by Country (in US$ ‘000)
Location        Year 1 ($)   Year 2 ($)    Year 3 ($)    Year 4($)       Year 5 ($)
Country (list)




Total Project
Year

The Sum of all “Total Project Years” should equal Total for LOP


                                       Page 80
                                                                      ANNEX D 


Planning Matrix

A Planning Matrix is a visual, summary presentation of the project design.
There are a number of different matrices used by different organizations.
Their relative merit is a matter of debate and applicants are free to use the
matrix format that it feels is most appropriate. Whatever form is used, it
is essential that the matrix:

      1)   Present the final results, and any interim results, in measurable
           terms (use of percentages is only acceptable if the baseline is
           provided);

      2)   Demonstrate a clear and convincing logic of cause and effect which
           links the initial inputs/interventions with the final results;

      3)   Avoid confusing means with ends;

      4)   Recognize that it is the transformation of inputs into outputs,
           purposes into goals, that is central. The description of what the
           applicant proposes to do to ensure this transformation should not
           be omitted.

      5)   Ensure consistency with the application text.

Care in the choice of words – particularly verbs – can ensure that stated
results can be measured and that the cause and effect relationships are
clear.

Care in problem analysis and in linking program strategy with the solutions
can strengthen a application (See note in “Annex E”).

Those interested in examining different approaches to planning matrices might
see:

http://www.dec.org/pdf_docs/PNACA947.pdf
http://www.dec.org/pdf_docs/PNACT274.pdf
http://www.delind.cec.eu.int/en/csn/civil_society/eccp/eccp­
logical_framework.xls
http://www.ausaid.gov.au/ausguide/ausguidelines/1.cfm
http://www.metametrics.com/logframe.html




                                   Page 81
                                                                        Annex E

Problem Solving

Development often addresses what are perceived to be problems. It is
important to take care to identify, as precisely as possible, the problem/s
that you intend to address. Often a problem can be seen as a state which
falls short of the desired one. Thus, the solution can be described as the
desired state – when that state is achieved, the solution has been achieved.

Having defined the problem and solution, it is useful to inventory the
factors that may be causally related to the problem. When we narrow those to
the ones that actually can be addressed (as opposed to those that are, for
example, force majeure), they often relate to the lack of an adequate design,
the lack of definition in how to carry out a function or process, a lack of
skill, an absence of, or contrary motivation or valuing behavior, and/or a
shortage of material or financial resources.

The actual factors related to a problem can   often suggest the
appropriateness, or inappropriateness, or a   particular approach. A
consultant, or training, may not do much to   address a shortage of financial
resources or an affective problem that lies   outside the sphere of project
influence.

A solution strategy generally focuses on aligning those factors that support
achievement of the solution and minimizing or eliminating those that
represent obstacles. Another way of looking at it would be to look at a
systematic problem-solving approach:




                                   Page 82
You begin with a statement of the problem – easier said than done. Let’s say
the problem is: HIV/AIDS is threatening the financial viability of Kenyan
credit unions. The solution (as opposed to the solution strategy) would be
that HIV/AIDS is not a threat to the financial viability of Kenyan credit
unions. You would then do as careful and detailed an analysis of the factors
that promote achievement of the solution (literacy rates, financial
resources, availability of educational materials, availability of counseling
services, etc.) and inhibiting factors that are obstacles to the solution
(board/management lack of interest, lack of skill in the design of effective
educational programs, membership located throughout several provinces, etc.
Based on this you would design a solution strategy that took maximum
advantage of promoting factors and attempted to eliminate or minimize the
effect of inhibiting factors. You implement/test the strategy and assess the
results. If the strategy produced the result, i.e. HIV/AIDS was no longer a
threat to the financial viability of Kenyan credit unions, you could
extrapolate from the strategy the principles that underlay its success and
say that the Kenya experience suggests that if x, y and z are followed, then
the likelihood of success is enhanced. If, however, you failed to achieve
the result, then you would go back and analyze the cycle: did we correctly


                                  Page 83
identify the problem; was our analysis of promoting and inhibiting factors
accurate; did our strategy correctly reflect what we knew about promoting and
inhibiting factors and how to maximize/minimize them. Documentation of this
process helps us to better understand the processes that work and don’t work
and the principles (not practices) that underlie those processes.




                                   Page 84
                                                                       Annex F1

                       Measurable Outcome Statements

Precision in statement of outcomes is important to program design,
management, monitoring and ultimate evaluation. As Yogi Berra once said, “If
you don’t know where you are going, you will wind up somewhere else.” It is
equally true that if you don’t know where you’re going, you may not even know
if you get there.

There are two parts to a good outcome statement: first it is measurable;
second, it describes a significant end result, not an intermediate step or an
activity performed in order to reach an end result.

A central element in writing outcomes is to prepare them in a way that is
subject to measurement. What does that mean? If means that not only the
author of the outcome statement, but any objective observer – board member,
staff, evaluator – will be able to recognize whether the objective has or has
not been achieved. The following chart contrasts measurable with other
outcome statements:

Not Measurable                            Measurable
The insurance program will be             By the end of the project, coverage
strengthened.                             will extend to 55,000 households,
                                          premium income will exceed $4.5
                                          million, claims will be settled within
                                          an average of 40 days, net income will
                                          equal 7.2% of premium income.
The numbers of farmers receiving          Twenty-thousand farmer members will
adequate credit will expand.              receive pre-planting finance equal to
                                          an average of 80 percent of total
                                          fertilizer, seed and agricultural
                                          chemical costs.
Microfinance will be extended to an       Numbers of eligible borrowers
additional 20 percent.                    receiving loans will increase from
                                          40,000 to 48,000.
Participating health cooperatives will    Health cooperative membership will
improve their services to members.        benefit from:
                                             80 percent of members will
                                              receive smallpox vaccinations
                                             90 percent of member children
                                              between the ages of 2 and 15 will
                                              receive polio vaccinations
                                             Clinic waiting time will be
                                              reduced from 1 hour 40 minutes to
                                              25 minutes
                                             Repeat visits for the same
                                              complaint will be reduced from 47
                                              percent of first visits to 22
                                              percent.
Cooperative governance will be            By the end of the project:
strengthened.                                Member participation in annual
                                              meetings and elections will
                                              increase to 80 percent of those
                                              eligible.
                                             Elected board members will meet




                                      Page 85
                                           by-law eligibility requirements.
                                          Review of board meeting minutes
                                           will confirm that given a choice
                                           between a management decision and
                                           a policy decision, the board will
                                           take policy decisions >70 percent
                                           of the time.
Corruption will be reduced.            Independent audits will confirm that
                                       cooperative funds have been used in
                                       accordance with law, regulation and
                                       bylaws and that any exceptions have
                                       been prosecuted.
Board members and senior staff will    Review of board agendas and minutes
receive training in board-management   will confirm that board decisions have
roles and responsibilities.            consistently reflected policy
                                       decisions, strategic planning and/or
                                       member outreach, and that there have
                                       been no instances of board taking
                                       management decisions.

Very often “outcome” statements describe activities that are necessary to
achieve an important result – but are not that result. Training, workshops,
technical assistance, and the like are not ends in themselves. They are
means to an end. In preparing outcome statements it is important to always
ask the question whether the result is an end, or a step toward that end. If
we write a statement that 5,000 women entrepreneurs will be trained, we must
ask the question, “Why are we training them? What will they be able to do at
the end of the training? Is those skills and values ends in themselves, or
do they contribute to some other end?” While there is nothing wrong about
identifying steps toward an end, it is wrong to mistake those steps for ends.




                                   Page 86
                                                                      Annex F2

                      Standard and Custom Indicators

The U.S. Agency for International Development employs the Foreign Assistance
Coordination and Tracking System (FACTS)for Operational Planning and
Reporting. Central elements in FACTS are a sector-centered taxonomy and
standardized indicators that are used as objectives and the focal-point of
reporting.

Please note that each award recipient will be expected to select appropriate
standardized indicators and/or custom indicators, establish targets for the
full performance period as well as each annual increment, prepare both a pre-
implementation baseline as well as report annual achievements.

The Cooperative Development Program is largely focused on the following major
Program Areas, Elements and Sub-Elements:

  2.0    Governing Justly and Democratically

     2.4     Civil Society

         2.4.1 Civic Participation

  3.0    Investing in People

      3.1    Health 

         3.1.5 Other Public Health Threats 

         3.1.8 Water Supply and Sanitation

  4.0    Economic Growth 

      4.2    Trade and Investment 

          4.2.2 Trade and Investment Capacity

      4.3    Financial Sector 

          4.3.1 Financial Sector Enabling Environment

          4.3.2 Financial Sector Capacity

      4.4    Infrastructure 

          4.4.1 Modern Energy Services

          4.4.2 Communications Services 

      4.5    Agriculture

          4.5.1 Agriculture Sector Capacity

      4.6    Private Sector Competitiveness

          4.6.1 Business Enabling Environment

          4.6.2 Private Sector Capacity

      4.7    Economic Opportunity

          4.7.1 Inclusive Financial Markets 

          4.7.2 Policy Environment for Micro and Small Enterprises

          4.7.3 Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity 


You will find below the relevant standardized indicators for these Program
Elements.



