Smart mobility- Walking and Cycling – Bike and Foot Mobility The by bestt571

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									Smart mobility- Walking and Cycling – Bike and Foot Mobility

The problem
Most people use their cars to travel around, to work, to school and in their

leisure time. This behaviour contributes to pollution and carbon emissions. It

also leads to unhealthy lifestyles with car users not getting enough daily

exercise.




Policy relevance and policy references
National Cycle Policy Framework – Objectives


   ●   Support the development of towns and cities in a cycling and
       pedestrian friendly way.
   ●   Provide designated rural cycle networks especially for visitors and
       recreational cycling.
   ●    Ensure that all of the surfaces used by cyclists are maintained to a high
        standard and are well lit
   ●    Ensure proper integration between cycling and public transport.
   ●    Improve driver education so that there is an appreciation for the safety
        of cyclists.
   ●    Provide appropriate levels of,and timely, financial resources towards
        implementing the NCPF.
Improve enforcement of traffic laws to enhance cyclist safety and respect for
cyclists.



Key messages for radio listeners
Why cycle? Regular cycling keeps you fit. ● During rush-hour, a bicylce is

about twice as fast as a car ● Bicycles don't need road tax ● NCT, insurance,

licensing or fuel ● To make a bicycle requires only a fraction of the materials

and energy needed to make a car ● Bicycles produce no pollution and are

quiet


Why Walk? It's good for the environment ● Walking keeps you fit ● A

transportation system that is geared towards walking is good for reducing

traffic ● Walking is free, so will save you money




Market development/Market supply/Changing behaviour
Lobbying for Change: Dublin Cycling Campaign has been working since the
early 1990s to improve conditions for cyclists in Dublin. Some of the changes
they have made include: ● 30 km/h speed limit in Dublin city centre and
residential areas ● Restrictions on heavy goods vehicles in the city centre ●
The removal of bull bars from SUVs
Bicycle Lanes: Dublin City Council began installing cycle lanes and cycle

tracks in the mid 1990s. There are now approximately 120km of on-road

cycle track in the city and 50km of bus lanes that cyclists can use. In addition

there are about 25km of off-road cycle track.


Bicycles and Public Transport: There is no policy in Ireland for allowing

bicycles to be transported on trains and buses.




Mechanisms and supporting measures
Bike To Work Scheme

The new bike scheme covers bicycles and accessories up to a maximum
cost of €1,000. The bicycle must be purchased by your employer but the
scheme can then operate either with your employer bearing the full cost of
the bicycle, or by way of a salary sacrifice agreement (like the existing travel
card scheme) in which you pay for it, tax free, over 12 months.

Dublin Bikes

The Dublin Bikes scheme has been a hugely popular addition to the city.

There are 450 bikes and 40 stations. There are currently over 25,000

subscribers to the scheme. Which means there are 39 long term subscibers

per bike. Most people use the bikes for short journeys in the city with 95% of

the rentals being free (which is under 30 minutes) and the average journey

time is 16 minutes




Best Practices
In Holland there is a dedicated infrastructure for cycling. There is a plethora
of routes and countrywide cycling grids to be enjoyed, and they are
constantly being expanded. Of the 29,000 total kilometers (18,020 miles) of
bike paths, there are some 6,500 km designated as ‘recreational bicycle
routes,’ and of these, some 4,500 km are signposted.

In the London borough of Hackney 8% of people cycle bikes. This is the
highest percentage in Britain. This has been encouraged by bringing in
20mph speed limits in certain areas, creating and upgrading cycle lanes,
providing free cycle training, and promoting a bike to work scheme.

Copenhagen is one of the world's great pedestrian cities. Although it's

blessed with certain inherited characteristics--such as a narrow medieval

street grid--the city has worked steadily to improve the quality of its street life.




Data and Sources
Smarter Travel – A Sustainable Transport Future http://www.smartertravel.ie/

Dublin 2 City Pedestrian Zone Extension Programme
http://www.dublin2walk.com/

Cyclist.ie – Irelands National Cycle Lobby http://www.cyclist.ie/

Walking Matters – Consultancy service promoting walking to work
http://www.walkingmatters.ie/

Ciaran Cuffe, Cycling Officer, Dubin City Council – Cuffe Street blog
http://cuffestreet.blogspot.com/

Dublin Cycling Campaign http://www.dublincycling.com/
Context
Most people use their cars to travel around, to work, to school and in their

leisure time. This behaviour contributes to pollution and carbon emissions. It

also leads to unhealthy lifestyles with car users not getting enough daily

exercise. In 2008 an average of 63,976 cars entered the Royal/Grand Canal

cordon in peak morning traffic.       In the same time 6,143 bicycles entered.

