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City-Related_Bills_Filed by zhangyun

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									H.B. 4 (Pitts) – Park Funding: This supplemental appropriations bill would cut parks grants
from proceeds of the sporting good sales during the current 2010-2011 biennium by $300,000.

H.B. 12 (Solomons) – Immigration: would provide that: (1) a city may not adopt a rule, order,
ordinance, or policy under which the city prohibits the enforcement of state or federal laws
relating to immigration; (2) a city may not prohibit a person employed by or otherwise under the
direction of the city from: (a) inquiring into the immigration status of a person who is arrested or
lawfully detained; (b) sending information to, or receiving information from, United States
Citizenship and Immigration Services or United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement,
or exchanging that information with another federal, state, or local governmental entity; (c)
assisting a federal immigration officer as needed; or (d) permitting a federal immigration officer
to conduct enforcement activities at a municipal jail; (3) a city may not receive state grant funds
if it adopts a rule, order, ordinance, or policy prohibiting the enforcement of state or federal laws
relating to immigration, or prohibits of enforcement of the laws by consistent action; (4) the
attorney general may file a petition for a writ of mandamus or other appropriate equitable relief
to compel a city to comply with (1), above. (Companion bill is S.B. 11 by Williams.)

H.B. 16 (Riddle) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain Web sites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) modify the types of
acceptable voter identification documents; (5) provide that a voter who presents a voter
registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the precinct, but whose
name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for voting if the voter’s
identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (6) provide that a provisional ballot may be
accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of identification at the time the ballot is
cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to the voter registrar by personal
delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot board not later than the fifth day
after the date of the election.

H.B. 18 (Riddle) – Immigration: would prohibit a city from adopting a policy under which the
city's police department or other city officials would not fully enforce state or federal laws
relating to immigration.

H.B. 20 (Riddle) – Burglary of a Vehicle: would make burglary of a vehicle a state jail felony
offense and provide that the amount of community service work ordered by a judge may not
exceed 200 hours for a Class A misdemeanor offense or any other misdemeanor for which the
maximum permissible confinement exceeds six months or the maximum permissible fine
exceeds $4,000.

H.B. 21 Riddle) – Immigration: would require a state agency that distributes money
(apparently including federal pass-through money) to a city to include in the agency’s accounting
amounts spent by the city to provide services to non-citizens.
H.B. 23 (Riddle) – Property Tax: would allow a county commissioners court to call a county-
wide election to reduce the property tax appraisal cap for all taxing units in the county from ten
percent to some percentage between three and ten. (Note: please see H.J.R. 16, below.)

H.B. 26 (Guillen) – Property Tax: would establish eligibility criteria for the active duty
military personnel tax freeze authorized by H.J.R. 17, below. Specifically, the bill would: (1)
require that the property owner be on duty for at least six months at a distance of at least 60 miles
from the homestead; (2) limit the freeze to property that also receives a homestead tax
exemption; (3) allow increased taxes on improvements to the property; (4) permit the chief
appraiser to require proof of ongoing eligibility for the freeze; (5) provide that the tax freeze
expires when the land no longer receives a homestead exemption or when the owner no longer
meets the active duty and distance criteria; (6) provide for the portability of the tax freeze from
one homestead to another within the same taxing unit; and (7) provide rollback rate relief for
value lost to the military tax freeze.

H.B. 30 (Guillen) – Electricity Billing: would prohibit an electric provider, including a
municipally owned utility, from disconnecting service to a residential customer on a Friday,
Saturday, Sunday, federally-declared holiday, the day before the federally-declared holiday, or
after 3:00 pm on any calendar day.

H.B. 32 (Creighton) – Health Insurance: would provide that, with limited exceptions, no
resident of this state, regardless of whether he has or is eligible for health insurance coverage
under any policy or program provided by or through his employer, or a plan sponsored by the
state or the federal government, shall be required to obtain or maintain a policy of individual
insurance coverage except as required by a court or a governmental agency or department where
an individual is named a party in a judicial or administrative proceeding.

H.B. 37 (Menendez) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) define the term “school crossing zone” to
be the same as that in the Transportation Code; (2) prohibit use of a wireless communication
device while operating a motor vehicle unless the vehicle is in park, the vehicle’s brake is
applied, or the device is used with a hands-free device; (3) provide an affirmative defense to
prosecution if the device is used to make an emergency call to an emergency response service, a
hospital, a fire department, a health clinic, a doctor’s office, an individual to administer first aid,
or a law enforcement agency; (4) make an offense under the bill a misdemeanor; and (5) repeal
current requirements to post signs at school crossing zones regarding use of wireless
communication devices.

H.B. 38 (Menendez) - Graffiti: would increase the penalty for graffiti on a government
building to a state jail felony, with an enhancement to the next higher category of offense if the
person has been previously convicted for graffiti.

H.B. 40 (Menendez) – Collective Bargaining: would amend Chapter 174 of the Local
Government Code to grant collective bargaining rights to all city firefighters and police officers
without a popular vote. (Note: this bill anticipates the passage of federal legislation that would
impose collective bargaining on all cities. The TML Legislative Update has frequently reported
on this proposed federal legislation, most recently in the August 26, 2010, edition.)
H.B. 43 (Menendez) – Fire/Police Civil Service: would amend Chapter 143 of the Local
Government Code to limit the way in which a civil service city may investigate a complaint
against a police officer or firefighter, including: (1) limiting the times at which a police officer or
firefighter may be interrogated; (2) not allowing interrogation of a police officer or firefighter at
his/her home; (3) specifying the individuals who may perform the investigation; and (4) limiting
the way in which an interrogation of a police officer or firefighter may be conducted.

H.B. 49 (Pena) – Synthetic Derivative of Marihuana: would make synthetic cannabinoids that
are structurally and clinically similar to marihuana and their analogues and homologues subject
to Penalty Group 2 of the Texas Controlled Substances Act.

H.B. 54 (Martinez Fischer) - Mental Health Transport: would, in specific border counties,
create a prioritized list of persons a judge or magistrate may authorize to transport a person
apprehended under an emergency detention order for mental health. The bill would require the
judge or magistrate to consider four other options for transport before considering the use of
police officers.
H.B. 66 (Martinez) – Public Information: would provide that information a city receives from
a state legislator or the lieutenant governor that is composed exclusively of communications
between the state official and a resident of this state is confidential and may be disclosed by the
city only if the state official elects to disclose the information.

H.B. 68 (Martinez) – Personnel: would require a city employer who decides not to hire an
applicant based on criminal history information to provide a written explanation of the reason for
not hiring the applicant, including: (1) the specific incident that influenced the city employer’s
hiring decision; and (2) the name of the entity from which the city received the criminal history
information.

H.B. 82 (Flynn) – Gambling: would make various changes to the Penal Code provisions
relating to gambling devices such as “eight liners.”

H.B. 87 (Cook) - Metal Recycling: would, among many new provisions regarding the sale of
recyclable metals: (1) expand the definition of those "regulated materials" that a city may govern
through ordinances regarding purchases by recyclers; (2) permit a city to require a fingerprint
from a seller of regulated materials to a metal recycler; (c) require a seller of insulated regulated
material which has been burned in whole or part to present documentation to the recycling entity
from the fire department of a county, city, or other political subdivision that the material was
salvaged from a fire in that political subdivision; and (d) create restrictions on payments for
regulated materials brought for recycling and specifically prohibit a city from creating a more
restrictive ordinance or policy regarding such payments.

H.B. 91 (Cook) – Extraterritorial Jurisdiction: would: (1) expand the ETJ of a city with
25,000 to 49,999 inhabitants to three miles; (2) apportion the ETJ between two cities with
overlapping ETJ as a result of the expansion but prohibit splitting small tracts of land under one
ownership between two cities without the owner’s consent; and (3) prohibit the expansion into
any area in the existing ETJ of another city.
H.B. 93 (Cook) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) prohibit an operator from using a wireless
communication device to read, write, or send a text-based communication while operating a
motor vehicle; (2) provide an affirmative defense to prosecution if the device is permanently
installed in the vehicle, is used while stopped, is used for a phone call, is used with a hands-free
device, or is used to report a suspicious or criminal activity to law enforcement; and (3) make an
offense a misdemeanor or felony depending on certain factors.

H.B. 95 (Fletcher) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran who has not remarried since
the death of the disabled veteran. (Note: please see H.J.R. 23, below.)

H.B. 97 (Paxton) – Health Care: would prohibit a city, insurance provider, or other
governmental agency from penalizing an individual for not accepting health insurance coverage.
(Note: H.J.R. 24 by Paxton proposes a constitutional amendment that mirrors the language of
this bill. Multiple other bills and joint resolutions have been filed regarding this issue.)

H.B. 103 (Martinez Fischer) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) prohibit an operator from using a
wireless communication device while operating a passenger bus with a minor on the bus except
in case of emergency or if the bus is stopped; (2) prohibit an operator from using a wireless
communication device to read, write, or send a text message while operating a motor vehicle
unless the vehicle is stopped and make an offense punishable by fine of $2-$400 if the offense
occurs while the vehicle is in a school crossing zone; and (3) except from the above prohibition
an operator who is a peace officer or emergency response provider using the wireless device in
connection with official duties.

H.B. 105 (Brown) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit use of a wireless communication device
to read, write, or send a text-based communication while operating a motor vehicle unless the
vehicle is stopped, and make an offense a misdemeanor.

H.B. 108 (Brown) – Synthetic Derivative of Marihuana: would make a synthetic derivative of
marihuana, 1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, subject to Penalty Group 2 of the Texas Controlled
Substances Act.

H.B. 111 (V. Taylor) –Elections: would implement the federal Military and Overseas Voter
Empowerment Act by requiring the early voting clerk to make registration and absentee ballots
available to overseas military voters in an election held in conjunction with an election involving
a federal or statewide office. (Companion bill is S.B. 100 by Van de Putte, below.)

H.B. 112 (Harless) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) modify the types of
acceptable voter identification documents; (5) provide that a voter who presents a voter
registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the precinct, but whose
name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for voting if the voter’s
identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (6) provide that a provisional ballot may be
accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of identification at the time the ballot is
cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to the voter registrar by personal
delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot board not later than the sixth
business day after the date of the election.

H.B. 113 (Harless) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit a city from adopting a policy under
which the city’s police department or other city official would not fully enforce state or federal
laws relating to immigration; (2) penalize a city that adopts such a policy by taking away state
grant funds; (3) provide for a civil penalty in the amount of $10,000 per day to be sought by the
attorney general against a city that violates (1), above; and (4) allow a citizen residing in a city
that adopts such a policy or fails to enforce state or federal law to file a petition in a district court
to compel compliance with this law. (Companion bill is S.B. 124 by Patrick.)

H.B. 125 (Legler) – TCEQ Rulemakings: would require that any rule proposed by the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) under the authority of the Texas Water Code
include a draft impact analysis that, at a minimum, meets the requirements of an analysis
required under the Texas Government Code for any major environmental rule, including an
analysis of costs that the agency anticipates state agencies, local governments, the public, and the
regulated community would experience after implementation of the rule.

H.B. 138 (Callegari) – Eminent Domain: would provide that:

    1. the term "blighted area" means an tract of real property that presents four or more of the
       following conditions for one year after a property owner receives notice of the condition:
       (a) the property contains uninhabitable, unsafe, or abandoned structures; (b) the property
       has inadequate provisions for sanitation; (c) there exists on the property an imminent
       harm to life or other property caused by fire, flood, hurricane, tornado, earthquake, storm,
       or other natural catastrophe declared to be a disaster; (d) the property has been identified
       by the federal Environmental Protection Agency as a Superfund site or as
       environmentally contaminated to an extent that the property requires remedial
       investigation or a feasibility study; (e) the property has been the location of substantiated
       and repeated illegal activity of which the property owner knew or should have known; (f)
       the maintenance of the property is below county or municipal standards; (g) the property
       is abandoned and contains a structure that is not fit for its intended use because the
       utilities, sewerage, plumbing, heating, or a similar service or facility of the structure has
       been disconnected, destroyed, removed, or rendered ineffective; or (h) the property
       presents an economic liability to the immediate area because of deteriorating structures or
       hazardous conditions;

    2. the current statutory provisions relating to urban renewal eminent domain apply only to a
       tract of blighted property (as opposed to "slum" areas);
    3. a municipal governing body must determine that each unit of property (as opposed to an
       “area,” as is current law) be designated as blighted, and make corresponding procedural
       changes to urban renewal laws;

    4. notwithstanding any other law, an area may not be considered a blighted area on the basis
       of a condition described in number (1) above unless the city has given notice in writing to
       the property owner regarding the imminent harm to life or other property caused by the
       condition of the property, and the property owner fails to take reasonable measures to
       remedy the harm caused by the property;

    5. an area may not be considered blighted solely for aesthetic reasons;

    6. the special commissioners in a condemnation hearing shall admit evidence on the injury
       to the property owner, including the financial damages associated with the cost of
       relocating from the condemned property, if the property was habitable, to another
       property that allows the property owner to have a standard of living comparable to the
       property owner's standard of living before the condemnation of the property; and
    7. the provisions of the bill shall supercede broad eminent domain powers relative to tax
       increment financing.

H.B. 159 (Raymond) – Texas Municipal Retirement System (TMRS): would: (1) allow an
individual who has retired from TMRS, and who has returned to work at the same city at least
five years since the date of retirement, to receive an additional benefit equal to the amount of
deposits and interest that were credited during the time of re-employment; and (2) preclude
anyone who is already employed by an affected city at the time the bill goes into effect from
receiving the additional benefit. (Note: This bill summary has been slightly revised from the
previously-published summary.)

H.B. 160 (Raymond) – Retaliatory Lawsuits: would: (1) govern certain suits filed by a person
against a complainant who files a complaint with a governmental or quasi-governmental agency
(a.k.a. Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation (SLAPP) suit); (2) allow a complainant to
recover damages, including exemplary damages, from a person who files suit under the above
provision in bad faith; (3) require a court or trier of fact to refer the matter to the district attorney
or federal authorities if a person commits a criminal act in the course of the proceedings in a
SLAPP suit; and (4) not create or authorize a cause of action against a governmental or quasi-
governmental agency.

H.B. 173 (Veasey) – Railroad Commission: would change the name of the Texas Railroad
Commission to the Texas Oil and Gas Commission.

H.B. 177 (Jackson, J) – Immigration: would require that cities and other licensing authorities
who license or permit individuals to engage a business, occupation, or profession to ensure that
the applicant is eligible for employment in the United States before issuing the license.

H.B. 178 (Jackson) – Immigration: would require a city to: (1) participate in the federal
government’s program for electronic verification of employee immigration status (“E-Verify”);
and (2) immediately terminate an employee responsible for verifying the immigration status of
other employees if the verifying employee fails to participate in E-Verify.

H.B. 179 (Alonzo) – Elections: would provide that a person who would be eligible to vote in an
election, but who is not registered, shall be accepted for voting in the precinct of the person's
residence if, on the day the person offers to vote, the person submits a voter registration
application and presents proof of identification that establishes the person’s residence.

H.B. 181 (S. Miller) – Sales Tax: would create an August sales tax holiday for guns and
ammunition.

H.B. 183 (Solomons) – Immigration: would provide that, not later than 48 hours after a person
is arrested and before the person is released on bond, the law enforcement agency that arrested
the person or that has custody of the person shall: (1) have the person's immigration status
verified by a law enforcement officer who is authorized under federal law to verify a person's
immigration status or a federal law enforcement officer; and (2) if United States Immigration
and Customs Enforcement (ICE) does not have the results of the immigration status of the
person, notify ICE if the person is not a citizen or national of the United States and is unlawfully
present in the United States.

H.B. 186 (Perry) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by mailed notice and publishing notice on
certain websites; (2) require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter
registration certificate and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does
not present acceptable identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4)
modify the types of acceptable voter identification documents; (5) provide that a voter who
presents a voter registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the
precinct, but whose name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for
voting if the voter’s identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (6) provide that a
provisional ballot may be accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of
identification at the time the ballot is cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to
the voter registrar by personal delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot
board not later than the sixth business day after the date of the election.

H.B. 188 (Sheffield) – Eminent Domain: would provide that a governmental or private entity
may not take private property through the use of eminent domain if the taking is not necessary
for a public use.

H.B. 199 (Parker) – Sales Tax: would change the date of the sales tax holiday from the third
weekend in August to the first weekend in August.

H.B. 204 (Pickett) – Transportation Reinvestment Zones: would amend the law relating to
transportation reinvestment zones (TRZs) to provide that: (1) a TRZ may be used to facilitate the
improvement, development, or redevelopment of property or to enhance a local entity's ability to
sponsor a transportation project funded by pass-through tolls; (2) an ordinance designating an
area as a TRZ must, among other things, designate the base year for purposes of establishing the
tax increment base of the municipality and contain findings that promotion of the transportation
project will cultivate the improvement, development, or redevelopment of the zone; (3) from
taxes collected on property in a TRZ, the city shall pay into the tax increment account the tax
increment produced by the city, less any amount allocated under previous agreements; (4) all, or
the portion specified by the city, of the money deposited to a tax increment account must be used
to fund the transportation project for which the TRZ was designated, and any remaining money
deposited to the tax increment account may be used for other transportation projects or for
improvements in the TRZ; (5) the governing body of a city may contract with a public or private
entity to develop, redevelop, or improve a transportation project in a TRZ and may pledge and
assign all or a specified amount of money in the tax increment account to that entity; (6) to
accommodate changes in the scope of the project for which a TRZ was designated, the
boundaries of a zone may be amended, with certain exceptions; and (7) county TRZ authority is
expanded.

H.B. 209 (Alonzo) – Library Computers: would require that a public library provide computers
with high-speed Internet access for public use if the public library: (1) has a service area of more
than 50,000 residents; (2) receives state or federal funding to provide high-speed Internet access;
and (3) seeks accreditation as part of a major resource system or a regional library system.
(Note: This summary has been slightly revised from that published in the previous edition of the
Legislative Update.)

H.B. 210 (Alonzo) – Mandated Health Benefit: would: (1) require a health benefit carrier to
allow an enrollee to choose a physician other than her primary care provider to receive a
mammography; but (2) allow the health benefit carrier to have criteria for physicians and
providers who provide these services.

H.B. 215 (Gallego) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require local law enforcement agencies
that use live and photograph lineups to adopt a detailed written policy regarding lineup
identification procedures; and (2) direct the Bill Blackwood Law Enforcement Management
Institute of Texas to develop a model policy and associated training materials to assist law
enforcement agencies with compliance.

H.B. 219 (Gallego) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a law enforcement agency to, in
many cases, make an electronic recording of a custodial interrogation; and (2) create guidelines
for the creation, retention, and later use of the recording as evidence. (Companion bill is S.B. 123
by Ellis, below.)

H.B. 221 (Fletcher) – Burglary of a Vehicle: would make burglary of a vehicle a state jail
felony except in cases where the individual: (1) is younger 21 years of ager; (2) has not been
previously convicted of a class B misdemeanor or higher; and (3) submits a request for
community supervision.

H.B. 234 (Otto) – Property Tax: would provide that back taxes assessed on an improvement to
real property do not incur interest if: (1) the property on which the improvement is located did
not escape taxation in the year the improvement escaped taxation; (2) the appraisal district had
actual or constructive notice of the presence of the improvement the year the improvement
escaped taxation (constructive notice can be acquired if building permit is issued for an
improvement); and (3) the property owner pays all back taxes on the improvement within 120
days of when the tax bill for back taxes on improvement is sent to property owner.

H.B. 239 (Parker) – Elections: would provide that an individual commits a Class A
misdemeanor if the individual compensates another person, or receives compensation, based on
the number of voter registrations that the individual facilitates.

H.B. 241 (Parker) – Property Tax: would repeal the requirement that interest is due on
“rollback” taxes when land loses an agricultural appraisal.

H.B. 243 (Craddick) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit an operator from using a wireless
communication device to read, write, or send a text-based communication while operating a
motor vehicle, unless the vehicle is stopped, and would define text-based communication to
include a text message, instant message, and electronic mail.

H.B. 247 (Solomons) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit a city from adopting a policy under
which the city's police department or other city officials would not fully enforce state or federal
laws relating to immigration; (2) allow the attorney general to file suit to compel a governmental
entity to fully enforce immigration laws; and (3) allow the attorney general to recover reasonable
expenses incurred enforcing this law.

H.B. 248 (Chisum) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) require an election
officer to inform a voter not accepted for voting of rights to cast a provisional ballot and provide
voter with written information regarding information; (5) require an election officer to distribute
written notice of identification requirements to each voter who would present an insufficient
form of identification(4) modify the types of acceptable voter identification documents; (5)
provide that a voter who presents a voter registration certificate indicating that the voter is
currently registered in the precinct, but whose name is not on the precinct list of registered
voters, shall be accepted for voting if the voter’s identity can be verified from the proof
presented; and (6) provide that a provisional ballot may be accepted only if: (a) the voter presents
acceptable proof of identification at the time the ballot is cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of
the identification to the voter registrar by personal delivery or by mail for examination by the
early voting ballot board not later than the sixth day after the date of the election. (Companion
bill is S.B. 178 by Fraser, below.)

H.B. 250 (Hilderbran) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and
the secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) modify the types of
acceptable voter identification documents; (5) make an offense under the bill a second degree
felony or a state jail felony if the person is convicted of attempt; (6) provide that a voter who
presents a voter registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the
precinct, but whose name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for
voting if the voter’s identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (7) provide that a
provisional ballot may be accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of
identification at the time the ballot is cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to
the voter registrar by personal delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot
board not later than the sixth business day after the date of the election.

H.B. 251 (Hilderbran) – Wild Animals: would allow a city to sue for an injunction against an
individual who owns a wild animal and who does not follow the requirements of the Health and
Safety Code.

H.B. 253 (Hilderbran) – School Attendance Officer: would: (1) provide for the enforcement
of compulsory public school attendance requirements, ensure reports of abuse or neglect, ensure
reports of births, and provide for the prosecution of bigamy; and (2) authorize a peace officer
who serves as an attendance officer to make a home visit or otherwise contact the parent of a
student who is the subject of an ongoing investigation of abuse or neglect and who is in violation
of compulsory school attendance requirements.

H.B. 256 (HIlderbran) – Cable and Video Service: would provide that: (1) beginning
September 1, 2011, a cable service provider or video service provider that was not allowed to or
did not terminate a municipal franchise under the current state franchise law (S.B. 5 (2005)) may
elect to terminate that franchise and seek a state-issued certificate of franchise authority for the
area served under the municipal franchise by providing written notice to the Public Utility
Commission and the affected city before January 1, 2012; (2) a cable service provider that elects
to terminate an existing municipal franchise is responsible for remitting to the affected city,
before the 91st day after the date the municipal franchise is terminated, any accrued but unpaid
franchise fees due under the terminated franchise; (3) a city may review the business records of a
cable service provider or video service provider to the extent necessary to ensure compensation
in accordance with a state-issued franchise, provided that the city may only review records that
relate to the 48-month period preceding the date of the last franchise fee payment; (4) if a city
uses the one-percent public, education, and governmental (PEG) channel fee for a purpose that is
not authorized by federal law, the fees are chargeable as a credit against the state-issued
franchise fee payments; (5) a city that receives PEG fees: (a) shall maintain revenue from the
fees in a separate account established for that purpose; (b) may not commingle revenue from the
fees with any other money; (c) shall maintain a record of each deposit to and disbursement from
the separate account, including a record of the payee and purpose of each disbursement;
and (d) not later than January 31 of each year, shall provide to each certificate holder that pays a
fee to the city a detailed accounting of the deposits to and disbursements from the separate
account made in the preceding calendar year; (6) once a local franchise is terminated under the
bill, cable services to community public buildings, such as municipal buildings and public
schools, no longer must be provided; (7) on the expiration or termination of a local franchise
agreement, a provider that provides such services may deduct from the franchise fee to be paid to
the city an amount equal to the actual incremental cost of the services in (6) if the city requires
the services after that date; and (8) where technically feasible, the holder of a state-issued
certificate of franchise authority that is not an incumbent cable service provider and an
incumbent cable service provider, including an incumbent cable service provider that holds a
state-issued certificate of franchise authority issued after terminating pursuant to the bill, shall
use reasonable efforts to interconnect their cable or video systems for the purpose of providing
PEG programming. (S.B. 1089 is substantially similar to this bill.)

H.B. 257 (Hilderbran) – Utility Deposits: would reduce the amount of time that must pass
before an unclaimed utility deposit or other unclaimed personal property is presumed abandoned.
(This bill is identical to H.B. 1764 by Harper-Brown.)

H.B. 258 (N. Gonzalez) – State Traffic Fine: would increase the amount of the “state traffic
fine” on convictions in municipal court from $30 to $45. (This bill is identical to H.B. 1233 by
N. Gonzalez.)(Note: See lead article in this edition for more information on this bill.)

H.B. 259 (Eiland) – Assessment on Video Providers: would: (1) impose on each video
provider (e.g., cable television services and similar services, as well as satellite service) a state
“assessment” of 6-1/4 percent of gross revenues derived from the provision of subscription video
services in this state (but excluding Internet service); (2) define “gross revenues;” (3) provide
that each video provider is entitled to a credit against the assessment imposed under this bill for
state or local franchise fees paid to cities; (4) provide that the total credit claimed on an
assessment report may not exceed the amount of the assessment due for the report; (5) provide
that the assessment imposed by the bill is due and payable to the comptroller on or before the last
day of the first month following the end of each calendar quarter; (6) require a provider on whom
the assessment is imposed by the bill to maintain the necessary records (which shall be open to
the comptroller at all times), and any other information required by the comptroller, to determine
the amount of the assessment that the provider is required to remit and any credit that the
provider is entitled to claim, the number of subscription video service subscribers in each
incorporated area and in the unincorporated area of each county; (7) provide various penalties
against a provider that violates the provisions of the bill; (8) require that three-fourths of the
revenue collected from the assessment imposed by the bill shall be deposited to the credit of the
general revenue fund and one-fourth of the revenue shall be deposited to the credit of the
subscription video assessment clearance fund created under the bill; (9) provide that the
subscription video assessment clearance fund is a special fund in the state treasury outside the
general revenue fund; (10) provide that, effective on January 1, 2012, not later than the last day
of the second month following a calendar quarter, the comptroller shall calculate the pro rata
share of total subscription video service subscribers for each city and the unincorporated area of
each county according to the most recent subscription report filed by each provider; and (11)
require the comptroller to distribute the balance of the amount in the subscription video
assessment clearance fund, less up to a five percent administrative fee in certain circumstances,
by issuing a warrant drawn on the fund to each city with subscription video service subscribers in
an amount equal to the city's pro rata share of the amount in the fund as of the date the warrant is
issued and each county with subscription video service subscribers outside of an incorporated
area in an amount equal to the county’s pro rata share of the amount in the fund as of the date the
warrant is issued. (Note: this bill is apparently meant to be part of a “paired package” with S.B.
1087, below)

H.B. 263 (Hilderbran) – Underground Excavations: would provide, among other things: (1)
that the “call before you dig” requirements in current law do not apply to an emergency
excavation that is necessary to respond to a situation that endangers life, health, or property; and
(2) for procedures and increased penalties for certain violations under the bill. (Companion bill
is S.B. 1217 by Estes.)

H.B. 268 (Hilderbran) – Sales Tax: would require a person to apply for and obtain an
exemption number from the comptroller in order to qualify for a sales tax exemption for certain
agricultural items.

H.B. 270 (Hilderbran) – Sales Tax: would require the state comptroller, upon request, to
provide to a city information relating to the amount of sales tax paid to the city during the
preceding calendar year by each entity doing business in the city that remits annual sales tax
payments of more than $5,000 to the comptroller.

H.B. 274 (Creighton) – Litigation: this is omnibus tort reform legislation and would make
various procedural changes to civil litigation regarding attorney’s fees, early dismissal, expedited
trials, and certain remedies and procedures. (Note: city attorneys need to review this bill
carefully.)

H.B. 278 (Alonzo) – Municipal Court: would require a municipal court to set a pre-trial
hearing upon the request of either party and would require the court to hold the hearing not later
than 30 days before the trial begins.

H.B. 279 (Geren) – Eminent Domain: would do the following:

   1. provide that a governmental or private entity may not take private property through the
      use of eminent domain if the taking is not for a “public use.”
   2. require a record vote with specific procedures and wording to take each parcel of land
      through the use of eminent domain.
   3. require that any entity authorized to exercise the power of eminent domain must submit
      to the state comptroller, by December 31, 2012, a letter stating that the entity is
      authorized to exercise the power of eminent domain and identifying the provision or
      provisions of law that grant the entity that authority, and would provide that the entity’s
      authority to use eminent domain will expire if the letter is not sent by the deadline.

   4. provide, among other things, that an entity with eminent domain authority that wants to
      acquire real property shall disclose to the property owner any and all appraisal reports
      produced or acquired by the entity relating specifically to the owner’s property and
      prepared in the 10 years preceding the offer.

   5.    provide that: (1) an entity seeking to acquire property may not include a confidentiality
        provision in an offer or agreement to acquire the property; and (2) the entity shall inform
     the owner of the property that the owner has the right to: (a) discuss any offer or
     agreement regarding the entity’s acquisition of the property with others; or (b) keep the
     offer or agreement confidential (subject to the requirements of the Texas Public
     Information Act).

6.    require an entity with eminent domain authority that wants to acquire real property for a
     public use to make a bona fide offer to acquire the property from the property owner
     voluntarily, and list specific criteria that must be met to meet the bona fide offer
     requirement.

7. provide that a court that determines that a condemnor did not make a bona fide offer to
   acquire the property from the property owner voluntarily must abate the suit, order the
   condemnor to make a bona fide offer, and order the condemnor to pay costs and
   attorneys’ and other professionals’ fees.

8. provide that a condemnation petition must state with specificity the public use for which
   the entity intends to acquire the property and that the city made a bona fide offer to
   acquire the property voluntarily.

9. provide, among other things, that each party has a reasonable period to strike one of the
   three special commissioners appointed by the judge in the case, with the judge appointing
   a replacement.

10. provide that the special commissioners shall consider an injury or benefit that is peculiar
    to the property owner and that relates to the property owner’s ownership, use, or
    enjoyment of the particular parcel of real property, including a material impairment of
    direct access on or off the remaining property that affects the market value of the
    remaining property, but they may not consider an injury or benefit that the property
    owner experiences in common with the general community, including circuity of travel
    and diversion of traffic.

11. require a city, as a cost of acquiring real property, to: (a) provide a relocation advisory
    service for an individual, a family, a business concern, a farming or ranching operation,
    or a nonprofit organization that is compatible with the Federal Uniform Relocation
    Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act; and (b) pay moving expenses and
    rental supplements, make relocation payments, provide financial assistance to acquire
    replacement housing, and compensate for expenses incidental to the transfer of the
    property if an individual, a family, the personal property of a business, a farming or
    ranching operation, or a nonprofit organization is displaced in connection with the
    acquisition.

12. provide that an entity that is not subject to the Public Information Act, such a gas pipeline
    operator, must disclose certain information relating to its use of eminent domain upon
    request.
   13. modify the current provisions that allow a property owner to repurchase the property if it
       isn’t used by the condemnor within ten years of the date of acquisition.

   14. provide that a city council may adopt a development plan for a public use project at a
       public hearing to toll the 10-year right to repurchase.

   15. modify the standard for determination of the fair value of the state’s interest in access
       rights to a highway right-of-way to be the same legal standard that is applied by the
       Texas Transportation Commission according to the Texas Transportation Code, which
       may include the impairment of highway access to or from real property where the real
       property adjoins the highway.

(Companion bill is S.B. 180 by Estes.)

H.B. 283 (Lucio) – Parks: would: (1) require newly constructed or renovated (where at least
50 percent of the equipment or facilities are renovated) land or water parks that are owned,
operated, or maintained by a city to have: (a) a wheelchair-accessible surface wide enough for
two wheelchairs to pass that connects the parking area to each playground in the park; and (b) at
least one element of the available play equipment in a playground wheelchair accessible; and (2)
authorize the Parks and Wildlife Commission, after consultation with the Department of Aging
and Disability Service or another qualified person, to adopt guidelines to assist a city that
develops or maintains a park in the purchase, design, construction, or installation of wheelchair-
accessible surfaces and equipment.

H.B. 287 (Lucio) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit an operator from using a wireless
communication device to read, write, or send a text-based communication while operating a
motor vehicle unless the vehicle is stopped.

H.B. 288 (Lucio) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) prohibit an operator of a passenger bus from
using a wireless communication device while operating the bus unless the vehicle is stopped; (2)
prohibit an operator of a vehicle used to transport clients of the business or public entity that
owns or leases the vehicle from using a wireless communication device while operating the
vehicle unless the vehicle is stopped; and (3) establish that a vehicle used to transport clients
includes vehicles owned or leased by certain convalescent and nursing home institutions,
continuing care facilities, assisted living facilities, and entities that provide special transportation
services to elderly or disabled persons.

H.B. 293 (Berman) – Immigration: would make an individual whose presence in the United
States is not authorized by federal law ineligible to: (1) be an employee for the state or a city; or
(2) receive retirement payments or benefits as a former employee of the state or a city.

