Docstoc

The Effect of Gasoline Price Changes on Consumer Demand for Fuel

Document Sample
The Effect of Gasoline Price Changes on Consumer Demand for Fuel Powered By Docstoc
					        
The Effect of Gasoline Price Changes on Consumer Demand for Fuel 
      Economy: Empirical Estimates and Policy Implications 
                         James M. Sallee, The Harris School 
 
        The consumption of petroleum in the personal transportation sector is 
central to energy and climate policy. In the United States, personal transportation 
alone accounts for 40% of the petroleum consumed and 20% of the greenhouse 
gases emitted.  Hydrogen fuel cells are a distant solution, electric vehicles remain 
unproven, and there are doubts on the climate value of biofuels as an alternative.  
All of this puts great emphasis on the role of conservation through efficiency. To 
spur conservation, economists favor policies that increase the price of fuel (a gas 
tax) over regulatory structures (fuel economy standards). How consumer demand 
for fuel economy responds to fuel price changes is, however, not well understood. 
        In this project, Sallee proposes to estimate how consumer demand for fuel 
economy responds to fuel price changes by examining how the prices of used cars 
with differing fuel economies have responded to gasoline prices over the last 20 
years.   
        Sallee’s research is aimed at answering two related empirical questions. 
First, what is the elasticity of demand for fuel economy with respect to the price of 
fuel? Estimates of this parameter will be directly useful to researchers interested in 
forecasting how consumer demand for fuel economy and petroleum demand will 
respond to policy and economic shocks. The second question is: how does the 
observed response of used vehicle prices to gasoline prices compare to a theoretical 
benchmark? A gasoline price shock changes the operating cost of a vehicle over the 
remainder of its lifetime by a specific amount. This means that observed price 
changes of used cars can be compared to a specific prediction. Sallee will test 
whether or not observed price responses differ significantly from the theoretical 
benchmark and interpret this as a test of whether or not consumers properly 
calculate the present discounted value of fuel economy when purchasing a vehicle. 
The answer has important policy implications regarding fuel economy standards. 
         

				
DOCUMENT INFO