Cycling has been in steep decline since the 1980’s. In 1986 a total of 23,635

primary level pupils cycled to school whereas in 2006 the number was only

4,087 (a decline of 83%).




Policy relevance and policy references

National Cycle Policy Framework – Objectives

   ●   Support the planning, development and design of towns and cities in a
       cycling and pedestrian friendly way.
   ●   Ensure that the urban road infrastructure (with the exception of
       motorways) is designed/retrofitted so as to be cyclist-friendly and that
       traffic management measures are also cyclist friendly.
   ●   Provide designated rural cycle networks especially for visitors and
       recreational cycling.
   ●   Provide cycling-friendly routes to all schools, adequate cycling parking
       facilities within schools, and cycling training to all school pupils.
   ●   Ensure that all of the surfaces used by cyclists are maintained to a high
       standard and are well lit
   ●   Ensure that all cycling networks - both urban and rural - are signposted
       to an agreed standard.
  ●   Provide secure parking for bikes.
  ●   Ensure proper integration between cycling and public transport.
  ●   Provide public bikes in cities.
  ●   Improve the image of cycling and promote cycling using “soft
      interventions” such
  ●   as promotional campaigns, events etc.
  ●   Improve cyclists’ cycling standards and behaviour on the roads.
  ●   Improve driver education and driving standards so that there is a
      greater appreciation for the safety needs of cyclists.
  ●   Support the provision of fiscal incentives to cycle.
  ●   Provide appropriate levels of,and timely, financial resources towards
      implementing the NCPF.
  ●   Introduce changes to legislation to improve cyclist safety.
  ●   Improve enforcement of traffic laws to enhance cyclist safety and
      respect for cyclists.
  ●   Develop a structure that can coordinate the implementation of activities
      across
  ●   the many Government Departments, Agencies and NGO’s
  ●   Provide design professionals with suitable training / guidance to develop
      and implement the policies of the NCPF. Support the deepening of
      knowledge of the subject of planning for cyclists in Ireland.
  ●   Evaluate the cycling policy and monitor the success as the measures
      are implemented.




Key Messages for the Listeners of Radio Programme

Why cycle?
   ●   Regular cycling keeps you fit

   ●   During rush-hour, a bicycle is about twice as fast as a car

   ●   Bicycles don't need road tax, NCT, insurance, licensing or fuel

   ●   A bicycle can be parked just about anywhere

   ●   To make a bicycle requires only a fraction of the materials and energy
       needed to make a car

   ●   Bicycles produce no pollution and are quiet

   ●   Bicycles generally don't kill people



Why Walk?

   ●   It's good for the environment (and resulting health of all living things)
   ●   Walking keeps you fit.
   ●   A transportation system that is conducive to walking is good for
       reducing traffic
   ●   Walking is free, so will save you money
   ●   It's good for communities that are promoting bicycle and pedestrian
       mobility.



In communities across the world, there is a growing need and responsibility to
provide options that give people the opportunity to walk—to walk more often,
to walk to more places, and to feel safe while doing so.
Intro for the radio programme

Cycling and walking are great ways to travel around the city. When used in

combination with public transport they can get you just about anywhere in the

country. In Holland using bicycles for day trips is hugely popular with over

70% of people in Amsterdam using their bikes for day trips. But in Ireland

cycling is in decline. There are 83% less children cycling to school then there

were in the 1980's. So why aren't more people leaving the car at home? And

how can we encourage people to use the safe, green and healthy options?




Market development- supply/ Changing behavior

Lobbying for Change: Dublin Cycling Campaign has been working since the
early 1990s to improve conditions for cyclists in Dublin. Some of the changes
they have made include:

      30 km/h speed limit in Dublin city centre and residential areas
      Restrictions on heavy goods vehicles in the city centre
      Public bicycle parking provision in the city centre
      Bicycle policy audit (BYPAD) for Dublin City Council
      Establishment of cycle forum for Dublin City
      The removal of bull bars from SUVs

Bicycle Lanes: Dublin City Council began installing cycle lanes and cycle

tracks in the mid 1990s. There are now approximately 120km of on-road cycle

track in the city and 50km of bus lanes that cyclists can use. In addition there
are about 25km of off-road cycle track.
Bicycles and Public Transport: There is no policy in Ireland for allowing

bicycles to be transported on trains and buses. Only two bicycles are allowed

on trains or intercity buses at any one time, making intercity cycling without a

car inaccessible for most people. Nor can you take your bicycle on the Dart in

Dublin. Without change in this area it will be difficult to increase bicycle use.