H.B. 296 (Berman) – Immigration: would: (1) require a peace officer to make a reasonable
attempt to determine the immigration status of a person detained or arrested; (2) prohibit an
officer from using immigration status as the grounds for a detention or arrest; (3) prohibit an
officer from unlawfully prolonging the period during which an individual is detained or held in
custody; (4) prohibit an officer from attempting to determine the immigration status of a person
if it would hinder or obstruct a criminal investigation; (5) require an officer to receive judicial
authorization before transferring an undocumented immigrant to a federal facility in another
state; (6) require an officer to notify the federal immigration authorities when an undocumented
immigrant is discharged from confinement or from a fine for violating state or city law; (7)
prohibit a city from limiting or restricting the enforcement of federal immigration law; (8)
require that a city or state agency be allowed to send, receive, and maintain information
regarding a person’s immigration status for use in determining an individual’s eligibility for
benefits and other listed uses; (9) allow a peace officer to use multiple forms of documentation to
determine an individual’s immigration status; (10) allow an officer to transport an undocumented
immigrant to a federal facility or into federal custody; (11) allow an officer to stop and detain a
driver if the officer has an objectively reasonable suspicion that the individual is involved in
violating state or city law; (12) allow an officer to arrest without warrant an individual who the
officer has probable cause to believe has committed an offense that would allow for removal
from the United States under federal law; (13) prohibit a city or other governmental entity from
giving economic development incentives to a business unless the business can prove that it uses
e-verify; (14) require a city as employer to use e-verify and retain the records of verification;
(15) prohibit a city as employer from employing or contracting with an undocumented
immigrant; (16) prohibit a city as employer from contracting with anyone who employs or
contracts with undocumented immigrants; (17) give the attorney general investigation and
enforcement authority regarding these provisions; (18) give the county attorney and county
courts the authorization to enforce these provisions against a city as employer; (19) allow a city
police department to assist in investigating a violation of these provisions; (20) prohibit
individuals from picking up individuals in their car to perform work at another site, if the car is
blocking traffic; (21) prohibit individuals from seeking work from a driver of a car if such
seeking blocks or impedes traffic; (22) prohibit undocumented immigrants from soliciting work;
and (23) require a peace officer to impound a motor vehicle for 30 days if that the officer has
probable cause to believe is being used to transport undocumented immigrants.

H.B. 297 (Berman) – Health Care: would: (1) declare the federal Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act unconstitutional and unenforceable; and (2) make it a crime to enforce the
Act.

H.B. 301 (Berman) – Official Language: would: (1) establish English as the official language
for acts of government; (2) prevent the state or a political subdivision of the state from making a
policy that expresses a preference for any language other than English, subject to certain
exceptions; (3) require elected and appointed officers of the state or a political subdivision of the
state to take all reasonable steps to ensure the role of English as the official language is preserved
and enhanced; and (4) prohibit the legislature or the governing body of a political subdivision
from appropriating money to promote the use of or demonstrate a preference for any language
other than English, except as expressly provided. (Note: please see H.J.R. 38, below.)

H.B. 302 (Berman) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit a city from adopting a policy under
which the city would not fully enforce state or federal laws, including laws relating to
immigration; (2) prohibit a city from restricting a person employed by or under the direction or
control of the city from: (a) sending information to or requesting information about the
immigration status of an individual to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service or
United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement; (b) maintaining information about the
immigration status of an individual; (c) exchanging information about the immigration status of
an individual with another federal, state, or local government; (d) assisting or cooperating with a
federal immigration officer; or (e) permitting a federal immigration officer to enter and conduct
enforcement activities at a municipal jail; (3) penalize a city that violates (1) or (2), above, by
taking away state grant funds; (4) allow a citizen residing in a city that violates (1) or (2), above,
to file a petition in a district court to compel compliance with this law; and (5) make an elected
city official who violates (1) or (2), above, liable to the state for a civil penalty of $1,000-$5,000.

H.B. 303 (McClendon) – Commuter Rail Districts: would provide, among other things, that:
(1) an agreement to create an intermunicipal commuter rail district may establish one or more
transportation infrastructure tax increment zones, which may consist of a contiguous or
noncontiguous geographic area in the territory of one or more local governments; (2) a district
and a local government may agree that, at one or more specified times, the local government will
pay to the district an amount that is calculated on the basis of increased ad valorem tax
collections in a zone that are attributable to increased values of property located in the zone
resulting from an infrastructure project; and (3) money received by a district may be used to,
among other things, pay economic development costs associated with district projects, including
a portion of the cost of affordable housing in a zone, assistance to a private entity to provide
affordable housing in the zone, or for acquiring property rights for underdeveloped lands in the
zone to be preserved for the benefit of the public.

H.B. 304 (Pena) – Elections: would provide that a person providing assistance to a voter: (1)
must be a registered voter of the county in which the election is being held; (2) shall provide
photo identification to an election officer at the polling place; (3) may not assist more than two
voters in a day, which includes early voting and voting by mail; and (4) is liable to the state for a
civil penalty up to $10,000 if the person assists more than two voters in a day.

H.B. 305 (Harless) – Burglary of a Vehicle: would make burglary of a vehicle a state jail
felony offense if it is shown at trial that the defendant was previously convicted of a burglary of
a vehicle offense or if it is shown the vehicle or part of the vehicle broken into or entered is a rail
car, otherwise an offense would be a Class A misdemeanor.

H.B. 307 (Menendez) – Housing: would require the Texas Department of Housing and
Community Affairs to administer a homeless housing and services program in each city with a
population of 285,500 or more to provide for the development of housing for homeless persons
and provide local programs to prevent homelessness.

H.B. 310 (T. King) – Water Supply Corporations: would create election procedures and
candidate eligibility requirements for directors of water and sewer supply corporations, including
a requirement for an independent election auditor.

H.B. 311 (Geren) – Immigration: would require a peace officer to: (1) inquire into the
immigration status of any arrestee; and (2) identify and report the individual to the federal
immigration authorities if the person is an undocumented immigrant.
H.B. 312 (Callegari) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax appraisal cap on
homesteads from ten to five percent. (Companion bill is S.B. 129 by Patrick.) (Note: Please
see H.J.R. 39, below.)

H.B. 313 (Pickett) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since
the death of the disabled veteran. (This bill is identical to H.B. 95 by Fletcher.) (Note: please
see H.J.R. 40, below.)

H.B. 317 (Cook) – County Land Use Authority: would: (1) authorize the commissioners court
of a county, if authorized by an election in the county, to regulate, by order, land use in the
unincorporated area of the county by requiring a buffer zone between the land used for
residential and certain other uses; and (2) provide for an exemption for gas pipelines or drilling
or operating an oil or gas well.

H.B. 320 (Alonzo) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) authorize a city’s police department to
equip each vehicle used in a K-9 law enforcement program, except open-air vehicles, with a heat
alarm system that would activate when the vehicle stops running or the temperature in the
vehicle become dangerous to a police dog; (2) require the heat alarm system, when activated, to
have an audible alarm, to lower the vehicle’s rear windows, and to page the K-9 officer; and (3)
exempt a vehicle with a heat alarm system in place on September 11, 2011, from the
requirements in (2) above until January 1, 2013.

H.B. 327 (Guillen) – Specialty License Plates: would provide for the issuance of specialty
license plates for municipal judges.

H.B. 331 (Guillen) – Municipal Court Fees: would authorize a city to: (1) create a municipal
court equal justice and education fund; (2) require a defendant convicted of a misdemeanor
offense to pay a $1 equal justice and education fee for deposit into the fund; and (3) use such
funds for various expenditures to be authorized by the municipal judge, including the
appointment of an attorney for an indigent defendant, the education of judges and personnel, or
the purchase of services, materials, or equipment for the court to provide equal justice.

H.B. 339 (Aycock) – Elections: would provide that a political subdivision with a population of
less than 1,500, other than a county, is exempt from certain electronic voting machine
requirements, provided reasonable accommodations are made for persons with disabilities. The
exemption would not apply during a joint election where a federal office appears on the ballot.

H.B. 340 (Gallego) – Net Electric Metering: would mandate that the Public Utility
Commission adopt rules and standards under which a retail electric provider, electric
cooperative, municipally-owned electric utility, or transmission and distribution utility shall offer
net metering service its customers. (Note: net metering allows a customer with in-home
renewable energy technology, such as solar panels or a wind turbine, to sell excess energy back
to the utility.)
H.B. 342 (Fletcher) – Police/Fire Civil Service: would amend Chapter 143 of the Local
Government Code to provide that: (1) if a civil service commission finds that a period of
disciplinary suspension should be reduced, the commission may order a reduction in the period
of suspension; and (2) if the commission or a hearing examiner orders that a suspended
firefighter or police officer be restored to the position or class of service from which the person
was suspended, the firefighter or police officer is entitled to immediate reinstatement to the
position or class of service from which the person was suspended, notwithstanding any action
filed in a court by the city or department head challenging the commission's decision.

H.B. 343 (Fletcher) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) provide that the record of a license holder
who is a peace officer, fire fighter, or emergency medical services employee of a city may not
include information relating to a traffic accident that occurs while the employee is driving an
official vehicle in the course and scope of the employee’s official duties if the traffic accident
results in damages to property of less than $1,000 or an investigation by a peace officer not
involved in the accident determines that the employee was not at fault (Current law provides that
the record may not include information relating to a traffic accident that occurs during an
emergency while the person is driving an official vehicle in the course and scope of official
duties.); and (2) require that an accident form prepared by the Texas Department of
Transportation: (a) include a way to designate and identify a peace officer, firefighter or
emergency medical services employee who is involved in an accident while driving a vehicle in
the performance of the employee’s duties; and (b) require a statement by the employee as to the
nature of the accident.

H.B. 345 (Kleinschmidt) – Litigation: would expand the liability of a city in a contract dispute
by allowing parties prevailing against a city to be awarded interest on disputed payments.

H.B. 348 (Walle) – Police Training: would require a peace officer who is a school resource
officer to complete: (1) a twenty-hour education and training program developed by the Texas
Education Agency before being allowed to work as a school resource officer or school security
personnel; and (2) eight hours of continuing education developed by the Texas Education
Agency.

H.B. 350 (Walle) – Juvenile Defendants: would authorize a justice to discharge all or part of
the fine or costs assessed against a juvenile defendant for a class C misdemeanor committed at a
primary or secondary school at which the defendant was enrolled by performing community
service or attending a tutoring program.

H.B. 351 (Veasey) – Expunction: would expand the circumstances under which a person may
request expunction of all records of an arrest

H.B. 363 (S. Turner) – Urban Renewal: would, among other things, provide that abnormally
high rates of crime are an additional criteria that defines a “blighted area” under the current
urban renewal law.
H.B. 364 (S. Turner) – Urban Renewal: would permit eminent domain for the elimination of
urban blight even in cases where economic development is a secondary purpose of the eminent
domain.

H.B. 369 (Hochberg) – Elections: would require the secretary of state to create a process to
verify a voter registration application if a minor correction to the applicant’s last name or date of
birth would lead a reasonable person to conclude that the submitted application corresponds with
the applicant.

H.B. 378 (Guillen) – Tow Trucks: would require a driver to reduce his speed or vacate the lane
next to a stationary tow truck when its lights are flashing.

H.B. 379 (Guillen) – Sales Tax: would change the date of the sales tax holiday to the Friday
before the eighth day preceding the earliest date on which a school district may begin instruction
for the school year.

H.B. 382 (Menendez) – Poker: would: (1) legalize poker in Texas; (2) tax poker proceeds
received by businesses; and (3) provide that part of the proceeds of the state tax on poker would
be used for city projects to help the homeless.

H.B. 387 (S. Turner) – Employee Leave: would require a city to: (1) grant up to ten hours of
unpaid leave to an employee who has worked for the city for at least a year for purposes of
meeting with school officials; (2) grant paid leave if the employee has accrued vacation,
compensatory, personal, or other appropriate leave; and (3) post notice of employees’ rights
under this law.

H.B. 395 (V. Gonzales) – Municipal Court Security Fee: would increase the cap for the
municipal court security fee from $3 to $8.

H.B. 401 (T. Smith) – Voter Identification: would make various changes to the documentation
required to vote. Specifically, the bill would provide that:

   1. On offering to vote, a voter must present one form of identification listed in the bill,
      including: (a) a driver’s license or personal identification card issued to the person by the
      Department of Public Safety that has not expired or that expired no earlier than one year
      before the date of presentation; (b) a United States military identification card that
      contains the person’s photograph; (c) a United States citizenship certificate issued to the
      person that contains the person’s photograph; (d) a United States passport issued to the
      person; (e) a license to carry a concealed handgun issued to the person by the Department
      of Public Safety that contains the person’s photograph; (f) a student identification card
      issued by a public or private institution of higher education that contains the person’s
      photograph; (g) a valid identification card that contains the person’s photograph and is
      issued by an agency or institution of the federal government or an agency, institution, or
      political subdivision of this state; or a tribal organization; or (h) a Texas voter
      identification card issued under the bill.
2. Each voter registrar shall: (a) issue Texas voter identification cards to registered voters to
   be used only for the purpose of meeting the identification requirements to vote; (b)
   provide at least one place in the county to accept applications for and issue Texas voter
   identification cards; and (c) not charge an application fee or a fee for the issuance of a
   Texas voter identification card.

3. A person who has a valid driver’s license or personal identification card issued to the
   person by the Department of Public Safety is not eligible for a Texas voter identification
   card.

4. The Texas voter identification card issued to a person must: (a) be captioned “TEXAS
   VOTER IDENTIFICATION CARD”; (b) contain a prominent statement that under
   Texas law the card is valid only as identification for voting purposes; (c) be laminated;
   (d) contain a digital color photograph of the person; and (e) include the following
   information relating to the person: (A) full legal name; (B) residence address; (C) birth
   date;      (D) date       the     identification      card     was       issued; (E) sex;
   (F) height; (G) weight; (H) eye color; (I) the county where the identification card
   was issued, including a county number to be assigned for each county by the secretary
   of state; and (J) any other information or identification as required by rule of the
   secretary of state.

5. The application for a Texas voter identification card must be signed and sworn to by the
   applicant.

6. The following information must be presented to, and verified by, the voter registrar
   before the voter registrar issues a Texas voter identification card to a person: (a) a photo
   identification document, or an identification document that includes both the person's full
   legal name and date of birth; (b) documentation showing the person’s date of
   birth; (c) evidence that the person is registered to vote in this state; and
   (d) documentation showing the person's name and address of principal residence.

7. A Texas voter identification card remains valid if the person to whom it was issued
   resides at the same address and remains qualified to vote.

8. A person who changes residence within the state must surrender the card to the voter
   registrar of the new county of residence and may apply for and receive a Texas
   voter identification card issued by the new county of residence if the person is otherwise
   eligible under this section.

9. The secretary of state shall provide each voter registrar with the necessary equipment,
   forms, supplies, and training for the production of the Texas voter identification cards
   and shall maintain the equipment and adopt rules for the administration of the bill.

10. On presentation of the documentation required by section (1), above: (a) an election
    officer shall determine whether the voter’s name on the documentation is on the list of
    registered voters for the precinct; (b) if the voter’s name is on the precinct list of
       registered voters and the voter’s identity can be verified from the documentation
       presented, the voter shall be accepted for voting; and (c) after determining whether to
       accept a voter, an election officer shall return the voter's documentation to the voter.

   11. A voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only if the requirement for identification
       is not met.

   12. A voter who is accepted for provisional voting because the voter does not present proof
       of identification may, not later than the seventh business day after the date of the election,
       present proof of identification to the voter registrar for examination by the early voting
       ballot board.

   13. The Texas Department of Public Safety may not collect a fee for a personal identification
       certificate issued to a person who executes an affidavit stating that the person is obtaining
       the personal identification certificate for the purpose of satisfying the voter identification
       requirements in the Election Code and does not have another form of identification
       acceptable under the Election Code if the person is a registered voter in this state and
       presents a valid voter registration certificate or submits a registration application to the
       department.

H.B. 405 (Quintanilla) – Tire Disposal: would: (1) enact provisions relating to the
registration, storage, transportation, and disposal of scrap tires; (2) require a seller of new or used
tires to collect certain fees upon the sale of tires; (3) mandate that the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality adopt application forms and procedures for the processes authorized
under the bill; and (4) provide that a political subdivision shall notify the commission when the
political subdivision becomes aware of used or scrap tires disposed of at a location where the
disposal is not authorized by permit.

H.B. 406 (Quintanilla) – Alcohol: would: (1) authorize a city council to enact regulations
prohibiting the possession or consumption of alcohol at a location that was previously licensed or
permitted to sell alcohol for on-premises consumption if the council determines the license or
permit was canceled or not renewed because of ongoing criminal activity on the premises that
threatened the public health, safety, or welfare; and (2) authorize a county commissioners court
to do the same as described in (1), above, in areas in the county outside of an incorporated city.

H.B. 408 (Walle) – Juvenile Case Managers: would create new ethics and training
requirements for juvenile case managers in municipal court, similar to those for juvenile
probation officers.

H.B. 409 (Walle) – Juvenile Case Managers: would: (1) require the judge of a municipal court
that has a juvenile case manager to either directly supervise the case manager or delegate the
duty to another officer of the court who is authorized to conduct hearings under the Family Code,
and (2) prohibit the judge from delegating the duty of supervising a juvenile case manager to the
clerk of the court. (This bill is the same as S.B. 209 by Zaffirini.)
H.B. 416 (Anchia) – Elections: would: (1) extend the time in which the early voting ballot board
shall verify and count provisional ballots from within seven days after election day to within ten
days after election day; (2) extend the time frame in which a local canvass must occur for a May
election from no later than the eleventh day after election day to no later than the fourteenth day
after election day; and (3) provide that an election officer serving at an early voting polling
place is a deputy voter registrar and shall accept a voter who submits a voter registration
application and photo identification at polling place, but specifies that an this requirement does
not apply to an authority holding an election that does not include a statewide or federal election.

H.B. 431 (Larson) – County Charter: would: (1) authorize the commissioners court of Bexar
County to adopt a home rule charter pursuant to procedures that are similar to the adoption of
home rule charter by a city; and (2) provide detailed procedures whereby a county charter would
integrate the county with other political subdivisions, including cities. (Note: please see H.J.R.
47, below).

 H.B. 437 (Rodriguez) – MTBEs: would: (1) provide standards for a manufacturer, processor,
distributor, recycler, or seller of certain anti-freeze or engine coolant additives; (2) limit the
liability of an entity listed in (1), above; and (3) provide that a political subdivision may not
adopt or enforce an ordinance that is inconsistent with or more restricted than the standards in the
bill.

H.B. 438 (Thompson) – Mandatory Health Benefits: would require the issuer of a health
benefit plan to provide coverage for orally administered anticancer medication at the same level
that it provides coverage for intravenously administered or injected cancer medications.
(Companion bill is S.B. 262 by Carona).

H.B. 439 (T. Smith) – Sobriety Checkpoints: would authorize sobriety checkpoints by the
Texas Department of Public Safety, the sheriff's department of a county with a population of
250,000 or more, or the police department of a city with a population of 500,000 or more; and
(2) provide detailed guidelines for checkpoint operations, including – among many others –
requirements that: (1)the mayor of a city approve a checkpoint operated by the police department
of the city; (b) the law enforcement agency record in writing and publish on an appropriate
publicly accessible Internet Web site the procedures used to implement the bill; (c) before
beginning the operation of a sobriety checkpoint, the law enforcement agency shall publicize
through the use of the media the date and time for the operation of the checkpoint but is not
required to disclose the location of the checkpoint; and (d) not later than January 15 of each
calendar year, each law enforcement agency that operated a sobriety checkpoint during the
preceding calendar year shall report the operation of the checkpoint to the traffic safety section
of the traffic operations division of the Texas Department of Transportation.

H.B. 440 (S. Turner) – Law Enforcement: would prohibit a peace officer from taking a blood
specimen from a vehicle operator to test for alcohol concentration or other intoxicating
substances.

H.B. 442 (Guillen) – Emergency Communications: would change the purpose of the court
cost for fugitive apprehension to that of emergency radio infrastructure, with the proceeds to be
used for an interoperable statewide emergency radio infrastructure and other public safety
purposes.

H.B. 443 (Fletcher) – Municipal Court: would authorize a $75 fee to be assessed upon
conviction of any offense to pay for the services of a peace officer who has executed or
processed an arrest warrant, capias, or capias pro fine.

H.B. 445 (Guillen) – Property Tax: would provide that a disabled veteran or the unmarried
surviving spouse of a disabled veteran may make installment payments of property taxes if at
least one-fourth of the individual’s taxes are paid before the delinquency date and certain steps
are taken to notify the taxing unit that the remaining taxes will be paid in installments.

H.B. 451 (Lucio) – Illegal Dumping: would require the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality to create a hotline, which would forward calls to the appropriate local law enforcement
agency, for drivers to report illegal dumping.

H.B. 453 (Lucio) – Sales Tax: would exempt the sale, use, or installation of a renewable energy
device from sales taxes.

H.B. 454 (Lucio) – Motor Fuels Tax: would provide that the state motor fuels tax does not
apply to certain ethanol fuels.

H.B. 455 (Lucio) – Sales Tax: would exempt books purchased by university and college
students from sales taxes if purchased during a specified time period each semester.

H.B. 461 (Kleinschmidt) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead
property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran if the property was
the residence homestead of the surviving spouse when the disabled veteran died and the property
remains the residence homestead of the surviving spouse. (Note: please see H.J.R. 47, below).

H.B. 465 (Burnam) – Texas Enterprise Fund: would abolish the Texas Enterprise Fund, as
well as other economic development programs and zones, some of which are city-created.

H.B. 466 (Burnam) – Texas Enterprise Fund: would prohibit the governor from entering into
an agreement to award a grant from the Texas Enterprise Fund after August 31, 2011, as well as
other economic development programs and zones, some of which are city-created.

H.B. 469 (Callegari) – Property Tax: would prorate the taxes due on a residence homestead of
a totally disabled veteran when an individual terminates the exemption for one property and
qualifies a different property for the exemption in the same year. (Companion bill is S.B. 201 by
Uresti.)

H.B. 470 (Anderson) – Salvia Divinorum: would make Salvia Divinorum and its derivatives
and extracts subject to Penalty Group 3 of the Texas Controlled Substances Act.
H.B. 471 (C. Anderson) – Unions: would require an exclusive bargaining representative for a
union to: (1) be elected by secret ballot and by majority vote of those present and participating;
or (2) be elected through a vote of an entire collective bargaining unit through mailed ballots.
(The collective bargaining provisions of Chapter 101 of the Labor Code may or may not apply to
a city depending on the outcome of litigation currently at the Supreme Court of Texas. Please
contact the TML Legal Department for more information).

H.B. 472 (Anderson) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving spouse
has not remarried; (2) the property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse when
the disabled veteran died; and (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the surviving
spouse. (Note: please see H.J.R. 48, below.)

H.B. 473 (T. Smith) – Intoxication Offenses: would modify the consequences of an arrest or
conviction for driving while intoxicated and certain other intoxication offenses.

H.B. 478 (Orr) – Traffic Fines: would eliminate the court cost associated with the offense of
failing to secure a child passenger in a motor vehicle, which is currently remitted to the state
comptroller and appropriated only to the Texas Department of Transportation for the purchase of
child safety seat systems for low-income families.

H.B. 479 (Orr) – Economic Development Corporations: would permit the board of directors
for a Type A or Type B economic development corporation located in a county with a population
of less than 30,000 to conduct a board meeting anywhere within the boundaries of the county.
(Current law requires that a meeting be held within the limits of the creating city.)

H.B. 480 (Fletcher) – Peace Officer Training: would allow the Bill Blackwood Law
Enforcement Institute of Texas (LEMIT) to establish and offer a continuing education program
for second-in-command staff that would exempt the second in command staff from certain other
the continuing education standards. (Companion bill is S.B. 244 by Patrick).

H.B. 489 (Dutton) – Municipal Court: would: (1) require a municipal prosecutor, upon request
by a defendant and subject to certain exceptions and existing rules of evidence, to make available
to the defendant multiple types of discovery records related to the case; (2) require the same of
the defendant; (3) create sanctions for violations; (4) apply the requirements to pro se defendants
only as required by the court; and (5) give the release requirement precedence over the Texas
Public Information Act

H.B. 490 (Dutton) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity: would allow a city and an
investor-owned water and sewer utility to agree in writing to, upon annexation of an area into a
city, transfer the certificate of convenience and necessity for that area to the city or provide that
the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality shall grant single certification to the city,
among other authorized action.

H.B. 494 (Dutton) – Water Ratemaking: would require a ratemaking authority (either a city or
the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality) to exclude legal expenses that are incurred by
a privately owned water and sewer utility during a contested ratemaking case or appeal in the
calculation of water rates.

H.B. 499 (Rodriguez) – Property Tax: would allow the governing body of a taxing unit or
appraisal district to collect an additional penalty on a corrected or supplemental tax bill that
become delinquent on or after June 1.

H.B. 501 (Solomons) – Public Information: would: (1) prohibit a person from disseminating
any criminal history record information for which the person has knowledge or has received
notice that an order of expunction or nondisclosure has been issued, and (2) makes the person
who releases criminal history record information in spite of knowledge or notice of such orders
liable to the individual who is the subject of the information for up to $25,000 per violation and
$5,000 per subsequent day of violation, as well as court costs and attorney's fees.

H.B. 506 (Callegari) – Intoxication Offenses: would require the use of ignition interlock
devices as a condition of community supervision following a conviction for certain intoxication
offenses.

H.B. 507 (Button) – Procurement Notice: would provide that: (1) if a city maintains an
Internet Web site, the city – instead of publishing notice of competitive procurement solely in a
newspaper – may: (a) publish notice – either in print or on a newspaper's Internet Web site – in
the newspaper once not later than the fourteenth day before the bid receipt deadline; and (b) post
notice continuously on the city’s Web site for at least fourteen days immediately preceding the
bid receipt deadline; and (2) the procurement of legal notices is exempt from competitive
bidding.

H.B. 509 (Guillen) – Reckless Driving: would increase the maximum fine for the offense of
reckless driving from $200 to $500.

H.B. 512 (Dutton) – Peace Officer Searches: would provide that a peace officer who stops a
motor vehicle for any alleged violation of a law or ordinance regulating traffic may not search
the vehicle unless the peace officer: (1) has probable cause or another legal basis for conducting
the search, including conducting a search based on a reasonable fear for the safety of the peace
officer or another person; (2) obtains the written consent of the operator of the vehicle on a state-
mandated form; or (3) obtains the oral consent of the operator of the vehicle and ensures that the
oral consent is evidenced by an audio and video recording made according to state-adopted
procedures.

H.B. 519 (S. Turner) – Electricity: would, among other things, provide that: (1) until a
municipally owned utility or electric cooperative implements customer choice, the utility or
cooperative may not reduce in any manner programs already offered to assist low-income
electric customers; (2) the Public Utility Commission shall adopt and enforce rules requiring
transmission and distribution utilities to establish a low-income electric customers program fund
under commission oversight; and (3) the commission by rule shall impose a nonbypassable low-
income electric customers program fund fee in an amount not to exceed 63 cents per megawatt
hour, allocated to customers based on the amount of kilowatt hours used, on the retail electric
customers of a municipally owned utility or electric cooperative beginning on the first day of the
sixth month preceding the date on which the utility or cooperative implements customer choice.

H.B. 520 (Driver) – Police Personnel Records: would: (1) require a police chief to indicate
that an officer was terminated when filing a report to the Texas Commission on Law
Enforcement Officer and Education; (2) allow an officer to dispute a report stating that the
officer was terminated in an appeal to the State Office of Administrative Hearings; and (3) allow
the Commission to assess an administrative penalty against a police chief who fails to make a
correction to an employment termination report after being ordered to do so by the State Office
of Administrative Hearings.

H.B. 524 (F. Brown) – Disannexation: would provide that if a city fails or refuses to disannex
an area pursuant to a petition alleging failure to provide services, a district court shall enter an
order disannexing the area if the court finds that a valid petition was filed with the city and that
the city failed to perform its obligations in accordance with the service plan or the state law
governing provision of services. (Note: This bill would overturn a Supreme Court of Texas
decision in favor of the City of Bryan.)

H.B. 526 (McLendon) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead
property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving
spouse has not remarried; (2) the property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse
when the disabled veteran died; and (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the
surviving spouse. (Note: please see H.J.R. 528, below.)

H.B. 531 (McClendon) – Emergency Prehospital Care: would: (1) except emergency
medical services personnel who are providing emergency prehospital care from civil liability,
criminal liability or disciplinary action for failure to act in accordance with a written directive;
(2) except emergency medical service personnel who are providing emergency prehospital care
from reviewing, examining, interpreting or honoring a person’s out-of-hospital DNR order; and
(3) permit a physician present while a person is receiving emergency prehospital care to order
the termination of CPR if the physician determines that it should be discontinued.

H.B. 532 (Lewis) – Immigration: would: (1) provide that as soon as practicable after a person
is arrested for a felony or for driving while intoxicated, and before the person is released on
bond, the law enforcement agency that arrested the person or that has custody of the person shall
make a reasonable effort to: (a) have the person's immigration status verified by a law
enforcement officer who is authorized under federal law to verify a person's immigration status
or a federal law enforcement officer; and (b) if United States Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE) does not have the results of the immigration status of the person, notify ICE
if the person is not a citizen or national of the United States and is unlawfully present in the
United States; (2) allow a peace officer: (a) without warrant, to arrest an individual who the
officer has probable cause to believe is not a citizen and is unlawfully present in the United
States; (b) to detain the individual for up to 48 hours; and (c) require an officer to promptly
notify ICE; (3) limit how bail may be set for individuals arrested for a felony or for driving while
intoxicated and who is unlawfully present in the United States; and (4) make it a felony of the
second degree for a person who is not a citizen of the United States to: (a) submit or attempt to
induce another to submit an application for voter registration; or (b) vote in an election.

H.B. 533 (Villarreal) – Property Tax: would: (1) require the chief appraiser of an appraisal
district to provide written notice to a property owner of a penalty for failure to file a rendition
statement or property report by certified mail; (2) provide that a penalty for failure to file a
rendition statement or property report is final if the penalty is not timely protested, an appraisal
review board order has been issued, or if a court imposes the penalty; (3) repeal the statute
allowing the chief appraiser to keep up to twenty percent of a penalty and redistribute a portion
to each taxing unit participating in the appraisal district; (4) allow an appraisal review board, and
not the chief appraiser, to waive a penalty under certain circumstances.

H.B. 539 (C. Anderson) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and
the secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain Web sites; (2)
provide that each election clerk shall complete training relating to the acceptance and handling of
the identification presented by a voter to an election officer; (3) provide that the presiding judge
shall post in a prominent place on the outside of each polling location notice that a provisional
ballot will be provided to a person who executes the appropriate affidavit and a list of the
acceptable forms of photographic and non-photographic identification; (4) require a voter to
present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate and an acceptable
form of identification; (5) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable identification, the
voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (6) modify the types of acceptable voter
identification documents; and (7) provide that a voter who is accepted for provisional voting due
to lack of proper identification may present acceptable proof of identification to the early voting
ballot board not later than the sixth day after the date of the election.

H.B. 546 (Dutton) – Arrest Expunction: would authorize a district court to expunge all records
and files relating to the arrest of a person if the person is placed on deferred adjudication
community supervision for certain offenses and the judge subsequently discharges the person
and dismisses the proceedings.

H.B. 552 (Phillips)—Federal Health Care Act: would prohibit any health care exchange
administered by the federal government or created by the federal health care act from providing
coverage for abortions.

H.B. 563 (Pickett) – Transportation Reinvestment Zones: would amend the law relating to
transportation reinvestment zones (TRZs) to provide that: (1) a TRZ may be used to facilitate the
improvement, development, or redevelopment of property or to enhance a local entity's ability to
sponsor a transportation project funded by pass-through tolls; (2) an ordinance designating an
area as a TRZ must, among other things, designate the base year for purposes of establishing the
tax increment base of the municipality and contain findings that promotion of the transportation
project will cultivate the improvement, development, or redevelopment of the zone; (3) from
taxes collected on property in a TRZ, the city shall pay into the tax increment account the tax
increment produced by the city, less any amount allocated under previous agreements; (4) all, or
the portion specified by the city, of the money deposited to a tax increment account must be used
to fund the transportation project for which the TRZ was designated, and any remaining money
deposited to the tax increment account may be used for other transportation projects or for
improvements in the TRZ; (5) the governing body of a city may contract with a public or private
entity to develop, redevelop, or improve a transportation project in a TRZ and may pledge and
assign all or a specified amount of money in the tax increment account to that entity; (6) to
accommodate changes in the scope of the project for which a TRZ was designated, the
boundaries of a zone may be amended, with certain exceptions; (7) any surplus remaining in a
tax increment account on termination of a zone may be used for other purposes as determined by
the municipality; (8) county TRZ authority is expanded; and (9) The Texas Department of
Transportation may not reduce funding to a county or city that designates and uses a TRZ, nor
may the department reduce funding to one if its districts because the district contains a TRZ.

H.B. 564 (Craddick) – Portable Fire Extinguishers: would require a city that adopts an
ordinance, order, or policy requiring motor vehicles owned by the city to be equipped with
portable fire extinguishers to have the extinguishers inspected annually.

H.B. 567 (Guillen) – Mandatory School Attendance: would authorize a municipal court to, in
some instances where juveniles appear before the court: (1) require a parent and child to provide
the court with evidence that the child is in compliance with the compulsory school attendance
requirements in state law; (2) include in the judgment against the child an order for the parent
and child to comply with compulsory school attendance laws and provide evidence of such
compliance to the court; and (3) if applicable, order the child’s learner’s permit or driver’s
license suspended for up to a year.

H.B. 571 (Huberty) – Aggregate Quarries: would place new registration, inspection, and
reporting requirements on aggregate quarries, as well as creating fees and enforcement authority
through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. (Any city that regulates quarry
operations should review this bill closely.)

H.B. 575 (Howard, D.)—Governmental Immunity: would allow a nurse to sue a
governmental entity, including a city, who employs the nurse if the city has retaliated,
discriminated, or terminated the nurse for filing a good faith report.

H.B. 576 (McClendon) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead
property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving
spouse has not remarried; (2) the property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse
when the disabled veteran died; (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the
surviving spouse; and (4) the qualifying surviving spouse applies for an exemption each year the
spouse claims entitlement to the exemption.

H.B. 577 (McClendon) – Emergency Services: would: (1) provide that emergency medical
services personnel who are providing emergency prehospital care do not have to review or honor
a person’s written directive; (2) provide that emergency medical services personnel who are
providing emergency prehospital care are subject to Health and Safety Code chapter 166; and (3)
authorize a physician present while a person is receiving emergency prehospital care to order the
termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
H.B. 582 (Button) – E-verify: would prohibit a governmental entity, including a city, from
awarding an economic development subsidy to a business that does not participate in E-verify.