2.4.1.A Number of Civil Society Organizations using USG

Assistance to Improve Internal Organizational Capacity 


2.4.1.B Number of Civil Society Organizations using USG

Assistance to Promote Political Participation 


2.4.1.C Number of CSO Advocacy Campaigns Supported by USG 




                                   Page 87
2.4.1.D Number of independent and democratic trade/labor

unions supported by USG to promote international core labor

standards 


2.4.1.E Number of participants in USG-funded programs

supporting participation and inclusion of traditionally

marginalized ethnic minority and/or religious minority groups 


2.4.1.E-a Number of men 


2.4.1.E-b Number of women 


2.4.1.F Number of People who Have Completed USG Assisted Civic

Education Programs 


2.4.1.F-a Number of men 


2.4.1.F-b Number of women 


2.4.1.G Number of policies that have been influenced by CSOs 


2.4.1.H Number of positive modifications to enabling

legislation/ regulation for civil society accomplished with

USG assistance 


2.4.1.I Number of USG Assisted Civil Society Organizations

that engage in advocacy and watchdog functions 


3.1.5.A Assessment of USG-assisted clinic facilities’ 

compliance with clinical standards 


3.1.5.B Number of baseline or feasibility studies 


3.1.5.C Number of beneficiaries of USG-funded service-oriented 

programs to reduce non-communicable diseases 


3.1.5.C-a number of men 


3.1.5.C-b number of women 


3.1.5.D Number of evaluations 


3.1.5.D-a impact 


3.1.5.D-b other 


3.1.5.D-c process 


3.1.5.D-d results 


3.1.5.E Number of improvements to laws, policies, regulations

or guidelines related to improve access to and use of health 




                                   Page 88
services drafted with USG support

3.1.5.F Number of information gathering or research activities 


3.1.5.G Number of instances of interventions being introduced

or expanded in countries (functional/pillar bureau use only) 


3.1.5.H Number of institutions that have used USG-Assisted MIS 

System Information to inform administrative/management

decisions 


3.1.5.I Number of institutions with improved Management

Information Systems, as a result of USG Assistance 


3.1.5.K Number of medical and para-medical practitioners

trained in evidence-based clinical guidelines 


3.1.5.L Number of missions accessing centrally-designed or

managed mechanisms using their own funding 


3.1.5.M Number of monitoring plans 


3.1.5.N Number of people covered by USG-supported health

financing arrangements 


3.1.5.O Number of people trained in monitoring and evaluation 


3.1.5.P Number of people trained in other strategic

information management 


3.1.5.Q Number of people trained in research with USG

assistance 


3.1.5.R Number of people who receive medication or other

services from USG-funded programs to control and reduce

neglected tropical diseases 


3.1.5.S Number of Sector Assessments 


3.1.5.S-a gender 


3.1.5.T Number of special studies 


3.1.5.U Number of technologies under development 


3.1.5.V Number of USG-assisted service delivery points

experiencing stock-outs of specific tracer drugs 


3.1.5.W Person-days of technical support provided to Missions

through TDYs 


3.1.5.X Ratio of mission funding to core funding in centrally­



                                      Page 89
managed mechanisms designed to support the field

3.1.5.Y USG-assisted facilities’ provider staff with a written

performance appraisal 


3.1.5.Z Value of pharmaceuticals and health commodities

purchased by USG-assisted governmental entities through

competitive tenders 


.1.8.A Amount of Private Financing Mobilized with a DCA

Guarantee 


3.1.8.B Number of baseline or feasibility studies 


3.1.8.C Number of evaluations 


3.1.8.C-a results 


3.1.8.D Number of hours per day that households in areas

assisted by USG programs have potable water services 


3.1.8.E Number of information gathering or research activities 


3.1.8.F Number of instances of interventions being introduced

or expanded in countries (functional/pillar bureau use only) 


3.1.8.G Number of institutions that have used USG-Assisted MIS 

System Information to inform administrative/management

decisions 


3.1.8.H Number of institutions with improved Management

Information Systems, as a result of USG Assistance 


3.1.8.J Number of missions accessing centrally-designed or

managed mechanisms using their own funding 


3.1.8.K Number of monitoring plans 


3.1.8.L Number of people in target areas with access to

improved drinking water supply as a result of USG assistance 


3.1.8.L-a number of men 


3.1.8.L-b number of women 


3.1.8.M Number of people in target areas with access to

improved sanitation facilities as a result of USG assistance 


3.1.8.M-a number of men 


3.1.8.M-b number of women 





                                   Page 90
3.1.8.N Number of people trained in monitoring and evaluation 


3.1.8.O Number of people trained in other strategic

information management 


3.1.8.P Number of people trained in research with USG

assistance 


3.1.8.Q Number of Sector Assessments 


3.1.8.Q-a environmental 


3.1.8.R Number of special studies 


3.1.8.S Number of technologies under development 


3.1.8.T Percent of operations and maintenance costs for water

supply and sanitation services covered through customer

charges in USG-assisted target areas 


3.1.8.U Person-days of technical support provided to Missions

through TDYs 


3.1.8.V Ratio of mission funding to core funding in centrally-

managed mechanisms designed to support the field 


4.2.2.A Amount of Private Financing Mobilized with a DCA

Guarantee 


4.2.2.B Number of Capacity-Building Service Providers

receiving USG assistance 


4.2.2.C Number of firms receiving capacity building assistance

to export 


4.2.2.D Number of firms receiving USG assistance that obtain

certification with international quality control,

environmental and other process voluntary standards or

regulations 


4.2.2.E Number of participants in USG supported trade and

investment capacity building trainings 


4.2.2.E-a Number of men 


4.2.2.E-b Number of women 


4.2.2.F Number of Trade and Investment capacity building

diagnostics conducted 


4.2.2.G Number of trade-related business associations that are 

at least 50 percent self-funded as a result of USG assistance 




                                      Page 91
4.2.2.H Number of USG supported training events on topics

related to investment capacity building and improving trade 


4.3.1.A Has an automated off-site surveillance system been

installed and made operational this year with USG assistance 


4.3.1.B Has the country adopted any new International

Accounting Standards this year with USG assistance 


4.3.1.C Number of analysts trained in off-site surveillance

with USG assistance 


4.3.1.C-a Number of men 


4.3.1.C-b Number of women 


4.3.1.D Number of financial professionals certified in

compliance with international accounting standards as a result

of USG assistance 


4.3.1.E Number of financial sector supervisors trained with

USG assistance 


4.3.1.E-a Number of men 


4.3.1.E-b Number of women 


4.3.1.F Number of financial sector training and/or

certification programs established or supported that meet

international standards 


4.3.1.G Number of institutions with improved Management

Information Systems, as a result of USG Assistance 


4.3.1.H Number of Internationally recognized Financial Sector

Standards adopted as a result of USG assistance 


4.3.1.I Number of on-site examinations undertaken this year with USG

assistance 


4.3.2.A Number of financial sector professionals trained on

international standards this year with USG assistance 


4.3.2.A-a Number of men 


4.3.2.A-b Number of women 


4.3.2.B Number of material improvements in the infrastructure

institutions that reduce market risks made this year with USG

assistance 


4.3.2.C Number of USG supported special funds loans issued 




                                   Page 92
this year

4.3.2.D Value of the USG supported special funds loans issued

this year 


4.4.1.A Capacity constructed or rehabilitated as a result of

USG assistance 


4.4.1.B Energy saved as a result of USG assistance 


4.4.1.C Legal separation of generation, transmission and

distribution functions in the electricity sector established

this year with USG assistance 


4.4.1.D Number of energy agencies, regulatory bodies,

utilities and civil society organizations undertaking capacity

assessments as a result of USG assistance 


4.4.1.E Number of energy agencies, regulatory bodies,

utilities and civil society organizations undertaking capacity

strengthening as a result of USG assistance 


4.4.1.F Number of energy companies prepared and offered for

privatization as a result of USG assistance 


4.4.1.G Number of energy enterprises with improved business

operations as a result of USG assistance 


4.4.1.H Number of people receiving USG supported training in

energy related business management systems 


4.4.1.H-a Number of men 


4.4.1.H-b Number of women 


4.4.1.I Number of people receiving USG supported training in

energy related policy and regulatory practices 


4.4.1.I-a Number of men 


4.4.1.I-b Number of women 


4.4.1.J Number of people receiving USG supported training in

technical energy fields 


4.4.1.J-a Number of men 


4.4.1.J-b Number of women 


4.4.1.K Number of people with increased access to modern

energy services as a result of USG assistance 





                                   Page 93
4.4.1.L Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures analyzed to enhance sector governance and/or
facilitate private sector participation and competitive
markets as a result of USG assistance

4.4.1.M Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures drafted and presented for public/stakeholder
consultation to enhance sector governance and/or facilitate
private sector participation and competitive markets as a
result of USG assistance

4.4.1.N Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures for which implementation has begun to enhance
sector governance and/or facilitate private sector
participation and competitive markets as a result of USG
assistance

4.4.1.O Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures passed/approved to enhance sector governance and/or
facilitate private sector participation and competitive
markets as a result of USG assistance

4.4.1.P Number of utilities with improved billing and
collection systems as a result of USG assistance

4.4.1.Q Quantity of greenhouse gas emissions, measured in
metric tons CO2 equivalent, reduced or sequestered as a result
of USG assistance in energy, industry, urban, and/or transport
sectors.

4.4.1.R Total public and private dollars leveraged by USG for
energy infrastructure projects

4.4.2.A Average decrease in cost to final customer receiving
cellular service after USG assistance

4.4.2.B Average decrease in cost to final customer receiving
internet service after USG assistance

4.4.2.C Number of people with access to cellular service as a
result of USG assistance

4.4.2.D Number of people with access to internet service as a
result of USG assistance

4.4.2.E Number of policy reforms /regulations/administrative
procedures drafted and presented for public/stakeholder
consultation as a result of USG assistance

4.4.2.F Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures analyzed to enhance sector governance and/or
facilitate private sector participation and competitive
markets




                                  Page 94
4.4.2.G Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures for which implementation has begun to enhance
sector governance and/or facilitate private sector
participation and competitive markets

4.4.2.H Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures passed/approved to enhance sector governance and/or
facilitate private sector participation and competitive
markets

4.4.2.I Number of policy reforms/regulations/administrative
procedures presented for legislation/decree as a result of USG
assistance

4.4.2.J Number of private sector internet service providers
established as a result of USG assistance

4.4.2.K Number of public institutions with access to
telecommunication services as a result of USG assistance

4.4.2.L Number of telecommunications agencies, regulatory
bodies and utilities undergoing capacity assessments as a
result of USG assistance

4.4.2.M Number of telecommunications agencies, regulatory
bodies and utilities undertaking capacity strengthening as a
result of USG assistance

4.4.2.N Number of telecommunications utilities prepared and
offered for privatization as a result of USG assistance

4.4.2.O Total Public and private dollars leveraged by USG for
communication infrastructure projects

4.5.2.A Amount of Private Financing Mobilized with a DCA
Guarantee

4.5.2.B Number of additional hectares under improved
technologies or management practices as a result of USG
assistance

4.5.2.C Number of additional surveillance and/or control
systems in place for agricultural threats (biological and
environmental) as a result of USG assistance

4.5.2.D Number of agriculture-related firms benefiting
directly from USG supported interventions

4.5.2.E Number of farmers, processors, and others who have
adopted new technologies or management practices as a result
of USG assistance

4.5.2.F Number of individuals who have received USG supported



                                  Page 95
long term agricultural sector productivity training

4.5.2.F-a Number of men

4.5.2.F-b Number of women

4.5.2.G Number of individuals who have received USG supported
short term agricultural sector productivity training

4.5.2.G-a Number of men

4.5.2.G-b Number of women

4.5.2.H Number of new technologies or management practices
made available for transfer as a result of USG assistance

4.5.2.I Number of new technologies or management practices
under field testing as a result of USG assistance