Supporting mechanism

Bike to Work Scheme

On 1 January 2009 a new government scheme to encourage people to cycle
to work came into force. The new bike scheme covers bicycles and
accessories up to a maximum cost of €1,000. The bicycle must be purchased
by your employer but the scheme can then operate either with your employer
bearing the full cost of the bicycle, or by way of a salary sacrifice agreement
(like the existing travel card scheme) in which you pay for it, tax free, over 12
months.

Participating in the bicycle scheme is easy. If your employer decides to take
part, they simply buy the bike and equipment on your behalf and off you go. It
is up to you and your employer to decided whether they buy the bike outright
for you or whether you pay for it via ‘salary sacrifice’. Either way you save on
tax.

The scheme is flexible in its application in that your employer doesn’t have to
specifically notify the Revenue Commissioners that you’re availing of the
scheme and there are no Government forms to fill out. However, your
employer does have to maintain the normal records such as invoices and
payment details associated with buying the bike.
Dublin Bikes

The Dublin Bikes scheme has been a hugely popular addition to the city.
Following the success of similar schemes in Paris Brussels and Seville, Dublin
City Council undertook a contract with French company JC Decaux. This
company administers the scheme in return for the revenue from 120 new
advertising panels in the city. There are 450 bikes and 40 stations. There are
currently over 25,000 subscribers to the scheme. Which means there are 39
long term subscribers per bike. Most people use the bikes for short journeys
in the city with 95% of the rentals being free (which is under 30 minutes) and
the average journey time is 16 minutes.



Best Practices
In Holland there is a dedicated infrastructure for cycling. There is a plethora of

routes and countrywide cycling grids to be enjoyed, and they are constantly

being expanded. Of the 29,000 total kilometres (18,020 miles) of bike paths,

there are some 6,500 km designated as ‘recreational bicycle routes,’ and of

these, some 4,500 km are signposted.         Also Amsterdam has one of the

highest parking fees in the world: circa €5 per hour, this again encourages

people to cycle.




In the London borough of Hackney 8% of people cycle bikes. This is the

highest percentage in Britain. This has been encouraged by bringing in 20mph

speed limits in certain areas, creating and upgrading cycle lanes, providing

free cycle training, and promoting a bike to work scheme.
Copenhagen is one of the world's great pedestrian cities. Although it's blessed

with certain inherited characteristics--such as a narrow medieval street grid--

the city has worked steadily to improve the quality of its street life. In the 40

years since Copenhagen's main street was turned into a pedestrian

thoroughfare, city planners have taken numerous small steps to transform the

city from a car-oriented place to a people-friendly one. They have pioneered a

method of systematically studying and recording people in the city. After

twenty years of research, they have been able to prove that the steps they

have taken have created four times more public life. This is Copenhagen's

program for a more pedestrian-friendly city.




   ●   Convert street into pedestrian thoroughfares
   ●   Reduce traffic and parking gradually
   ●   Turn parking lots into public squares
   ●   Keep scale dense and low
   ●   Honour the human scale
   ●   Populate the core
   ●   Encourage student living
   ●   Adapt the cityscape to changing seasons
   ●   Promote cycling as a major mode of transportation
   ●   Make bicycles available



BOX Graphs/data and bibliography
Smarter Travel – A Sustainable Transport Future http://www.smartertravel.ie/

Dublin      2     City     Pedestrian      Zone       Extension     Programme
http://www.dublin2walk.com/
Cyclist.ie – Irelands National Cycle Lobby http://www.cyclist.ie/

Walking Matters –       Consultancy service promoting walking to work
http://www.walkingmatters.ie/

Ciaran Cuffe, Cycling Officer, Dubin City Council – Cuffe Street blog
http://cuffestreet.blogspot.com/

Dublin Cycling Campaign http://www.dublincycling.com/

								
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