H.B. 590 (Thompson) – Sales Tax: would do the following regarding the reallocation of city
sales tax revenues due to a mistake: (1) allow a taxpayer to amend a tax report for a previous
reporting period within the statute of limitations; (2) grant cities a right to notification and
independent audit review regarding reallocation decisions; and (3) allow cities to view certain
information concerning the pending reallocation, regardless of whether the information is
confidential.

H.B. 593 (Pitts) – State Auditor: would authorize the state auditor to perform an audit of any
local governmental entity or political subdivision that received funding under the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

H.B. 594 (Raymond) – Gambling: would: (1) require a coin-operated machine license holder
to include in its report to the comptroller: (a) the name and address of the owner of the machine;
and (b) the name and address of any person other than the owner who has a financial interest in
the proceeds of the machine; (2) except from the requirement in (1)(b) above a corporate license
holder where the shareholder holds less than ten percent of the shares in the license holder’s
corporation; (3) make a failure to provide the required information to the comptroller a Class A
misdemeanor; (4) provide that the offense of gambling promotion is a state jail felony; and (5)
provide that a person who commits a gambling offense punishable as a felony or a Class A
misdemeanor may also, under certain circumstances, commit the offense of engaging in
organized criminal activity.

H.B. 595 (Raymond) – False Identification as a Peace Officer: would make the offense of
false identification as a peace officer a third degree felony if the person committed the offense
with the intent to commit another felony.

H.B. 597 (Madden) – Synthetic Derivative of Marihuana: would make any quantity of a
synthetic chemical compound that is a cannabinoid receptor agonist and that mimics the
pharmacological effect of naturally occurring cannabinoids subject to Penalty Group 2 of the
Texas Controlled Substances Act. (Companion bill is S.B. 331 by Shapiro.)

H.B. 601 (Jackson) – E-verify: would: (1) require an employer, including a city, to participate
in the e-verify program; and (2) require a city to terminate the employee responsible for using E-
verify if they fail to comply with this law.

H.B. 603 (Farrar) – Immigration: would provide that a peace officer may not inquire as to the
nationality or immigration status of a victim of or witness to a criminal offense except as
necessary to investigate the offense.

H.B. 607 (Miller) – Commercial Driver’s Licenses: would allow deferred disposition or driver
safety course dismissal for a holder of a commercial driver’s license who violates a state law or
local ordinance relating to motor vehicle control.
H.B. 609 (Zerwas) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads
from ten to five percent. (Note: please see H.J.R. 62 below.)

H.B. 610 (Zerwas) – Texas Commission on Environmental Quality: would require TCEQ to
provide certain notices to state representatives and senators via e-mail.

H.B. 611 (Murphy) – Professional Services: would provide that: (1) a governmental entity,
including a city, may not provide through its officers or employees a commercially available
service (e.g., the practice of engineering or architecture, construction services, or construction
management services) for an improvement to real property that is not owned or leased by the
entity; and (2) a governmental entity, including a city with a population of 50,001 or more, that
provides through its officers or employees a commercially available service for an improvement
to real property owned or leased by the entity shall provide and make available to the public an
accounting of the cost of performing that service.

H.B. 616 (Quintanilla) – Alcohol Regulations: would provide that the commissioners court of a
county may enact certain regulations applicable in areas in the county outside an incorporated
city, and the governing board of an incorporated city may enact regulations applicable in the city,
that prohibit the possession or consumption of an alcoholic beverage at a location that was
previously licensed or permitted to sell alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption if the
commissioners court or governing board determines the license or permit was: (1) canceled for
cause; (2) denied renewal; or (3) voluntarily canceled or expired before a hearing after the Texas
Alcoholic Beverage Commission had initiated action to cancel or suspend the license or permit.

H.B. 617 (Dutton) – Sovereign Immunity: would permit plaintiffs to obtain discovery from
cities that raise certain sovereign immunity defenses to a lawsuit.

H.B. 621 (Fletcher) – Police Education: would require a police chief to complete certain initial
training and continuing education provided by the Bill Blackwood Law Enforcement
Management Institute of Texas.

H.B. 623 (Bonnen) – Immigration: would enact comprehensive “immigration reform.”
Specifically, the bill would, among other things, provide that:

   1. Not later than 48 hours after a person is arrested and before the person is released on
      bond, the law enforcement agency that arrested the person or that has custody of the
      person shall: (1) have the person’s immigration status verified by a law enforcement
      officer who is authorized under federal law to verify a person's immigration status or a
      federal law enforcement officer; and (2) if United States Immigration and Customs
      Enforcement (ICE) does not have the results of the immigration status of the person,
      notify ICE if the person is not a citizen or national of the United States and is unlawfully
      present in the United States.
2. A law enforcement agency that notifies ICE of the results of an immigration status
   verification shall provide the results of the immigration status verification to the Texas
   Department of Public Safety (DPS).

3. DPS shall maintain a computerized central database containing information regarding
   each person who has been arrested in the state and immigration status verification reveals
   that the person: (a) is not a citizen or national of the United States; and (b) is unlawfully
   present in the United States according to the terms of the federal Immigration Reform and
   Control Act.

4. DPS shall make the information in the database available to any peace officer or law
   enforcement agency in the state.

5. Most of the information in the database is public and shall be posted on the DPS Web
   site.

6. A person who is not authorized by law to be present in the United States may not be
   considered a resident of this state for higher education tuition purposes.

7. Each state agency must include with the agency’s legislative appropriations request a
   supporting schedule that provides an accounting of amounts spent by the agency during
   the state fiscal biennium preceding the biennium for which the legislative appropriations
   request is made to directly or indirectly provide services to persons who were not
   lawfully present in the United States.

8. A state agency that distributes money to a local governmental entity must include in the
   agency’s accounting the amounts distributed to a local governmental entity that the
   entity spent to provide services to persons who were not lawfully present in the United
   States.

9. A state agency, through the agency's governing body or chief administrative officer, as
   appropriate, may adopt rules requiring local governmental entities to which the agency
   distributes money to provide sufficiently detailed information that will enable the agency
   to comply with the requirement in number 8, above.

10. English is the official language of the state.

11. A city or any officer or employee of the city may not adopt any policy that does not fully
    enforce state and federal law, and, in the case of policies that would not fully enforce
    state and federal immigration laws, prohibit the city from receiving state funds.

12. Cities and other licensing authorities who license or permit individuals to engage a
    business, occupation, or profession must ensure that the applicant is eligible for
    employment in the United States before issuing the license.
   13. DPS shall verify the citizenship status of each applicant for a driver’s license or personal
       identification certificate and provide that information on the card.

H.B. 624 (Bonnen) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) modify the types of
acceptable voter identification documents; (5) provide that a voter who presents a voter
registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the precinct, but whose
name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for voting if the voter’s
identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (6) provide that a provisional ballot may be
accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of identification at the time the ballot is
cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to the voter registrar by personal
delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot board not later than the sixth
business day after the date of the election.

H.B. 628 (Callegari) – Construction Procurement: would, among other things: (1) prohibit a
reverse auction procedure for a public works contract for which a performance or payment bond
is required; (2) provide that the board of trustees of a school district may enter into an agreement
for the design, construction, or renovation of improvements to real property not owned or leased
by the district if the improvements benefit real property owned or leased by the district, such as
the design, construction, or renovation of highways, roads, streets, sidewalks, crosswalks,
utilities, and drainage improvements; (3) prohibit the use of an interlocal contract to purchase
construction services unless the services are in connection with the construction of a specific
facility to be jointly owned, used, or financed by the parties to the contract or: (a) the services are
in connection with a job order contract; (b) the governing body of the governmental entity for
whom the work will ultimately be performed approves the purchase in open session; (c) public
notice is provided in a manner consistent with a direct contract for job order contracting
services; and (d) work orders under the contract comply with state law; (4) consolidate the
provisions of current law relating to alternative delivery systems for construction projects (e.g.,
competitive sealed proposals, construction manager-agent, construction manager at-risk, design-
build, job order contracting for buildings) by most governmental entities, including cities; (5)
provide procedures and criteria for a governmental entity to use when selected a construction
contractor using a method other than competitive bidding; (6) authorize the use of any alternative
delivery method, except for design-build (which is authorized for most projects but with various
limitations), for any improvement to real property; and (5) limit the use of design-build in
various ways, and in some instances provide that an unsuccessful design-build offeror owns the
information submitted unless the governmental entity pays a stipend to the offeror; (7) provide
that, if a change order for a public works contract in a city with a population of 500,000 or more
involves a decrease or an increase of $100,000 or less, or a lesser amount as provided by
ordinance, the governing body may grant general authority to an administrative official of to
approve the change order; (8) provide that a contract with an original contract price of $1 million
or more may not be increased by more than 25 percent; (9) provide that, if a change order for a
contract with an original contract price of less than $1 million increases the contract amount to
$1 million or more, subsequent change orders may not increase the revised contract amount by
more than 25 percent.

H.B. 629 (Pickett) – Transportation Reinvestment Zones: would amend the law relating to
transportation reinvestment zones (TRZs) to provide that: (1) the governing body of a city or
county may determine the portion of tax increment generated from the sales and use taxes
attributable to the zone, above the sales tax base, to be used only to pay for authorized project
costs or to satisfy claims of holders of tax increment bonds, notes, or other obligations issued or
incurred for authorized projects; (2) a city or county shall deposit the designated portion or
amount of tax increment to their respective tax increment account; and (3) before pledging or
otherwise committing money in the tax increment account under Subsection, the governing body
of a city or county may enter into an agreement to authorize and direct the comptroller to:
(a) withhold from any payment to which the city or county may be entitled the amount of the
payment into the tax increment account; (b) deposit that amount into the tax increment account;
and (c) continue withholding and making additional payments into the tax increment account
until an amount sufficient to satisfy the amount due has been met.

H.B. 631 (Chisum) – Elections: would allow an early voting ballot board to establish a process
for removing data from voting machines used in early voting before election day if: (1) the
county will use the voting machines on election day; and (2) the process is approved by the
secretary of state.

H.B. 633 (Chisum) – Police Application Fees: would allow the Texas Commission on Law
Enforcement Officers Standards and Education to refund an application fee, including a fee that
is otherwise nonrefundable, if the commission determine the application was submitted by
mistake.

H.B. 644 (Orr) – Employment Preference: would: (1) lengthen the time from 15 days to 30
days, after receiving a written complaint, for a public entity, including a city, to reconsider a
matter of employment regarding a veteran; and (2) require the city to discuss the complaint at its
next meeting for which it has not posted notice.

H.B. 654 (Solomons) – Sales Tax: would require the comptroller to report to the legislature and
governor on the amount of revenue remitted to the comptroller for each tax collected in each city
and county.

H.B. 659 (Villarreal) – Property Assessments: would: (1) authorize a city to create a voluntary
property assessment in order to finance certain water improvements; (2) require a city that
authorizes contractual assessments for water or energy efficiency improvements to file written
notice of each assessment in the real property records of the county in which the property is
located; (3) provide that a contractual assessment for water or energy efficiency improvements
has the same priority as a lien for city property taxes.

H.B. 662 (Rodriguez) – County Development Authority: would provide that: (1) pursuant to
certain procedures, the commissioners court of a county may adopt a comprehensive plan and
land use regulations that require a buffer zone between certain uses in the unincorporated area of
the county, with certain exceptions; and (2) the commissioners court by order may enter into
agreements with any city located in the county to assist in the implementation and enforcement
of buffer zone regulations.

H.B. 664 (Larson) – Metropolitan Planning Organizations: would provide that, to be eligible
to be a voting member of a metropolitan planning organization policy board, a member must be
an elected official.

H.B. 665 (Villarreal) – Employment Discrimination: would prohibit an elected city official or
a city that employs fifteen or more employees from discriminating against an employee or an
employment applicant on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

H.B. 666 (Villarreal) – Property Tax: would require the comptroller to conduct a study to
evaluate the impact that requiring disclosure of the sales price of real property would have on the
property tax system.

H.B. 668 (F. Brown) – Vehicle Storage: would provide that if a vehicle towed to a vehicle
storage facility is not claimed before the tenth day after the date notice is mailed or published,
the vehicle storage facility shall consider the vehicle abandoned, send notice to the owner and
primary lienholder, and send a report of abandonment to certain law enforcement agencies,
including the police department of a city.

H.B. 670 (Crownover) – Statewide Smoking Ban: would: (1) prohibit smoking in most public
places, in places of employment, and in seating areas at outdoor events; (2) provide that the bill’s
provisions preempt and supersede a local ordinance, rule, or regulation that prohibits smoking to
a lesser degree; (3) provide that a local ordinance, rule, or regulation that prohibits or restricts
smoking to a greater degree than the bill is not preempted; (4) require the Texas Department of
State Health Services to annually request other government agencies to establish local operating
procedures to comply with the bill, including urging all federal, state, county, and municipal
governments as well as independent school districts to update existing smoking control
regulations to be consistent with the current health findings regarding secondhand smoke; and
(5) require any entity that grants business licenses, including a city, to provide notice of the state
smoking law to each license applicant.

H.B. 676 (Lucio) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit the operator of a motor vehicle from using
a wireless communication device while stopped for a bus that is receiving or discharging a
student.

H.B. 678 (Lucio) – Transportation: would provide that: (1) before a school district may issue
bonds or enter into a contract to construct a facility to be used for any purpose on real property
owned by the district on September 1, 2011, the board of trustees must hold a joint meeting with
representatives of the Texas Department of Transportation district office, the governing body of
each city in which or in whose extraterritorial jurisdiction any part of the property is located, and
the commissioners court of each county in which any part of the property is located; and (2) the
meeting must address: (a) the impact of the facility on traffic and the transportation
infrastructure in the area of the facility; (b) the cost of any necessary associated transportation
infrastructure improvements; and (c) each entity that will be responsible for paying for any
necessary associated transportation infrastructure improvements.

H.B. 679 (Button) – Purchasing: would provide that: (1) if a change order involves a decrease
or an increase of $50,000 or less and is for work within the original bid, the governing body may
authorize an administrative official of the municipality to approve the change order; (2) a
governing body may authorize an official or employee responsible for purchasing or
administering a contract to approve a change order that involves a change of $50,000 or less; and
(3) similar changes shall apply to civic center authorities and certain other local governmental
entities.

H.B. 681 (Kleinschmidt) – Firearms: would: (1) preclude an employer from prohibiting an
employee who has a concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm or
ammunition in a locked, privately owned vehicle in a parking lot, garage, or parking area
provided for employees; but (2) provide that the bill’s restriction on an employer do not apply to
a vehicle owned or leased by the employer and used by the employee, unless the employee is
required to transport or store a firearm in the official discharge of the employee’s duties.
(Companion bill is S.B. 321 by Hegar).

H.B. 683 (Rodriguez) – Property Tax: would change the community housing development
(CHDO) property tax exemption as follows: (1) provide that rented housing may qualify for a
CHDO exemption regardless of whether it is single-family housing or apartments; (2) provide
that in order to qualify for an exemption, an apartment property owned for the purpose of
rehabilitating a housing project must contain original construction that was completed at least ten
years before the rehabilitation began, and the owner from whom the organization acquired the
property must have owned the project for at least five years; and (3) require a chief appraiser to
use the income method when appraising CHDO property even if the appraiser considers another
method to be more appropriate.

H.B. 685 (Dutton) – Municipal Court: would allow a prosecutor to dismiss a case involving a
nonviolent criminal offense if the defendant becomes a member of the U.S. armed forces serving
on active duty and has no other convictions other than fine-only traffic or parking offenses.

H.B. 687 (Dutton) – Governmental Immunity: would amend the Texas Tort Claims Act to
provide that a governmental unit, including a city, is liable for personal injury and death caused
by the negligence of the city if the city would, were it a private person, be liable to the claimant
according to Texas law.

H.B. 688 (Dutton) – Criminal History Records: would: (1) expand the situations in which an
individual who was placed on community supervision may petition for an order of nondisclosure,
and (2) creates an offense if a person compiles or disseminates the information that is the subject
of an order of nondisclosure with the intend to benefit or with intent to harm or defraud another.

H.B. 690 (Martinez Fischer) – Graffiti: would provide that marking a historic structure or
property with graffiti is a state jail felony offense if the amount of the pecuniary loss to real
property or to tangible personal property is less than $20,000.
H.B. 695 (Allen) – Mercury Thermostat Recycling: would enact detailed procedures for
mercury thermostat recycling and require an operator of a solid waste treatment, processing, or
disposal facility to notify the facility’s customers of the requirement to take an out-of-service
mercury-added thermostat to a point of collection by posting at the facility signs that clearly note
the requirement.

H.B. 697 (Hunter) – Police Training: would prohibit the Texas Commission on Law
Enforcement Standards and Education from adopting rules that place a police training provider
on at-risk probationary status based solely on the provider’s students’ scores if at least 80 percent
of the students pass by their third attempt.

H.B. 703 (Gutierrez) – Health Care Services Providers: would make assault on a health care
services provider, while the person is providing health care services, a felony of the third degree.

H.B. 704 (Gutierrez) – Sales Tax: would: (1) allow a city or other local governmental entity
authorized to adopt a sales tax at an increment of one-fourth or one-eighth of one percent to
adopt a sales tax rate set at an increment of one-sixteenth of one percent; and (2) authorize a city
or local governmental entity that imposes a sales tax at a rate that may be increased or decreased
by one-fourth or one-eighth of one percent to increase or decrease the rate in increments of one-
sixteenth of one percent.

H.B. 715 (Hochberg) – Elections: would: (1) designate the secretary of state as the voter
registrar for purpose of the registration of voters and maintenance of the list of registered voters;
(2) require the secretary of state to automatically register any individual who is eligible to vote
and who is issued or makes a change to a Texas driver’s license or personal identification card
by the Department of Public Safety (DPS); (3) require the secretary of state to post registration
application forms on its website in English and any other language other than English for which
over five percent of the total voting age citizens of a political subdivision in this state are
members of that single minority language group; (4) require the secretary of state to adopt rules
establishing standards used for the verification of information on a voter registration application;
and (4) require the DPS and secretary of state to develop printed materials and a public service
announcement to inform the public about automatic voter registration.

H.B. 717 (S. Miller) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that an appraisal district is governed
by a board of seven directors; (2) provide that two of the seven directors be elected at the general
election for state and county officers by the voters of the county in which the district is
established; and (3) eliminate the ability of the governing bodies of a majority of the taxing units
in an appraisal district to adopt resolutions disapproving of actions by the board.

H.B. 725 (Callegari) – Water Districts: would make numerous changes to the laws that affect
water districts. Of particular interest to cities, the bill would – among many other things –
provide that: (1) to be annexed for limited purposes under a strategic partnership agreement, an
area must be in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction and contiguous to the corporate or limited
purpose boundaries, unless the district consents to noncontiguous annexation pursuant to a
strategic partnership agreement with the city; (2) a municipal management district may enact and
apply to residential property in the district an impact fee, assessment, tax, or other requirement
for payment for water, sewer, drainage, reclamation, flood control, road, or park and recreational
services or improvements of a district; (3) a city may enter into a contract with a water district or
with a non-profit water supply corporation under which the district or corporation will acquire
for the benefit of and convey to the city, either separately or together, one or more water, sewer,
drainage, or road projects; (4) that the contract under (3), above, may provide that any payments
due are payable from and are secured by a pledge of a specified part of the revenues of the city,
including revenues from municipal sales and use taxes; (5) a peace officer contracted for by a
water district, individually or through a county, sheriff, constable, or city, is an independent
contractor, and the district is responsible for the acts or omissions of the peace officer only to the
extent provided by law for other independent contractors; (6) a water district providing potable
water or sewer service to household users may, separately or jointly with another district, city, or
other political subdivision, establish, operate, and maintain, finance with ad valorem taxes,
mandatory fees, or voluntary contributions, and issue bonds for a fire department to perform all
fire-fighting services within the district and may provide for the construction and purchase of
necessary buildings, facilities, land, and equipment and the provision of an adequate water
supply; and (7) a city may provide in its written consent for the inclusion of land in a district that
is initially located wholly or partly outside the corporate limits of the city that a contract
(“allocation agreement”) between the district and the city be entered into prior to the first issue of
bonds, notes, warrants, or other obligations of the district. (Note: Any city in an area with water
districts should carefully review the provisions of this bill to determine its impact on the city’s
relationship with those districts.)

H.B. 735 (Patrick) – Major Events Trust Fund: would expand the definition of “event” for
purposes of the major events trust fund to include the Academy of Country Music Awards or a
national political convention of the Republican National Committee or the Democratic National
Committee.

H.B. 744 (Raymond) – Sales Tax: would exempt the sale, lease, or rental of certain computer
equipment by an eligible small business from the sales tax if the item: (1) is for the exclusive use
and benefit of the business; (2) is necessary for the operation of the business; (3) replaces
computer equipment with respect to the sale, lease, rental, or use of which the business paid the
tax imposed by this chapter; and (4) was sold, leased, rented, or used not later than the fifth
anniversary of the date the business initially qualifies as an eligible small business.

H.B. 745 (Johnson) – Eminent Domain: would amend the provision in current law that
requires an entity that makes a final offer to a property owner to acquire real property to provide
the owner with a “landowner’s bill of rights.” Specifically, the bill would provide that the bill of
rights must include a provision informing the property owner that the entity is required to
provide the information in English, Spanish, or any other language requested by the property
owner.

H.B. 746 (Johnson) – Eminent Domain: would modify the damages available to a property
owner in a condemnation proceeding by providing that the special commissioners shall admit
evidence relating to, among other things, the injury to the property owner, including, if the
condemnation makes relocation of a homestead, farm, or business necessary, the financial
damages associated with the cost of relocating from the condemned property to another property:
(1) in the same city or, if the property is not in an incorporated area, the same county; and
(2) that allows the property owner, without the necessity of incurring an amount of debt, debt
service, or total projected interest obligation that is higher than the property owner was subject to
immediately before the condemnation, to: (a) have a standard of living comparable to the
property owner’s standard of living immediately before the condemnation, if the condemned
property is a homestead that is habitable; or (b) operate a comparable farm or business, if the
condemned property is a farm or business.

H.B. 747 (Johnson) – Eminent Domain: would add additional requirements to the current
condemnation process that would mandate a governmental entity that wants to acquire real
property for a public use to disclose to the property owner at the time an offer to purchase is
made: (1) in a written statement, the reasons the acquisition of the property is necessary for
public use; and (2) on request of the owner, information and records relating to the governmental
entity’s analysis in selecting the property, including alternative properties considered.

H.B. 758 (Eiland)—Mandatory Health Benefits: would require a health benefit carrier,
including a benefits pool, to cover any emergency or medical expenses incurred because of an
injury caused by the insured’s intoxication or by the insured being under the influence of drugs.

H.B. 759 (Eiland) – Appraisals: would require an owner of a facility that stores oil, gas, or
other hydrocarbons to report to the appraisal district the owners of the gas, oil, or other
hydrocarbons and the type and volume of the hydrocarbon.

H.B. 760 (Eiland) – Government Hospitals and Clinics: would exempt from the term “health
spa” a hospital or clinic owned or operated by a political subdivision of the state and thereby
exempt the same from certain regulations imposed on health spas.

H.B. 764 (Lozano) – Sex Offenders: would permit a general law city to prohibit a registered
sex offender from going in, on, or within a specified distance of a child safety zone within the
city.

H.B. 766 (Lozano) – Sales Tax: would exempt textbooks for university and college courses
from the sales tax if the book is: (1) written, designed, and produced for educational,
instructional, or pedagogical purposes; (2) bought by a full-time or part-time student enrolled at a
state college or university; and (3) required for a course at the state college or university.

H.B. 767 (Lozano) – Property Tax: would entitle a disabled veteran to an exemption from
taxation of the total appraised value of the veteran’s residence homestead (Note: H.B. 3613,
passed in 2009, already entitles a disabled veteran to a residence homestead exemption.)

H.B. 773 (Anchia) – Energy Efficiency: would: (1) establish the state-level Energy Efficiency
Council (EEC) to be supported by the State Energy Conservation Office (to the extent resources
are available); (2) require the EEC to develop and periodically update a list of currently
operating energy efficiency programs in the state; and (3) authorize the EEC to submit to various
entities, including cities, recommendations on means to encourage greater energy efficiency.
H.B. 774 (Anchia) – Renewable Energy: would provide: (1) for the establishment of additional
goals for renewable energy capacity in the state; (2) that the Public Utility Commission shall
adopt rules necessary to administer and enforce the goals; and (3) that, at a minimum, the rules
shall establish the minimum annual renewable energy requirement for each retail electric
provider, municipally owned utility, and electric cooperative operating in this state in a manner
reasonably calculated by the commission to produce, on a statewide basis, compliance with the
requirements. (Companion bill is S.B. 330 by Watson.)

H.B. 781 (P. King) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran who has not remarried since
the death of the disabled veteran. (Note: please see H.J.R. 72, below.)

H.B. 782 (Y. Davis) – Municipal Bonds: would provide that neither a city nor a Type B
economic development corporation may issue bonds to purchase property unless the city or
corporation first obtains an independent appraisal of the property’s market value.

H.B 783 (Y. Davis) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) make impersonation of a peace officer or
other public servant with the intent to commit an offense a second-degree felony; and (2) create
an offense for providing or possessing a uniform bearing an insignia of a law enforcement
agency that identified as person as a peace officer, or intentionally or knowingly misrepresenting
that uniform as property belonging to a law enforcement agency.

H.B. 784 (Y. Davis,) – Property Tax: would require the Sunset Commission to evaluate each
property tax exemption provided by state statute at least once every six years, and make
recommendations for retaining, repealing, or amending each exemption.

H.B. 786 (Y. Davis) – Mandatory Health Benefits: would generally require health benefit
plans to provide coverage for HIV tests. (Companion bill is S.B. 241 by Ellis).

H.B. 787 (Kuempel) – Abandoned Watercraft and Aircraft: would: (1) authorize a law
enforcement agency to seize and auction an abandoned aircraft; and (2) provide that an aircraft
or watercraft could, under certain circumstances, constitute a junked vehicle and a nuisance
subject to abatement.

H.B. 798 (Creighton) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax appraisal cap on
homesteads from ten to five percent. (Note: please see H.J.R. 74 below.)

H.B. 800 (C. Anderson) – Purchasing: would provide that an interlocal contract between a
governmental entity and a purchasing cooperative may not be used to purchase roofing materials
or services, including materials or services for construction, repair, or replacement of a roof.

H.B. 802 (Bonnen) – Alarm Sales Solicitation: would provide that an alarm systems company,
including any employee or contractor of an alarm systems company, engaged in business or
performing a service in a city must comply with any ordinance regulating the unsolicited
promotion, sale, or offer for sale of goods or services.
H.B. 803 (Bonnen) – Property Tax: would reduce the penalty for failure to make a timely
installment payment of ad valorem taxes on property in a disaster area from twelve percent for
each month the tax remains unpaid, to six percent for each month the tax remains unpaid, plus
interest.

H.B. 804 (Lewis) – Elections: would provide that a person commits a second degree felony if
he or she is not a United States citizen and votes in an election held in Texas.

H.B 806 (D. Howard) – Elections: would provide, among other things, that a candidate for
public office: (1) who files a declaration of intent that he or she will not exceed $500 in political
expenditures in the election is not required to appoint a campaign treasurer unless the candidate
exceeds the aggregate amount of $500 in political expenditures; and (2) is exempt from filing
any additional reports if the candidate does not intend to make political expenditures that in the
aggregate exceed $500 in connection with the election.

H.B. 812 (P. King) – Fire Peace Officers: would make fire marshals, fire investigators, and
some county fire personnel authorized peace officers under the Code of Criminal Procedure.

H.B. 815 (Paxton) – Transportation Funding: would provide that the proceeds from the
collection of state sales taxes on the sale, storage, or use of new and used motor vehicle tires and
new and used motor vehicle parts shall be deposited to the credit of the state highway fund.
(Please see H.J.R. 75, below.)

H.B. 816 (Hunter) – Health Care Benefit: would prohibit all health benefit plans, including
benefit pools, from covering the cost of an abortion unless the plan provides a specific premium
and plan solely for coverage of abortions. (Companion bill is S.B. 404 by Hegar.)

H.B. 820 (Farrar) – Air Quality: would require additional on-site air quality monitoring for
sites that qualify as “major sources” under the federal Clean Air Act.

H.B. 821 (Farrar) – Municipal Solid Waste: would: (1) require the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality to pass a rule prohibiting a person from intentionally or knowingly
disposing of used electronic equipment eligible for manufacturer recovery in a municipal solid
waste landfill; (2) create a penalty for disposing of or accepting such electronic waste in a
municipal solid waste landfill; and (3) require the owner or operator of a municipal solid waste
facility to make a good faith effort to both post a sign in a conspicuous location stating that used
electronic equipment eligible for manufacturer recovery is not accepted and notify any solid
waste collector registered to dispose at the landfill that such equipment is not accepted in order to
avoid liability for accepting such waste, even unknowingly.

H.B. 830 (Dutton) – Air Quality: would require the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality to consider the cumulative effects on public health and physical property of expected air
contaminant emissions from a facility in the area of the facility when issuing or renewing certain
emissions permits for new construction or modification of an existing facility.
H.B. 831 (Craddick) – Public Hospitals: would: (1) authorize certain entities, including a city
or municipal hospital authority, to borrow money for purposes of a hospital owned or operated
by the entity and secure the loan with: (a) revenue from the hospital that is not pledged to pay the
entity’s bonded indebtedness; or (b) tax revenue to be collected by the entity during the twelve
months following the date of the pledge; and (2) establish a loan maturation date.

H.B. 833 (Lozano) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse or surviving children of totally disabled veterans. (Note:
please see H.J.R. 76, below.)

H.B. 834 (Hernandez Lunz) –Mandated Health Benefit: would require a health benefit
provider, including a benefits pool, to cover the cost of mammography, low dose mammography,
and physician recommended supplemental breast cancer screening.

H.B. 837 (V. Taylor) – Motor Vehicle Stops: would: (1) authorize a peace officer who makes
a motor vehicle stop to request and obtain: (a) a digital thumbprint from the vehicle’s operator if
the person fails to provide a driver’s license, a passport, or other form of photographic
identification; and (b) an ink thumbprint if the operator fails to provide identification described
in (a) above and the officer issues a citation; (2) authorize a law enforcement agency to maintain
the thumbprint beyond the duration of the stop if the person is cited or arrested during or as a
result of the stop; (3) require discard of the thumbprint after the charge is dismissed, the person is
acquitted, or the person is convicted of an offense punishable by fine; and (4) require a court to
notify thumbprint custodians after disposition of a defendant’s case.

H.B. 838 (Elkins) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit a city from adopting a policy under
which the city’s police department or other city official would not fully enforce state or federal
laws relating to immigration; (2) penalize a city that adopts such a policy by taking away state
funds, not allowing a city to retain unexpended state money, and prohibiting a city from
imposing a tax other than a property or additional sales and use tax; (3) require the attorney
general to determine if a city is ineligible to retain state money or impose a property or additional
sales and use tax and provide notice to the city and comptroller of the determination; and (4)
allow a city to appeal a determination by the attorney general to a Travis County district court.

H.B. 843 (Geren) – Property Tax: would require the assessor for a taxing unit to deliver a tax
bill by electronic means to a person listed on the tax roll and that person’s authorized agent if: (1)
the assessor has implemented procedures to permit delivery of a bill by electronic means; and (2)
on or before September 15 the person or person’s authorized agent submits a written request to
receive an electronic tax bill to the assessor. An assessor who delivers a tax bill electronically
under this section does not need to mail the same bill.

H.B. 854 (Dutton) – Public Information Act: would amend the law enforcement exception in
the Public Information Act by providing that information held by a law enforcement agency is
excepted from disclosure only if: (1) the release of the information would unduly interfere with
the detection, investigation, or prosecution of crime; and (2) the information relates to an
ongoing investigation or conduct that remains subject to prosecution.
H.B 856 (Dutton) – Water and Sewer Utilities: would: (1) require a non-municipally-owned
water or sewer utility to provide the city’s governing body with a statement of intent to change
its rates at least 120 days before the proposed effective date of the rate change; (2) suspend the
proposed rates once a ratemaking hearing is scheduled by the city’s governing body; and (3)
require a non-municipally-owned water or sewer utility to file a statement of intent to increase its
rates no later than sixty months after the effective date of the utility’s last rate increase, with
some exceptions.

H.B. 864 (Fletcher) – Evading Arrest: would provide that the punishment for the offense of
evading arrest or detention is: (1) a state jail felony if the actor has been previously convicted of
the same offense; (2) a third-degree felony if the actor uses a vehicle while in flight, another
person suffers bodily injury as a result of the flight, or the actor uses a tire deflation device
against the officer; or (3) a second-degree felony if another person dies as a result of the flight or
suffers serious bodily injury as a result of the use of a tire deflation device.

H.B. 876 (C. Howard) – Financial Statements: would provide that financial disclosure
statements required for elected officers, the city manager, and the city attorney in a city with over
100,000 population are not required from a municipal officer who doesn’t receive compensation
for serving as an officer, or from a candidate for such office.

H.B. 868 (Huberty) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax rollback rate from 108
percent to the lesser of either 105 percent or the rate of inflation.