4.5.2.J Number of new technologies or management practices
under research as a result of USG assistance

4.5.2.K Number of producers organizations, water users
associations, trade and business associations, and community-
based organizations (CBOs) receiving USG assistance

4.5.2.L Number of public-private partnerships formed as a
result of USG assistance

4.5.2.M Number of rural households benefiting directly from
USG interventions

4.5.2.N Number of vulnerable households benefiting directly
from USG assistance

4.5.2.O Number of women’s organizations/associations assisted
as a result of USG interventions

4.5.2.P Number of women’s organizations/associations assisted
as a result of USG supported interventions

4.5.2.Q Percent change in value of international exports of
targeted agricultural commodities as a result of USG
assistance

4.5.2.R Percent change in value of intra-regional exports of
targeted agricultural commodities as a result of USG
assistance

4.5.2.S Percent change in value of purchases from smallholders
of targeted commodities




                                  Page 96
4.5.2.T Percent change in value of purchases from smallholders
of targeted commodities as a result of USG assistance

4.6.1.A Number of alternative dispute resolution mechanisms
put in place as a result of USG assistance

4.6.1.B Number of institutions/organization assessments
presented for consultation as a result of USG assistance

4.6.1.C Number of institutions/organizations mature/viable in
the competency areas strengthened as a result of USG
assistance

4.6.1.D Number of institutions/organizations undergoing
capacity/competency assessments as a result of USG assistance

4.6.1.E Number of institutions/organizations undertaking
capacity/competency strengthening as a result of USG
assistance

4.6.1.F Number of international labor organization conventions
ratified as a result of USG support

4.6.1.G Number of municipalities receiving USG assistance with
regulatory/ administrative simplification

4.6.1.H Number of the 11 core commercial laws analyzed as a
result of USG assistance

4.6.1.I Number of the 11 core commercial laws drafted and
presented for public/stakeholder consultation as a result of
USG assistance

4.6.1.J Number of the 11 core commercial laws passed for which
implementation has begun with USG assistance

4.6.1.K Number of the 11 core commercial laws prepared with
USG assistance passed/approved

4.6.1.L Number of the 11 core commercial laws presented for
legislation/decree as a result of USG assistance

4.6.2.A Amount of Private Financing Mobilized with a DCA
Guarantee

4.6.2.B Number of business associations and trade unions that
are at least 50 percent self-funded as a result of USG
assistance

4.6.2.C Number of firms receiving USG assistance to improve
their management practices




                                  Page 97
4.6.2.D Number of firms receiving USG assistance to invest in
improved technologies

4.6.2.E Number of new members in private business associations
as a result of USG assistance

4.6.2.F Number of public-private dialogue mechanisms utilized
as a result of USG assistance

4.6.2.G Number of SMEs receiving USG assistance to access bank
loans or private equity

4.6.2.H Number of SMEs that successfully accessed bank loans
or private equity as a result of USG assistance

4.7.1.A Amount of Private Financing Mobilized with a DCA
Guarantee

4.7.1.B Number of borrowers from USG-assisted microfinance
institutions

4.7.1.B-a number of men

4.7.1.B-b number of women

4.7.1.C Number of clients at USG-assisted microfinance
institutions

4.7.1.D Number of Depositors at USG-Assisted Microfinance
institutions

4.7.1.E Number of microfinance institutions supported by USG
financial or technical assistance

4.7.1.F Percent of portfolio outstanding of USG assisted
microfinance institutions held as poverty loans

4.7.1.G Percent of USG-assisted microfinance institutions that
have reached financial sustainability

4.7.1.H Percent of USG-assisted microfinance institutions that
have reached operational sustainability

4.7.1.I Total savings deposits held by USG-assisted
microfinance institutions

4.7.1.J Value Of Portfolio Outstanding Of USG Assisted
Microfinance activities Held As Poverty Loans

4.7.2.A Number of improvements in laws and regulations
affecting the access of poor households to financial services
drafted with USG assistance




                                  Page 98
4.7.2.B Number of improvements in laws and regulations
affecting the access of poor households to financial services
enacted with USG assistance

4.7.2.C Number of improvements in laws and regulations
affecting the operations of micro enterprises enacted with USG
assistance

4.7.2.D Number of improvements in laws and regulations
affecting the registration of micro enterprises enacted with
USG assistance

4.7.2.E Number of procedures required to register a firm

4.7.2.F Number of proposed improvements in laws and
regulations affecting the operations of micro enterprises
drafted with USG assistance

4.7.2.G Number of proposed improvements in laws and
regulations affecting the registration of micro enterprises
drafted with USG assistance

4.7.3.A Amount of Private Financing Mobilized with a DCA
Guarantee

4.7.3.B Number of micro enterprise linked to larger-scale
firms as a result of USG assistance to the value chain

4.7.3.C Number of micro enterprises participating in USG
assisted value chains

4.7.3.D Number of micro enterprises receiving business
development services from USG assisted sources

4.7.3.E Total number of micro enterprises receiving finance
from participating firms in a USG assisted value chain


Applicants are encouraged to develop their own custom indicators that
uniquely reflect the nature of the cooperative enterprise, its role in the
sector/s involved and the Metrics of measuring cooperative success.




                                   Page 99
                                                                       Annex G

                                   Work Plan

A “work plan” should clearly display critical activities and/or events drawn
from the project strategy and the approximate sequence in which they are
started and completed. The plan should be consistent with the strategy that
is outlined in the text as well as with the planning matrix. Where there is
a relationship between activities (for example when completion of one is
necessary to initiation of – or even the decision to initiate – another) that
relationship should be clear. Where one activity can lead to a decision to
pursue two or more alternatives that, too, should be clearly depicted.

The work plan should be presented in a way that will allow the project
manager, project participants and interested bystanders to track significant
progress over time.

There is an extensive   literature on work plans describing variations on
GANTT, PERT, Critical   Path and similar approaches to displaying sequences of
activities leading to   specific results. There are also a variety of software
programs available to   assist in project planning, most of which include
visual displays.




                                    Page 100
                                                                          ANNEX H

ODP/PVC PRIORITY COUNTRY LIST



           Africa              Asia and Near East        Latin America/
                                                         Caribbean
     Sudan                     Mongolia                  Haiti
     Democratic Republic       Timor L’este              Colombia
     of the Congo
     Ethiopia                  Vietnam
     Kenya                     Yemen
     Liberia                   Sri Lanka
     South Africa              Bangladesh
     Nigeria
     Zimbabwe
**   Somalia


*NOTE: This list of Priority countries is subject to change without prior
notice.




                                   Page 101
                                                                                                        ANNEX I

USAID MISSION ADDRESSES

ODP Priority Countries
USAID/Indonesia                      USAID/Bangladesh                   USAID/Egypt
Mission Director: Walter             Mission Director: Denise           Mission Director: Hilda
North                                Rollins                            Arellano
Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan            Madani Avenue                      1A Ahmed Kamel Street
No. 3-5                              Baridhara                          off El-Laselki Street
Jakarta, Indonesia 10110             Dhaka, Bangladesh 1212             New Maadi
Phone: (011-62-21) 3435­             Phone: (880-2) 885-5500            Cairo, Egypt 11435
9000                                 FAX: (880-2) 882-3648              Phone: (2-02) 2-522-7000
FAX:                                 Email: derollins@usaid.gov         FAX: (2-02) 2-516-4628
Email: wnorth@usaid.gov              Program Officer: Julie Chen        Email: harellano@usaid.gov
Program Officer: Chris               Email: jchen@usaid.gov             Program Officer:
Edwards                              Acting Desk Officer: Carrie        Email:
Email: chedwards@usaid.gov           Mitchell                           Desk Officer: William Riley
Desk Officer: Stephen Solat          Phone: 202-712-1537                Phone: (202) 712-5815
Phone: 202-712-1002                  Email: camitchell@usaid.gov        Email: wriley@usaid.gov
Email: ssolat@usaid.gov

USAID/Morocco                        USAID/Iraq                         USAID/Sudan 13
Mission Director: John               Mission Director:                  Mission Director: William
Groarke                              Christopher Crowley                Hammink
10 Avenue Mehdi                      Iraq APO AE 09316                  c/o US Embassy
Ben Barka                            Washington, D C                    Khartoum, Sudan
Souissi                              Phone: 202-216-6289                Phone: 249 1557 704 76
Rabat, Morocco                       FAX:                               FAX:
Phone: (212)537-63-20-01             Email: ccrowley@usaid.gov          Email: whammink@usaid.gov
FAX: (212)537-63-20-13               Program Officer: Erin              Program Officer (Juba):
Email: jgroarke@usaid.gov            Holleran                           Marc Douglas
Supervisory Program Officer:         Email: eholleran@usaid.gov         Email: madouglas@usaid.gov
Ramona El Hamzaoui                   Special Assistant: George          Desk Officer (Temporary):
Email: relhamzaoui@usaid.gov         Laudato                            Andrea Freeman
Desk Officer: Sonia Davis-           Phone: 202-712-0300                Phone: 202-712-5509
Clemons                              Email: glaudato@usaid.gov          Email: afreeman@usaid.gov
Phone: (202) 712-5819
Email: sdavis­
clemons@usaid.gov

USAID/Afghanistan                    USAID/Uzbekistan                   USAID/Yemen
Mission Director: William            Mission Director: Andrew           Mission Director: Dr.
Frej                                 Sisson                             Jeffrey Ashley
U.S. Embassy Cafe Compound           3 Moyorqorghon St, 5th Block       USAID/Yemen
Great Masood Road                    Yunusobod District                 6330 Sanaa Place
Kabul, Afghanistan                   Tashkent, Uzbekistan 700093        Washington, DC 20521-6330
Phone: (00 93) (20) 230­             Phone: 998-71-120-63-09            Phone: 967-1-755-2197
0436                                 FAX:                               FAX:
FAX: (00 93) (20) 230-1364           Email: jbonner@usaid.gov           Email: ashleyjw@state.gov
Email: wfrej@usaid.gov               Program Officer: James             Program Management Advisor:
Email:                               Bonner                             Bonnie Krajewski
Phone:                               Email: jbonner@usaid.gov           Email: krajeskiBP@state.gov
Email:                               Central Asia Team Leader:          Desk Officer: Christopher
                                     Bob Wallin                         Kisco
                                     Phone: 202-712-0141                Phone: (202) 712-1027
                                     Email: bowallin@usaid.gov          Email: ckisco@usaid.gov