H.B. 874 (C. Howard) – Property Tax: would do the following: (1) eliminate the requirement
that appraisal value notices must include estimated tax liability based on an application of last
year’s tax rate to this year’s appraised value; (2) require tax assessors to submit the appraisal roll
to a city not later than 21 days after the date the appraisal roll is certified to the assessor; (3)
require a city to calculate its effective tax rate, same services tax rate, and rollback tax rate not
later than 30 days after it receives the certified appraisal roll from the assessor; (4) require the
person who calculates the effective tax rate, same services tax rate, and rollback rate to submit
the rate to the city council within five days of making the calculation; (5) require an officer or
employee designated by the city to either mail to each property owner, or publish in the
newspaper, tax rate information at least 14 days before the date of the first meeting of the city
council to consider the budget; (6) amend various sections of state law to include the application
of a same services tax rate; (7) extend from 60 to 90 days the deadline for a city to adopt its tax
rates after receiving a certified appraisal roll; (8) provide that if the requirements of number 5,
above, are not met due to circumstances beyond the city’s control, such as a natural disaster, the
city must adopt a default property tax rate for the year that is the lower of the same services tax
rate or last year’s adopted rate; (9) eliminate the application of the default tax rate provision in
cases where the city council fails to meet the statutory deadline for adopting a tax rate (Note: it
appears that the confusing provisions in numbers 8 and 9, above, may be unintended features of
this bill); and (10) require a city council, before giving notice of tax increase hearings, to take a
record vote on the proposal to increase taxes and that the motion for that vote must be as follows:
“I move that a proposal to increase property taxes by the adoption of a tax rate of (specify tax
rate) be placed on the agenda for the meeting to be held on (date at which the governing body
anticipates adopting the tax rate).”
H.B. 875 (C. Howard) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a sheriff or any other office in
charge of a correctional facility in which a defendant is confined awaiting trial for a felony or
certain intoxication offenses to make a reasonable effort to determine the defendant’s citizenship
status and contact federal immigration officials within forty-eight hours if the status cannot be
determined; (2) require a sheriff or any other office in charge of a correctional facility in which a
defendant is confined awaiting trial for a felony or certain intoxication offenses to notify the
judge or magistrate authorized to determine bail release if the defendant is not in the country
legally; and (3) create a rebuttable presumption at any bail hearing that the defendant presents a
flight risk.

H.B. 878 (C. Howard) – E-verify: would: (1) require a governmental entity, including a city, to
participate in e-verify and check the immigration status of all new employees using e-verify; (2)
prohibit a governmental entity, including a city, from entering into a contract with a contractor
who does not participate in e-verify; and (3) make it an unlawful employment practice for an
employer, including a city, to retain an undocumented immigrant when discharging a citizen or
permanent resident if the city is not participating in e-verify.

H.B. 879 (C. Howard) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax appraisal cap on
homesteads from ten to five percent.

H.B. 884 (D. Howard) – Governmental Immunity: would waive governmental immunity for a
city or other governmental entity in a suit where a nurse alleges the city took adverse
employment action against the nurse in retaliation for a report required by state laws governing
nurse conduct.

H.B. 887 (Geren) – Red Light Cameras: would prohibit the county assessor collector and the
Texas Department of Motor Vehicles from refusing to register a vehicle when the owner of the
motor vehicle is delinquent in the payment of a civil penalty imposed as the result of a violation
detected by a photographic traffic signal enforcement system.

H.B. 889 (Lewis) – Property Tax: would change the method by which a real property interest
in oil and gas in place is appraised by: (1) using the average price of the oil or gas interest for the
preceding two calendar years; and (2) eliminating the comptroller-computed market condition
factor multiplier.

H.B. 892 (C. Howard) – Transport of Illegal Aliens: would create the offense of unlawful
transport of an illegal alien.

H.B. 903 (Thompson) – Juvenile Case Manager Fund: would expand the permitted uses of
the juvenile case manager fund to include training expenses, travel expenses, costs of office
supplies, and other operating and maintenance costs of the juvenile case manager.

H.B. 904 (Thompson) – Municipal Court Building Security Fund:                     would increase the
optional municipal court building security fee to $4.
H.B. 913 (Dutton) – Expunction: would: (1) expand the situations in which an individual
would be entitled to have all records and files relating to an arrest expunged; (2) expand the
situations in which a court would be required to enter an order of expunction of all files and
records relating to a specific arrest; (3) require a municipal prosecutor to bring a motion for
expunction in any case where a person was arrested but a complaint was not filed before the
second anniversary of the date of arrest; and (4) repeal all expunction fees.

H.B. 918 (Allen) – Solid Waste: would require a solid waste permit application to include: (1)
a certification from the applicant that an explanation of the site’s proposed operations and a
questionnaire seeking community comments was mailed to each resident and community
organization, nonprofit organization, or civic club within a certain distance of the proposed site;
and (2) any comments made in response to the questionnaire.

H.B. 925 (Bonnen) -- TMRS: would allow a city to provide for retirement credit for prior
service as a volunteer reserve police officer if the officer currently works for the city as a full
time officer.

H.B. 926 (Harper-Brown) – Elections: would: (1) allow the Department of Public Safety to
disclose the results of an investigation into the validity of an address to the secretary of state
(SOS) for voter registration purposes; and (2) require the SOS to inform the voter registrar of the
county in which the address is located.

H.B. 930 (Darby) – Property Tax: would require a court to issue a tax warrant authorizing the
seizure of personal property for the payment of property taxes if the applicant for the warrant has
reason to believe that personal property owned by the property owner will be sold at a liquidation
sale in connection with the cessation of a business.

H.B. 939 (V. Gonzales) – Municipal Court Fees: would create a $75 fee to be paid by a
defendant convicted of a misdemeanor if a written notice to appear was issued following the
defendant’s violation of a traffic law, municipal ordinance, or state penal law, and the services of
a peace officer are required to locate the defendant to issue that notice.

H.B. 943 (Dukes) – Missing Persons: would: (1) require the Department of Family and
Protective Services to report to and make monthly contact with appropriate law enforcement
agencies regarding certain missing children; and (2) require a local law enforcement agency to
enter a report of a missing child or person, no later than two hours after receiving the report, into
the clearinghouse, national crime information center missing person file, and Alzheimer’s
Association Safe Return crisis number.

H.B. 947 (Lozano) – Education Partnerships: would establish a pilot program to expand
access to career and technical education partnerships in rural areas, including cities with a
population of less than 50,000.

H.B. 951 (Lozano) – Rural Economic Development: would create the “Texas Rural
Development Fund” as an account in the state’s general revenue fund. Money in the account
may consist of legislative appropriations, gifts, and donations, and may be spent in rural areas of
the state on entrepreneurship programs, regional planning, rural leadership enhancement, and
rural youth corps programs.

H.B. 954 (Lozano) – Firearms: would: (1) preclude an employer from prohibiting an employee
who has a concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm or ammunition in a
locked, privately owned vehicle in a parking lot, garage, or parking area provided for employees;
but (2) provide that the bill’s restriction on an employer do not: (a) prohibit an employer from
requiring that the firearm be hidden from view; (b) apply if the parking area has restricted or
limited access; (c) apply if the employer provides an alternative location to store the firearm; (d)
apply to property where the possession of a firearm or ammunition is prohibited by law; or (e)
apply to a vehicle owned or leased by the employer and used by the employee, unless the
employee is required to transport or store a firearm in the official discharge of the employee’s
duties.

H.B. 956 (Marquez) – Firefighter Death Investigation: would broaden the state fire marshal’s
authority to investigate firefighter deaths, including any factors that may have contributed to a
death in connection with an on-duty incident. (Companion bill is S.B. 396 by Deuell.)

H.B. 963 (Hartnett) – Cruelty to Animals: would provide that when an animal’s owner has
cruelly treated the animal and been divested of ownership: (1) a court could order the animal to
be given to a city or county animal shelter; (2) a court must order the owner to pay any costs
incurred by a city or county animal shelter in housing and caring for the animal; (3) a court must
set the amount of bond for an appeal to include the estimated costs to house and care for the
impounded animal as provided by the city, county, or a nonprofit; (4) an officer that is unable to
sell the animal at auction may give the animal to a city or county animal shelter; and (5) the
owner may appeal the divestment order and the court shall provide either a transcript, clerk’s
record, or audio recording of the proceedings, depending upon whether the court is or is not a
court of record.

H.B. 965 (Callegari) – TCEQ License Requirements: would: (1) permit the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to recognize Internet-based continuing
education programs; and (2) require the TCEQ to provide a method for certain individuals who
hold a license issued by the TCEQ to certify at the time of license renewal that the license holder
has complied with the TCEQ’s continuing education requirements.

H.B. 966 (Murphy) – Gas Ratemaking: would – among other things – provide that, in
establishing a gas utility’s rates, the regulatory authority (a city or the Railroad Commission)
shall allow expenses for pension and other postemployment benefits, as determined by actuarial
or other similar studies in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, in amounts
the regulatory authority finds reasonable and necessary. (Companion bill is S.B. 403 by Eltife.)

H.B. 974 (Dutton) – Elections: would provide that: (1) an election judge or clerk is entitled to
at least one-and-a-half times the federal hourly minimum wage as compensation for services
rendered at a precinct polling place; and (2) the election judge or clerk serving in a municipal
election shall be paid by the city not later than 72 hours after the time the compensation
statement is submitted.
H.B. 975 (Dutton) – Appraisal Review Board: would provide that a person who has served all
or part of three consecutive terms as a member of an appraisal review board is ineligible to serve
on the next appraisal review board during a term that begins on the next January 1 following the
third of those consecutive terms.

H.B. 976 (Carter) – Magistrates: would permit a magistrate to hear a complaint under oath
through an electronic broadcast system, with certain restrictions and requirements.

H.B. 978 (Villareal) – School Boards: would provide a system for reforming school board
governance of academically unacceptable school districts of a certain size that would allow the
mayor of a city with the largest overlapping population of the school district to make
appointments to the board if authorized by election to do so.

H.B. 981 (Guillen) – Transportation Funding: would – among other things – authorize, in
certain circumstances, a metropolitan planning organization, a rural planning organization, or a
Texas Department of Transportation district to participate in a new “local mobility credit
program,” which would allow those entities to accumulate amounts in excess of the local cost
share requirement for a federally-financed project, and to use those credits for the local cost
share of future projects.

H.B. 983 (Menendez) - Survivor Benefits: would make a survivor of an individual killed in the
line of duty: (1) eligible to purchase health benefits from the deceased officer’s employer’s
benefits carrier even if the survivor has health benefits with another employer; and (2) eligible to
apply for health benefits until September 1, 2012, if the officer died after September 1993.

H.B. 984 (Truitt) – Municipal Court: would authorize a city with a non-record municipal
court to enter into an agreement with a contiguous city to provide concurrent and original
jurisdiction of the municipal courts in both cities for most types of cases heard by municipal
courts.

H.B. 993 (Rodriguez) – Road Closures: would authorize a firefighter working for a volunteer
fire department or a fire department operated by an emergency services district or general-law
city to close one or more lanes of a road or highway to protect the safety of persons or property
when performing the firefighter’s official duties.

H.B. 997 (Truitt) – TMRS: would: (1) combine the Municipality Accumulation Fund,
Employees Saving Fund, and Current Service Annuity Reserve Fund into one fund (the Benefit
Accumulation Fund); and (2) require all benefits to be paid into and out of this fund.
(Companion bill is S.B. 350 by Williams.)

H.B. 998 (McClendon) – Dogs: would: (1) require a dog owner to obtain liability insurance for
large male dogs who have not been neutered; and (2) create a class C misdemeanor for the
offense of not having the insurance.
H.B. 1005 (Hopson) – Elections: would: (1) require the secretary of state to establish methods
to obtain a photograph of each registered voter for use on voter registration certificates; and (2)
require a voter to present his/her voter registration certificate with a photograph, an identification
card, or a certain affidavit in order to vote.

H.B. 1011 (Bonnen) – Synthetic Derivatives of Marihuana and Salvia divinorum: would
make synthetic derivatives of marihuana subject to Penalty Group 2 of the Texas Controlled
Substances Act and would make salvia divinorum, and its derivatives and extracts, subject to
Penalty Group 3 of the Texas Controlled Substances Act.

H.B. 1014 (Legler) – Municipal Court: would authorize a justice of the peace to appoint a
municipal court judge of a city located in the same county as the justice precinct to serve as a
visiting justice of the peace in criminal cases involving a misdemeanor traffic offense.

H.B. 1021 (Guillen) – Historically Underutilized Businesses: would provide that a person who
is disabled according to the federal Americans with Disabilities Act is eligible to be listed as a
historically underutilized business by the state.

H.B. 1024 (Dutton) – Metal Recycling: would, among other things, require an individual to
show documentation that insulated wire that is being sold for recycling was salvaged from a fire.

H.B. 1038 (Reynolds) – Elections: would make it a state jail felony for an election officer to
knowingly: (1) remove the name of an eligible voter from the list of registered voters or the poll
list for the precinct; (2) refuse to accept for voting a person whose acceptance is required by this
code, or (3) prevent the deposit in the ballot box of a marked and properly folded ballot that was
provided at the polling place to the voter who is depositing it or for whom the deposit is
attempted. The bill would also make it a class B misdemeanor for a person to knowingly, and
with the intent to prevent another from voting in an election, deceive another person regarding an
election or voter eligibility.

H.B. 1044 (Solomons) – Public Information Act: would provide that certain types of
information are expressly public unless they are made confidential under the Public Information
Act or other law. (Companion bill is S.B. 375 by Wentworth.)

H.B. 1045 (Fletcher) – Police Proficiency Certificates: would require a proficiency certificate
issued by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Education and Standards to include the
date the license holder became eligible for the certificate.

H.B. 1047 (Schwertner) – Impoundment of Motor Vehicle: would: (1) authorize a peace
officer to impound the vehicle of a person who operates a vehicle but fails to establish financial
responsibility for the vehicle, such as liability insurance, and fails to display a driver’s license;
(2) require the officer to provide a written explanation about how to recover the vehicle; and (3)
establish criteria under which a law enforcement agency may release the vehicle.
H.B. 1053 (D. Patrick) – Fire Fighters: would require the Texas Higher Education
Coordinating Board to study and develop rules regarding a tuition exemption for fire science
curriculum for fire fighters.

H.B. 1056 (Villarreal) – Affordable Housing: would: (1) provide that a property tax
exemption is available for property owned directly by a Community Housing Development
Organization (CHDO) and for property owned by a 100 percent subsidiary of the CHDO; (2)
provide that an entity controlled or equitably owned by a CHDO can receive an exemption, even
if it is not a 100 percent subsidiary of the CHDO, only if the entity initially applied for the
exemption between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003; (3) provide that, if a multifamily
rental housing property that previously received an exemption has that exemption in question,
the owner must file an application with, and comply with the rules promulgated by, the Texas
Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA) to determine the availability of the
exemption; (4) provide that a non-profit organization that owns a home ownership project or a
multifamily rental project, either directly or through a 100 percent subsidiary, may apply for the
exemption to either the appraisal district or TDHCA; (5) provide that a non-profit organization
that own a multifamily rental project by controlling a limited partnership or similar entity or by
equitable ownership must apply for the exemption to TDHCA; (6) require TDHCA to create an
application process and rules allowing TDHCA to implement its duties; and (7) clarify that
properties that have received the exemption in prior years will not lose the exemption because
the population of the county subsequently increases beyond 1.4 million.

H.B. 1058 (Frullo) -- Assessments: would allow a city council to contract with the governing
body of another taxing unit or the board of directors of an appraisal district to perform the duties
of the city relating to the collection of special assessments levied in a public improvement
district. (Companion bill is S.B. 422 by Duncan.)

H.B. 1062 (Madden) – Eminent Domain: would provide that a city may exercise the right of
eminent domain for a public use to acquire public or private property, whether located inside or
outside the municipality, for any of an enumerated list of uses in current law, including
providing, enlarging, or improving of a municipally owned city hall or any other municipal
public use the governing body considers advisable.

H.B. 1066 (Workman) – Red Light Cameras: would require a local authority, including a city,
to install a timer at each intersection at which a photographic traffic signal enforcement system is
used that displays the number of seconds that remain before the signal changes.

H.B. 1068 (F. Brown) – License Plates: would require the Department of Motor Vehicles to
issue only one license plate for attachment at the rear of the vehicle for which the plate is issued
and authorize a person to operate a vehicle on a public highway with only one license plate
displayed and attached at the rear of the vehicle.

H.B. 1079 (P. King) – Property Tax: would extend the current ten-percent appraisal cap to
business property. (The cap currently applies only to residential homesteads.)(Companion bill is
S.B. 474 by Patrick.)
H.B. 1083 (Elkins) - Police Identification: would require a city police department to issue an
identification card to an honorably retired police officer who holds a proficiency certificate.

H.B. 1088 (C. Howard) – Property Tax: would: (1) clarify that only a citizen of the United
States is eligible to serve on an appraisal review board; (2) provide that appraisal review board
members are appointed by the local administrative district judge in the county in which the
appraisal district is established; and (3) provide that members of a consolidated appraisal review
board are appointed jointly by the local administrative district judges in the counties in which the
appraisal districts that are parties to the contract are established.

H.B. 1089 (Martinez Fischer) – Graffiti: would provide that a city may – but is not required to
– first offer to remove graffiti for free prior to requiring the property owner to remove the
graffiti.

H.B. 1090 (N. Gonzalez) – Property Tax: would change the amount of interest that a city
making a refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to
an annual rate that is equal to the auction average rate quoted on a bank discount basis for three-
month treasury bills issued by the federal government.

H.B. 1092 (Christian) – Volunteer Fire Departments: would exempt certain volunteer fire
department facilities in counties with a population of 80,000 or less from certain engineering-
related construction requirements.

H.B. 1094 (Farias) – Political Contributions and Expenditures: would: (1) require the clerk
of a city with a population of 500,000 or more to post on the city’s Web site reports of political
expenditures and contributions that are filed with the clerk by the mayor or a member of the city
council; (2) repeal Election Code section 254.0401(b) relating to the Texas Ethics Commission’s
duty to make available on the Internet reports for filing deadlines for candidates for office that
are nominated by or seek the nomination of a political party required to nominated candidates by
primary election and specific-purpose committees that support or oppose only one such
candidate; and (3) repeal Local Government Code section 176.009(b) which requires a city with
a population of 500,000 or more to post on the city’s Web site reports of political contributions
and expenditures filed by members of the city council.

H.B. 1096 (Farias) – Historically Underutilized Businesses: would provide that veterans who
have a service-centered disability according to the federal Americans with Disabilities Act are
eligible to be listed as historically underutilized businesses by the state.

H.B. 1104 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would totally phase out ad valorem taxes on the residence
homesteads of elderly persons by 2021. (Note: please see H.J.R. 83, below.)

H.B. 1105 (Harper-Brown) – Transportation: would, among other things, provide that: (1) the
Texas Department of Transportation will adopt a plan to ensure access to transportation by
pedestrians, bicyclists, persons with disabilities, children, senior citizens, users of public
transportation, movers of commercial goods, and motorists on streets and highways; and (2) a
local authority (including a city) shall ensure that all transportation planning, design,
construction, and reconstruction, street or highway improvements, and access roads, bicycle
paths, and sidewalks to public transportation comply with the complete plan if federal or state
funds are used. (Companion bill is S.B. 513 by Ellis.)

H.B. 1107 (Zerwas) – County Assistance Districts: would authorize a county assistance
district to raise sales taxes within a city’s limits without an election. (Companion bill is S.B. 520
by Hegar.)

H.B. 1116 (Harper-Brown) – Radar Interference Devices: would make it a Class C
misdemeanor offense for a person, other than a law enforcement officer in the discharge of his
official duties, to use a radar interference device in a motor vehicle.

H.B. 1118 (Ritter) – Property Tax: would provide that a taxing unit that purchases property at
a foreclosure sale may sell the property at a private sale for an amount equal to or greater than its
market value if: (1) the sum of the amount of the judgment plus post-judgment taxes, penalties,
and interest owing against the property exceeds the market value; and (2) each taxing unit
entitled to receive proceeds of the sale consents to the sale for that amount. The bill provides
that a taxing unit that does not consent to a private sale is liable to the taxing unit that purchased
the property for a pro rata share of the costs incurred by the purchasing unit in maintaining the
property, including the costs of preventing the property from becoming a public nuisance or
threat to the public health.

H.B. 1122 (Weber) – Personal Bond: would: (1) make several changes to the law regarding
the trafficking of persons; and (2) allow a magistrate to release a defendant on personal bond
when charged with deadly assault on a law enforcement or corrections officer, employee of the
Board of Pardons and Paroles, or a court participant.

H.B. 1124 (Burnam) – Gas Pipelines: would enact various safety requirements applicable to
gas pipelines in a county over the Barnett Shale, including – among other things – a prohibition
on gathering or transmission pipelines being constructed within 50 feet of an established
permanent structure that is used by human beings on a regular basis, unless certain conditions are
met.

H.B. 1125 (Burnam) – Gas Pipelines: would provide that the Texas Railroad Commission shall
conduct a study regarding, among other things, the odorization of natural gas transported in
gathering and transmission lines located in populated areas.

H.B. 1131 (Larson) – Transportation Funding: would provide that: (1) money that is required
to be used for public roadways by the Texas Constitution or federal law and that is deposited in
the state treasury to the credit of the state highway fund be used only: (a) to improve the state
highway system; or (b) to mitigate adverse environmental effects that result directly from
construction or maintenance of a state highway; and (2) with certain exceptions, money in the
state highway fund that is not described by (1), above, may be used only to improve the state
highway system. (Note: Please see H.J.R. 84, below.)
H.B. 1132 (Larson) – Public Nuisance: would give a person 15 days after receipt of notice to
abate a public nuisance.

H.B. 1135 (Aycock) – Application for Political Office: would: (1) prohibit a candidate from
amending an application for a place on a ballot and prohibit an election authority from accepting
an amendment to the application; and (2) prohibit a candidate from amending a petition filed in
lieu of a filing fee and prohibit an election authority from accepting an amendment to the
petition.

H.B. 1136 (Aycock) – Notice to County Chairs: would require a city secretary to deliver
written notice, at least 72 hours in advance, of the time and place of a meeting called by the city
secretary for the purpose of discussing business related to an upcoming primary, runoff, or
general election to the county chair of each political party that made nominations by primary
election for the general election for state and county officers.

H.B. 1137 (Darby) – Pseudoephedrine: would, among other things, provide that: (1) a business
establishment may not sell to a person who makes over-the-counter purchases of one or more
products containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine more than nine grams
of those substances within a 30-day period; (2) before completing an over-the-counter sale of a
product containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine, a business
establishment shall transmit the sale information to a real-time electronic logging system used by
pharmacies and law enforcement agencies and personnel, such as the National Precursor Log
Exchange, that is administered by a nonprofit organization involved in the prevention and
investigation of prescription drug diversion , if such a system is available to the establishment at
no cost; and (3) a business establishment may not complete an over-the-counter sale of a product
containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine if a real-time electronic logging
system returns a report that the completion of the sale would result in the person obtaining an
amount greater than allowed by the bill or current law, regardless of whether all or some of the
products previously obtained by the buyer were sold at another business establishment.

H.B. 1145 (Geren) – Air Quality: would allocate a certain amount of money from the Texas
emissions reduction plan to fund the implementation and oversight of a regional air monitoring
program in the Barnett Shale area, to be implemented through a regional nonprofit entity with
representation from several interests, including cities. (This bill is identical to S.B. 527 by
Fraser.)

H.B. 1147 (W. Smith) – Geospatial Data: would require a city to provide certain notice on each
geospatial data product (including any basic map) that: (1) is created or hosted by the city; (2)
appears to represent property boundaries; and (3) was not produced using information from an
on-the-ground survey conducted under the supervision of a registered professional land surveyor.

H.B. 1153 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would: (1) require the comptroller to establish an Internet
portal to allow a member of the public to access cities’ financial and tax information free of
charge and that includes a link to a political subdivision’s Web site address or, if the city does
not operate a website, contact information to enable a member of the public to obtain the
information; (2) for any city that maintains such information on an Web site, allow a citizen to
access: (a) the budget for the current fiscal year; (b) any proposed budget for a subsequent fiscal
year being considered by the city; (c) the most recent annual financial report published by the
city; (d) the most recent annual financial exhibit and monthly financial report as provided under
the bill; (e) any other financial report, statement, or exhibit prepared by the city; and (f) each
current check registry published by the city; (3) require that the Internet portal allow a user to
access property tax information, including the Web site for an appraisal district and a table of the
applicable property tax rates (maintenance and operations tax rate, effective tax rate, rollback tax
rate, internet and sinking fund tax rate, and total tax rate) for each city in the state; (4) require the
assessor for each taxing unit to provide tax rate information to the comptroller no later than
October 31, or 30 days after the date the taxing unit adopts a tax rate for that tax year; (5) require
the budget officer in a city with a population of 100,000 or more to publish in a newspaper and
on a Web site (if maintained by the city) an exhibit that shows: (a) the aggregate amount paid
from each fund for the four preceding quarters and the balance to the debit or credit of each fund;
(b) the amount of municipal indebtedness; (c) the respective dates of accrual of that
indebtedness; (d) to whom the debt is owed; (e) the reason for the debt; and (f) the amount to the
debit or credit of each officer or other person with whom an account is kept in the municipal
finance records; and (6) require the budget officer in a city with a population of 100,000 or more
to publish in a newspaper and on a Web site (if maintained by the city) a monthly report on the
financial condition of the city that includes: (a) all of the facts of interest related to the financial
condition of the municipality; (b) a consolidated balance sheet; (c) a complete statement of the
balances on hand at the beginning and end of the month; (d) a statement of the aggregate receipts
and disbursements of each fund; (e) a statement of transfers to and from each fund; (f) a
statement of the bond and warrant indebtedness with corresponding rates of interest; and (g) a
summarized budget statement that shows the expenses paid from the budget, any encumbrances
against the budgets, and the amounts available for further expenditures.

H.B. 1154 (Walle) – Eight Liners: would: (1) authorize the comptroller to assess a penalty
between $50 and $2,000 against an owner or operator of a coin-operated machine who is
convicted, in relation to owning or operating the machine, of keeping a gambling place or
possessing a gambling device, equipment, or paraphernalia; (2) provide that in a suit to recover
the penalty, the comptroller or attorney general may recover reasonable expenses; (3) authorize a
city to assess a civil penalty against an owner or operator of a coin-operated machine who is
convicted, in relation to owning or operating the machine, of keeping a gambling place or
possessing a gambling device, equipment, or paraphernalia; (4) authorize a city to sue to collect
the civil penalty and, in the suit, recover reasonable expenses; and (5) allow a person assessed a
civil penalty to request a hearing in accordance with applicable city hearing procedures.

H.B. 1163 (Elkins) – Police Tuition Exemption: would provide for tuition and fee exemptions
for certain police officers enrolled in college classes related to law enforcement or criminal
justice.

H.B. 1164 (Keffer) – Engineering: would prohibit the Texas Board of Professional Engineers
from taking any enforcement action or imposing an administrative penalty for a violation of the
Engineering Practices Act on a political subdivision of the state or a public official or employee
of the state or of a political subdivision of the state who is not licensed under the Act.
H.B. 1168 (D. Miller) – Smoke Alarms and Fire Extinguishers: would make several changes
to the law regarding smoke alarms and fire extinguishers in residential rental units, including
that: (1) a local ordinance could not require that a smoke alarm powered by alternating current,
rather than battery, be installed in a dwelling unit built before September 1, 1987, unless: (a) the
interior of the unit is repaired, remodeled, or rebuilt at a projected cost of more than $5,000 and
requires a building permit; or (b) an addition occurs to the unit at a projected cost of more than
$5,000; and (2) if a dwelling unit was occupied as a residence before September 1, 2011, or a
certificate of occupancy was issued before that date, a smoke alarm may be powered by battery,
alternating current, or other power source and is not required to be interconnected with other
smoke alarms but that the alarm must comply with any local ordinance in effect at the time the
unit was first occupied or a certificate of occupancy was issued requiring the alarm be powered
by alternating current or other power source.

H.B. 1175 (Workman) – City Council Elections: would: (1) require the city council of a city
with a population of 500,000 or more to consist of a mayor elected at large and at least six
members elected from single-member districts; and (2) require, among other things, that the
single-member districts be compact, consist of contiguous territory, and be of equal population.
(Companion bill is S.B. 380 by Wentworth.)

H.B. 1178 (Flynn) – Personnel: would: (1) make it an unlawful employment practice for an
employer, including a city, to terminate or not rehire an individual based on their service in the
state militia; and (2) provide a procedure under which the Texas Workforce Commission reviews
complaints regarding an alleged unemployment practice under the bill.

H.B. 1181 (Deshotel) – Department of Rural Affairs: would abolish the Texas Department of
Rural Affairs and transfer its functions to the Texas Department of Housing and Community
Affairs, Department of State Health Services, and Department of Agriculture.

H.B. 1183 (Raymond) – Eight Liners: would: (1) authorize a commissioners court and – in
some instances – a city, to order, on proper petition, a local option election to legalize or prohibit
the operation of eight-liners; and (2) authorize the imposition of a fee on eight-liner owners and
provide for the allocation of the fee revenue as follows: (a) thirty percent to the state’s general
revenue fund; and (b) seventy percent to a city in which the eight-liner is located.

H.B. 1184 (Legler) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax appraisal cap from ten to
five percent, and apply the five percent cap to all property, not just to residential homesteads.
(Note: please see H.J.R. 87, below.)

H.B. 1192 (Castro) – Mandated Health Benefit: would require a group health benefit plan to
provide coverage for serious emotional disturbance and serious mental illness of a child.

H.B. 1194 (Zerwas) – Child Abuse/Neglect Investigations: would change requirements as to
investigations and procedures with respect to allegations of child abuse and neglect, including:
(1) an entity receiving a report of abuse or neglect shall maintain each report until the second
anniversary of the date the entity receives the report; (2) an investigation that includes an
examination of the subject child or a child in the house may not include a medical,
psychological, or psychiatric exam unless the parent or guardian consents but that a Department
of Family and Protective Services official can seek emergency medical attention for a child
before a representative of a law enforcement agency arrives at the investigation; and (3) the
standards for persons who investigate suspected child abuse and neglect at the local level shall
provide procedures to preserve audio records, email, and other evidence until the second
anniversary of the later of the date the evidence is created or date of a final judgment.

H.B. 1200 (McClendon) – Law Enforcement: would require: (1) a city peace officer to whom
a violation is reported involving the alleged photography or visual recording of certain payment
card or sight order information or related offense to make a written report to the police
department that includes the name of the victim, the name of the suspect, the type of information
captured or transferred, and the results of any information; and (2) the police department to
provide the report created to the victim.

H.B. 1202 (Riddle) – Immigration: would make it a criminal offense to employ or contract with
an undocumented immigrant, unless the employment is by the owner of a single family residence
to perform work on the residence.

H.B. 1203 (Harper-Brown) – School Buses: would: (1) generally prohibit the idling of a
school bus with a diesel engine while the bus is at a school or in a school crossing zone; and (2)
authorize a local authority to enforce the prohibition.

H.B. 1207 (S. Davis) – Child Abduction Prevention: would establish the Uniform Child
Abduction Prevention Act and provide, among other things, that: (1) in order to prevent an
imminent child abduction, a court may direct law enforcement to take any action reasonably
necessary to locate a child, obtain return of a child, or enforce a custody determination; and (2) a
court may issue an ex parte warrant that directs law enforcement officers to take physical
custody of a child and, if necessary, forcibly enter private property at any hour.

H.B. 1215 (McClendon) – Unauthorized Acquisition or Transfer of Financial Information:
would: (1) create the offense of unauthorized acquisition or transfer of certain financial
information; (2) require a peace officer to make a written report to the law enforcement agency
that employs the officer of an alleged offense described in (1), above; and (3) require the law
enforcement agency to provide the report to the victim, if requested.

H.B. 1219 (Miles) – Employee Leave: would: (1) require an employer to give an employee up
to 30 days of unpaid leave with benefits to handle issues related to family violence against the
individual or the individual's child; (2) require an employee to take any accrued paid leave first;
(3) require an employer to post notice of the rights given to employees by this law; (4) make
information related to the purpose of the unpaid leave confidential; and (5) prohibit retaliation
for use of this unpaid leave.

H.B. 1223 (Workman) – Water and Sewer Utilities: would: (1) require a small water or sewer
utility that is not owned by a city or water or sewer supply corporation to make a change in its
rates by holding an election via ballots mailed to ratepayers; (2) outline the procedures for such
an election; (3) prohibit the utility from recovering costs incurred from a rate appeal by the utility
if the majority of votes were against a rate increase; and (4) restrict how often such an election
may be held.

H.B. 1231 (Hopson) – Volunteer Fire Departments: would exempt certain volunteer fire
department facilities in counties with a population of 80,000 or less from certain engineering-
related construction requirements. (Companion bill is H.B. 1092 by Christian.)

H.B. 1233 (Gonzalez) – State Traffic Fine: would increase the amount of the “state traffic
fine” on convictions in municipal court from $30 to $45.

H.B. 1239 (Zedler) – Day Labor Centers: would prohibit a local governmental entity,
including a city, from using public money to construct or operate a day labor center used for the
purpose of facilitating the knowing employment of a person who is not a citizen, legal permanent
resident, qualified alien, or nonimmigrant lawfully present in the United States.

H.B. 1242 (Geren) – Metal Recycling: would, among other things, provide that a peace officer
who has reasonable suspicion to believe that an item of crafted precious metal in the possession
of a dealer is stolen may place the item on hold by issuing to the dealer a written notice
containing certain information.

H.B. 1249 (Callegari) – Civil Service: would: (1) repeal various requirements for the attorney
general to report, communicate, and publish certain information; and (2) repeal the requirement
that a department head for a police or fire department operating under civil service must file with
the attorney general a statement describing a criminal investigation if the department head
intends to order an indefinite suspension of an officer or firefighter who is under felony
indictment or misdemeanor complaint.

H.B. 1250 (Frullo) – Facsimile Signatures: would: (1) allow an authorized officer of a city of
200,000 or more to execute a public security, an instrument of payment, a certificate of
assessment, and certain contracts with the officer’s facsimile signature rather than a manual
signature; and (2) authorize a facsimile signature on a health and safety lien statement.
(Companion bill is S.B. 577 by Duncan.)

H.B. 1261 (Thompson) – Municipal Court: would increase the amount of the local option
municipal court technology fee to $5.

H.B. 1272 (D. Miller) – Immigration: would require an employer, including a city, to enroll in
and use the federal E-Verify Program.

H.B. 1273 (Workman) – LP Gas: would: (1) provide that an LP gas utility is a person that owns
or operates for compensation in this state equipment and facilities connected to a contiguous
piping system through which LP gas is supplied to residential and commercial end users; and (2)
subject an LP gas utility to the jurisdiction of the Texas Railroad Commission. (Note: This bill
would appear to preempt municipal regulation of LP gas utilities. Any city that regulates LP gas
utilities within its city limits should review the bill carefully.)
H.B. 1275 (Harless) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit an employer, including a city, from
knowingly employing an undocumented immigrant; (2) penalize a city by revoking any
government license it holds if it knowingly employs an undocumented immigrant; (3) allow
individuals to file complaints if they have reason to believe the city is employing an individual
who is an undocumented immigrant; (4) require a licensing authority, including a city, to
suspend any license issued to a person found to have knowingly employed an undocumented
immigrant; and (5) allow a licensing authority, including a city, to charge a fee to a person whose
license is suspended under this law.

H.B. 1276 (Guillen) – Transportation Funding: would provide that: (1) a peace officer who
stops a motor vehicle for an alleged violation of a law or ordinance shall report to the law
enforcement agency that employs the officer information relating to the stop, including among
other things the race or ethnicity of each passenger in the motor vehicle, as stated by the
passenger or, if the passenger does not state the person’s race or ethnicity, as determined by the
officer to the best of the officer’s ability; and (2) the Texas Department of Transportation shall
work and plan with local transportation planning entities to maximize the amount of federal
funding awarded for projects in the state by identifying and pursuing projects that are eligible for
federal grant programs, including the scenic byways program.

H.B. 1282 (Kleinschmidt) – Property Tax: would provide that the chief appraiser of an
appraisal district is elected rather than appointed.

H.B. 1283 (Craddick) – Procurement: would provide that – for a contract of less than
$500,000 – a city may, when purchasing any real property, personal property, or services other
than construction services, give preference to a local bidder that is within five percent of the
lowest bid price if certain conditions are met. (Companion bill is S.B. 640 by Seliger.)

H.B. 1284 (Menendez) – Affordable Housing: would, among other things, transfer of the
powers, duties, and programs of the Texas State Affordable Housing Corporation to the Texas
Department of Housing and Community Affairs, including provisions relating to providing
grants, supportive housing services, and housing retention services to support services offered to
homeless persons by political subdivisions, housing finance corporations, for-profit corporations,
and nonprofit organizations.

H.B. 1285 (Kleinschmidt) – Property Tax: would require the holder of mineral property to
obtain a tax certificate from the collector for each taxing unit that taxes the mineral interest, and
pay the taxing unit the delinquent taxes, penalties, interest, and other costs due to the taxing unit
out of the mineral proceeds that are presumed to be abandoned.

H.B. 1287 (Villarreal) – Property Tax: would change the amount of interest that a city making
a refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an
annual rate that is equal to the auction average rate quoted on a bank discount basis for three-
month treasury bills issued by the federal government.

H.B. 1292 (Coleman) – Mandated Health Benefit: would generally require health benefit plans
to cover the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders.
H.B. 1297 (Paxton) – Immigration: would: (1) provide that a city may not adopt a rule, policy,
or ordinance, or follow a practice, that requires a peace officer to violate a state or federal
criminal law; and (2) provide that a city may enter into an agreement with United States
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to train and authorize city police officers to
perform the functions of an immigration officer; (3) provide that if a city enters into such an
agreement, the agreement: (a) cannot require a peace officer to violate state racial profiling law;
and (b) must require a peace officer to comply with state reporting requirements for motor
vehicle stops; and (3) allow a city to request funds from the criminal justice division of the
governor’s office for expenditures incurred by the city in connection with an agreement with
ICE.

H.B. 1302 (Larson) – Texas Energy and Communications Commission: would provide that,
on January 1, 2012, the Railroad Commission of Texas is reestablished as the Texas Energy and
Communications Commission (TECC), and that the powers, duties, obligations, rights, contracts,
records, employees, property, funds, and appropriations of the Public Utility Commission of
Texas are transferred to the TECC on September 1, 2012.

H.B. 1308 (Villarreal) – Taxes: would create a “select commission on periodic tax review” and
charge the commission with periodically reviewing all state and local taxes and other revenue
sources and making recommendations as to whether the taxes or revenue sources should be
continued or repealed.

H.B. 1309 (Craddick) – Sexting: would: (1) create the offense of electronic transmission of
certain visual material depicting a minor; (2) provide that is an affirmative defense to prosecution
of the offense described in (1), above, if the defendant, among other things, reports receipt of the
material to a law enforcement agency not later than 48 hours after receiving the visual material
from another minor; (3) create various education programs concerning the prevention and
awareness of the offense described in (1), above; and (4) require certain courts, including a
municipal court, to order a defendant guilty of the offense described in (1), above, to attend and
complete an educational program about the consequences of the offense and require the
defendant or the defendant’s parent to pay the cost of the program if financially able.

H.B. 1317 (Naishtat) – Property Tax: would provide that, for sales tax purposes, there is a
rebuttable presumption that a retailer is engaged in business in this state if the retailer: (1) enters
into an agreement with a Texas resident under which the resident receives a commission or other
consideration for the referral of potential customers by any means, including by a link on an
Internet Web site; and (2) received at least $10,000 during the previous four calendar quarters in
cumulative gross receipts from sales to consumers located in Texas who were referred to the
retailer by an agreement under (1), above.

H.B. 1319 (Laubenberg) – Water Conservation: would: (1) require the Texas Water
Development Board and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to consult with the Water
Conservation Advisory Council to develop uniform methodology and guidance for calculating
and reporting municipal water use and conservation; and (2) require all municipal water utilities
to use the system in developing water conservation plans and preparing reports required by the
Water Code.

H.B. 1321 (Allen) – Mandated Health Benefit: would extend required health benefit coverage
for autism from 9 years of age to 17 years of age.

H.B. 1328 (Raymond) – TCLEOSE: would require the Texas Commission on Law
Enforcement Standards and Education to create a voluntary training program on the use of
electromagnetic pulse devices (an EMP device is used to disable a fleeing suspect’s engine in a
police chase) for police officers.

H.B. 1336 (Allen) – School Bus: would: (1) authorize a school district to implement a school
bus monitoring system that records images, including images of vehicles that pass a stopped
school bus; and (2) allow for the imposition of a civil penalty for such violation.

H.B. 1353 (Elkins) – Speed Limits: would: (1) increase the speed to 75 miles per hour on state
and interstate highways regardless of the type of vehicle or time of day; (2) allow a speed limit of
60 miles per hour on non-urban highways and other roads regardless of time of day; (3) require
all speed limits to be the same regardless of the time of day; and (4) repeal lower speed limits for
trucks.

H.B. 1354 (S. Davis) – City Building Inspectors: would grant certified city building inspectors
immunity from civil damages, including personal injury, wrongful death, property damage, or
other loss arising from services provided by the inspector during an emergency.

H.B. 1360 (Coleman) – County Sign Authority: would give a county the authority to prohibit
new off-premise signs in the unincorporated areas of the county.

H.B. 1365 (Callegari) – Red Light Cameras: would require that signs installed at an
intersection alerting drivers to the presence of a photographic traffic monitoring system or
photographic traffic signal enforcement system: (1) may not be located more than 750 feet from
the intersection; (2) must have affixed a flashing yellow circular beacon; and (3) must comply
with design and size requirements established by the Texas Department of Transportation.

H.B. 1372 (Christian) – Housing Authority: would repeal the requirement to appoint a tenant
to the position of commissioner in a municipal housing authority if: (1) the housing authority has
less than 300 units; and (2) certain other conditions are met.

H.B. 1375 (Bohac) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit a city from adopting a policy under
which the city’s police department or other city officials would not fully enforce state or federal
laws relating to immigration; (2) allow the attorney general to file suit to compel a governmental
entity to fully enforce immigration laws; and (3) allow the attorney general to recover reasonable
expenses incurred enforcing this law. (Companion bill is H.B. 247 by Solomons.)
H.B. 1376 (Bohac) – Junked Vehicles: would rephrase the definition of “junked vehicle” in
state law to include vehicles that: (1) display an expired license plate or invalid inspection
sticker; or (2) do not display any license plate or inspection sticker.

H.B. 1377 (V. Taylor) – Motor Vehicle Stops: would: (1) authorize a peace officer who
makes a motor vehicle stop to request and obtain: (a) one digital fingerprint from each hand of
the vehicle’s operator if the person fails to provide a driver’s license, a passport, or other form of
photographic identification; and (b) an ink fingerprint if the operator fails to provide
identification described in (a) and the officer issues a citation; (2) authorize a law enforcement
agency to maintain the fingerprint beyond the duration of the stop if the person is cited or
arrested during or as a result of the stop; (3) require discard of the fingerprint after the charge is
dismissed, the person is acquitted, or the person is convicted of an offense punishable by fine; (4)
require a court to notify fingerprint custodians after disposition of a defendant’s case; and (5)
allow an officer to obtain fingerprints through a person’s voluntary compliance with the officer’s
request or other lawful means.

H.B. 1382 (Bohac) – Immigration Status: would: (1) require a law enforcement agency that
arrests or has custody of a person to have the person’s immigration status verified not later than
48 hours after the arrest and before the person is released on bond; and (2) if United States
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) does not have the result of the immigration status
verification, notify ICE if the verification reveals that the person is not a citizen or national of the
United States and is unlawfully present in the United States.

H.B. 1384 (Kleinschmidt) – Property Tax: would make land used for supporting outdoor
education eligible for appraisal as open-space land for property tax purposes.

H.B. 1388 (Hopson) – Tree Preservation: would prohibit a city from regulating the planting,
clearing, or harvesting of trees or vegetation or other uses of trees or vegetation on a particular
tract of land in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. (Companion bill is S.B. 732 by Nichols.)

H.B. 1389 (Hopson) – Dangerous Dogs: would increase the penalty for a dog owner whose
dog kills a person to a felony of the first degree if the individual killed is under 15 years of age or
older than 65 years of age.

H.B. 1391 (Deshotel) – Access to Driver’s License Information: would provide that a person
who is certified, or otherwise authorized, to take or analyze a breath specimen is not prohibited
from accessing or using electronically readable information derived from a driver’s license,
commercial driver’s license, or personal identification certificate.

H.B. 1395 (Parker) – Personal Watercraft and Boats: would: (1) prohibit a person under 13
years of age from operating a personal watercraft; (2) prohibit a person under 13 years of age
from operating a motorboat powered by a motor with a manufacturer’s rating of more than 15
horsepower on public waters; (3) provide that a person born on or after September 1, 1993, and
operating a vessel powered by a motor with a manufacturer’s rating of more than 15 horsepower
on public water is required to take a boater education course, as well as modify other
requirements as to persons who are required to take a boater education course; (4) exempt from
the boater education course requirement a person who is supervised by a person at least 18 years
of age, a customer of a business engaged in renting, showing, demonstrating or testing boats, and
a person exempt by rule of the Parks and Wildlife Commission; and (5) authorize the
commission to establish a boater education deferral program.

H.B. 1400 (Elkins) – Public Improvement Districts: would, among other things, provide that
costs of improvements in a public improvement district may be paid or reimbursed by any
combination of certain methods if the improvements are dedicated, conveyed, leased, or
otherwise provided to a city, county, or related entity for the benefit of the city, county, or related
entity. (Companion bill is S.B. 412 by West.)

H.B. 1401 (Laubenberg) – Local Option Elections: would provide that, if a city annexes area
on or after the date a local option liquor election petition is submitted, the city may hold the
election only if the petition has enough signatures after including the voters in the annexed area.

H.B. 1402 (Guillen) – Law Enforcement: would provide that certain licensed law enforcement
officers are not subject to provisions of law that authorize a licensing authority to suspend or
revoke a license, disqualify a person from receiving a license, or deny a person to sit for a
licensing examination on the ground that the person has been convicted of certain criminal
offenses.

H.B. 1406 (Riddle) – Blood Specimens: would provide, in relation to individuals who take a
blood specimen from a vehicle operator to test for alcohol concentration or other intoxicating
substances, that: (1) only a physician, qualified technician, registered or licensed nurse, and
certain emergency medical technicians may take a blood specimen; (2) emergency medical
technicians may take a blood specimen only if authorized by the medical director for the entity
that employs the technician and in accordance with a protocol developed by the medical director;
(3) a medical director can develop a protocol that allows an emergency medical technician to
refuse to: (a) go to the location of a person from whom a peace officer requests or orders the
taking of a blood specimen; (b) take a blood specimen if it will impair or interfere with the
performance of patient care or other duties; and (c) provide the equipment or supplies necessary
to take a blood specimen; and (4) if an emergency medical technician takes a blood specimen, a
peace officer must observe the taking and then immediately take possession of the specimen.

H.B. 1412 (Chisum) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) modify the types of
acceptable voter identification documents; (5) make an offense under the bill a second degree
felony or a state jail felony if the person is convicted of attempt; (6) provide that a voter who
presents a voter registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the
precinct, but whose name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for
voting if the voter’s identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (7) provide that a
provisional ballot may be accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of
identification at the time the ballot is cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to
the voter registrar by personal delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot
board not later than the sixth business day after the date of the election.

H.B. 1419 (Hughes) – Elections: would prohibit the use of an electronic voting machine in an
election unless the machine: (1) has been certified or otherwise approved by means of
qualification testing by a nationally recognized test laboratory; (2) meets certain voluntary
standards developed and adopted by the Federal Election Commission, the Election Assistance
Commission, or the National Institute of Standards and Technology; and (3) creates a
contemporaneous auditable paper record copy of each electronic ballot that allows a voter to
confirm the choices the voter made through both a visual and a non-visual method. Additionally,
the bill would require an election authority using electronic voting machines to: (1) submit, at the
request of the secretary of state, complete documentation relating to all hardware, software, and
firmware components for the system, as well as all documents relating to the federal
qualification process; (2) submit a physical security plan for the system to the secretary of state
not later than 90 days before a system using electronic voting machines will be used in an
election; (3) submit a list of all changes and modifications to the system, a training plan, and a
communication plan explaining how election officers at each polling place will communicate on
election day to the secretary of state not later than 46 days before a system using electronic
voting machines will be used in an election; and (4) provide notice of the penalties for tampering
with an electronic voting machine in each language used at a polling place at which an electronic
voting machine is used for voting.

H.B. 1425 (Garza) – Graffiti: would provide that a city may – but is not required to – first offer
to remove graffiti for free prior to requiring the property owner to remove the graffiti.
(Companion bill is H.B. 1089 by Martinez Fischer.)

H.B. 1433 (Strama) – Property Tax: would extend the charitable organization property tax
exemption to include organizations that provide access to affordable financial products and
services for low-income individuals, provided the organization is a certified community
development financial institution and is exempt from federal income taxes under Section 501 of
the Internal Revenue Code.

H.B. 1435 (Elkins) – Property Tax: would provide that: (1) a taxing unit may not be made a
party to a suit to compel the appraisal review board to order a change in an appraisal roll; (2) the
movant in a suit to compel an appraisal review board to order a change in an appraisal roll must
mail notice of a hearing to the collector for each taxing unit that imposes taxes on the property at
issue; and (3) a taxing unit that imposes taxes on the property at issue may intervene in a suit
filed to compel an appraisal review board to order a change in an appraisal roll for the limited
purpose of determining whether the property owner has forfeited a remedy due to the
nonpayment of taxes.

H.B. 1436 (Price) – Elections: would add public junior college districts to the current list of
entities with which a school district must hold a joint election. (Companion bill is S.B. 729 by
Seliger.)
H.B. 1438 (Lewis) – Property Tax: would allow a city to serve notice of delinquent property
taxes to a domestic or foreign limited liability company whose right to transact business in the
state was forfeited by the comptroller, or on a limited liability company that was involuntarily
terminated or had its registration revoked. (Companion bill is S.B. 582 by Harris.)

H.B. 1451 (Thompson) – Dog and Cat Breeders: would: (1) provide for the licensing and
regulation of commercial dog and cat breeders by the Texas Department of Licensing and
Regulation; (2) authorize the department to contract with third-party inspectors, including local
law enforcement agencies and local animal control agencies, to enforce or assist in the inspection
of, investigation of, and enforcement against commercial dog and cat breeders; (3) authorize the
department to establish training requirements, registration procedures, and policies governing
third-party inspectors; (4) require that a person inspecting or investigating a dog or cat breeder
notify a local law enforcement or local animal control agency not later than 24 hours after
discovering evidence of animal cruelty or neglect during an inspection or investigation; and (5)
not affect the applicability of an ordinance or other legal requirement of a city or prevent a city
from prohibiting or further regulating the possession, breeding, or selling of dogs or cats.

H.B. 1454 (Murphy) – Hotel Occupancy Tax: would define “price” for purposes of the
amount paid for a hotel room as the retail price paid by a person for right to use or posses the
room, including any booking, handling, or similar fee or charge paid by or on behalf of the
person.

H.B. 1455 (Kolkhorst) – Law Enforcement: would allow a law enforcement agency, including
a city, to: (1) release an undocumented immigrant into the office of a United States senator or
United States representative; and (2) maintain a record of each released undocumented
immigrant who is not transferred to the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

H.B. 1457 (Fletcher) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) make various changes to the law
regarding the interception of wire, oral, or electronic communications for law enforcement
purposes; (2) provide that in order to be eligible to intercept a wire, oral, or electronic
communication in a circumstance that is not an immediate life-threatening situation, a designated
law enforcement agency must adopt a written policy and submit the policy to the director of the
Department of Public Safety for approval; (3) require that, if the director approves the policy
described in (2), above, chief law enforcement officers, including police chiefs, would submit to
the director a written list of peace officers authorized to possess, install, monitor, or operate wire,
oral, or electronic communications interception equipment in a non-life-threatening situation; (4)
authorize the department to conduct audits of law enforcement agencies to ensure compliance
with the written policy described in (2), above; and (5) require that a peace officer is authorized
to operate or monitor the interception of a wire, oral, or electronic communication in a non-life-
threatening situation only if the officer completes at least 16 hours of related training.
(Companion bill is S.B. 687 by Huffman.)

H.B. 1458 (Harless) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter registration certificate
and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does not present acceptable
identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4) modify the types of
acceptable voter identification documents; (5) make an offense under the bill a second degree
felony or a state jail felony if the person is convicted of attempt; (6) provide that a voter who
presents a voter registration certificate indicating that the voter is currently registered in the
precinct, but whose name is not on the precinct list of registered voters, shall be accepted for
voting if the voter’s identity can be verified from the proof presented; and (7) provide that a
provisional ballot may be accepted only if: (a) the voter presents acceptable proof of
identification at the time the ballot is cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of the identification to
the voter registrar by personal delivery or by mail for examination by the early voting ballot
board not later than the sixth business day after the date of the election.

H.B. 1466 (Hernandez Luna) – Immigration: would authorize a young person who is not a
citizen or permanent resident of the United States and who has been abused, neglected, or
abandoned to petition a court for a declaration that declares the child as a “special immigrant”
under federal law.

H.B. 1470 (Miles) – Law Enforcement Complaints: would: (1) create a Texas State Civilian
Complaint Review Board that would investigate written complaints against peace officers filed
with the board; (2) require the board to send substantiated complaints to the employer, including
a city, of a peace officer to take disciplinary action; and (3) require the board to send the
complaint to the district attorney if the city does not take disciplinary action against the officer.

H.B. 1471 (Miles) – Official Oppression: would increase the penalty prescribed for official
oppression in certain circumstances.

H.B. 1472 (Miles) – Public Information Act: would provide that: (1) a complaint filed against
a fire fighter or police officer alleging conduct constituting official oppression must be retained
by the city as long as the fire fighter or police officer at issue remains employed by the city; and
(2) such a complaint may not be withheld from disclosure under the Public Information Act.

H.B. 1474 (Alonzo) – Immigration: would provide that a city may not require a landlord to: (1)
refuse to lease to a prospective tenant or renew the lease of a tenant solely on the basis of the
immigration status of the tenant or a member of the tenant’s family; or (2) inquire as to the
immigration status of a tenant or prospective tenant or a member of the tenant’s family.

H.B. 1476 (Riddle) – Emergency Medical Services: would revoke the license of any
emergency medical services personnel who has been convicted or had a deferred disposition for
certain serious offenses.

H.B. 1485 (D. Patrick) – Electric Utility Rates: would add school districts and charter schools
to the current list of entities that are entitled to a discounted rate for electric service provided by
an electric utility or a municipally owned utility. (Companion bill is S.B. 504 by Davis.)

H.B. 1503 (White) – Elections: would provide that only a TCLEOSE-licensed peace officer is
eligible for appointment as a special peace officer at a polling place.
H.B. 1507 (Christian) – Magistrates: would allow any magistrate in a county with a
population of less than 100,000 to issue certain types of search warrants.

H.B. 1519 (Isaac) – Traffic Fine Revenue: would provide that, in each fiscal year, a city
having a population of less than 1,000 (as opposed to 5,000 in current law) may retain, from
fines collected for Rules of the Road violations, an amount equal to 30 percent of the city’s
revenue for the preceding fiscal year from all sources, and shall send to the comptroller any
remainder portion of a fine collected that exceeds one dollar.

H.B. 1526 (D. Miller) – Automobile Theft: would make the Automobile Burglary and Theft
Authority ensure that all grants issued by the authority help increase recovery and clearance rate
of vehicle burglaries and theft.

H.B. 1531 (Ritter) – Property Tax: would exempt from property taxes land that is leased to a
person to be used as a school.

H.B. 1533 (Eiland) – Elections: would provide that: (1) in conjunction with the Department of
Public Safety, the secretary of state shall adopt rules to establish a process by which the issuance
of a driver’s license or personal identification card by the department is the sole means of voter
identification; (2) an election officer serving an early voting polling place is a deputy voter
registrar and has the same authority as a regular deputy registrar; (3) a person who would be
eligible to vote in an election, but for the requirement to be a registered voter, shall be accepted
during early voting if the person submits a voter registration application and acceptable proof of
residence.

H.B. 1537 (Eiland) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) allow a person with knowledge of the
commission of a crime to report it to any attorney who prosecutes criminal cases, including a city
prosecuting attorney; and (2) allow the criminal attorney, including a city prosecuting attorney,
to refer the matter to the police or the appropriate court.

H.B. 1541 (McClendon) – Law Enforcement: would change the way the state Automobile
Burglary and Theft Prevention Authority administers and allocates grants to help prevent and
solve automobile theft offenses by providing that the authority shall: (1) develop and use
standard performance measures for each category of grants provided by the authority in order to
assess grantee success in achieving the purposes of this article; and (2) ensure that grants are
used to help increase: (a) the recovery rate of stolen motor vehicles; (b) the clearance rate of
motor vehicle burglaries and thefts; and (c) the number of persons arrested for motor vehicle
burglary and theft. The bill would also require the authority to allocate grant funds primarily
based on the number of motor vehicles stolen in, or the motor vehicle burglary or theft rate
across, the state rather than based on geographic distribution.

H.B. 1543 (Schwertner) – Property Tax: would eliminate the stipulation that the surviving
spouse of an elderly or disabled individual must be disabled in order to qualify for a property tax
freeze.
H.B. 1545 (Lewis) – Elections: would provide that the governing body of a political
subdivision, other than a county, that holds its general election for officers on a date other than
the November uniform election date may, not later than December 31, 2012, change the date on
which it holds its general election for officers to the November uniform election date.

H.B. 1547 (Larson) – Groundwater: would change the way desired future conditions for the
groundwater resources in a groundwater management area are established.

H.B. 1552 (Madden) – Sex Offenders: would, among several other provisions: (1) require a
city police department designated as the primary registration authority for certain sex offenders
to use a required monitoring system to verify the authenticity of any geographically verifiable
information contained in the offender’s registration form; and (2) require the manufacturer or
vendor of a monitoring system to provide training to a city police department on the equipment.

H.B. 1553 (Larson) – Immigration: would provide that a city that receives appropriated money
from the state to provide a health care, educational, welfare, correctional, or other service to an
individual must: (1) identify the individual’s country of citizenship before providing the service;
(2) determine the cost to the state of providing the service if the individual is a citizen of a
foreign country; and (3) submit to the comptroller a report that contains this information. A city
that does not submit a report in accordance with the comptroller’s rules is not eligible to receive
any disbursement from the state comptroller.

H.B. 1556 (Burnam) – Oil and Gas Drilling: would prohibit the issuance of an oil and gas
drilling permit for a site within 1,200 feet of a public school.

H.B. 1558 (Reynolds) – Air Quality Permitting: would require an applicant for certain new
facility or expansion of facility permits to, depending on whether the facility is located in a
community with certain percentages of minority inhabitants or inhabitants below the federal
poverty level: (1) submit an environmental justice report to the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality (TCEQ); (2) file a public participation plan with the TCEQ, (3) if within
city limits, consult with the mayor to evaluate the need for a community environmental benefit
agreement in order to mitigate adverse effects on the community; and (4) participate in a public
hearing. (Companion bill is S.B. 549 by Ellis.)

H.B. 1559 (S. Davis) – Records Retention: would: (1) prohibit a court from destroying a court
document filed with, presented to, or produced by the court before 1951; and (2) authorize the
Supreme Court of Texas to create rules for the retention of such documents.

H.B. 1560 (Scott) – Enterprise Zones: would allow a county commissioners court to nominate
a project or activity of a qualified business as an enterprise project if the business is located both
in the county and in the extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city primarily located in another county.

H.B. 1561 (Orr) – Red Light Cameras: would: (1) prohibit a city from adopting an ordinance
to implement a photographic traffic signal enforcement system unless the city holds an election
and a majority of the voters approve the proposition; and (2) require a city that currently has a
photographic traffic signal enforcement ordinance to hold a referendum election no later than
November 8, 2011, and if a majority of voters do not approve the proposition, allow the city to
continue to operate the system until any related administration and enforcement contract expires.

H.B. 1563 (Flynn) – Local Option Elections: would, among other things, extend the period of
time between certain local option elections to legalize or prohibit the sale of alcoholic beverages
from one to three years.

H.B. 1571 (S. Miller) – Motorcycles: would allow the operation and movement of motorcycles
between lanes of traffic moving in the same direction during periods of traffic congestion if
certain conditions are met.

H.B. 1576 (Garza) – Property Tax: would provide that either an opinion by an independent
auditor and licensed certified public accountant included in an audit, or a determination of tax-
exempt status by the United States Internal Revenue Service of a community housing
development organization or other organization constructing or rehabilitating low-income
housing, is prima facie evidence of the facts stated in the opinion or determination for purposes
of determining tax exempt status.

H.B. 1593 (Isaac) – Elections: would require the inclusion of a space for a candidate’s e-mail
address on an official application for a place on the ballot

H.B. 1594 (Isaac) – Traffic Citations: would allow a city of less than 5,000 to retain all traffic
fine revenue (current law provides that such a city is limited to 30 percent of the previous year’s
revenue) if less than ten-percent of traffic citations issued by the city’s police officers are for
driving five miles per hour or less above the posted speed limit.

H.B. 1595 (Isaac) – Firearm Discharge: would: (1) prohibit a governmental unit, including a
city, from bringing suit against a sport shooting range for the lawful discharge of firearms on the
sport shooting range; (2) prohibit a city from regulating the discharge of a firearm at a sport
shooting range; and (3) allow a city to enforce an ordinance or regulation through injunctive
relief against a sport shooting range under certain circumstances. (Companion bill is S.B. 766
by Estes.)

H.B. 1596 (Isaac) – Elections: would eliminate as acceptable proof of identification for voting:
(1) official mail addressed to a person by name from a governmental entity; and (2) a copy of a
current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document
that shows a person’s name and address.

H.B. 1600 (Rodriguez) – Property Tax: would: (1) amend the definition of “qualified open-
space land” to include land that has been devoted principally to agricultural use or to production
of timber or forest products for three of the preceding five years (instead of five of the preceding
seven years, as current law provides); (2) provide that in determining whether agricultural use
meets the degree of intensity generally accepted in an area, a chief appraiser shall distinguish
between land in an area that is incorporated and land in an area that is unincorporated; and (3)
before February 1, require the chief appraiser to deliver an application form, including a brief
explanation of the requirements for obtaining an appraisal, to each person whose land was
appraised as “qualified open-space land” during the preceding year.

H.B. 1609 (Gonzales) – Driver Responsibility Program: would repeal the state driver
responsibility program. (Companion bills are S.B. 624 by Whitmire and H.B. 299 by Berman.)

H.B. 1616 (Geren) – Campaign Reports: would provide that campaign reports required to be
filed under the Election Code must list the following amounts received during the reporting
period: (1) any credit, interest, rebate, refund, reimbursement, or return of a deposit fee resulting
from the use of a political contribution or an asset purchased with a political contribution; (2) any
proceeds of the sale of an asset or investment purchased with a political contribution; and (3) any
other gain received from a political contribution.

H.B. 1619 (Orr) – Emergency Services Districts: would make various changes to the
administration of emergency services districts, including training requirements for board
members and a removal procedure whereby the county commissioners may remove a board
member.

H.B. 1622 (Menendez) – Graffiti: would change the definition of “gang activity” under
nuisance abatement laws by expanding the type of graffiti that is considered gang activity.

H.B. 1626 (Flynn) – Pseudoephedrine: would provide that a political subdivision may adopt an
ordinance, rule, or regulation authorizing or requiring a business establishment in that political
subdivision that engages in over-the-counter sales of products containing ephedrine,
pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine to use an electronic reporting database in addition to
any other reporting or recordkeeping required by state law.

H.B. 1627 (Flynn) – Elections: would allow a city to appoint as alternate presiding election
judge of an election precinct a qualified voter that lives anywhere in the city limits if the city
cannot find an eligible qualified voter of the election precinct to appoint.

H.B. 1628 (Larson) – Sales Tax: would repeal the state law prohibiting the state comptroller
from crediting to the Parks and Wildlife Department or the Texas Historical Commission any
amount of taxes imposed on the sale of sporting goods in excess of the amounts appropriated to
the department or commission, respectively.

H.B. 1634 (Bonnen) – Unfunded Mandates: would: (1) establish an unfunded mandates
interagency work group to consist of the state auditor, director of the Legislative Budget Board,
the comptroller, a senator, and a member of the house of representatives; (2) provide that the
work group publish and keep updated an advisory list of mandates for which the legislature has
not provided reimbursement; (3) provide that a political subdivision must only comply with a
mandate for which the legislature has provided reimbursement and allow a political subdivision
to act in reliance on the advisory list of unfunded mandates published by the work group; and (4)
repeal Government Code Section 320.004, which provides for the review of unfunded mandates.
H.B. 1640 (Dutton) – Law Enforcement: would expand the definition of the crime of official
oppression to include excessive force; and (2) make excessive force by a peace officer a third
degree felony.

H.B. 1643 (Zerwas) – Development Agreements: would amend the current law relating to
development agreements (which includes by reference non-annexation agreements for
agriculture-exempt property) to: (1) provide that a city may make a written contract with an
owner of land that is located in the extraterritorial jurisdiction of the city; and (2) provide that the
contract may include only those lawful terms and conditions that the city and the land owner
agree to, including among other things: (a) a guarantee of the continuation of the extraterritorial
status of the land and its immunity from annexation for any period up to 45 years (i.e., the bill
would delete the 15-year term limit in current law); and (b) providing that the total duration of
the contract may not exceed 45 years.

H.B. 1647 (Gallego) – Municipal Court: would, among other things: (1) require either party in
a criminal case before a municipal court to disclose, as soon as practicable after receiving a
timely request from the other party, most evidence pertaining to a criminal case to the other
party’s attorney; (2) require the court to permit an attorney representing the parties to make
copies of the evidence; (3) permit the city to assert exceptions to required disclosure that is
believed to be confidential by law; (4) require a municipal prosecutor to supplement or amend
this information as needed; (5) require a defendant who intends to use an alibi defense to file a
good faith notice of intent to raise the defense with the court; (6) permit a court to enter a
protective order restricting a specific disclosure or permit an in camera review of the documents;
and (7) create sanctions for violation of the disclosure requirements.

H.B. 1649 (Marquez) – County Development Authority: would: (1) expand county authority
with regard to building code enforcement and fees in the unincorporated area of the county; and
(2) provide that an electric, gas, water, or sewer service utility may not serve or connect new
residential construction in that area unless the utility receives a certificate issued by the
commissioners court that states that the new residential construction meets all applicable county
building codes. (Companion bill is S.B. 861 by Rodriguez.)

H.B. 1650 (Hopson) – Purchasing: would provide, among other things, that a governmental
entity making purchases of building materials shall give preference to materials offered by
resident bidders if the building materials meet state specifications regarding quantity and quality
and the cost of the building materials is equal to or less than the cost of other similar materials
that are offered by a nonresident bidder.

H.B. 1652 (Alonzo) – Collective Bargaining: would: (1) give fire fighters and police officers
the right to organize and bargain collectively without an election to adopt the provisions of Local
Government Code Chapter 174 (the collective bargaining chapter); (2) repeal the adoption
procedure for collective bargaining provided for in the collective bargaining chapter; (3) require
arbitration if a request for arbitration is made under the collective bargaining chapter; and (4)
repeal the procedures for collective bargaining for cities over 50,000 that are required to adopt
collective bargaining.
H.B. 1665 (King) – Defense Base Authorities: would provide that, on receipt of an application
for a permit for a proposed structure in an area located within eight miles of the boundary line of
a defense base, the defense community reviewing the application shall notify the defense base
authorities concerning the compatibility of the proposed structure with base operations.

H.B. 1671 (Marquez) – Public Information: would: (1) authorize a governmental body to
redact certain motor vehicle record information without the necessity of requesting a decision
from the attorney general; (2) authorize a governmental body to redact a credit card, debit card,
charge card, or access device number without the necessity of requesting a decision from the
attorney general; (3) make a public information request that is modified in response to the
requirement of a deposit or bond a separate request that is considered received on the date the
governmental body receives the modified request; and (4) provide that if a governmental body
receives a written request by mail and cannot establish the actual date of receipt, the written
request is considered to be received on the third business day after the date of the postmark.
(Companion bill is S.B. 602 by Rodriguez.)