13
     Emphasis is on the Government of Southern Sudan. Please note that the status may change in 2011.


                                                   Page 102
USAID/Niger                   USAID/Mali                     USAID/Senegal
Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Alexander    Mission Director: Kevin
Henderson                     Newton                         Mulally
USAID/West Africa             Immeuble Dotembougou           Petit Ngor
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   Rue Raymond Poincarré & rue    B.P. 49
PO Box 1630                   319                            Dakar, Senegal
Accra, Ghana                  Quartier du Fleuve             Phone: 221-869-61-00
Phone:                        Bamako, Mali                   FAX: 221-869-61-01
FAX:                          Phone: 223 222 36 02           Email: kmulally@usaid.gov
Email:                        FAX: 223 222 39 33             DLI Program Officer: Brandy
Email:                        Email: anewton@usaid.gov       Witthoft
Acting Desk Officer: Karen    Economic Growth Team Leader:   Email: bwitthoft@usaid.gov
Towers                        Jean Harman                    Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski
Phone: 202-712-4547           Email: jharman@usaid.gov       Phone: 202-712-5532
Email: ktowers@usaid.gov      Acting Desk Officer: Karen     Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov
                              Towers
                              Phone: 202-712-4547
                              Email: ktowers@usaid.gov

USAID/Burkino Faso            USAID/Somalia                  USAID/Central Asia Regional
Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Lawrence     Mission Director: Andrew
Henderson                     Meserve                        Sisson
USAID/West Africa             REDSO East Africa              Park Palace Building
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   PO Box 629 Village Market      41 Kazibek Bi, Street
PO Box 1630                   00621                          Almaty, Kazakhstan 050100
Accra, Ghana                  Village Market 00621           Phone: 7 (327)250-76-12
Phone:                        Nairobi, Kenya                 FAX: 7 (327)250-76-35
FAX:                          Phone: 254-20-862 2000         Email: asisson@usaid.gov
Email:                        FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Program Officer
Email:                        Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      (Kazakhstan): John Morgan
Acting Desk Officer: Karen    Somalia Program Manager:       Email: jmorgan@usaid.gov
Towers                        Maura Barry                    Central Asia Team Leader:
Phone: 202-712-4547           Email: mabarry@usaid.gov       Bob Wallin
Email: ktowers@usaid.gov      Desk Officer: Julie            Phone: 202-712-0141
                              Ciccarone                      Email: bowallin@usaid.gov
                              Phone: 202-712-1626
                              Email: jciccarone@usaid.gov

USAID/Kazakhstan              USAID/Guinea                   USAID/Chad
Mission Director: Erin        Mission Director: Glenn        Mission Director: Patrick
McKee, Deputy Mission         Slocum (Acting)                Henderson
Director                      US Embassy                     USAID/West Africa
Park Palace Building          Quartier Cameroun, Corniche    E. 45/3 Independence Avenue
41 Kazibek Bi, Street         Nord                           PO Box 1630
Almaty, Kazakhstan 050100     B.P. 603                       Accra, Ghana
Phone: 7 (327)250-76-12       Conakry, Guinea                Phone:
FAX: 7 (327)250-76-35         Phone: 224-3046-8715           FAX:
Email: emckee@usaid.gov       FAX: 224-3046-8714             Email:
Program Officer               Email: gslocum@usaid.gov       Email:
(Kazakhstan): John Morgan     Program Officer: Laura E.      Desk Officer: Chad Weinberg
Email: jmorgan@usaid.gov      Coughlin                       Phone: 202-712-0511
Central Asia Team Leader:     Email: lcoughlin@usaid.gov     Email: cweinberg@usaid.gov
Bob Wallin                    Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski
Phone: 202-712-0141           Phone: 202-712-5532
Email: bowallin@usaid.gov     Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov




                                          Page 103
USAID/Jordan                  USAID/Tajikistan              USAID/Kyrgzstan
Mission Director: Jay Knott   Mission Director: Andrew      Mission Director: Andrew
c/o American Embassy          Sisson                        Sisson
PO Box 354                    USAID                         USAID
Amman, Jordan                 109 “A” Ismoili Somoni Ave    c/o US Embassy
Phone: 962-6-590-6000         Dushanbe, Tajikistan 734019   171 Prospect Mira
FAX:                          Phone: 10-922-372-229-2000    Bishkek, Kyrgzstan 720016
Email: jknott@usaid.gov       FAX:                          Phone: (996-312) 551-241
Program Officer: Kathryn      Email: jlehrer@usaid.gov      FAX: (996-312) 551-264
Stevens                       Program Officer: Jeffrey      Email: pshapiro@usaid.gov
Email: kstevens@usaid.gov     Lehrer                        Program Officer: Pat
Desk Officer: Margaret Dula   Email: jlehrer@usaid.gov      Shapiro
Phone: (202) 712-1533         Central Asia Team Leader:     Email: pshapiro@usaid.gov
Email: mdula@usaid.gov        Bob Wallin                    Central Asia Team Leader:
                              Phone: 202-712-0141           Bob Wallin
                              Email: bowallin@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-0141
                                                            Email: bowallin@usaid.gov

USAID/Gambia                  USAID/Djibouti                USAID/Comoros
Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Lawrence    Mission Director: Lawrence
Henderson                     Meserve                       Meserve
USAID/West Africa             REDSO East Africa             REDSO East Africa
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   PO Box 629 Village Market     PO Box 629 Village Market
PO Box 1630                   00621                         00621
Accra, Ghana                  Village Market 00621          Village Market 00621
Phone: 233-21-228440          Nairobi, Kenya                Nairobi, Kenya
FAX: 233-21-770101            Phone: 254-20-862 2000        Phone: 254-20-862 2000
Email: phenderson@usaid.gov   FAX: 254-20-862 2680          FAX: 254-20-862 2680
NEP Program Officer: Taisha   Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov     Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov
Jones                         USAID Resident                Email:
Email: tajones@usaid.gov      Representative: Stephanie     Desk Officer: Ashley Marcus
Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski   Funk                          Phone: 202-712-5513
Phone: 202-712-5532           Email: sfunk@usaid.gov        Email: amarcus@usaid.gov
Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov     Desk Officer: Tanya Dalton
                              Phone: 202-712-4732
                              Email: tdalton@usaid.gov

USAID/Middle East Regional    USAID/West Bank-Gaza
Office                        Mission Director: Howard
Mission Director: Kim         Sumka
Delaney                       US Embassy
1A Ahmed Kamel Street         71 HaYarkon Street
off El-Laselki Street         Tel Aviv, Israel 63903
New Maadi                     Phone: 972-3-511-4855
Cairo, Egypt                  FAX: 972-3-511-4888
Phone: 20-2-2522-6846         Email: hsumka@usaid.gov
FAX:                          Program Officer: Kimberlee
Email: kdelaney@usaid.gov     Bell
Email:                        Email: kbell@usaid.gov
Acting Desk Officer:          Desk Officer: Sara Borodin
Christopher Kisco             Phone: (202) 712-4836
Phone: (202) 712-1027         Email: sborodin@usaid.gov
Email: ckisco@usaid.gov




                                          Page 104
AFRICA Bureau
USAID/Angola                   USAID/Benin                    USAID/Botswana
Mission Director: Randall      Mission Director: Kevin        Mission Director: Carleene
Peterson                       Armstrong                      Dei
Rua Houari Boumedienne, No.    Ambassade Américaine           USAID/Southern Africa
31                             01 B.P. 2012                   Mission
Miramar                        Cotonou, République du Bénin   PO Box 43
Luanda, Angola                 Phone: (229) 21-30-05-00       Pretoria, South Africa 0027
Phone: +244 222 641 000        FAX: (229) 21-30-12-60         Phone: 27-012-452-2000
FAX: +244 222 641 262          Email: karmstrong@usaid.gov    FAX: 27-012-452-2399
Email: sbrems@usaid.gov        Program Officer: Kitty         Email: cdei@usaid.gov
General Development Officer:   Andang                         Supervisory Program Officer:
Vic Duarte                     Email: kandang@usaid.gov       Anthony Vodraska
Email: viduarte@usaid.gov      Desk Officer: Dana Alzouma     Email: avodraska@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Ian MacNairn     Phone: 202-712-0432            Desk Officer: Elizabeth
Phone: 202-712-5051            Email: dalzouma@usaid.gov      Pleuss
Email: imacnairn@usaid.gov                                    Phone: 202-712-5193
                                                              Email: epleuss@usaid.gov

USAID/Burkino Faso             USAID/Burundi                  USAID/Cameroon
Mission Director: Patrick      Mission Director: Lawrence     Mission Director: Patrick
Henderson                      Meserve                        Henderson
USAID/West Africa              REDSO East Africa              USAID/West Africa
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue    PO Box 629 Village Market      E. 45/3 Independence Avenue
PO Box 1630                    00621                          PO Box 1630
Accra, Ghana                   Village Market 00621           Accra, Ghana
Phone:                         Nairobi, Kenya                 Phone:
FAX:                           Phone: 254-20-862 2000         FAX:
Email:                         FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Email:
Email:                         Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      Email:
Acting Desk Officer: Karen     Burundi Program Manager:       Desk Officer: Chad Weinberg
Towers                         Stephanie Lazar                Phone: 202-712-0511
Phone: 202-712-4547            Email: slazar@usaid.gov        Email: cweinberg@usaid.gov
Email: ktowers@usaid.gov       Desk Officer: Brian Stout
                               Phone: 202-712-1387
                               Email: bstout@usaid.gov

USAID/Cape Verde               USAID/Central African          USAID/Chad
Mission Director: Patrick      Republic                       Mission Director: Patrick
Henderson                      Mission Director: Lawrence     Henderson
USAID/West Africa              Meserve                        USAID/West Africa
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue    REDSO East Africa              E. 45/3 Independence Avenue
PO Box 1630                    PO Box 629 Village Market      PO Box 1630
Accra, Ghana                   00621                          Accra, Ghana
Phone:                         Village Market 00621           Phone:
FAX:                           Nairobi, Kenya                 FAX:
Email:                         Phone: 254-20-862 2000         Email:
Email:                         FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Email:
Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski    Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      Desk Officer: Chad Weinberg
Phone: 202-712-5532            Email:                         Phone: 202-712-0511
Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov      Desk Officer: Brian Stout      Email: cweinberg@usaid.gov
                               Phone: 202-712-1387
                               Email: bstout@usaid.gov

USAID/Comoros                  USAID/Cote d'Ivoire            USAID/Democratic Republic of
Mission Director: Lawrence     Mission Director: Patrick      the Congo`
Meserve                        Henderson                      Mission Director: Steven
REDSO East Africa              USAID/West Africa              Haykin
PO Box 629 Village Market      E. 45/3 Independence Avenue    198 Isiro Avenue
00621                          PO Box 1630                    Kinshasa/Gombe, Democratic
Village Market 00621           Accra, Ghana                   Republic of Congo
Nairobi, Kenya                 Phone:                         Phone: 243-81-700-5701
Phone: 254-20-862 2000         FAX:                           FAX: 243-880-3274
FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Email:                         Email: shaykins@usaid.gov
Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      Email:                         Program Officer: Allyson
Email:                         Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski    Gardner
Desk Officer: Ashley Marcus    Phone: 202-712-5532            Email: agardner@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-5513            Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov      Desk Officer: Krista
Email: amarcus@usaid.gov                                      Desgranges



                                           Page 105
                                                             Phone: 202-712-4457
                                                             Email:
                                                             kdesgranges@usaid.gov

USAID/Djibouti                 USAID/Equatorial Guinea       USAID/Eritrea
Mission Director: Lawrence     Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Lawrence
Meserve                        Henderson                     Meserve
REDSO East Africa              USAID/West Africa             REDSO East Africa
PO Box 629 Village Market      E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   PO Box 629 Village Market
00621                          PO Box 1630                   00621
Village Market 00621           Accra, Ghana                  Village Market 00621
Nairobi, Kenya                 Phone:                        Nairobi, Kenya
Phone: 254-20-862 2000         FAX:                          Phone:
FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Email:                        FAX:
Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      Email:                        Email:
USAID Resident                 Desk Officer: Dana Alzouma    Email:
Representative: Stephanie      Phone: 202-712-0432           Desk Officer: Tanya Dalton
Funk                           Email: dalzouma@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-4732
Email: sfunk@usaid.gov                                       Email: tdalton@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Tanya Dalton
Phone: 202-712-4732
Email: tdalton@usaid.gov

USAID/Ethiopia                 USAID/Gabon                   USAID/Gambia
Mission Director: Thomas       Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Patrick
Staal                          Henderson                     Henderson
Riverside Building             USAID/West Africa             USAID/West Africa
PO Box 1014                    E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   E. 45/3 Independence Avenue
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia          PO Box 1630                   PO Box 1630
Phone: 251-11-15-510088        Accra, Ghana                  Accra, Ghana
FAX: 233-21-770292             Phone:                        Phone: 233-21-228440
Email: tstaal@usaid.gov        FAX:                          FAX: 233-21-770101
Program Development Officer:   Email:                        Email: phenderson@usaid.gov
Kevin Smith                    Email:                        NEP Program Officer: Taisha
Email: kevsmith@usaid.gov      Desk Officer: Chad Weinberg   Jones
Desk Officer: Tanya Dalton     Phone: 202-712-0511           Email: tajones@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-4732            Email: cweinberg@usaid.gov    Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski
Email: tdalton@usaid.gov                                     Phone: 202-712-5532
                                                             Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov

USAID/Ghana                    USAID/Guinea                  USAID/Guinea Bissau
Mission Director: David        Mission Director: Glenn       Mission Director: Patrick
Atteberry (Acting)             Slocum (Acting)               Henderson
E45/3 Independence Avenue      US Embassy                    USAID/West Africa
PO Box 1630                    Quartier Cameroun, Corniche   E. 45/3 Independence Avenue
Accra, Ghana                   Nord                          PO Box 1630
Phone: 233-21-780580           B.P. 603                      Accra, Ghana
FAX: 233-21-231937             Conakry, Guinea               Phone:
Email: datteberry@usaid.gov    Phone: 224-3046-8715          FAX:
Program Officer: Regina        FAX: 224-3046-8714            Email:
Dennis                         Email: gslocum@usaid.gov      Email:
Email: rdennis@usaid.gov       Program Officer: Laura E.     Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski
Desk Officer: Crystal          Coughlin                      Phone: 202-712-5532
Garrett                        Email: lcoughlin@usaid.gov    Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-5963            Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski
Email: cgarrett@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-5532
                               Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov




                                           Page 106
USAID/Kenya                    USAID/Lesotho                 USAID/Liberia
Mission Director: Erna         Mission Director: Carleene    Mission Director: Pamela
Kerst                          Dei                           White
PO Box 629                     USAID/Southern Africa         P.O. Box 10-1445
Village Market 00621           Mission                       1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia
Nairobi, Kenya                 PO Box 43                     Phone: 231-77-054-825
Phone: 254-20-862-2000         Pretoria, South Africa 0027   FAX: 231-226-152
FAX: 254-20-862-2680           Phone: 27-012-452-2000        Email: pwhite@usaid.gov
Email: ekerst@usaid.gov        FAX: 27-012-452-2399          Acting Program Officer:
Supervisory Program Officer:   Email: cdei@usaid.gov         Modupe Broderick
Mark Meassick                  Deputy Program Officer:       Email: mbroderick@usaid.gov
Email: mmeassick@usaid.gov     Alex Gainer                   Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski
Desk Officer: Julia            Email: againer@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-5532
Escalona                       Desk Officer: Elizabeth       Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-4981            Pleuss
Email: jescalona@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-5193
                               Email: epleuss@usaid.gov

USAID/Madagascar               USAID/Malawi                  USAID/Mali
Mission Director: Rudolph      Mission Director: Curt        Mission Director: Alexander
Thomas                         Reintsma                      Newton
Tour Zital, 6th Floor          NICO House                    Immeuble Dotembougou
ZI Taloumis Ankorondrano       P.O. Box 30455                Rue Raymond Poincarré & rue
BP 5253                        Lilongwe, Malawi              319
Antananarivo, Madagascar       Phone: 265-1-772-455          Quartier du Fleuve
Phone: 261-20-22-539-20        FAX: 265-1-773-181            Bamako, Mali
FAX: 260-20-22-538-86          Email: creintsma@usaid.gov    Phone: 223 222 36 02
Email: rthomas@usaid.gov       Email:                        FAX: 223 222 39 33
PDA Office Chief: Barbara      Desk Officer: Rosalind Best   Email: anewton@usaid.gov
Dickerson                      Phone: 202-712-0839           Economic Growth Team Leader:
Email: bdickerson@usaid.gov    Email: rbest@usaid.gov        Jean Harman
Desk Officer: Ashley Marcus                                  Email: jharman@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-5513                                          Acting Desk Officer: Karen
Email: amarcus@usaid.gov                                     Towers
                                                             Phone: 202-712-4547
                                                             Email: ktowers@usaid.gov
USAID/Mauritius                USAID/Mauritania              USAID/Mozambique
Mission Director: Carleene     Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Todd
Dei                            Henderson                     Amani
USAID/Southern Africa          USAID/West Africa             JAT Complex
Mission                        E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   Rua 1231, No. 41
PO Box 43                      PO Box 1630                   Bairro Central "C"
Pretoria, South Africa 0027    Accra, Ghana                  Maputo, Moçambique
Phone: 27-012-452-2000         Phone:                        Phone: 258-1-352-000
FAX: 27-012-452-2399           FAX:                          FAX: 258-1-352-100
Email: cdei@usaid.gov          Email:                        Email: tamani@usaid.gov
Email:                         Email:                        Program Officer: Nancy
Desk Officer: Ashley Marcus    Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski   Fisher-Gormley
Phone: 202-712-5513            Phone: 202-712-5532           Email: Nfisher­
Email: amarcus@usaid.gov       Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov     gormley@usaid.gov
                                                             Desk Officer: Deborah
                                                             Mendelson
                                                             Phone: 202-712-0302
                                                             Email: dmenelson@usaid.gov

USAID/Namibia                  USAID/Niger                   USAID/Nigeria
Mission Director: Gregory      Mission Director: Patrick     Mission Director: Ray
Gottlieb                       Henderson                     Kirkland
6th Floor, Southern Life       USAID/West Africa             Metro Plaza, 3rd Floor
Tower                          E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   Zakaria Maimalari Street
Post Street Mall               PO Box 1630                   P.M.B. 519
Private Bag 12028              Accra, Ghana                  Garki, Abuja, Nigeria
Windhoek, Namibia              Phone:                        Phone: 234-09 234-3048
Phone: 264-61-225935           FAX:                          FAX: 234-09 234-2930
FAX: 264-61-227006             Email:                        Email: rkirkland@usaid.gov
Email: ggottlieb@usaid.gov     Email:                        Acting Program Officer:
Assistant Mission Director:    Acting Desk Officer: Karen    Sandy Ojikutu
Debra Mosel                    Towers                        Email: sojikutu@usaid.gov
Email: dmosel@usaid.gov        Phone: 202-712-4547           Desk Officer: Dana Alzouma




                                           Page 107
Desk Officer: Elizabeth        Email:   ktowers@usaid.gov     Phone:   202-712-0432
Pleuss                                                        Email:   dalzouma@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-5193
Email: epleuss@usaid.gov

USAID/REDSO/EA                 USAID/Republic of Congo        USAID/Rwanda
Mission Director: Lawrence     Mission Director:              Mission Director: Dennis
Meserve                        Brazzaville, Congo             Weller
REDSO East Africa              Phone:                         2657 Avenue de la
PO Box 629 Village Market      FAX:                           Gendarmerie
00621                          Email:                         Kigali, Rwanda
Village Market 00621           Email:                         Phone: 250-252-596400
Nairobi, Kenya                 Desk Officer: Krista           FAX: 250-252-596-591
Phone: 254-20-862 2000         Desgranges                     Email: dweller@usaid.gov
FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Phone: 202-712-4457            Program Officer: Carl
Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      Email:                         Seagrave
Email:                         kdesgranges@usaid.gov          Email: cseagrave@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Julia                                           Desk Officer: Julia
Escalona                                                      Escalona
Phone: 202-712-4981                                           Phone: 202-712-4981
Email: jescalona@usaid.gov                                    Email: jescalona@usaid.gov

USAID/Sao Tome and Principe    USAID/Senegal                  USAID/Seychelles
Mission Director: Patrick      Mission Director: Kevin        Mission Director: Lawrence
Henderson                      Mulally                        Meserve
USAID/West Africa              Petit Ngor                     REDSO East Africa
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue    B.P. 49                        PO Box 629 Village Market
PO Box 1630                    Dakar, Senegal                 00621
Accra, Ghana                   Phone: 221-869-61-00           Village Market 00621
Phone:                         FAX: 221-869-61-01             Nairobi, Kenya
FAX:                           Email: kmulally@usaid.gov      Phone:
Email:                         DLI Program Officer: Brandy    FAX:
Email:                         Witthoft                       Email:
Desk Officer: Chad Weinberg    Email: bwitthoft@usaid.gov     Email:
Phone: 202-712-0511            Desk Officer: Kasia Krynski    Desk Officer: Ashley Marcus
Email: cweinberg@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-5532            Phone: 202-712-5513
                               Email: kkrynski@usaid.gov      Email: amarcus@usaid.gov