H.B. 1676 (Hochberg) – Property Tax: would provide that the governing body of a taxing unit
or appraisal district must, in a timely manner in order to take into account any statutory changes,
take official action to collect a penalty for delinquent taxes on tangible personal property, or not
be able to apply the penalty until the following tax year.

H.B. 1678 (Burkett) – Elections: would authorize a county commissioners court, rather than
the county election commission, to appoint the county elections administrator.

H.B. 1679 (Burkett) – Elections: would: (1) make the offense of unlawful assistance of a voter
a state jail felony; and (2) make it a state jail felony for a person to deposit in the mail or with a
common carrier more than two carrier envelopes containing ballots voted by other persons in an
election.

H.B. 1684 (Fletcher) – Fireworks: would provide that a city that annexes an area for limited
purposes may not prohibit the sale or use of fireworks in the area.

H.B. 1685 (Fletcher) – Property Tax: would entitle an owner of real property who contracts to
have a commercial or industrial building constructed on the property to a credit based on the cost
of construction against the property taxes imposed on the property by a city.

H.B. 1688 (Raymond) – Utility Relocation: would provide that the governing body of a city
may require a certificated telecommunications utility to relocate the utility’s facility at the
utility’s expense to permit a public development that increases the capacity or use of a public
street, alley, road, sidewalk, gutter, right-of-way, or public way, including a berm, ditch, or
shoulder, by: (1) giving the utility 30 days notice; and (2) specifying the new location for the
facility along the right-of-way of the street.

H.B. 1697 (P. King) – Elections: would provide that a person residing outside the United States
who indicates on a federal postcard application that the person is a United States citizen is
entitled to vote a full ballot if the person is otherwise eligible to vote and is a registered voter at
the address stated on the application. (Companion bills are H.B. 1773 by L. Taylor, and S.B.
904 by Patrick.)

H.B. 1707 (Gutierrez) – Theft: would provide that theft of an item with a value of less than
$100 (rather than $50 in current law) is a class C misdemeanor.

H.B. 1712 (Christian) – Offenses Against Public Administration: would: (1) establish the
public integrity unit in the office of the attorney general; (2) give the unit authority to prosecute
an offense against public administration or an offense involving insurance fraud; (3) require local
law enforcement agencies to cooperate with the unit; and (4) authorize the employment of
commissioned peace officers by the attorney general to investigate offenses for the unit. (Note:
please see H.J.R. 106, below.)

H.B. 1715 (Laubenberg) – Crime Victims: would require the state’s attorney and law
enforcement to ensure that victims of certain crimes are informed of and afforded certain rights.

H.B. 1717 (Garza) – Property Tax: would: (1) authorize a majority of the group of taxing units
composed of the cities, school districts, and the county participating in an appraisal district to
request an audit of the performance of the appraisal district, or the discontinuance of that audit;
(2) change the makeup of an appraisal district board to include one elected, rather than
appointed, director from each of the four commissioner’s precincts of the county for which the
district is established; (3) make other changes to the eligibility requirements and manner of
filling a vacancy in the position of director on an appraisal board. (Companion bill is S.B. 722
by Williams.)

H.B. 1724 (Hamilton) – Transportation Funding: would: (1) establish the state economically
driven mobility project account, which would consist of revenue received from projects financed
under the bill and proceeds from obligations secured by revenue received from those projects; (2)
provide that the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) shall develop a project
application process for local transportation planning entities, including cities, counties,
metropolitan planning organizations, toll project entities, and public transportation entities to
identify projects suitable for funding under the account; (3) provide for project selection criteria
to prioritize projects that: (a) promote economic development, including by creating employment
and cash flow; (b) have sustainable economic value; and (c) create transportation corridors as
opposed to isolated projects; (4) authorize TxDOT to contract with local governments or private
entities for the construction of selected projects, including construction through pass-through toll
agreements, or to construct projects itself; (5) mandate that revenue from projects financed under
the bill – including tax increment revenues - must be deposited to the credit of the economically
driven mobility project account; and (6) provide that TxDOT may contract with local
governments or directly with private entities, including property owners, who will benefit from a
selected project to recover amounts sufficient to cover the cost of the project and any associated
debt service for the project.

H.B. 1728 (Keffler) – Energy Savings Contracts: would: (1) authorize a contract for the
installation or implementation of energy savings equipment in new or existing facilities; and (2)
provide that the governing body of a local government may use any available money, other than
money borrowed from the state, to pay the provider of the energy or water conservation
measures; and (3) provide that the governing body is not required to pay for energy or water
conservation measures solely out of the savings realized under an energy saving performance
contract.

H.B. 1729 (Keffer) – Sale of Leased Land: would: (1) authorize governmental entities,
including cities, to sell surplus land that it owns to a person leasing the land without notice or bid
and prohibit a governmental entity from selling the land to any other person except a bulk
purchaser; (2) exempt the sale of a leased tract from platting requirements; (3) exempt the sale of
an individual leased tract from various requirements including chapter 272 of the Local
Government Code (which generally governs the sale of city property); (4) authorize a
governmental entity to suspend a lessee’s right to purchase leased land in order to pursue a bulk
sale of the leased land; (5) provide for the method of purchase and valuation of the land; (6)
require that certain roads be transferred to the county; and (7) provide a procedure for a lessee to
purchase the leased tract from the bulk purchaser.

H.B. 1730 (Ritter) – Groundwater: would: (1) create a vested ownership interest in and a right
to produce groundwater below the surface of a landowner’s real property, and (2) prohibit an
aquifer authority from depriving or divesting the landowner or his lessee of that right. (This bill
is identical to S.B. 332 by Fraser.)

H.B. 1731 (Ritter) – Groundwater: would: (1) make a legislative finding and declaration of
policy regarding the long-term viability of groundwater resources; (2) clarify the rights of
landowners and groundwater conservation districts with regard to groundwater use and
conservation policy creation.

H.B. 1733 (Ritter) – Property Tax: would: (1) require the State Soil and Water Conservation
Board, with the assistance of the comptroller, to develop standards for determining whether land
qualifies for appraisal based on water-stewardship use; and (2) provide that the chief appraiser an
appraisal review board shall apply the standards adopted by the State Soil and Water
Conservation board and comptroller. (Companion bill is S.B. 409 by Estes.)

H.B. 1734 (Ritter) - Texas Water Development Board Assistance: would prohibit an
applicant for financial assistance or loans from the Texas Water Development Board from
receiving assistance if the applicant has failed to satisfactorily complete a request by the board’s
executive administrator or a regional planning group for information relevant to the project for
which the assistance is being requested, including a water infrastructure financing survey. (This
bill is identical to S.B. 370 by Seliger.)

H.B. 1735 (Bohac) – Speed Limit Signs: would require a city that erects a sign giving notice of
an altered speed limit on a highway or street under the city’s jurisdiction to install and maintain a
orange frame behind the sign containing the word “NEW” until the 91st day after the date the
sign is erected.
H.B. 1736 (Bohac) – Emergency Vehicles: would provide that it is a third degree felony to
illegally pass a stationary authorized emergency vehicle if the violation results in serious bodily
injury or death.

H.B. 1737 (Bohac) – Speeding: would provide that a property owners’ association may install a
speed feedback sign on a road, highway, or street in the association’s jurisdiction if: (1) the
association receives the consent of the governing body of the political subdivision that maintains
the road, highway, or street for the placement of the sign; and (2) the association pays for the
installation of the sign.

H.B. 1739 (Walle) – Workers’ Compensation: would: (1) require construction contractors and
subcontractors to provide workers’ compensation insurance coverage for each of their
employees; and (2) provide that, if the contractor enters into a contract with a governmental
entity for a public project, the coverage must be satisfactory to the governing body of the
governmental entity. (Companion bill is S.B. 938 by Lucio.)

H.B. 1743 (Martinez Fischer) – Blood and Breath Specimens: would require an officer –
before requesting a person to submit to the taking of a specimen – to inform the person orally
and in writing that, if the person refuses, the officer may apply for a warrant authorizing a
specimen to be taken from the person.

H.B. 1744 (Allen) Mandated Health Benefit: would require a health benefit plan to provide
coverage for autism therapy to develop appropriate social, emotional, and interpersonal skills.

H.B. 1746 (Veasey) – Property Tax: would: (1) require a taxing unit to make a payment to a
tax increment fund not later than the 90th day after the later of: (a) the delinquency date for the
unit’s property taxes; or (b) the date the city or county that created the zone submits to the taxing
unit an invoice specifying the amount the taxing unit is required to pay into the tax increment
zone; and (2) allow a county commissioners court that enters into an agreement with a city
council to also enter into an agreement with the city council for payment into the tax increment
fund on behalf of a taxing unit other than the county if the property tax rate of the other taxing
entity must be approved by the commissioners court, or if the commissioners court is expressly
required by statute to levy the ad valorem taxes of the other entity. (Companion bill is S.B. 627
by Davis.)

H.B. 1747 (Veasey) Personnel: would: (1) make it an unlawful employment practice for an
employment complaint or other protected activity to be a motivating factor in an adverse
employment action, even if other factors also lead to adverse employment action; (2) make it a
defense that the same action would have been taken even without the impermissible motivating
factor; and (3) allow attorney fees and costs to be awarded to the individual complaining of
retaliation if an impermissible motivating factor is shown, even if the action would have been
taken without the impermissible motivating factor.

H.B. 1761 (Harper-Brown) – Elections: would require the secretary of state to prescribe
instructions to be printed on balloting materials for a ballot to be voted by mail to include a
statement, in Spanish and English, advising why a person should decline help from a stranger
who offers to help read, mark, or mail the ballot.

H.B. 1764 (Harper-Brown) – Abandoned Property: would reduce the amount of time that
must pass before an unclaimed utility deposit or other unclaimed personal property is presumed
abandoned.

H.B. 1765 (S. Miller) Emergency Communications: would: (1) require the governor’s
Emergency Management Division, with cooperation from the Texas Department of
Transportation and emergency management directors, to create an emergency information
network system consisting of at least 200 digital displays to display local public health and safety
information and availability of fuel, food, lodging, and pharmacy services in certain urban areas;
(2) require the division to contract with vendors who will erect and maintain the signs within city
limits or within extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city; (3) allow the vendors to display commercial
messages when emergency information is not being displayed; (4) require the vendors to share
2.5 percent of gross revenue with any city in which a sign is in the city limits or extraterritorial
jurisdiction and 2.5 percent to the state for general revenue; (4) allow local law enforcement to
show certain emergency information on the signs; and (4) allow the erection of such signs
without requiring compliance with municipal sign ordinances or permission from the city in
which the sign is located. (Companion bill is S.B. 971 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 1771 (Madden) – Drug Court: would create the Specialty Courts Advisory Council to
evaluate applications for grant funding for drug courts and other specialty courts.

H.B. 1773 (Taylor) – Elections: would provide that a person residing outside the United States
who indicates on a federal postcard application that the person is a United States citizen is
entitled to vote a full ballot if the person is otherwise eligible to vote and is a registered voter at
the address stated on the application. (Companion bills are H.B. 1697 by P. King and S.B. 904
by Patrick.)

H.B. 1775 (Allen) – Solid Waste: would: (1) create a waste reduction stakeholders committee;
and (2) charge that committee with conducting a study regarding waste reduction in the state and
preparing a statewide waste reduction plan to be presented to the legislature.

H.B. 1791 (Kleinschmidt) – Emergency Services Districts: would make various changes to
the administration of emergency services districts, including training requirements for board
members and a removal procedure whereby the county commissioners may remove a board
member. (Companion bill is H.B. 1619 by Orr.)

H.B. 1792 (Gutierrez) – Red Light Cameras: would provide that all revenue from red light
camera violations, after a city has deducted its administrative costs, be deposited to the credit of
the state’s regional trauma account.

H.B. 1794 (Gutierrez) – Property Tax: would provide that a city that adopted an ordinance
prior to 2002 allowing for the taxation of leased motor vehicles for personal use may no longer
collect property taxes on the vehicle if the lessee is 65 years of age or older.
H.B. 1800 (Bonnen) – Immigration: would, among other things, provide that:

   14. Not later than 48 hours after a person is arrested and before the person is released on
       bond, the law enforcement agency that arrested the person or that has custody of the
       person shall: (1) have the person’s immigration status verified by a law enforcement
       officer who is authorized under federal law to verify a person's immigration status or a
       federal law enforcement officer; and (2) if United States Immigration and Customs
       Enforcement (ICE) does not have the results of the immigration status of the person,
       notify ICE if the person is not a citizen or national of the United States and is unlawfully
       present in the United States.
   15. A law enforcement agency that notifies ICE of the results of an immigration status
       verification shall provide the results of the immigration status verification to the Texas
       Department of Public Safety (DPS).
   16. DPS shall maintain a computerized central database containing information regarding
       each person who has been arrested in the state and immigration status verification reveals
       that the person: (a) is not a citizen or national of the United States; and (b) is unlawfully
       present in the United States according to the terms of the federal Immigration Reform and
       Control Act.
   17. DPS shall make the information in the database available to any peace officer or law
       enforcement agency in the state.
   18. Most of the information in the database is public and shall be posted on the DPS Web
       site.
   19. A city or any officer or employee of the city may not adopt any policy that does not fully
       enforce state and federal law, and, in the case of policies that would not fully enforce
       state and federal immigration laws, prohibit the city from receiving state funds.

H.B. 1810 (Burnam) – Driver Responsibility Program: would repeal the driver responsibility
program and replace the revenue derived from the program with an increase in the tax on
cigarettes.

H.B. 1812 (Phillips) – Newspapers: would allow newspaper publication by a city in periodical
postal matter in a county where a second class newspaper is not published.

H.B. 1814 (Lucio) – Fire Suppression: would authorize a water supply or sewer service
organization to provide a water supply to a city or volunteer fire department for use in fire
suppression.

H.B. 1820 (R. Anderson) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would change the definition
of “employee” for purposes of participation in the Texas Municipal Retirement System to require
that an employee work 1,500 hours per year instead of 1,000 hours a year.

H.B. 1827 (McClendon) – Employee Leave: would require an employer, including a city, to
allow an employee unpaid time off to participate in certain student activities for the employee’s
child.
H.B. 1836 (Hughes) – Fireworks: would: (1) authorize a retail fireworks permit holder to sell
fireworks beginning February 20 and ending at midnight on March 2; (2) require the Texas
Forest Service to make its services available each day during the Texas Independence Day
fireworks season to determine whether drought conditions exist; and (3) require that an order of a
commissioners court prohibiting or restricting the sale or use of fireworks be adopted before
February 15 for the Texas Independence Day fireworks season.

H.B. 1841 (Hartnett) – Sales Tax: would provide that a person whose only activity in this state
is Internet hosting is not engaged in business in this state for sales tax purposes.

H.B. 1844 (Guillen) – Records Retention: would authorize the executive and administrative
officer of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission to: (1) store, for a fee, local
government records on the request of the local government; and (2) allow the state records center
to provide for the storage, access, protection, and disposition of inactive and vital local
government records.

H.B. 1847 (Farias) – Solid Waste: would increase the fee charged by the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality to dispose of construction or demolition waste at a municipal solid waste
landfill.

H.B. 1850 (Elkins) – State Agency Rules: would provide that a proposed rule may not be
adopted by a state agency until the rule is approved by a majority of members of the standing
committee of each house reviewing the rule.

H.B. 1851 (Reynolds) – Procurement: would: (1) provide that a person who is a veteran with a
service-connected disability is eligible to be listed as a historically underutilized business by the
state; and (2) add attorneys to the list of professionals that must be procured under the
Professional Services Procurement Act.

H.B. 1862 (Anchia) – Substandard Housing: would provide that, if a city or a county revokes a
certificate of occupancy for a leased premises because of the landlord’s failure to maintain the
premises, the landlord is liable to a tenant who is not in default under the lease for: (1) the full
amount of the tenant’s security deposit; (2) the pro rata portion of any rental payment the tenant
has paid in advance; (3) the tenant’s actual damages, including any moving costs, utility
connection fees, storage fees, and lost wages; and (4) court costs and attorney’s fees arising from
any related cause of action by the tenant against the landlord.

H.B. 1863 (Anchia) – Electric Rates: would provide that a regulatory authority, including a
city or the Public Utility Commission, shall allow as reasonable and necessary expenses an
electric utility’s expenditures related to recharging stations for electric vehicles to the extent the
expenditures meet certain conditions.

H.B. 1869 (Giddings) – Procurement: would remove the population brackets in current law to
allow any city to use the current local preference bidding statutes.
H.B. 1876 (Truitt) – Residential Fire Sprinklers: would authorize a city to require the
installation of a multipurpose residential fire protection sprinkler system, or any other fire
sprinkler protection system, in a new one- or two-family dwelling if the city holds an election to
authorize the enactment of the requirement and a majority of voters approve the proposition.

H.B. 1877 (Coleman) – Recycling: would: (1) create a local recycling assistance grant program
available only to cities and counties; (2) create a five cent disposable bag fee for every
disposable plastic bag provided to a retail customer, to be collected by the retailer and remitted to
the comptroller in order to fund the recycling assistance grant.

H.B. 1878 (D. Miller) – Emergency Services Districts: would: (1) allow for the consolidation
of emergency services districts if the board of each district determines that consolidation would
allow the districts to provide services more efficiently and adopts a joint order of consolidation;
(2) require each emergency services commissioner to complete a training course provided or
approved by the Texas Department of Rural Affairs; and (3) authorize the board of directors of
an emergency services district to contract with a volunteer fire department, local government, or
other district to provide staff, facilities, equipment, programs, or services the board considers
necessary to provide emergency services.

H.B. 1880 (Madden) – Property Tax: would provide that, for a residence homestead owned by
a veteran of the armed services of the United States and that was donated to or renovated for the
veteran at no charge to the veteran, an appraisal district may only increase the appraised value of
the property to an amount not to exceed the lesser of: (1) the market value of the property for the
most recent tax year; (2) for a residence homestead donated to the veteran, the sum of the
appraised value of the land and $150,000; or (3) for a residence homestead renovated at no
charge to a veteran, the sum of the appraised value of the property for the tax year preceding the
renovation and the market value of all new improvements to the property that are not considered
renovations. (A veteran would be required to apply for the limitation with the chief appraiser of
the appraisal district in order to receive a limitation under the bill.)

H.B. 1883 (Garza) – Extraterritorial Jurisdiction: would provide that: (1) the governing body
of a city that is incorporated in the extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) of an existing city with the
consent of the existing city may - by resolution - petition the existing city to release area in the
ETJ of the existing city located contiguous to and within one-half mile of the boundaries
surrounding the petitioning city; (2) not later than the 30th day after the date the existing city
receives the petition, the governing body - by ordinance or resolution - shall release the area; (3)
the existing city is not required to release any area that is annexed for limited purposes, has been
included in the existing city’s municipal annexation plan for at least one year, or is proposed for
annexation and is not required to be included in a municipal annexation plan; and (4) the two
cities shall enter into a memorandum of understanding to provide for the transition of the
application of any municipal ordinances to the transferred ETJ.

H.B. 1884 (Garza) – Property Tax: would do the following: (1) limit re-appraisals of
residential homesteads to no more often than once every three years; and (2) prevent taxable
value increases in years in which homesteads are not re-appraised. (Note: the intended effect of
this bill is to create a three and one-third-percent appraisal cap on homesteads, but its
constitutionality – absent an accompanying constitutional amendment – is questionable).

H.B. 1887 (Villarreal) – Property Tax: would, among other things: (1) require an appraisal
review board to include in a written order to resolve a protest the appraised value as determined
by the board for each account that was the subject of the protest; (2) provide that a district court
has jurisdiction over a timely petition if the property identified in the petition was the subject of
an appraisal review board hearing and the issuance of an order determining the protest, and if the
plaintiff identified in the petition was the owner or lessee of the property on January 1 of the tax
year, during the tax year, or as identified on the appraisal roll; (3) permit the property owner or
the owner’s agent to offer evidence of the market value or the equal and uniform value of the
property for purposes of a no evidence motion for summary judgment filed by an appraisal
district; (4) require a party to agree to alternative dispute resolution upon the written request of
the other party; (5) provide that an individual need not be a licensed real estate appraiser to offer
expert testimony with regard to the market value or equal and uniform value of property in an
appeal; and (6) change the amount of interest that a city making a refund of property taxes
following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an annual rate that is equal to the
auction average rate quoted on a bank discount basis for three-month treasury bills issued by the
federal government, while also providing that a taxing unit may not agree as part of any
settlement of a lawsuit to waive the interest.

H.B. 1888 (S. Miller) – E-Verify: would require an employer, including a city, to register and
participate in E-verify.

H.B. 1891 (S. Davis) – Search Warrants: would clarify that a search and seizure warrant for
data on an electronic communication or data storage device is considered to have been executed
within the time allowed if the device was seized within that time frame.

H.B. 1895 (Farias) – Elections: would require a city ordering a general election to order that
early voting by personal appearance at the main early voting polling place be conducted on at
least one Saturday and Sunday during the early voting period.

H.B. 1898 (Pickett) – Transportation Funding: would authorize the governing body of the
City of El Paso to call an election on the issue of imposing an additional fee up to ten dollars for
registering a vehicles to be used for road and bridge projects in the city.

H.B. 1899 (Pickett) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) exempt a city from the requirement to post a
sign at a school crossing zone regarding the prohibited use of a wireless communication device if
the city prohibits the use of a wireless communication device while operating a motor vehicle
throughout its jurisdiction; and (2) authorize political subdivisions, including a city, to regulate
the use of a wireless communication device by the operator of a motor vehicle.

H.B. 1900 (Burnam) – Unfunded Mandates: would: (1) establish an unfunded mandates
interagency work group to consist of the state auditor, director of the Legislative Budget Board,
the comptroller, a senator, and a member of the house of representatives; (2) authorize the work
group to enter into an interagency memorandum of understanding regarding the completion of its
work; (3) provide that a political subdivision is not required to comply with an unfunded
mandate identified on the published list of unfunded mandates; and (4) repeal Government Code
Section 320.004, which provides for the review of unfunded mandates.

H.B. 1903 (Keffer) – Property Tax: would: (1) allow a city to sell a delinquent tax receivable
at any time through a negotiated sale or competitive bidding on terms that the city determines are
in its best interest; and (2) provide that the sale of a delinquent tax receivable does not alter or
affect the duty or authority of a local government to collect a delinquent tax receivable.

H.B.1906 (D. Howard) – Vehicle Idling: would make it a class C misdemeanor offense to
violate a Texas Commission on Environmental Quality rule concerning locally enforced motor
vehicle idling limitations.

H.B. 1907 (Madden) – Student Offenses: would: (1) require that written notification by a law
enforcement agency to a superintendent concerning an offense committed by a student include
the facts contained in the earlier oral notification, the name of the person who was orally
notified, and the date and time of the oral notification; (2) require that oral and written notice
concerning an offense committed by a student include all pertinent details including details of
any assaultive behavior and weapons used or possessed during the offense; and (3) give school
districts discretion over admission or placement of certain students.

H.B. 1911 (Bonnen) – Governmental Immunity: would provide immunity from liability for
injuries or damages incurred during training exercises for emergencies to the same extent a
person would be immune for providing services during an actual emergency.

H.B. 1912 (Bonnen) – Texas Department of Rural Affairs: would transfer the Texas
Department of Rural Affairs to the Office of Rural Affairs within the Department of Agriculture
and abolish the board of the Texas Department of Rural Affairs.

H.B. 1913 (Hancock) – Plastic Bags: would: (1) require certain businesses to take certain
actions to reduce the use of plastic checkout bags; and (2) preempt a conflicting local ordinance
or rule. (Companion bill is S.B. 908 by Fraser.)

H.B. 1914 (W. Smith) – Solid Waste: would require the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality to adopt rules to require additional financial assurance for certain commercial solid
waste facilities.

H.B. 1919 (Price) – Animal Cruelty: would provide a defense to prosecution for cruelty to a
dog if the individual had a reasonable fear of serious injury from the dog to himself or another
person.

H.B. 1920 (Pickett) – Transportation: would make various changes relating to transportation
planning and funding, including among others:

   1. providing that the Texas Transportation Commission consists of five members, of which
      three are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate, one is
       appointed by the lieutenant governor, and one is appointed by the governor with the
       advice and consent of the senate from a list provided by the speaker of the house of
       representatives;
   2. mandating that the commission align Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT)
       district boundaries along the boundaries of regional planning commissions;
   3. creating a ten-member legislative oversight committee on transportation, which shall
       appoint an inspector general who will cooperate and coordinate with the state auditor’s
       office to oversee TxDOT operations;
   4. providing that TxDOT shall develop a statewide transportation program and budget plan,
       which includes detailed planning and financial reporting requirements;
   5. providing that each metropolitan planning organization shall, for the area in its
       boundaries, select projects and order them in priority (for an area that is not within an
       MPO, each TxDOT district office will prepare a plan).
   6. providing that an MPO may also prepare and update periodically a long-range
       transportation plan for its region;
   7. providing that, in developing a plan, an MPO shall seek the opinions and assistance of the
       appropriate transportation officials, and TxDOT and an MPO may enter into a
       memorandum of understanding relating to the planning of transportation services;
   8. requiring TxDOT to use the MPO project lists to create the statewide transportation
       program and budget.
   9. allowing the commission to adopt rules to allow an MPO to loan funds to another MPO
       (but only if required to avoid the lapsing of federal appropriations authority);
   10. providing that the statewide transportation program and budget shall be organized first by
       region, then by mode of transportation, followed by the year of the project, and the
       commission shall adopt rules that create funding formulas for transportation projects after
       considering the input of planning organizations, transportation officials, and county and
       municipal officials;
   11. providing that all funds received by TxDOT for highways, including toll roads and toll
       road systems, that may be allocated in the state’s or TxDOT’s discretion shall be
       allocated by a formula to each MPO that is based on performance measures and includes
       at least the following criteria: (a) centerline miles; (b) level of congestion; (c) percentage
       of population below federal poverty level; (d) population; (e) safety; and (f) vehicle miles
       traveled;
   12. mandating that the commission allocate to the MPOs funding for the project costs of all
       transportation projects;
   13. providing that TxDOT shall develop an interactive, Web-based system for the tracking of
       MPO allocations and projects, and that MPOs shall be granted access to the system
       through a secure site to input information regarding projects and the associated project
       costs; and
   14. mandating the application of local conflict of interest laws to an MPO board member.

H.B. 1923 (Zedler) – Intergovernmental Relations: would: (1) require a city that contracts
with a federal-level government relations consultant to require the consultant to report to the
Office of State-Federal Relations information about the contract and any subcontract including:
(a) the name of the consultant; (b) the issues for which the consultant hired to provide services;
and (c) the amount paid to the consultant; (2) provide for liquidated damages in the amount of
$1,000 for each day the consultant fails to comply with the reporting requirement; (3) require the
report to be filed within 30 days of hire and 30 days of when the contract expires or is
terminated; and (4) require the consultant to pay a $250 fee when submitting the report.

H.B. 1926 (Aliseda) – Elections: would, among other things, provide that: (1) the presiding
judge or a special peace officer may not remove an alternate presiding judge from the polling
place without the approval of an election official other than the presiding judge or special peace
officer and documentation from the presiding judge of the reason for removal; (2) a person is
eligible for appointment as a special peace officer only if the person is licensed as a peace officer
by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education; and (3) any
information provided by a poll watcher that may be used to identify the watcher is confidential
and may only be used for election administration purposes.

H.B. 1928 (Zedler) – Offenses Against Public Administration: would: (1) establish the public
integrity unit in the office of the attorney general; (2) give the unit authority to prosecute an
offense against public administration, an offense involving insurance fraud, and an offense
involving motor fuels tax; (3) authorize the attorney general to direct the county or district
attorney to prosecute or assist in the prosecution of an offense described in (2), above; (4) require
local law enforcement agencies to cooperate with the unit; (5) provide for the venue for
prosecution by the unit; and (6) authorize the employment of commissioned peace officers by the
attorney general to investigate certain offenses for the unit.

H.B. 1929 (Aliseda) – Sexually Oriented Businesses: would create a state licensing scheme to
be administered by the State Department of Health Services for owners, operators, employees, or
independent contractors of sexually oriented businesses; (2) provide certain requirements that
must be met to obtain a license, including ineligibility if a person has been convicted of certain
criminal offenses; (3) prohibit a person from owning, operating, or working at, or otherwise
engaging in a business transaction as an owner, operator, employee, or independent contractor at,
a sexually oriented business unless the person holds a state license; (4) create civil and criminal
penalties for a violation under the bill; and (5) provide that the bill’s requirements are in addition
to any municipal or county regulation and that, to the extent of a conflict between the bill and a
municipal or county regulation, the bill controls.

H.B. 1930 (Zedler) – Human Trafficking: would, among other things, propose that the Human
Trafficking Prevention Task Force examine the extent to which human trafficking is associated
with the operation of sexually oriented businesses.

H.B. 1933 (W. Smith) – Metal Recycling: would, among many other things: (1) add various
items, including fire hydrants, an item with the logo of a governmental entity or utility, and wire
that has been burned to remove the insulation, to the list of regulated metals under state law; (2)
provide that a county, city, or other political subdivision may require the record of purchase of
regulated metals to contain a clear and legible thumbprint of a seller; (3) provide that a county,
city, or other political subdivision that issues a license or permit to a metal recycling entity shall
issue a notice to an owner or operator that is operating without the license or permit informing
the owner or operator that the owner or operator may be subject to criminal and civil penalties if
the owner or operator does not submit an application for the appropriate license or permit; (4)
provide that a person commits a misdemeanor if the person owns or operates a metal recycling
entity and does not submit an application for the appropriate license or permit; (5) authorize the
Department of Public Safety (DPS) to enter into contracts relating to the operation of the
statewide electronic reporting system and database; and (6) from fines collected and distributed
to the DPS for violations of metal recycling laws, mandate that DPS by rule establish and
implement a grant program to provide funding to assist local law enforcement agencies in
preventing the theft of regulated metals.

H.B. 1939 (Menendez) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would create an advisory
committee to assist the board of trustees of the Texas Municipal Retirement System. (Note: An
advisory committee currently exists, and this bill would codify that requirement.)

H.B. 1959 (Thompson) – Alcoholic Beverage Permit: would require that an individual who is
denied an alcoholic beverage permit or license based on the certification of a city or county be
given a hearing before the Alcoholic Beverage Commission.

H.B. 1961 (Deshotel) – Police Workers Compensation: would require that a city ensure that a
police officer or firefighter who is injured in the line of duty be provided with necessary medical
care, compensation to pay for health care services to cure or relieve the injury and any effects
naturally resulting from the injury, and any necessary artificial body part within ten days of
receiving notice of a compensable injury.

H.B. 1962 (Villarreal) – Municipal Court: would: (1) require a city’s governing body to
approve certain special programs that a municipal judge may require a juvenile to attend after an
adjudication of guilt, if a city expenditure would be involved; and (2) increase the caps on cost of
the special program or a similar program for the parents of the juvenile.

H.B. 1964 (Villareal) – Municipal Court: would: (1) authorize a municipal court judge to
require a juvenile defendant to perform community service in lieu of a fine or cost; (2) allow the
juvenile to discharge the community service obligation by paying at any time the fine and costs
assessed; and (3) limit the judge’s liability for damages arising from the community service.

H.B. 1966 (Chisum) – Recycling: would provide for manufacturer registration, recovery plans,
and other responsibilities relating to television recycling for television manufacturers.

H.B. 1968 (Chisum) – Gas Pipelines/Municipal Jurisdiction: would create the Gas Pipeline
Regulatory Act, which would – among other things – provide that: (1) the Railroad Commission
has exclusive original jurisdiction over the rates and services of a gas pipeline that transmits,
transports, delivers, or sells natural gas or synthetic natural gas to a gas utility that distributes the
gas to the public; (2) the commission is vested with all the authority and power of the state to
ensure compliance with the obligations of gas pipelines; (3) detailed requirements apply to,
among other things, records, audits, inspections, establishment of rates, services standards, and
other facets of gas pipelines; (4) a city maintains the rights and powers of a city to grant or refuse
a franchise to use the streets and alleys in the city or to make a statutory charge for that use; (5) a
city that performs a regulatory function may make each charge that is authorized by a state law
or the applicable franchise agreement; (6) a franchise agreement may not limit or interfere with a
power conferred on the commission by the bill; (6) the governing body of a city participating in a
ratemaking proceeding may engage rate consultants, accountants, auditors, attorneys, and
engineers to: (a) conduct investigations, present evidence, and advise and represent the
governing body; and (b) assist the governing body with litigation or a gas pipeline ratemaking
proceeding before the railroad commission or court.; (7) the gas pipeline in the ratemaking
proceeding shall reimburse the governing body of the city for the reasonable cost of the services
of a such person to the extent the commission determines reasonable; (8) provide that: (a) a city
has standing in each case before the commission that relates to a gas pipeline's rates and services
in the city; (b) a city's standing is subject to the right of the commission to consolidate that city
with another party on an issue of common interest; and (c) a city is entitled to judicial review of
a commission order relating to a gas pipeline's rates and services; (8) with regard to a gas
pipeline’s costs of relocating a facility to accommodate construction or improvement of a
highway, road, street, public way, or other public work by or on behalf of the United States, this
state, a political subdivision, or another entity having the power of eminent domain, a gas
pipeline may recover its relocation costs through a surcharge on gas volumes sold and
transported to customers in the service area where the relocation occurred by applying to the
commission for a new rate schedule or tariff; (9) a surcharge application must include sufficient
documentation to demonstrate the requirement for each relocation, the entity requiring the
relocation, costs incurred for relocation of comparable facilities, surcharge computations,
and that reasonable efforts have been made to receive reimbursement from the entity requiring
the relocation, if applicable; (10) not later than the 35th day after the date a surcharge application
is received, the commission shall administratively grant or deny the application, or the
application is automatically approved.