USAID/Somalia                  USAID/South Africa             USAID/Sudan
Mission Director: Lawrence     Mission Director: Carleene     Mission Director: William
Meserve                        Dei                            Hammink
REDSO East Africa              USAID/Southern Africa          c/o US Embassy
PO Box 629 Village Market      Mission                        Khartoum, Sudan
00621                          PO Box 43                      Phone: 249 1557 704 76
Village Market 00621           Pretoria, South Africa 0027    FAX:
Nairobi, Kenya                 Phone: 27-012-452-2000         Email: whammink@usaid.gov
Phone: 254-20-862 2000         FAX: 27-012-452-2399           Program Officer (Juba):
FAX: 254-20-862 2680           Email: cdei@usaid.gov          Marc Douglas
Email: lmeserve@usaid.gov      Supervisory Program Officer:   Email: madouglas@usaid.gov
Somalia Program Manager:       Anthony Vodraska               Desk Officer (Temporary):
Maura Barry                    Email: avodraska@usaid.gov     Andrea Freeman
Email: mabarry@usaid.gov       Desk Officer: Marjorie         Phone: 202-712-5509
Desk Officer: Julie            Copson                         Email: afreeman@usaid.gov
Ciccarone                      Phone: 202-712-1504
Phone: 202-712-1626            Email: mcopson@usaid.gov
Email: jciccarone@usaid.gov

USAID/Swaziland                USAID/Tanzania                 USAID/Togo
Mission Director: Carleene     Mission Director: Robert       Mission Director: Patrick
Dei                            Cunnane                        Henderson
USAID/Southern Africa          686 Old Bagamoyo Road          USAID/West Africa
Mission                        Msasani                        E. 45/3 Independence Avenue
PO Box 43                      PO Box 9130                    PO Box 1630
Pretoria, South Africa 0027    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania        Accra, Ghana
Phone: 27-012-452-2000         Phone: 255-22-266-8482         Phone:
FAX: 27-012-452-2399           FAX: 255-22-266-8421           FAX:
Email: cdei@usaid.gov          Email: rCunnane@usaid.gov      Email:
Supervisory Program Officer:   Program Officer: Thomas        Email:
Anthony Vodraska               Crubaugh                       Desk Officer: Dana Alzouma
Email: avodraska@usaid.gov     Email: tcrubaugh@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-0432
Desk Officer: Elizabeth        Desk Officer: Ashley Marcus    Email: dalzouma@usaid.gov



                                            Page 108
Pleuss                        Phone:   202-712-5513
Phone:   202-712-5193         Email:   amarcus@usaid.gov
Email:   epleuss@usaid.gov

USAID/West Africa Regional    USAID/Zambia                  USAID/Zimbabwe
Program                       Mission Director: Melissa     Mission Director: Karen
Mission Director: Patrick     S. Williams                   Freeman
Henderson                     P.O. Box 32481                P.O. Box 6988
USAID/West Africa             351 Independence Avenue       1 Pascoe Avenue
E. 45/3 Independence Avenue   Lusaka, Zambia                Belgravia
PO Box 1630                   Phone: 260-1-254-303          Harare, Zimbabwe
Accra, Ghana                  FAX: 260-1-254-532            Phone: 263-4-250-992
Phone: 233-21-228440          Email: mewilliams@usaid.gov   FAX: 263-4-252-478
FAX: 233-21-770101            Program Officer: Michael      Email: kfreeman@usaid.gov
Email: phenderson@usaid.gov   McCord                        Program Officer: Amy
NEP Program Officer: Taisha   Email: MMcCord@usaid.gov      Tohill-Stull
Jones                         Desk Officer: Rosalind Best   Email: atohill­
Email: tajones@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-0839           stull@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Chad Weinberg   Email: rbest@usaid.gov        Desk Officer: Lorie Dobbins
Phone: 202-712-0511                                         Phone: 202-712-1805
Email: cweinberg@usaid.gov                                  Email: ldobbins@usaid.gov




                                           Page 109
ASIA Bureau
USAID/Bangladesh              USAID/Burma                    USAID/Cambodia
Mission Director: Denise      Mission Director: Oliver       Mission Director: Flynn
Rollins                       Carduner                       Fuller
Madani Avenue                 GPF Witthayu Tower A           American Embassy
Baridhara                     93/1 Wireless Road             #1, Street 96
Dhaka, Bangladesh 1212        Bangkok, Thailand 10330        P.O. Box APO AP 96546,
Phone: (880-2) 885-5500       Phone: (66-2) 263-7404         Phnom Penh, Cambodia
FAX: (880-2) 882-3648         FAX: (66-2) 263-7499           Phone: (855-23) 728000
Email: derollins@usaid.gov    Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov     FAX: (855-23) 430263
Program Officer: Julie Chen   Program Officer: Warren        Email: ffuller@usaid.gov
Email: jchen@usaid.gov        Harrity                        Program Officer: Sophy Seng
Acting Desk Officer: Carrie   Email: wharrity@usaid.gov      Email: sseng@usaid.gov
Mitchell                      Desk Officer: Cheryl           Desk Officer: Deidra
Phone: 202-712-1537           Jennings                       Winston
Email: camitchell@usaid.gov   Phone: 202-712-4705            Phone: 202-712-5377
                              Email: cjennings@usaid.gov     Email: dwinston@usaid.gov

USAID/Central Asia Regional   USAID/China                    USAID/India
Mission Director: Andrew      Mission Director: Oliver       Mission Director: Erin Soto
Sisson                        Carduner                       USAID
Park Palace Building          GPF Witthayu Tower A           c/o American Embassy
41 Kazibek Bi, Street         93/1 Wireless Road             Chanakyapuri
Almaty, Kazakhstan 050100     Bangkok, Thailand 10330        New Delhi, India 110021
Phone: 7 (327)250-76-12       Phone: (66-2) 263-7404         Phone: (91 11) 2419-8000
FAX: 7 (327)250-76-35         FAX: (66-2) 263-7499           FAX: (91 11) 2419-8454
Email: asisson@usaid.gov      Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov     Email: esoto@usaid.gov
Program Officer               Supervisory Program Officer:   Program Officer: Jennifer
(Kazakhstan): John Morgan     Sara Walter                    Graetz
Email: jmorgan@usaid.gov      Email: swalter@usaid.gov       Email: jgraetz@usaid.gov
Central Asia Team Leader:     Desk Officer: Cheryl           Desk Officer: Renee Howell
Bob Wallin                    Jennings                       Phone: 202-712-5919
Phone: 202-712-0141           Phone: 202-712-4705            Email: rhowell@usaid.gov
Email: bowallin@usaid.gov     Email: cjennings@usaid.gov

USAID/Indonesia               USAID/Kazakhstan               USAID/Kyrgzstan
Mission Director: Walter      Mission Director: Erin         Mission Director: Andrew
North                         McKee, Deputy Mission          Sisson
Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan     Director                       USAID
No. 3-5                       Park Palace Building           c/o US Embassy
Jakarta, Indonesia 10110      41 Kazibek Bi, Street          171 Prospect Mira
Phone: (011-62-21) 3435­      Almaty, Kazakhstan 050100      Bishkek, Kyrgzstan 720016
9000                          Phone: 7 (327)250-76-12        Phone: (996-312) 551-241
FAX:                          FAX: 7 (327)250-76-35          FAX: (996-312) 551-264
Email: wnorth@usaid.gov       Email: emckee@usaid.gov        Email: pshapiro@usaid.gov
Program Officer: Chris        Program Officer                Program Officer: Pat
Edwards                       (Kazakhstan): John Morgan      Shapiro
Email: chedwards@usaid.gov    Email: jmorgan@usaid.gov       Email: pshapiro@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Stephen Solat   Central Asia Team Leader:      Central Asia Team Leader:
Phone: 202-712-1002           Bob Wallin                     Bob Wallin
Email: ssolat@usaid.gov       Phone: 202-712-0141            Phone: 202-712-0141
                              Email: bowallin@usaid.gov      Email: bowallin@usaid.gov




                                          Page 110
USAID/Laos                    USAID/Mongolia                 USAID/Nepal
Mission Director: Oliver      Mission Director: Jeff         Mission Director: Kevin
Carduner                      Goodson (Acting)               Rushing
GPF Witthayu Tower A          P.O. Box 1021                  G.P.O Box: 295
93/1 Wireless Road            Ulan Bataar, Mongolia 13       Brahma Cottage, Maharajgunj
Bangkok, Thailand 10330       Phone: 976-11-312390           Kathmandu, Nepal
Phone: (66-2) 263-7404        FAX: 976-11-310440             Phone: 977 1 4007200
FAX: (66-2) 263-7499          Email: jgoodson@usaid.gov      FAX: 977 1 4007285
Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov    Program Officer: Medsaihan     Email: krushing@usaid.gov
Program Officer: Warren       Hasbastar                      Supervisory Program Officer:
Harrity                       Email: mhasbastar@usaid.gov    Sheila Roquitte
Email: wharrity@usaid.gov     Desk Officer: Deidra           Email: sroquitte@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Cheryl          Winston                        Acting Desk Officer: Alder
Jennings                      Phone: 202-712-5377            Phillips
Phone: 202-712-4705           Email: dwinston@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-1957
Email: cjennings@usaid.gov                                   Email: aphillips@usaid.gov

USAID/North Korea             USAID/Pacific Islands          USAID/Papua-New Guinea
Mission Director: Oliver      Mission Director: Oliver       Mission Director: Oliver
Carduner                      Carduner                       Carduner
GPF Witthayu Tower A          GPF Witthayu Tower A           GPF Witthayu Tower A
93/1 Wireless Road            93/1 Wireless Road             93/1 Wireless Road
Bangkok, Thailand 10330       Bangkok, Thailand 10330        Bangkok, Thailand 10330
Phone: (66-2) 263-7404        Phone: (66-2) 263-7404         Phone: (66-2) 263-7404
FAX: (66-2) 263-7499          FAX: (66-2) 263-7499           FAX: (66-2) 263-7499
Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov    Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov     Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov
:   n/a                       Program Officer: Mike Trott    Program Officer: Warren
Email:                        Email: mtrott@usaid.gov        Harrity
Desk Officer: Jon Brause      Desk Officer: Cheryl           Email: wharrity@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-5482           Jennings                       Desk Officer: Cheryl
Email: jbrause@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-4705            Jennings
                              Email: cjennings@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-4705
                                                             Email: cjennings@usaid.gov

USAID/Philippines             USAID/Regional Development     USAID/Sri Lanka
Mission Director: Elzadia     Mission for Asia               Mission Director: Rebecca
Washington (Acting)           Mission Director: Oliver       Cohn
PSC 502, Box 1                Carduner                       44, Galle Road
Manilla, Philippines          GPF Witthayu Tower A           Colomboi, Sri Lanka 3
Phone: 632-552-9800           93/1 Wireless Road             Phone: 9411.249.8000
FAX:                          Bangkok, Thailand 10330        FAX: 9411.247.2850
Email:                        Phone: (66-2) 263-7404         Email: rcohn@usaid.gov
ewashington@usaid.gov         FAX: (66-2) 263-7499           Program and Policy Officer:
Program Officer: Gil Dy-      Email: ocarduner@usaid.gov     Poonam Smith-Streen
Liacco                        Supervisory Program Officer:   Email: psmith­
Email: gdy-liacco@usaid.gov   Sara Walter                    sreen@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Bob Hanchett    Email: swalter@usaid.gov       Acting Desk Officer: Amy
Phone: 202-712-1566           Desk Officer: Cheryl           Paro
Email: rhanchett@usaid.gov    Jennings                       Phone:
                              Phone: 202-712-4705            Email: aparo@usaid.gov
                              Email: cjennings@usaid.gov




                                          Page 111
USAID/Uzbekistan               USAID/Vietnam
Mission Director: Andrew       Mission Director: Francis
Sisson                         A. Donovan
3 Moyorqorghon St, 5th Block   15/F, Tung Shing Tower
Yunusobod District             2 Ngo Quyen
Tashkent, Uzbekistan 700093    Hanoi, Vietnam
Phone: 998-71-120-63-09        Phone: 844-3935-1260
FAX:                           FAX: 844-3935-1265
Email: jbonner@usaid.gov       Email: fdonovan@usaid.gov
Program Officer: James         Program Officer: Dung Pham
Bonner                         Thi Le
Email: jbonner@usaid.gov       Email:
Central Asia Team Leader:      Desk Officer: Dany Khy
Bob Wallin                     Phone: 202-712-0733
Phone: 202-712-0141            Email: dkhy@usaid.gov
Email: bowallin@usaid.gov




                                           Page 112
Europe and Eurasia
Bureau
USAID/Albania                  USAID/Armenia                  USAID/Belarus
Mission Director: Roberta      Mission Director: Jatinder     Mission Director: Janina
Mahoney                        Cheema                         Jaruzelski
US Embassy in Tirana           1 American Avenue              46 Starovilenskaya Street
Rr. Elbasanit No. 103          Yerevan, Armenia 0082          Minsk, Belarus 220002
Tirana, Albania                Phone: (37410) 46 47 00        Phone: 375 17 210 1283
Phone: 011 +355-4-224-7285     FAX: (37410) 46 47 28          FAX: 375 17 211 3032
FAX:                           Email: jcheema@usaid.gov       Email:
Email: rmahoney@usaid.gov      Supervisory Program Officer:   jjaruzelski@usaid.gov
Supervisory Program Officer:   Timothy Alexander              Program Officer: John
John Brannaman                 Email: talexander@usaid.gov    Riordan
Email: jbrannaman@usaid.gov    Desk Officer: Heather Ward     Email: jriordan@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Sandra Stajka    Phone: 212-712-4755            Desk Officer: Valerie Chien
Phone: 202-712-5954            Email: hward@usaid.gov         Phone: 202-712-1116
Email: sstajka@usaid.gov                                      Email: vchien@usaid.gov

USAID/Bosnia                   USAID/Georgia                  USAID/Kosovo
Mission Director: Diana        Mission Director: Jock         Mission Director: Patricia
Swain                          Conly                          Rader
USAID/Bosnia-Herzegovina       11 George Balanchine Street    Arberia (ex-Dragodan) II No.
Department of State            Tblisi, Georgia 0131           1
Washhington, DC,    20521­     Phone: (995-32) 54-40-00       Pristina, Kosovo 10000
7130                           FAX: (995-32)54-41-45          Phone: 381 38 243 673
Phone: 387-33-702-300          Email: jconly@usaid.gov        FAX: 381 (38) 249-493
FAX: 387-33-611-973            Program Officer: Craig Hart    Email: prader@usaid.gov
Email: dswain@usaid.gov        Email: chart@usaid.gov         Strategy Planner: Judith
Program Officer: Karen Exel    Desk Officer: Heather Ward     Schumacher
Email: kexel@usaid.gov         Phone: 202-712-4755            Email: jschumacher@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Sandra Stajka    Email: hward@usaid.gov         Desk Officer: Lauren
Phone: 202-712-5954                                           Russell
Email: sstajka@usaid.gov                                      Phone: 202-712-4873
                                                              Email: lrussell@usaid.gov

USAID/Macedonia                USAID/Moldova                  USAID/Montenegro
Mission Director: Michael      Mission Director: Janina       Mission Director: Michael T
Fritz                          Jaruzelski                     Harvey
US Embassy                     57/1, Banulescu-Bodoni         Krusevac BB
Samoilova 21                   Street                         Podgorica, Montenegro 8100
Skopje, Macedonia 1000         ASITO Building, 5th Floor      Phone: (382-81) 241-050
Phone: +(389) 2 310 2000       Chisinau, Moldova 2005         FAX: (382-81) 241-251
FAX: +(389) 2 310 2463         Phone: (037322) 20-18-00       Email: mharvey@usaid.gov
Email: mfritz@usaid.gov        FAX: (037322) 23-72-77         Montenegro OIC: Joseph
Supervisory Program Officer:   Email:                         Taggart
Timothy Donnay                 jjaruzelski@usaid.gov          Email: Jtaggart@usaid.gov
Email: Tdonnay@usaid.gov       Program Officer (Acting):      Desk Officer: Abigail
Desk Officer: Lauren           Susan Kutor                    Lackman
Russell                        Email: skutor@usaid.gov        Phone: 202-712-1601
Phone: 202-712-4873            Desk Officer: Valerie Chien    Email: alackman@usaid.gov
Email: lrussell@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-1116
                               Email: vchien@usaid.gov




                                           Page 113
LATIN AMERICA and CARRIBEAN Bureau
USAID/Bolivia                  USAID/Brazil                  USAID/Caribbean Regional
Mission Director: Peter R      Mission Director: Jeffery     Office
Natiello Obrajes               D. Bell                       Mission Director: James L
Calle 9 No. 104                U.S. Embassy                  Goggin
La Paz, Bolivia                SES, Quadra 801, Lote 03      Wildey Business Park
Phone: 591-2-278-6544          Brasilia D.F., Brazil         Wildey
FAX:                           70403-900                     St. Michael, Barbados
Email: pnatiello@usaid.gov     Phone: 55-61-3312-7248        Phone: 246-227-4118
Program Officer: Michael       FAX:                          FAX:
Reilly                         Email: jbell@usaid.gov        Email: jgoggin@usaid.gov
Email: mreilly@usaid.gov       Program Officer: Alexandre    Email:
Desk Officer: Karen            Mancuso                       Desk Officer: Robert Boncy
Anderson                       Email: emanacuso@usaid.gov    Phone: 202-712-5157
Phone: 202-712-4876            Desk Officer: Joann           Email: rboncy@usaid.gov
Email: kanderson@usaid.gov     Lawrence
                               Phone: 202-712-4011
                               Email: jlawrence@usaid.gov

USAID/Colombia                 USAID/Dominican Republic      USAID/Ecuador
Mission Director: Ken          Mission Director: Richard     Mission Director: Alexi
Yamashita                      Goughnour                     Panehal (Acting)
BogotaCarrera 45               Calle Leopoldo Navarro #12    Embassy of the United States
No. 22D-45                     Gazcue Santo Domingo,         of America
Bogota D.C., Colombia          Dominican Republic            Avigiras, E12-170 and Eloy
Phone: 571-315-0811            Phone: (809) 221-1100         Alfaro
FAX:                           FAX:                          Quito, Ecuador
Email: kyamashita@usaid.gov    Email: rgoughnour@usaid.gov   Phone: (593) 3985000
Supervisory Program Officer:   Program Officer: Jeffrey      FAX: (593) 3971400
Nancy Hardy                    Cohen                         Email: apanehal@usaid.gov
Email: nhardy@usaid.gov        Email: jcohen@usaid.gov       SDO Director: Daniel
Desk Officer: T. David         Desk Officer: Debra Banks     Sanchez-Bustamente
Johnston                       Phone: 202-712-0821           Email: dsanchez­
Phone: 202-712-1527            Email: dbanks@usaid.gov       bustamante@usaid.gov
Email: djohnston@usaid.gov                                   Desk Officer: Karen
                                                             Anderson
                                                             Phone: 202-712-4876
                                                             Email: kanderson@usaid.gov
USAID/El Salvador              USAID/Guatemala               USAID/Guyana
Mission Director: Larry        Mission Director: Wayne       Mission Director: Carol
Brady                          Nilsestuen                    Horning
USAID/El Salvador              Km. 6.5 Final Boulevard Los   U.S. Embassy
Embajada de los Estados        Próceres Santa Catarina       100 Young & Duke Streets
Unidos                         Pinula                        Georgetown, Guyana
Bulevar y Urbanización Santa   Guatemala, Guatemala          Phone: 592-225-7315
Elena Antiguo Cuscatlán        Phone: 502-2422-4000          FAX:
La Libertad, El Salvador       FAX:                          Email: chorning@usaid.gov
Phone: 011-503-2501-2999       Email:                        Program Management
FAX:                           wnilsestuen@usaid.gov         Assistant: Chloe Noble
Email: lbrady@usaid.gov        Program Officer: Ernest       Email: cnoble@usaid.gov
Email:                         Rojas                         Desk Officer: Robert Boncy
Desk Officer: Emily Hogue      Email: erojas@usaid.gov       Phone: 202-712-5157
Phone: 202-712-1959            Desk Officer: Ken Seifert     Email: rboncy@usaid.gov
Email: ehogue@usaid.gov        Phone: 202-712-1862
                               Email: kseifert@usaid.gov