H.B. 1971 (J, Jackson) – Trespassers: would provide that an owner, lessee, or occupant of
land: (1) owes a duty to refrain from injuring a trespasser willfully, wantonly, or through gross
negligence; and (2) may, under certain circumstances, be liable for injury to a child younger than
16 years of age caused by a highly dangerous artificial condition on the land.

H.B. 1972 (Harper-Brown) – Electronic Reporting: would require each state agency to
encourage public entities, including cities, to electronically submit all reports and
correspondence required under state law.

H.B. 1974 (Sheets) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would: (1) require the Texas
Municipal Retirement System to establish and administer a defined contributions plan under
which a participant pays contributions to the plan for the purchase of investment products; (2)
make the defined contribution plan mandatory for any person employed on or after September 1,
2012, and who was not a member of the system upon employment; (3) make the defined
contribution plan optional for any employee who is a current contributing member of the
retirement system; (4) make a change to a defined contribution plan irrevocable; (5) make a
change to a defined contribution plan terminate any rights a person had in membership in TMRS;
and (6) vest benefits in the defined contribution plan on the first anniversary of the person’s
participation in the plan.

H.B. 1976 (P. King) – Elections: would repeal the state law allowing a registered voter who
changes residence to another election precinct in the same county to vote a full ballot in the
election precinct of former residence until the voter’s registration in the new precinct becomes
effective.

H.B. 1977 (P. King) – Elections: would provide that the ballot of a voter may not be counted if
the voter either does not sign the signature roster at a polling place, or have an election officer
enter the voter’s name with a notation indicating the reason why the voter could not sign.

H.B. 1978 (P. King) – Elections: would provide that a person whose name appears on a
precinct suspense list of registered voters may only cast a provisional ballot.

H.B. 1979 (Laubenberg) – Special Districts: would: (1) provide that a city may enter into a
strategic partnership agreement only with certain conservation and reclamation districts; and (2)
to be annexed for limited purposes under a strategic partnership agreement, an area must be in
the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction and contiguous to the corporate or limited purpose
boundaries unless the district consents to noncontiguous annexation pursuant to a strategic
partnership agreement with the city.

H.B. 1982 (Callegari) – Texas Department of Rural Affairs: would transfer the Texas
Department of Rural Affairs to the Office of Rural Affairs within the Department of Agriculture
and abolish the board of the Texas Department of Rural Affairs.

H.B. 1984 (Hancock) – Vehicle Storage: would require a vehicle storage facility to allow an
insurance company access to vehicles if the owner of the vehicle authorizes the company to
inspect or remove the vehicle under a claim of loss.

H.B. 1985 (S. Turner) – Municipal Court: would: (1) limit the ability of the state to revoke the
city’s ten percent part of the court costs, fees, and fines remitted to the state to only cases where
there is a conviction; and (2) extend the time period during which a city may reestablish
compliance with the rules regarding remitting court costs, fees, and fines to the state before the
city is barred from collecting a service fee from those funds.

H.B. 1986 (S. Turner) – Electric Generation: would provide that: (1) the Public Utility
Commission by rule shall develop a process for obtaining emergency reserve power generation
capacity as appropriate to prevent blackout conditions caused by shortages of generated power in
the ERCOT power region; and (2) the rules must provide parameters for estimating the amount
of emergency reserve power generation capacity necessary to prevent blackout conditions and
mechanisms for equitably sharing the costs of contracting for the reserve capacity to be available
and the costs of generated power provided to prevent blackout conditions; (3) in accordance with
rules adopted under the bill, a regional independent power organization shall contract with power
generation companies for a defined amount of emergency reserve power generation capacity to
prevent blackouts caused by shortages of generated power; and (3) before the regional
independent power organization calls on the emergency reserve power generation capacity to
prevent blackout conditions, it shall undertake to use all market sources of power and demand
reduction available in accordance with commission rules adopted under the bill.
H.B. 1987 (Workman) – Workers’ Compensation: would: (1) require construction contractors
and subcontractors to provide workers’ compensation insurance coverage for each of their
employees; and (2) provide that, if the contractor enters into a contract with a governmental
entity for a public project, the coverage must be satisfactory to the governing body of the
governmental entity.

H.B. 1988 (Gallego) – Peace Officers: would allow one immediate family member of a peace
officer killed as a result of criminal conduct to speak in court regarding the terms of any plea
bargain agreement.

H.B. 1992 (Hardcastle) – Animal Control Fees: would allow the Texas Animal Health
Commission to impose animal fees, including fees for: (1) inspection of animals or facilities; (2)
disease testing; (3) obtaining samples from animals for disease testing; (4) disease prevention,
control, or eradication; (5) treatment efforts; (6) control and eradication of ticks and other pests;
and (7) any other service for which the commission incurs a cost.

H.B. 1994 (Weber) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) authorize a city to create a first offender
prostitution prevention program; and (2) authorize such a program to collect a fee not to exceed
$1,000 to cover the costs of the program, five percent of which would go to the police
department in the city in order to provide training on domestic violence, prostitution, and human
trafficking.

H.B. 1995 (Weber) – TCEQ Enforcement: would: (1) remove Travis County as a possible
venue for alleged violations of most Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) rules
or criminal statutes; and (2) change the ratio of fine sharing for a prosecution of a violation of
most TCEQ rules or criminal statutes between the TCEQ and any local government significantly
involved in prosecuting the case from an even division to ninety percent to the state and ten
percent to the local government.

H.B. 2000 (Garza) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that the legal owner of property that is
not a public facility corporation is exempt from property taxation if: (a) a public facility
corporation owns 100 percent of the legal owner of the property; or (b) the legal owner of the
property is exclusively controlled by the corporation and is organized under state law, has its
principal place of business in this state, and has equitable title to the property; (2) provide that
property owned by a public facility corporation is exempt from property taxes if the property is
owned by a tax credit partnership or limited liability company and the general partner or member
is controlled by a public facility corporation.

H.B. 2010 (Smithee) – Construction Contracts: would essentially eliminate “broad form”
indemnification in construction contracts by, among other things, providing: (1) that a provision
in a construction contract, or in an agreement collateral to or affecting a construction contract, is
void and unenforceable as against public policy to the extent that it requires an indemnitor to
indemnify, hold harmless, or defend another party to the construction contract or a third party
against a claim caused by the negligence or fault, the breach or violation of a statute, ordinance,
governmental regulation, standard, or rule, or the breach of contract of the indemnitee, its agent
or employee, or any third party under the control or supervision of the indemnitee, other than the
indemnitor or its agent, employee, or subcontractor of any tier; (2) for an exception to (1), above,
for a provision in a construction contract that requires a person to indemnify, hold harmless, or
defend another party to the construction contract or a third party against a claim for the bodily
injury or death of an employee of the indemnitor, its agent, or its subcontractor of any tier; (3)
that provision in a construction contract that requires the purchase of additional insured
coverage, or any coverage endorsement or provision within an insurance policy providing
additional insured coverage, is void and unenforceable to the extent that it requires or provides
coverage the scope of which is prohibited for an agreement to indemnify, hold harmless, or
defend; (4) for certain exclusions from (1), above; and (5) that the provisions of the bill may not
be waived by contract or otherwise. (Companion bill is S.B. 361 by Duncan.)

H.B. 2013 (Hardcastle) – Solid Waste: would provide that the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality may issue a permit by rule to authorize the governing body of a county or
city with a population of 10,000 or less to dispose of demolition waste from an abandoned
building or building found to be a nuisance if the disposal occurs on land that: (1) the county or
city owns or controls; and (2) would qualify for an arid exemption under commission rules.

H.B. 2019 (McClendon) – Municipal Court: would: (1) authorize a city to create a pretrial
victim-offender mediation program for first-time offenders accused of certain property crimes;
and (2) require a defendant to pay for program costs up to a certain point, plus a $15 fee to be
deposited in a fund exclusively for the maintenance of the program.

H.B. 2025 (McClendon) – Solid Waste: would provide that a commissioners court by rule may
regulate solid waste collection, handling, storage, and disposal by establishing a mandatory
program in an area located within the extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city only if: (1) the area has
a population density of more than 3,000 persons per square mile; and (2) the commissioners
court or the governing body of the city has determined that the area has an established problem
with the illegal dumping of household garbage.

H.B. 2040 (Hamilton) – Emergency Management: would: (1) make crisis incident stress
management services provided to emergency response team members confidential; and (2) limit
liability for any loss related to an emergency response team member’s provision of critical
incident stress management services. (Companion bill is S.B. 1065 by Williams.)

H.B. 2042 (Menendez) – Defense Base Development Authorities: would provide that a
defense base development authority may charge for the use, lease, or sale of an open space or a
facility and various financial and professional services, and would exempt certain commercial
aircraft that are under construction inside the authority from ad valorem taxation in certain
instances.

H.B. 2043 (Menendez) – Property Tax: would provide that a commercial aircraft or tangible
personal property that the owner intends to incorporate into, or attach to, a commercial aircraft
that is located inside a defense base development authority is not to be considered tangible
personal property that is subject to taxation.
H.B. 2045 (Berman) – Sales Tax: would provide that a taxpayer may deduct and withhold
three-fourths of one percent of the amount of taxes due from the taxpayer on a timely return as
reimbursement for the cost of collecting sales taxes, so long as the total amount deducted does
not exceed certain specified limits per month, quarter, and year.

H.B. 2048 (Lyne) – Hotel Occupancy Taxes: would: (1) allow a city to directly perform an
audit, or to contract with another person to perform an audit, to determine any delinquency in
hotel occupancy tax payments to the city; (2) require the city to notify the comptroller if the
results of an audit reveal a failure of a hotel to collect or pay hotel taxes; (3) require the
comptroller to review the information submitted by a city to determine whether to proceed with
collection and enforcement efforts, and distribute 20 percent of any additional amount collected
as a result of the audit to the city to defray the cost of the audit; and (4) provide that a city may
not receive a percentage of the amount collected if the information submitted to the comptroller
was obtained as a result of an audit performed on a contingent fee basis.

H.B. 2049 (Lavender) – Property Tax: would make land used for raising or keeping bees for
pollination or for the production of human food or other tangible products eligible for appraisal
as open-space land for property tax purposes.

H.B. 2050 (Pena) – Elections: would allow a poll watcher to use a mechanical or electronic
means of recording images or sound while serving as a watcher only if: (1) the device is used to
report an irregularity or violation of law relating to the election; or (2) the device is used to
contact the authority holding the election, the secretary of state, the attorney general, or a law
enforcement officer.

H.B. 2051 (Pena) – Elections: would add additional language to the oath administered by an
election officer to a person selected to provide assistance to a voter.

H.B. 2053 (Pena) – Elections: would provide that a person may not serve as a poll watcher if
the person has been convicted of a felony.

H.B. 2055 (Pena) – Elections: would require the secretary of state to establish rules to allow
counties to use countywide polling places as an alternative election system.

H.B. 2056 (Pena) – Elections: would require the early voting clerk of an authority holding an
election that does not use as an early voting polling place a location used in the preceding
election to notify a person who represents that location of the change as soon as practicable after
the authority determines the location of each early voting polling place.

H.B. 2057 (Pena) – Elections: would create the offense of criminal conspiracy to interfere with
an election for any offense relating to the registration of voters, voting procedures, application
for a ballot, or voting by mail.

H.B. 2058 (Pena) – Elections: would provide that a person assisting an individual in the
completion of an early voting ballot application commits an offense if the person does not sign
and print his or her name on the application, regardless of whether the person is in the presence
of the applicant.

H.B. 2065 (Allen) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) authorize a city to create a pretrial victim-
offender mediation program for certain first-time offenders; (2) outline the requirements for the
program; (3) provide that victim-offender mediation does not have to be performed by a trained
mediator; (4) outline the requirements for a mediation agreement between the parties in a victim-
offender mediation; (5) require a city that establishes a mediation program to notify the attorney
general's office; (6) authorize a city to charge a fee for participation in the mediation program, to
be based on the defendant’s ability to pay, used only for program purposes, and in an amount not
to exceed $500; (7) create a $15 on all property offenses to be sent to the comptroller quarterly
for deposit in a special fund; (8) authorize a city with a pretrial victim-offender mediation
program to retain 40 percent of the $15 fee collected for maintenance of the program; and (9)
authorize any other city to keep ten percent of the fee, so long as the fee is remitted properly.

H.B. 2075 (Martinez) – Disease Presumption: would provide that: (1) a firefighter or
emergency medical technician (EMT) that has a heart attack or stroke while on duty is presumed
to have suffered the illness or death during the course and scope of employment, which means he
or she would be covered by workers' compensation for that condition; (2) a firefighter or EMT
who contracts acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), human immunodeficiency vicrus
(HIV), hepatitis B, or hepatitis C is presumed to have contracted the disease during the course
and scope of employment, which means he or she would be covered by workers' compensation
for that condition, if – while on duty: (a) the firefighter or EMT was exposed to a person with
these diseases who received treatment from the firefighter or EMT; or (b) the firefighter or EMT
regularly responded to scenes or calls involving exposure to blood or other bodily fluids; and (3)
a firefighter or EMT who contracts methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
resulting in illness or death is presumed to have suffered the illness or death during the course
and scope of employment, which means he or she would be covered by workers' compensation
for that condition – if, while on duty, the firefighter or EMT was exposed to a person with
MRSA who received treatment from the firefighter or EMT.

H.B. 2076 (Rodriguez) – Debt Collection: would: (1) authorize a city to contract with a public
or private vendor for the collection of a debt related to a civil case, including an unpaid fine, fee,
or court cost (but not a commercial bail bond), if the debt is more than 60 days overdue; and (2)
allow a city with a vendor described in (1), above, to authorize a collection fee of not more than
30 percent of the amount of the debt collected to be used to compensate the vendor.

H.B. 2078 (Villarreal) – Property Tax: would: (1) prohibit appraisal districts and appraisal
review boards from conducting their own training for board members; (2) prohibit appraisal
districts and appraisal review boards from instructing board members to disregard matters taught
by the comptroller or to conduct themselves differently from the manner in which they have been
instructed by the comptroller; (3) allow the chief appraiser or employee of an appraisal district or
appraisal review board to contact a board member only to discuss administrative, clerical, or
logistical matters related to the scheduling and operation of hearings, the processing of
documents, the issuance of orders, notices, and subpoenas, and the operation of the appraisal
review board; (4) require the appraisal district to provide the appraisal review board with
independent counsel of the appraisal review board’s own choosing; and (5) prohibit attorneys
from representing an appraisal review board if they or any member of their law firm has
represented a property owner, an appraisal district, or a governmental entity on an appraisal issue
within the prior twelve months.

H.B. 2084 (Kolkhorst) – Food Regulation: would: (1) prohibit a local health department from
regulating a cottage food production operation; (2) allow a local health department to investigate
a cottage food production operation if the local health department receives a complaint regarding
the operation; and (3) require the Department of Agriculture to develop a program to regulate
farmers markets to allow individuals receiving food assistance from the state to use that
assistance at farmers market.

H.B. 2093 (Thompson) – Construction Insurance: would: (1) authorize the use of a
“consolidated insurance program” under which a principal provides insurance on a construction
project for several contractors; and (2) provide specific procedures that must be followed to use
such a program.

H.B. 2100 (Lewis) – Property Tax: would provide that the property of a local government
corporation that is located within the boundaries of a local government that the local government
corporation was created to aid and act on behalf of, and a transaction to acquire that property, are
exempt from taxation in the same manner as a housing finance corporation. (Companion bill is
S.B. 1120 by Seliger.)

H.B. 2101 (Hernandez Luna) – Municipal Court Records: would require a court, upon the
motion of any involved party in a case, to seal identifying financial information or personal
identifying information which is included in the court’s record unless the court finds good reason
to not do so.

H.B. 2102 (Hernandez Luz) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require a health benefit
provider, including a benefits pool, to cover the cost of mammography, low dose mammography,
and physician-recommended supplemental breast cancer screening.

H.B. 2103 (Jackson) – Public Funds Collateral Act: would establish a letter of credit issued
by a federal home loan bank as “eligible security” for collateral to secure public funds.

H.B. 2105 (Y. Davis) – Procurement: would provide that: (1) a city may not award a contract
to a vendor, bidder, contractor, or subcontractor that will perform the work related to the contract
with workers located outside the United States, unless the city first obtains a waiver from the
state auditor; and (2) a public agency, including a city, may not award or provide a public
subsidy to an applicant that will perform any work related to the subsidy with workers located
outside the United States, unless the public agency first obtains a waiver from the state auditor.

H.B. 2106 (Y. Davis) – Eminent Domain: would provide that: (1) the term “blighted area”
means an area that presents four or more of the following conditions for one year after a property
owner receives notice of the condition: (a) the area contains uninhabitable, unsafe, or abandoned
structures; (b) the area has inadequate provisions for sanitation; (c) there exists at the area an
imminent harm to life or other property caused by fire, flood, hurricane, tornado, earthquake,
storm, or other natural catastrophe declared to be a disaster; (d) the area has been identified by
the federal Environmental Protection Agency as a Superfund site or as environmentally
contaminated to an extent that the property requires remedial investigation or a feasibility study;
(e) the area has been the location of substantiated and repeated illegal activity of which the
property owner knew or should have known; (f) the maintenance of the property is below county
or municipal standards; (g) the property is abandoned and contains a structure that is not fit for
its intended use because the utilities, sewerage, plumbing, or heating or a similar service or
facility of the structure has been disconnected, destroyed, removed, or rendered ineffective; or
(h) the property presents an economic liability to the immediate area because of deteriorating
structures or hazardous conditions; (2) the current statutory provisions permitting condemnation
for urban renewal apply only to “blighted” areas (as opposed to “slum” areas); (3) a municipal
governing body must determine that each unit of property (as opposed to an “area,” as provided
in current law) be designated as blighted; (4) notwithstanding any other law, an area may not be
considered a blighted area on the basis of a condition described in number (1) above unless the
city has given notice in writing to the property owner regarding the imminent harm to life or
other property caused by the condition of the property, and the property owner fails to take
reasonable measures to remedy the harm caused by the property; (5) an area may not be
considered blighted solely for aesthetic reasons; (6) the special commissioners in a condemnation
proceeding shall admit evidence on the financial injury to the property owner including—if the
condemnation makes relocation of a homestead or farm necessary—the financial damages
associated with the cost of relocating from the condemned property to another property that
allows the property owner to: (a) have a standard of living comparable to the property owner's
standard of living immediately before the condemnation; or (b) operate a comparable farm, if the
condemned property is a farm; (7) a city shall provide a relocation advisory service for an
individual, a family, a business concern, a farming or ranching operation, or a nonprofit
organization that is compatible with the Federal Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real
Property Acquisition Policies Act; and (8) a city shall, as a cost of acquiring real property, pay
moving expenses and rental supplements, make relocation payments, provide financial assistance
to acquire replacement housing, and compensate for expenses incidental to the transfer of the
property if an individual, a family, the personal property of a business, a farming or ranching
operation, or a nonprofit organization is displaced in connection with the acquisition.

H.B. 2107 (Anchia) – Sexually Oriented Businesses: would require a sexually oriented
business to post an outdoor sign if the business applies for a license or permit for a location that
is not currently licensed or permitted. (Companion bill is S.B. 1030 by Carona).

H.B. 2111 (Woolley) – Gambling: would: (1) provide for the operation of video lottery games
by licensed horse and greyhound racetrack operators; (2) prohibit a political subdivision from
imposing: (a) a tax, fee, or other assessment on consideration paid to play a video lottery game;
and (b) a tax or fee for attendance or admission to a video lottery establishment or a racetrack at
which a video lottery establishment is located unless specifically authorized by statute; (3)
require a local law enforcement agency, at the Racing Commission’s request and in accordance
with an interagency agreement, to conduct criminal background checks on prospective deputies
or investigators of the department of security; (4) require video lottery terminal provider
applicants to comply with all local ordinances and rules; and (5) require an applicant for a video
lottery terminal establishment license to ensure compliance with all applicable building codes.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1118 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 2112 (Price) – Priority Groundwater Management Districts: would allow the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality to adopt rules regarding the inclusion of all or part of the
land within certain existing priority groundwater management areas in a new or existing special
district. (This bill is identical to S.B. 313 by Seliger.)

H.B. 2114 (Coleman) – Recycling: would: (1) create a deposit system for recyclable beverage
containers in the state; (2) create a grant program to assist curbside recycling programs and
municipal recycling facilities in handling increased recycling rates; (3) require that cans and
bottles be recycled through licensed redemption centers or curbside recycling programs in order
to receive a deposit refund; (4) authorize a city to open a redemption center; (5) require a
redemption center to be licensed by the comptroller, which may establish rules for required hours
of operation and remove its approval at any time; and (6) set up a system by which redemption
centers and curbside recycling programs may be reimbursed for collection of eligible
recyclables. (Companion bill is S.B. 1119 by Ellis).

H.B. 2116 (Coleman) – Restraint of Dogs: would strengthen regulations regarding keeping
dogs in enclosures, including prohibiting leaving a dog outside and unattended in a small
enclosure.

H.B. 2128 (Geren) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity: would authorize a city to
designate a “public utility” as defined in Chapter 13 of the Texas Water Code as the retail public
utility that is authorized to serve in a newly annexed or incorporated area in a single certification
process before the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

H.B. 2130 (Fletcher) – Coin-Operated Machines: would: (1) require the owners of certain
coin-operated machines to display the owner’s name, address, and phone on each machine that is
exhibited or displayed; (2) increase the occupation tax that cities can imposes on certain coin-
operated machines; (3) increase the fee that a city can charge for releasing a coin-operated
machine that has been sealed for failure to pay an occupation tax; and (4) repeal Occupations
Code Section 2153.403, which provides for the prorated tax on a coin-operated machine.

H.B. 2134 (Solomons) – Public Utility Commission: this is the Public Utility Commission
sunset bill. The bill would extend the commission for 12 years, and make various administrative
changes to the commission. (In its current form, the bill would not directly affect cities.)

H.B. 2139 (Guillen) – Libraries: would require the Library and Archives Commission to
establish an “Adopt a Library” program to encourage private investment in and donations to
public libraries throughout the state.

H.B. 2141 (Guillen) – Law Enforcement: would commission game wardens as the sole
officers responsible for enforcing recreational water safety.
H.B. 2144 (Garza) – Uniform Election Dates: would: (1) except the initial election of the
members of the governing body of a newly incorporated city from the uniform election date
requirement; (2) provide that a newly incorporated city may, not later than the second
anniversary of the date of incorporation, change the date on which it holds its general election for
officers to another authorized uniform election date; and (3) require a newly incorporated city to
select a uniform election date for the general election of its governing body not later than the first
anniversary of the date of its incorporation.

H.B. 2153 (Eiland) – Automobile Theft Prevention Fee: would: (1) raise the Automobile and
Burglary and Theft Prevention Authority fee from $1 to $2; and (2) require that fifty percent of
the fee collected for the authority be used for the purposes of automobile burglary and theft
prevention.

H.B. 2156 (T. King) – Driving Without Insurance: would repeal the state annual surcharges on
convictions of driving with an invalid license and driving without insurance.

H.B. 2157 (Coleman) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) prohibit the use of a wireless
communication device while operating a motor vehicle, including use to read, write, or send a
text-based communication; and (2) repeal current requirements to post signs at school crossing
zones regarding the prohibited use of wireless communication devices.

H.B. 2161 (C. Howard) – Municipal Utility Districts: would provide that a city may provide
in its written consent for the inclusion of land in a municipal utility district that a contract (e.g.,
an “allocation agreement”) between the district and the city be entered into prior to the first issue
of bonds, notes, warrants, or other obligations of the district. The bill would also provide that the
allocation agreement shall contain, among other things, an allocation of the taxes or revenues of
the district or the city which will assure that, if the district is located outside the corporate limits
of the city on the date its creation is confirmed by the voters, following the date of the inclusion
of all the district’s territory within the corporate limits of the city, the total annual ad valorem
taxes collected by the city and the district from taxable property within the district does not
exceed an amount greater than the city's ad valorem tax upon such property.

H.B. 2169 (Aycock) – Property Tax: would: (1) allow a city council to rescind a property tax
discount previously adopted by the city council; and (2) provide that the rescission takes effect
beginning in the year in which the discount was rescinded, unless the discount was rescinded
after September 1, in which case the rescission takes place the following year.

H.B. 2174 (Hartnett) – Court Fees: would: (1) create a $5 fee for judicial access and
improvement to be collected on certain offenses and remitted to the comptroller for deposit in a
judicial access and improvement account; and (2) authorize a city to keep five percent of the fee.

H.B. 2180 (Isaac) – Disorderly Conduct: would provide, in relation to the offense of
disorderly conduct, that a noise is presumed unreasonable if the noise exceeds a decibel level of
60.
H.B. 2185 (Harper-Brown) – Municipal Court: would: (1) allow deferred disposition for
certain motor vehicle offenses for individuals with commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs); (2)
extend the time period since the last driver safety course when assigning a driving safety course
from twelve months to forty-eight months for CDL holders; (3) authorize a CDL holder to take a
driver safety course under a deferred disposition agreement, in certain circumstances and with
certain conditions.

H.B. 2191 (Elkins) – Elections: would require an application for a ballot to be voted by mail to
contain a box for the applicant to choose a language in which the applicant would prefer the
ballot to be printed, as well as a notice that if the applicant fails to choose the ballot will be
delivered in English. (Companion bill is S.B. 1199 by Patrick.)

H.B. 2194 (L. Taylor) – Elections: among other things, would: (1) prohibit a government
official who oversees, manages, or administers the elections process from being a candidate for
public office or an office of a political party, hold a public office, or hold an office or position in
a political party; (2) allow a presiding judge or alternate presiding judge to observe assistance
being provided to a voter under certain circumstances; (3) require unofficial election results to be
released as soon as they are available after polls close, except that the presiding judge of the
central counting station may withhold the release of unofficial election results until the last voter
has voted; and (4) provide that the nepotism laws do not apply to an appointment of an election
clerk who is not related in the first degree by consanguinity or affinity to an elected official of
the authority that appoints the election judges for that election. (Companion bill is S.B. 1128 by
Jackson.)

H.B. 2196 (Rodriguez) – Theft of Service: would provide, in regard to the offense of theft of
service, that if compensation is or was to be paid on a periodic basis, the intent to avoid payment
for a service may be formed at any time during or before a pay period, and the partial payment of
wages alone is not sufficient evidence to negate the actor’s intent to avoid full payment for a
service. (Companion bill is S.B. 1024 by Rodriguez.)

H.B. 2203 (Otto) – Property Tax: would extend a pilot program authorizing a property owner
to appeal an appraisal review board determination to the State Office of Administrative Hearings
to Collin, Denton, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Nueces Counties.

H.B. 2204 (Oliveira) – Motor Vehicle Registration: would: (1) authorize a city to enter into a
contract with the county assessor-collector to provide information so that the assessor-collector
can make a determination of whether to refuse to register a motor vehicle because of an
outstanding warrant for failure to pay a fine for violation of a traffic law; and (2) authorize a city
that has a contract described in (1), above, to impose an additional $20 fee on a person who has
an outstanding warrant to use to reimburse the Department of Motor Vehicles or the county
assessor-collector for its expenses for providing services under the contract.

H.B. 2208 (Oliviera) – Property Tax: would allow a chief appraiser or collector to waive
penalties for the failure to file certain documents only if: (1) the taxpayer seeking the waiver files
a written application for the waiver with the chief appraiser or collector, as applicable, not later
than the 30th day after the date the declaration or statement was required to be filed; and (2) the
taxpayer’s failure to file or timely file was a result of a natural disaster that rendered it
impossible to comply with the filing requirement, or an event beyond the control of the taxpayer
that destroyed the property or records.

H.B. 2209 (Farias) – Sales Tax: would impose a tax on the sale to a retailer of certain
sweetened beverages and ingredients used to make certain sweetened beverages, and use the
revenue generated by the tax for the promotion of children’s health programs.

H.B. 2213 (Farias) – Sales Tax: would impose a tax on the sale to a retailer of certain
sweetened beverages and ingredients used to make certain sweetened beverages, and use 40% of
the revenue generated by the tax for the promotion of children’s health programs, with the
remainder to the credit of the general revenue fund.

H.B. 2214 (Farias) – Sales Tax: would impose a tax on the sale to a retailer of certain
sweetened beverages and ingredients used to make certain sweetened beverages, and allocate 80
percent of the revenue generated by the tax to the Texas Education Agency, with the remaining
20 percent going to the Department of State Health Services.

H.B. 2215 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would require a city that adopts a budget that will require
raising more revenue from property taxes than in the previous year to create a cover page that:
(1) contains a statement in 18-point or larger font using specific language about the property tax
increase; (2) contains the record vote of each member of the governing body regarding the
adoption of the budget, the ratification of the property tax increase, and the setting of the
property tax rate; and (3) the property tax rates for the preceding and current fiscal years. The
bill would also require a city that maintains a Web site to post the record votes of each member
of the governing body as stated in (2), above, on the Web site for at least one year from the
adoption of the budget.

H.B. 2218 (Oliveira) – Property Tax: would change the amount of interest that a city making a
refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an
annual rate of interest paid by the bank on funds deposited in the account maintained by the tax
collector for the taxing unit from which refunds are disbursed as of the date on which the final
determination of the appeal is made, so long as that rate does not exceed eight percent.

H.B. 2220 (Y. Davis) – Property Tax: would provide that: (1) a delinquency date applies only
to the amount of taxes required to be paid on the portion of taxable value of the property that is
the subject of a motion to change the appraisal role to correct an error that is not in dispute
before the delinquency date; and (2) after filing an oath of inability to pay the taxes at issue, a
property owner may be excused from the requirement of prepayment of tax as a prerequisite to
the determination of a motion if the appraisal review board finds that such prepayment would
constitute an unreasonable restrain on the property owner’s right of access to the board.

H.B. 2221 (Y. Davis) – Property Tax: would allow an administrative law judge to award
reasonable attorney’s fees in an appeal relating to the appraised or market value of property in an
amount that does not exceed the greater of $15,000 or twenty percent of the total amount by
which the property owner’s tax liability is reduced as a result of the appeal.
H.B. 2225 (Y. Davis) – Eminent Domain: would provide that, if a taking makes relocation of a
homestead or farm necessary, the special commissioners in a condemnation proceeding shall
admit evidence on the cost of relocation from the condemned property to another property that
allows the property owner to: (1) have a standard of living comparable to the property owner's
standard of living immediately before the taking, if the property taken is a homestead that is
habitable; or (2) operate a comparable farm, if the property taken is a farm.

H.B. 2226 (Truitt) – Public Funds Investment: among other things, would: (1) require a city’s
investment policy to include procedures to monitor rating changes in investments acquired with
public funds and the liquidation of such investments; (2) require a city’s investment officer to
attend a training session not less than once each state fiscal biennium; (3) provide that an
obligation that is fully guaranteed or insured by the FDIC or by the explicit full faith and credit
of the United States is an authorized investment; (4) provide that certain investment in
certificates of deposit using a broker are authorized investments; (5) authorize an investment
pool to invest its funds in money market mutual funds to the extent permitted by and consistent
with state law and the investment policies and objectives adopted by the pool.

H.B. 2227 (Coleman) – Municipal Court: would require a municipal judge to make an
affirmative finding of fact to be entered into the judgment of the case if an individual is found to
have committed the offense of criminal mischief against a specific piece of property because of
the defendant's bias or prejudice against a group identified by gender identity or expression.

H.B. 2228 (Coleman) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require health benefit provider,
including a pool to provide coverage for self-inflicted injuries to a minor who has a serious
mental illness or in an attempt to commit suicide.

H.B. 2242 (Munoz) – Property Tax: would include cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or
epilepsy in the definition of “disabled” for purposes of eligibility for a local property tax
exemption or local property tax freeze on the residence homestead of a disabled person.

H.B. 2257 (Phillips) – Emergency Notification: would: (1) allow a public service provider,
including a city, to use an emergency notification system to notify the provider’s customers,
governmental entities and other affected persons of: (a) a disaster or emergency; and (b) actions
to take during a disaster or emergency; (2) require an emergency notification system to use a
dynamic information database for simultaneous transmission of the information; and (3) give a
provider the right to receive confidential 9-1-1 contact information to use the emergency
notification system.

H.B. 2260 (Zedler) – Immigration: would: (1) require a governmental entity, including a city,
to verify the lawful presence of an individual before providing any public benefit including a
license, food assistance, educational assistance, unemployment benefit, or other similar benefit if
the benefit requires lawful presence under state or federal law or local ordinance or rule; (2)
allow a city to offer certain benefits without asking immigration status including: (a) temporary
disaster or emergency benefits; (b) emergency health care services; (c) immunizations; and (d)
some short term shelter services; (3) allow a city to use the Systematic Alien Verification for
Entitlements (SAVE) program, an equivalent program, or adopt its own rules and procedures for
determining immigrations status; (4) require a city to make a report regarding the accuracy of its
verification program; and (5) require a city to report a false and willful representation of
citizenship to the United States attorney in its district.

H.B. 2261 (Zedler) – Public Retirement Systems: would prohibit the inclusion of overtime in
the amount of a member's compensation under a public retirement system including the Texas
Municipal Retirement System and other city retirement systems.

H.B. 2262 (Dutton) – Building Permits: would provide that a building permit fee is abolished
on the 10th anniversary after the date the fee is adopted or most recently reauthorized unless the
governing body of the city that adopted or reauthorized the fee: (1) holds a public hearing on the
reauthorization of the fee; and (2) reauthorizes the fee by vote of the governing body.

H.B. 2268 (Hancock) – MTBEs: would create an affirmative defense for a person who is
subject to an action brought for nuisance or trespass stemming from certain environmental
offenses if the person’s actions that resulted in the alleged nuisance or trespass were authorized
by a rule, permit, order, license, certificate, registration, approval, or other form of authorization
issued by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) or the federal government
or a federal agency, and: (1) the person was in general compliance with that rule, permit, order,
license, certificate, registration, approval, or other form of authorization while the alleged
nuisance or trespass was occurring; or (2) the person received enforcement discretion from the
TCEQ or federal government or an agency of the federal government for the actions that resulted
in the alleged nuisance or trespass. (This bill is identical to S.B. 875 by Fraser.)