USAID/Haiti                    USAID/Honduras                USAID/Jamaica
Mission Director: Beth         Mission Director: William     Mission Director: Karen
Cypser                         Brands                        Hilliard
Tabarre 41, Route de Tabarre   Avenida La Paz frente a la    142 Old Hope Road
Port-au-Prince, Haiti          Embajada Americana            Kingston 5, Jamaica
Phone: 509-2-229-8000          Tegucigalpa, Honduras         Phone: 876-702-6445
FAX:                           Phone: (504) 236-9320         FAX:
Email: bcypser@usaid.gov       FAX:                          Email: khilliard@usaid.gov
Program Officer: Karen Poe     Email: wbrands@usaid.gov      Deputy Office Director:
Email: Kpoe@usaid.gov          Project Development           Claire Spence
Desk Officer: Dan Riley        Specialist: Kelly Flowers     Email: cspence@usaid.gov
Phone: 202-712-1641            Email: Kflowers@usaid.gov     Desk Officer: Robert Boncy
Email: driley@usaid.gov        Desk Officer: Ken Seifert     Phone: 202-712-5157



                                           Page 114
                              Phone: 202-712-1862            Email:   rboncy@usaid.gov
                              Email: kseifert@usaid.gov
USAID/Mexico                  USAID/Nicaragua                USAID/Panama
Mission Director: Rodger      Mission Director: Alex         Mission Director: Littleton
Garner                        Dickie                         Tazewell
U.S. Embassy México           Embajada de los Estados        P.O. Box 0816-02561
Paseo de la Reforma 305       Unidos                         Panama 5, Republic of Panama
México 5, D.F., México        Km. 5.5 Carretera Sur.         Phone: 507-207-7000
Phone: 5255-5080-2000         Managua, Nicaragua             FAX:
FAX:                          Phone: (505)252-7100           Email: ltazewell@usaid.gov
Email: rgarner@usaid.gov      FAX: (505) 252-7000            Supervisory Program Officer:
Program Officer: Babette      Email: adickie@usaid.gov       Christopher Cushing
Prevot                        Supervisory Program Officer:   Email: ccushing@usaid.gov
Email: Bprevot@usaid.gov      Ginger Waddell                 Desk Officer: Ebony Bostic
Desk Officer: Ken Seifert     Email: gwaddell@usaid.gov      Phone: 202-712-4721
Phone: 202-712-1862           Desk Officer: Ebony Bostic     Email: ebostic@usaid.gov
Email: kseifert@usaid.gov     Phone: 202-712-4721
                              Email: ebostic@usaid.gov

USAID/Paraguay                USAID/Peru
Mission Director: Rose        Mission Director: Paul
Rakas                         Weisenfeld
Juan de Salazar 364 near      Av. La Encalada
Artigas                       cdra. 17 Monterrico
Asuncion, Paraguay            Surca Lima, Peru
Phone: 55-21-220 715          Phone: 51-1-618-1200
FAX:                          FAX:
Email: rrakas@usaid.gov       Email:
Development Program           pweisenfeld@usaid.gov
Specialist: Enrique           Deputy Program Director:
Villalba                      Jeremiah Carew
Email: Evillalba@usaid.gov    Email: jcarew@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Mike            Desk Officer: Mike
Karbeling                     Karbeling
Phone: 202-712-0769           Phone: 202-712-0769
Email: mkarbeling@usaid.gov   Email: mkarbeling@usaid.gov




                                          Page 115
MIDDLE EAST Bureau
USAID/Egypt                   USAID/Iraq                    USAID/Jordan
Mission Director: Hilda       Mission Director:             Mission Director: Jay Knott
Arellano                      Christopher Crowley           c/o American Embassy
1A Ahmed Kamel Street         Iraq APO AE 09316             PO Box 354
off El-Laselki Street         Washington, D C               Amman, Jordan
New Maadi                     Phone: 202-216-6289           Phone: 962-6-590-6000
Cairo, Egypt 11435            FAX:                          FAX:
Phone: (2-02) 2-522-7000      Email: ccrowley@usaid.gov     Email: jknott@usaid.gov
FAX: (2-02) 2-516-4628        Program Officer: Erin         Program Officer: Kathryn
Email: harellano@usaid.gov    Holleran                      Stevens
Program Officer:              Email: eholleran@usaid.gov    Email: kstevens@usaid.gov
Email:                        Special Assistant: George     Desk Officer: Margaret Dula
Desk Officer: William Riley   Laudato                       Phone: (202) 712-1533
Phone: (202) 712-5815         Phone: 202-712-0300           Email: mdula@usaid.gov
Email: wriley@usaid.gov       Email: glaudato@usaid.gov

USAID/Lebanon                 USAID/Middle East Regional    USAID/Morocco
Mission Director: Denise A.   Office                        Mission Director: John
Herbol                        Mission Director: Kim         Groarke
U.S. Embassy                  Delaney                       10 Avenue Mehdi
Awkwar, Lebanon               1A Ahmed Kamel Street         Ben Barka
Phone: 961-4-544-251          off El-Laselki Street         Souissi
FAX:                          New Maadi                     Rabat, Morocco
Email: dherbol@usaid.gov      Cairo, Egypt                  Phone: (212)537-63-20-01
Program Officer:              Phone: 20-2-2522-6846         FAX: (212)537-63-20-13
Email:                        FAX:                          Email: jgroarke@usaid.gov
Desk Officer: Elaine Scott    Email: kdelaney@usaid.gov     Supervisory Program Officer:
Phone: (202) 712-040          Email:                        Ramona El Hamzaoui
Email: escott@usaid.gov       Acting Desk Officer:          Email: relhamzaoui@usaid.gov
                              Christopher Kisco             Desk Officer: Sonia Davis-
                              Phone: (202) 712-1027         Clemons
                              Email: ckisco@usaid.gov       Phone: (202) 712-5819
                                                            Email: sdavis­
                                                            clemons@usaid.gov

USAID/West Bank-Gaza          USAID/Yemen
Mission Director: Howard      Mission Director: Dr.
Sumka                         Jeffrey Ashley
US Embassy                    USAID/Yemen
71 HaYarkon Street            6330 Sanaa Place
Tel Aviv, Israel 63903        Washington, DC 20521-6330
Phone: 972-3-511-4855         Phone: 967-1-755-2197
FAX: 972-3-511-4888           FAX:
Email: hsumka@usaid.gov       Email: ashleyjw@state.gov
Program Officer: Kimberlee    Program Management Advisor:
Bell                          Bonnie Krajewski
Email: kbell@usaid.gov        Email: krajeskiBP@state.gov
Desk Officer: Sara Borodin    Desk Officer: Christopher
Phone: (202) 712-4836         Kisco
Email: sborodin@usaid.gov     Phone: (202) 712-1027
                              Email: ckisco@usaid.gov




Please note that personnel as well as addresses can change. It is the
applicant’s responsibility to verify that addresses are correct and to
take all reasonable steps to ensure that they successfully transmit
their application to all concerned USAID Missions.




                                          Page 116
                                                                      Annex J

Cover Sheet for Submitting Application to Mission

Country:                  __________________________
USAID Mission Contact:    __________________________
Address:                  __________________________
                          __________________________


                          __________________________
                          __________________________
                          __________________________


                     FY 2010 Cooperative Development RFA


USAID/ODP/PVC has requested that ______________________ (CDO) provide
appropriate USAID Missions with copies of its application for the Cooperative
Development Program, “Development and expansion of economic assistance
programs that fully utilize cooperatives and credit unions”. We have been
directed to obtain Mission clearance for that segment of the proposed program
that will take place in ____________ (country).

Questions for PVC should be directed to:

_____________________
USAID/ODP/PVC
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW   6.07
Washington, DC 20523-6700
(202) 712-5226
E-mail: thcarter@usaid.gov

Questions for the CDO should be directed to:

________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________




                                      Page 117
                                                                           Annex K

       Typology of Progress-Prone and Progress Resistant Cultures

 A fusion of the ideas of Mariano Grondona, Lawrence Harrison, Matteo Marini,

                              and Irakli Chkonia 


Factor                 Progress-Prone Culture       Progress-Resistant Culture
WORLDVIEW
1. Spirituality        Nurtures rationality,        Nurtures irrationality;
                       achievement; promotes        inhibits its material
                       material pursuits; focus     pursuits; focus on the other
                       on this world; pragmatism    world; utopianism

2. Destiny             I can influence my destiny   Fatalism, resignation,
                       for the better.              sorcery

3. Time Orientation    Future focus promotes        Present or past focus
                       planning, punctuality,       discourages planning,
                       deferred gratification       punctuality, saving

4. Wealth              Product of human             What exists (zero-sum)
                       creativity, expandable
                       (positive sum)

5. Knowledge           Practical, verifiable;       Abstract, theoretical,
                       facts matter                 cosmological, not verifiable;
                                                    debate matters

VALUES, VIRTUES

6. Ethical code        Rigorous within realistic    Elastic, wide gap between
                       norms; feeds trust           utopian norms and
                                                    behavior=mistrust.

7. The lesser          A job well done, tidiness,   Lesser virtues unimportant;
virtues                courtesy, punctuality        love, justice, courage matter
                       matters

8. Education           Indispensable, promotes      Less Priority; promotes
                       autonomy, heterodoxy,        dependency, orthodoxy
                       dissent, creativity

ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR

9. Work/achievement    Live to work; work leads     Work to live; work doesn’t
                       to wealth                    lead to wealth; work is for
                                                    the poor

10. Frugality          The mother of investment     A threat to equality
                       and prosperity

11. Entrepreneurship   Investment and creativity    Rent seeking

12. Risk propensity    Moderate                     Low, occasional adventures




                                   Page 118
13. Competition        Leads to excellence          Aggression; a threat to
                                                    equality – and privilege

14. Innovation         Open; rapid adaptation       Suspicious; slow adaptation

15.   Advancement      Merit, achievement           Family, patron, connections

SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

16. Rule of            Reasonably law abiding;      Money, connections matter;
law/corruption         corruption is prosecuted     corruption is tolerated

17. Radius of          Stronger identification      Stronger identification with
identification and     with the broader society     the narrow community.
trust

18. Association        Trust, identification        Mistrust breeds excessive
(social capital)       breeds cooperation,          individualism, anomie
                       affiliation, participation

19. The                Emphasizes the individual    Emphasizes the collectivity
individual/the group   but not excessively

20. Authority          Dispersed; checks and        Centralized; unfettered,
                       balances, consensus          often arbitrary

21. Role of elites     Responsibility to society    Power and rent seeking;
                                                    exploitative

22. Secularism         Secularized; wall between    Religion plays major role in
                       church and state             civic sphere




                                   Page 119