H.B. 2274 (Eiland) – Elections: would require a city to pay for the expenses of an election
contest for a person elected to the city council, including reasonable attorney’s fees, court costs,
and similar related expenses.

H.B. 2279 (Eiland) – Prop 2: would add representatives of school districts that are required to
take action under the state’s Equalized Wealth Level law to the permanent advisory committee to
the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regarding the implementation of the ad
valorem tax exemption for pollution control property.

H.B. 2280 (Eiland) – Prop 2: would add at least one representative of a school district or junior
college district in which property is located that is subject to an ad valorem tax exemption for
pollution control to the permanent advisory committee to the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality regarding the implementation of the ad valorem tax exemption for
pollution control property.

H.B. 2284 (Hardcastle) – Engineering: would provide that: (1) for purpose of the Engineering
Practices Act, the practice of engineering includes the design, conceptual design, or conceptual
design coordination of engineering works or systems, including buildings or related structures;
and (2) for purposes of the Architect’s Practices Act, and engineer may perform the planning,
designing, or supervising work on the features of buildings or related structures.
H.B. 2289 (Crownover) – Gas Pipelines/Rights-of-Way: would provide that a gas corporation
has the right to lay and maintain lines over, along, under, and across a public road, a canal or
stream, or a municipal street or alley and over, under, and across a railroad, a railroad right-of-
way, an interurban railroad, or a street railroad only if certain conditions are met.

H.B. 2290 (Paxton) – Debt: would: (1) require the comptroller, in consultation with the Bond
Review Board, to develop and maintain a computerized database on the comptroller’s Web site
that lists the bond and other debt obligations issued by each city and that is searchable by zip
code; and (2) require cities to provide information necessary for the database to the comptroller
at times required by the comptroller.

H.B. 2291 (Callegari) – Regulation of Occupations: would prohibit a governmental entity,
including a city, from regulating an individual's right to engage in an occupation if the
regulation: (1) substantially burdens the right to engage in the occupation; and (2) the burden is
not necessary to protect against a present and recognizable harm.

H.B. 2294 (Hunter) – Sovereign Immunity: would state that the declaratory judgment act does
not waive sovereign immunity.

H.B. 2300 (Coleman) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would: (1) expand the definition of mental
illness for insurance purposes; (2) require a health benefit plan to cover mental illness to the
same extent, for the same amount of inpatient and outpatient treatment, and under the same
deductibles and limits as coverage for physical injuries; and (3) prohibit exclusion for a mental
disorder

H.B. 2308 (Cook) – Texas Forest Service: would: (1) allow the Texas Forest Service (TFS) to
provide incident management training to local fire personnel to develop the all-hazard response
capability of the state; (2) allow the director of the TFS to establish guidelines for volunteer fire
departments to assist TFS with wildfires when local firefighting resources are exhausted; (3)
allow TFS to compensate volunteer firefighters if resources are available; (4) require TFS to
enact a wildfire protection plan; (5) require TFS to review the frequency, size, and severity of
past wildfires or future wildfires when determining funding to volunteer fire departments; and
(6) allow TFS to designate a portion of the volunteer fire department assistance fund to be used
by local volunteer fire departments to be federal matching grant requirements. (Companion bill is
S.B. 646 by Nichols.)

H.B. 2312 (Coleman) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require a local health department to
provide testing and counseling for sickle cell disease for free to anyone who requests it.

H.B. 2317 (Miller) – County Development Authority: would expand county authority to
regulate development in certain counties located west of Austin and San Antonio, commonly
known as the Texas Hill Country.

H.B. 2318 (Kolkhorst) – Expunction: would expand the situations in which an individual is
entitled to have all records and files relating to an arrest expunged.
H.B. 2321 (C. Howard) – Property Tax: would provide that the “market value” of land for
property tax appraisal purposes is frozen at the 2009 appraised value until the land is sold or new
construction takes place.

H.B. 2327 (McClendon) – Bus Only Lanes: would create a motor-bus-only lane pilot program
for state highways with shoulders of sufficient width in Bexar, Denton, El Paso, and Travis
counties. (Companion bill is S.B. 1102 by Wentworth).

H.B. 2331 (P. King) – Appraisals: would provide that an appraisal review board shall seriously
consider evidence provided by a property owner of the price paid by the owner for a residence
homestead in a protest of the determination of the appraised value of the homestead.

H.B. 2338 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would require the chief appraiser of an appraisal district
or the county assessor-collector to publish on an Internet Web site certain specified tax rate
information for each taxing unit that imposes property in the county.

H.B. 2347 (Bonnen) – Property Tax: would allow a property owner to apply for an extension
of a residence homestead exemption for up to three tax years following the tax year in which the
owner ceases to occupy a residence if the former residence homestead: (1) is not occupied or
leased to any person; (2) is being actively offered for sale; and (3) is not used for any business or
commercial purpose.

H.B. 2355 (Madden) – Sales Tax: would provide that an employer who employs a person who
obtains a high school diploma or high school equivalency certificate while employed by that
employer is entitled to a credit or refund of sales taxes up to a certain amount.

H.B. 2357 (Pickett) – Motor Vehicles: would, among many other things, provide that a vehicle
used by law enforcement under an alias for covert criminal investigations is exempt from the
payment of a registration fee.

H.B. 2358 (Landtroop) – Water Rights: would repeal the statute that makes any proposed
transfer of all or a portion of a water right junior in priority to water rights granted before the
time application for transfer is accepted for filing.

H.B. 2359 (Hopson) – Political Contributions: would change the regulation of political
contributions by: (1) repealing provisions disallowing direct campaign expenditures; (2)
repealing the provision limiting when a corporation or labor organization can make direct
campaign expenditures for an election measure; and (3) creating new provisions relating to
individual’s making campaign contributions that exempt the person from filing a report if the
person already has to file a report under another provision in law.

H.B. 2361 (Truitt) – Automated Traffic Enforcement: would, among other things, modify the
current prohibition against using automated speed camera traffic enforcement to provide that a
city may use a device that records the speed of a motor vehicle and obtains photographs or other
recorded images or rely on evidence obtained from using the device in the prosecution of a
criminal offense if: (1) the device is used by a peace officer who personally observes the
violation and issues a citation to the operator of the vehicle at the time of the violation or is
unable to issue the citation because of events beyond the control of the peace officer; or (2) the
device is used by a peace officer working in a team of peace officers engaged in a localized
collective effort to enforce compliance with posted speed limits, the peace officer personally
observes the violation, and another peace officer working in the same team issues a citation to
the operator of the vehicle at the time of the violation or is unable to issue the citation because of
events beyond the control of the peace officer.

H.B. 2369 (Quintanilla) – Emergency Medical Personnel Training: would: (1) prohibit the
Department of State Health Services (DSHS) from requiring an emergency medical services
course or training to be accredited by a national organization before 2018; (2) require DSHS to
partner with a testing entity for paramedic examines; and (3) require the testing entity to charge
any cost or fee to the examinee.

H.B. 2376 (Hamilton) – Plumbing: would, among other things, provide that a political
subdivision that requires a responsible master plumber or an agent of a responsible master
plumber to obtain a permit before performing plumbing in the political subdivision shall verify
through the board’s Internet Web site, or by contacting the board by telephone, that the
responsible master plumber has on file with the board a certificate of insurance. (Companion bill
is S.B. 1075 by Jackson.)

H.B. 2390 (S. Davis) – Confidential Information: would provide that certain information
collected, assembled, or maintained by an emergency response provider relating to preventing,
detecting, responding to, or investigating an act of terrorism, criminal activity, or a natural
disaster is confidential.

H.B. 2398 (S. Miller) – Groundwater: would: (1) recognize a landowner’s or landowner’s
lessee’s ownership of groundwater in place and right to produce groundwater; and (2) permit a
landowner’s or landowner’s lessee’s groundwater rights to be limited only by a rule promulgated
by a groundwater conservation district if the rule is consistent with Sections 3, 17, and 19,
Article I, of the Texas Constitution and the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S.
Constitution.

H.B. 2400 (D. Miller) – Water and Sewer Utilities: would make certain changes to the process
of city regulation of water rates assessed by non-city-owned water utilities within city limits,
including: (1) requiring a utility to deliver a statement of intent to each ratepayer and the city,
acting as regulatory authority over rates, at least 120 days before the proposed effective date of
the proposed rate change; (2) repealing a city's authority to suspend the effective date of a
proposed rate change during the city's review of the proposal; (3) requiring a city to suspend the
date that a proposed rate change would be effective until the date that the city issues a final
decision on the rate; (4) making the approval of rates automatic if no hearing is scheduled by the
city within the time allotted; and (5) authorizing the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality to allow a city to provide sewer service without a certificate of convenience and
necessity if certain requirements are met.
H.B. 2403 (Otto) – Sales Tax: would provide that a retailer is engaged in business in this state
if the retailer: (1) utilizes a Web site on a server in this state from which digital goods are sold or
delivered; (2) holds a substantial ownership interest in, or is owned in whole or in substantial
party by, a person who maintains a location in this state from which business is conducted if: (a)
the retailer sells a substantially similar product as the related retailer and does so under a
substantially similar name; and (2) the facilities or employees of the related retailer are used to
advertise, promote, or facilitate sales by the retailer; or (3) holds a substantial ownership interest
in, or is owned in whole or in substantial part by, a person that maintains a distribution center,
warehouse, or similar location in the state that delivers property sold by the retailer.

H.B. 2406 (J. Davis) – Energy Efficiency Programs: would transfer certain energy assistance
programs, including the state low income energy assistance program, from the Texas Department
of Housing and Community Affairs to the Public Utility Commission of Texas.

H.B. 2411 (Miles) – Emergency Management: would require emergency management
directors to determine whether leased dwellings are inhabitable after a disaster within 30 days of
receiving a request to do so by a tenant.

H.B. 2413 (Miles) – Municipal Court: would enable an individual who holds a commercial
driver’s license to take a driver safety class as a condition of deferred disposition of a traffic
offense.

H.B. 2424 (Thompson) – Gambling: would: (1) provide for the operation of video gaming by
authorized organizations and commercial operators that are licensed to conduct bingo or lease
bingo premises; (2) preempt any conflicting zoning law that impedes the implementation of
video gaming at a location where bingo was conducted on January 1, 2011, and where a video
gaming retailer is authorized to conduct video gaming; (3) prohibit a city from imposing a tax or
fee for attendance or admission to a video gaming premises unless specifically authorized by
statute; (4) allow a video gaming retailer to conduct video gaming at a premises other than the
licensed bingo premises if the city in which the premises is located holds an election in which a
majority of the voters favor prohibiting bingo and the other premises are located in a jurisdiction
in which a majority of the voters voting in an election held before January 1, 2011, voted in favor
of legalizing bingo games; (5) authorize law enforcement personnel to be present at a retailer’s
video gaming premises at any time and authorize municipal peace officers to enter and inspect
the premises where video gaming is conducted or video gaming equipment is found; and (6)
create certain misdemeanor offenses for video gaming by individuals young than 21 years of age.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1212 by Van de Putte.)

H.B. 2425 (Thompson) – Litigation: would: (1) require a party to litigation who files a petition,
motion, or other pleading challenging the constitutionality of a Texas statute to notify the
attorney general; and (2) prohibit a court from entering a final judgment on the constitutionality
of a state statute before the 60th day after the date the notice is served on the attorney general.

H.B. 2428 (Strama) – Property Tax: would provide that a person who installs or constructs a
solar or wind-powered energy device on land or on a building or other permanent structure is
entitled to a property tax exemption.
H.B. 2431 (W. Smith) – TCEQ Enforcement: would make several changes to the
classification, evaluation, and use of compliance history by the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality.

H.B. 2432 (J. Davis) – Public/Private Partnerships: would create a program with detailed
criteria to encourage public and private facilities and infrastructure. (Companion bill is S.B.
1048 by Jackson.)

H.B. 2434 (Y. Davis) – Tax: would repeal certain property tax and sales tax exemptions,
including property tax exemptions for property owned by cities that is used for public purposes,
and sales tax exemptions for taxable items sold, leased, rented to, or consumed by cities.

H.B. 2435 (Deshotel) – Gas Rates: would provide that, in establishing a gas utility’s rates, the
regulatory authority may and is encouraged to approve a tariff or rate schedule in which the rate
for gas utility service is adjusted based on changes in the gas utility’s revenues, expenses, or
investments.

H.B. 2443 (Price) – Parking on Highway: would: (1) prohibit a person to remain or park a
vehicle on a state highway right-of-way except in case of an emergency or for highway
construction or maintenance purposes; and (2) provide that such parking is a class C
misdemeanor.

H.B. 2446 (Allen) – Law Enforcement: would authorize the release of certain confidential
physician-patient communications during certain internal law enforcement investigations having
to do with the use of force by a peace officer.

H.B. 2447 (Hartnett) – Sales Tax: would provide that, for sales tax purposes, the sales price of
telecommunications services does not include the following assessments and fees, if the
assessment or fee is passed through to the purchaser of the service: (1) the utility gross receipts
assessment; (2) the state universal service fund assessment; (3) the federal universal service fund
charge; or (4) a municipal franchise fee or right-of-way fee.

H.B. 2449 (Aliseda) – Elections: would allow ballots or carrier envelopes that are possessed
pursuant to a continuous course of conduct by a person over one or more days to be aggregated
in order to assess the number of ballots or carrier envelopes for the purposes of determining if an
offense was committed. (Companion bill is H.B. 2585 by Pena.)

H.B. 2451 (Zedler) – Public Retirement Systems: would require a member of a public
retirement system, including the Texas Municipal Retirement System but not individual city
retirement systems, who leaves a position but is reemployed to resume making contributions to
the applicable retirement system.

H.B. 2452 (Zedler) – Health Care Institutions: would require a health care institution owned
by a political subdivision, including a hospital district, to provide written notice to certain
individuals disclosing the liability limits applicable to a health care liability claim against the
institution and whether a doctor or health care provider is covered by malpractice insurance or
another form of financial responsibility.

H.B. 2456 (Zedler) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax rollback rate from 108
percent to the inflation rate as determined by the state comptroller.

H.B. 2460 (Truitt) – Public Retirement Systems: would: (1) make a public retirement system,
including a municipal retirement system, subject to the Public Information Act; and (2) preempt
any statute making information held by a public retirement system confidential.

H.B. 2461 (Bonnen) – Property Tax: would provide that property tax arbitrators are immune
from civil liability based on the arbitrator’s determination of the value of property or the
appropriate award of any remedy or relief.

H.B. 2462 (Bonnen) – Motor Vehicle Tax: would exempt motor vehicles used or sold by
trauma service area regional advisory councils from motor vehicle taxes and the costs of vehicle
registration.

H.B. 2466 (Phillips) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit a person under eighteen years of age
from operating a motor vehicle while using a wireless communications device.

H.B. 2471 (Phillips) – Animal Control: would limit the civil liability of animal control
agencies and their employees who, within the scope of employment and in good faith, take
custody of certain animals that are abandoned, running at large, or stray and are obtained from a
person that certifies that they took reasonable steps to locate the owner.

H.B. 2476 (Harless) – Property Tax: would: (1) expand the term “dealer’s heavy equipment
inventory” to include items of heavy equipment that a dealer holds for lease or rent for purposes
of appraisal for property tax purposes; and (2) require a person who engages in the sale, lease,
ore rental of more than five items of heavy equipment in a calendar year to register with the
comptroller.

H.B. 2479 (Perry) – Litigation: would include cities and other governmental units as parties
who may be referred to a court alternative dispute resolution system if the city is a party to a
lawsuit in a district or county court with such a system. (Companion bill is S.B. 1271 by
Duncan.)

H.B. 2483 (Pena) – DNRs and Advance Directives: would make various revisions to the law
relating to in-hospital and out-of-hospital do-not-resuscitate orders, including those contained in
an advance directive.

H.B. 2487 (Murphy) – Elections: would provide that a person is not eligible to register to vote
at a residence address if: (1) bathing and sleeping facilities are not available at the residence
address; or (2) the person claims a different residence address as the person’s homestead on the
person’s Texas driver’s license or personal identification card.
H.B. 2489 (Scott) – Litigation: would prohibit the use in court of statements made by a health
care provider, including emergency services health care providers, of statements of apology,
sympathy, explanation of medical treatment, or explanation of future actions to prevent similar
occurrences.

H.B. 2490 (Solomons) – Precious Metals: would, among many new provisions regarding the
sale of precious crafted metals, provide that: (1) the Texas Finance Commission shall regulate
and license persons in the business of purchasing and selling crafted previous metal; (2) a peace
officer who has reasonable suspicion to believe that an item of crafted precious metal in the
possession of a dealer is stolen may place the item on hold by issuing to the dealer a written
notice that specifically identifies the item alleged to be stolen and subject to the hold
and informs the dealer of the bill’s requirements; and (3) on receiving the notice, the dealer may
not melt, deface, alter, or dispose of the identified crafted precious metal until the hold is
released in writing by a peace officer or a court order.

H.B. 2507 (Chisum) – Irrigation Systems: would create a class C misdemeanor if a person
who is required to be licensed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality in order to
install an irrigation system does so without the required license.

H.B. 2527 (Harper-Brown) – Transportation Funding: would provide that, beginning in ten
percent increments in 2013 and being complete in 2022, the net revenue derived from the state
sales tax imposed on the sale of a motor vehicle sold in this state shall be deposited to the credit
of the state highway fund. (Companion bill is S.B. 523 by Nichols.)

H.B. 2529 (Price) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that an appraisal district is governed by
a board of five directors, four of whom are appointed by the commissioners court of the county
in which the appraisal district is established, with the county assessor-collector serving as a non-
voting director; (2) repeal other laws authorizing a city council, in conjunction with other taxing
units in an appraisal district, to appoint board members, to force an audit of the district, to
disapprove of board actions, and to reject an appraisal district’s budget; and (3) prevent an
individual that is an employee of a taxing unit in the appraisal district from being appointed to
the board of directors.

H.B. 2530 (Legler) – Foundation Repair Contractors: would: (1) establish a foundation
repair contractors advisory board, the membership of which must include one city official; (2)
require the Texas Commission of Licensing and Regulation to establish standards for the practice
of foundation repair, insurance requirements, licensure requirements, and prohibited practices;
(3) authorize the Department of Licensing and Regulation to contract with political subdivisions
for enforcement; (4) require licensees to provide notice to a city that the person has a license and
authorize a city to charge a related fee; (5) exempt certain persons from licensure but not from
city permit, inspection, or approval requirements; (6) provide that an individual who holds a
license is not required to hold a license issued by a city to engage in foundation repair
contracting in the city; and (7) provide that a person commits a class C misdemeanor if the
person knowingly engages in foundation repair contracting without holding a license.
H.B. 2532 (Veasey) – Life Insurance: would: (1) allow a local government, including a city, or
an assignee or designee of a local government to be designated as a beneficiary in a policy that
insures the life of an employee or retired employee of the local government at the time the life
insurance policy was issued but subsequently ceased employment for any reason; and (2)
establish the circumstance allowed in (1), above, as an authorized investment if the policy allows
the employee or retired employee to designate a beneficiary for a portion of the policy and the
local government allows the employee or retired employee to decline coverage under the policy.

H.B. 2543 (W. Smith) – Professional Services:              would consolidate the licensing and
regulation of architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, and land surveying into one new
state agency known as the Texas Board of Professional Services.

H.B. 2551 (Chisum) – Grit Trap Waste: would permit land application of grit trap waste to be
considered recovery, recycling, or reuse, but only in specific situations.

H.B. 2563 (Christian) – Elections: would provide that a city with a population of less than
5,000 is exempt from certain electronic voting machine requirements. The exemption would not
apply during an election held jointly with a county election.

H.B. 2566 (N. Gonzalez) – Parking: would prohibit the holder of a dealer distinguishing
number for a location from consigning vehicles for sale in an area adjacent to the location that is
on a public roadway, easement, right-of-way, or driveway, unless the governing body of the
entity that owns the roadway, easement, right-of-way, or driveway consents in writing.

H.B. 2567 (N. Gonzalez) – Motor Vehicle Complaints: would require the Department of
Motor Vehicles to make information about how to submit a complaint about a motor vehicle
dealer available to be posted in various public areas, including a city attorney’s office.

H.B. 2570 (Martinez) – Low Speed Vehicles: would require a city to prohibit the use of “low-
speed vehicles” to transport passengers for compensation.

H.B. 2571 (Martinez) – Transportation Reinvestment Zones: would authorize a city or a
county to establish a transportation reinvestment zone to provide commuter rail services in
counties adjacent to the Texas-Mexico border and from the Rio Grande Valley to San Antonio.

H.B. 2583 (Walle) – Gangs: would require the attorney general to establish a gang remediation
task force to be made up of representatives from various entities, including cities and local law
enforcement agencies.

H.B. 2585 (Pena) – Elections: would allow ballots or carrier envelopes that are possessed
pursuant to a continuous course of conduct by a person over one or more days to be aggregated
in order to assess the number of ballots or carrier envelopes for the purposes of determining if an
offense was committed. (Companion bill is H.B. 2449 by Aliseda.)

H.B. 2587 (Pena) – Elections: would provide that a person providing assistance to a voter: (1)
must be a registered voter of the county in which the election is being held; (2) shall provide
photo identification to an election officer at the polling place; (3) may not assist more than two
voters in a day, which includes early voting and voting by mail; and (4) commits a class C
misdemeanor if the person assists more than two voters in a day.

H.B. 2588 (Pena) – Elections: would provide that a poll watcher is entitled to be present at the
voting station when a voter is being assisted by a person of the voter’s choice.

H.B. 2596 (Garza) – Speed Limits: would authorize a city to lower the speed limit of a one-
lane or two-lane highway in the city that is not an official part of the state highway system to not
less than twenty miles per hour, if the governing body determines that the prima facie speed limit
is unreasonable or unsafe.

H.B. 2598 (Garza) – Property Tax: would provide that a property owner may be awarded
reasonable attorney’s fees if the owner prevails in an appeal to the court of a protest of the
modification or denial of a tax exemption.

H.B. 2601 (Nash) – Political Signs: would: (1) prohibit a public official, including a city
official, from removing a political sign from private real property, if the sign is placed on the
property in compliance with an applicable law; (2) prohibit a property owner association from
prohibiting political signs; and (3) provide penalties for violations.

H.B. 2605 (L. Taylor) – Workers’ Compensation: would: (1) provide for a contested case
hearing if a party has a medical dispute regarding workers compensation that is not resolved by
an independent review; (2) allow judicial review of the case after the contested case hearing if
there is still a dispute; (3) change the authority on who can allow an employee to seek an
alternate doctor from the workers’ compensation division to the workers’ compensation
insurance carrier; (4) change the authority on who can accelerate workers compensation benefits
from the workers’ compensation division to the workers’ compensation insurance carrier; (5)
subject to administrative review: (a) denial of an alternate doctor subject to administrative
review; (b) denial of accelerated benefits; (c) a dispute as to the amount of benefits; (d) denial of
supplemental benefits; (e) medical fee dispute; and (6) change the way administrative violations
by workers’ compensation insurance carriers are treated.

H.B. 2606 (Nash) – Political Expenditures: would authorize a corporation or labor
organization to designate a trade association or member organization as the recipient of political
expenditures to finance the establishment or administration of a general-purpose committee.

H.B. 2607 (Beck) – Property Tax: would provide that the surviving spouse of a firefighter or
peace officer killed in the line of duty is entitled to a property tax exemption for the total
appraised value of the surviving spouse’s residence homestead for a period of five consecutive
years.

H.B. 2608 (Harper-Brown) – Department of Housing and Community Affairs: this is the
Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA) sunset bill. It would, among
many other things, provide that: (1) TDHCA is continued for 12 years; (2) pursuant to the Texas
Disaster Act, each local and interjurisdictional agency shall prepare and keep current an
emergency management plan for its area providing for disaster mitigation, preparedness,
response, and recovery that identifies any requirements or procedures that local agencies and
officials must satisfy or implement to qualify for long-term federal disaster recovery funding,
prepare for long-term disaster recovery, and any appropriate state or local resources available to
assist the local agencies and officials in satisfying or implementing those requirements or
procedures; (3) TDHCA, in consultation with the Texas Department of Rural Affairs and the
office of the governor, shall develop – in consultation with local government officials and others
– a long-term disaster recovery plan to administer money received for disaster recovery from the
federal government or any other source; and (4) if an application for low income housing tax
credits satisfies TDHCA’s threshold criteria, TDHCA shall score and rank the application using
a point system that takes into account – among other things – quantifiable community
participation with respect to the development evaluated on the basis of a resolution concerning
the development that is voted on and adopted by the governing body of a city whose boundaries
contain the proposed development site or by the commissioners court of a county whose
boundaries contain the proposed development site. (Companion bill is S.B. 665 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 2612 (Aliseda) – Elections: would require the county or district attorney to notify the
attorney general of allegations of criminal conduct in connection with an election if no
prosecution is initiated.

H.B. 2619 (Callegari) – Water and Wastewater Facilities: would provide that: (1) each water
and wastewater utility, including a municipally owned utility, shall submit certain infrastructure
information to each retail electric provider that sells electric power to the utility, each electric
utility that provides transmission and distribution service to the utility, the office of emergency
management of each county in which the utility has water and wastewater facilities that qualify
for critical load status under rules adopted by the Public Utility Commission (PUC), and to the
PUC and the division of emergency management of the governor; and (2) if an electric utility
determines that a water or wastewater utility’s facilities do not qualify for critical load status, the
electric utility and the retail electric provider shall provide a detailed explanation of the electric
utility’s determination to the affected utility and to the office of emergency management of the
county in which the water and wastewater facilities are located.

H.B. 2620 (Hancock) – Telecommunications: would provide, among other things, that: (1) a
city may not by rule, order, or other means directly or indirectly regulate rates charged for,
service or contract terms for, conditions for, or requirements for entry into the market for Voice
over Internet Protocol services or other Internet Protocol enabled services; and (2) the limitation
in (1), above, does not: (a) affect payment of municipal right-of-way fees applicable to Voice
over Internet Protocol services; (b) affect any person’s obligation to provide video service as
defined by S.B. 5 (2005)(the state video franchise law) under any applicable state or federal law;
or (c) require or prohibit assessment of enhanced 9-1-1, relay access service, or universal service
fund fees on Voice over Internet Protocol service. (Companion bill is S.B. 980 by Carona.)

H.B. 2623 (Beck) – Critical Governmental Facilities: would require the State Energy
Conservation Office to establish guidelines for the evaluation required by state law when a
critical governmental facility (including a jail, police or fire station, and water or wastewater
facility, among others) is constructed, renovated, or major heating, ventilation, and air-
conditioning equipment is replaced in order to determine whether installing a combined heating
and power system would result in energy cost savings over a twenty-year period.

H.B. 2628 (Branch) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) repeal current requirements to post signs at
school crossing zones regarding the prohibited use of wireless communication devices while
operating a motor vehicle; and (2) remove the provision in current law that makes the absence of
such a sign an affirmative defense to prosecution.

H.B. 2629 (Branch) – Gifts to Public Servants: would exempt honorariums from the list of
political contributions and prohibited gifts that may be given to a public official.

H.B. 2641 (Burnam) – Waiver of Immunity: would subject a person, including a city, to
liability for damages if the city deprives a person of any immunities, rights, or privileges
provided to the person under state law.

H.B. 2651 (Allen) – Public Transportation: would provide that a public transportation provider
that provides services designed for people with disabilities who are unable to use the provider’s
bus or rail services shall determine if an individual who resides outside of the provider’s service
area and who seeks to use the provider’s services while visiting the provider’s service area is
eligible to use the services not later than 48 hours after the individual gives the provider the
appropriate notice and submits any required documentation.

H.B. 2653 (V. Taylor) – Retirement Benefits: would allow an employer, including a city, to
adopt a pension revocation policy in an employment contract that would revoke an employee’s
pension if the employee is finally convicted of a felony or misdemeanor of moral turpitude as
specified in the employment contract.

H.B. 2656 (S. Miller) – Private Security: would limit the exemptions for individuals required
to comply with the Private Security Act to current peace officers who are currently employed by
a law enforcement agency. (The bill is unclear as to whether all officers, or only the heads of
law enforcement agencies, retain the exemption.)

H.B. 2661 (Kleinschmidt) – Litigation: would: (1) allow governmental units, including cities,
to elect to use settlement procedures in state law, including written settlement offer and
acceptance requirements; and (2) if a city elects to use these provisions as a defendant and has a
settlement offer rejected, the city could recover litigation costs from a plaintiff if the court
judgment is more favorable to the defendant than the settlement offered by the defendant.

H.B. 2663 (Chisum) – LP Gas: would provide that the rules and standards promulgated and
adopted by the Railroad Commission preempt and supersede any ordinance, order, or rule
adopted by a political subdivision relating to any aspect or phase of the liquefied petroleum gas
industry.

H.B. 2665 (P. King) – Plumbing: would transfer the regulatory authority of the Texas State
Board of Plumbing Examiners to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation.
H.B. 2668 (Miles) – TCEQ Penalties: would increase the range of penalties for statute and rule
violations under the jurisdiction of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

H.B. 2669 (Miles) – Urban Farming: would create an advisory committee to study urban
farming.

H.B. 2672 (Dutton) – Culverts and Drainage Systems: would, in relation to culverts and other
enclosed flood or drainage systems, require a local government entity to: (1) ensure that the
system is protected by a bar, grate, or covering; (2) post a sign warning of the hazard for a child;
and (3) provide a hinged or similar opening to permit emergency services personnel to access the
system.

H.B. 2673 (Dutton) – Tree Mitigation Fees: would provide that, if a city requires as a condition
for the approval of a permit that the applicant pay to the city or to a third party a tree mitigation
fee to offset the impacts of the activity that the permit will authorize, the amount of the tree
mitigation fee shall be roughly proportionate to the impacts of the activity on the public.

H.B. 2675 (Harper-Brown) – Department of Transportation: this is the Texas Department of
Transportation (TxDOT) sunset bill. Among many other things, it would:

   1. replace the Texas Transportation Commission with a single appointed commissioner who
      is appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate for a term of two
      years that expires February 1 of each odd-numbered year;
   2. require TxDOT to develop a statewide transportation plan covering a period of 24 years
      and that is updated every four years that contains all modes of transportation;
   3. provide that the plan must contain specific, long-term transportation goals for the state
      and measurable targets for each goal, identify priority corridors, projects, or areas of the
      state that are of particular concern in meeting the plan goals, and contain a participation
      plan specifying methods for obtaining formal input on the plan’s goals and priorities with
      input from, among others, political subdivisions;
   4. require TxDOT to establish a project information reporting system that makes available
      in a central location on the Internet easily accessible and searchable information
      regarding all of TxDOT’s transportation plans;
   5. require TxDOT to develop a process to identify and distinguish between the
      transportation projects that are required to maintain the state infrastructure and the
      transportation projects that would improve the state infrastructure in a manner consistent
      with the statewide transportation plan;
   6. require TxDOT to evaluate and publish a report about the status of each transportation
      goal for this state and to provide a copy of each district’s report to the political
      subdivisions located in the district that is the subject of the report;
   7. require TxDOT to develop and implement a policy for public involvement that guides
      and encourages public involvement with TxDOT;
   8. require TxDOT to develop a unified transportation program covering a period of 10 years
      and updated each year to guide the development of and authorize construction of
      transportation projects;
   9. provide that the commission shall develop criteria for major transportation projects,
       program priority categories, and funding allocation and distribution;
   10. provide that any fines or fees received under the Texas highway Beautification Act go to
       the state highway fund, as opposed to the state highway beautification account;
   11. create additional administrative procedures, fees, and civil penalties relating to outdoor
       advertising that is subject to state law;
   12. provide that the combined license and permit fees may not exceed $10 for an off-premise
       sign erected and maintained by a nonprofit organization in a city or a city’s
       extraterritorial jurisdiction if the sign relates to or promotes only the city or a political
       subdivision whose jurisdiction is wholly or partly concurrent with the city; and
   13. require TxDOT, in cooperation with local governments, to actively manage a system of
       changeable message signs located on highways under the jurisdiction of TxDOT to
       mitigate traffic congestion by providing current information to the traveling public,
       including information about traffic incidents, weather conditions, road construction, and
       alternative routes when applicable.

(Companion bill is S.B. 1420 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 2677 (Shelton) – Municipal Electric Utilities: would provide that a school district served
by a municipally owned electric utility that has not chosen to participate in customer choice
shall, within the certificated retail service area of the utility, have the right of customer choice as
if the utility had chosen to participate in customer choice.

H.B. 2679 (T. Smith) – Dangerous Dogs: would: (1) provide for a jury trial for dangerous dog
trials in any court; (2) allow an appeal to county court for an animal control authority
determination or a municipal court or justice court order regarding a dangerous dog; and (3)
require a dog owner who utilizes the appeal process to post a bond in the amount of the cost to
house the animal during the appeal.

H.B. 2683 (Lucio) – Collective Bargaining: would: (1) allow a city to negotiate changes to
retirement benefits under the Texas Municipal Retirement System (TMRS) with employees
covered by certain collective bargaining and meet and confer agreements; and (2) require that a
change made to the TMRS benefits through certain collective bargaining or meet and confer
agreements can only apply to those employees covered by the agreement.

H.B. 2685 (Lucio) – DWI: would: (1) prohibit a city or city officer, employee, or department
from adopting a policy that prohibits or impedes the enforcement of driving while intoxicated
(DWI) laws; (2) prohibit a city from receiving state grant funds for a certain amount of time if
the city adopts a rule, order, ordinance, or policy that prohibits or impedes the enforcement of
DWI laws; and (3) authorize the attorney general to take certain legal action against a city that
violates (1), above.

H.B. 2686 (Lucio) – Uninsured Motor Vehicle: would: (1) require a peace officer to impound
the vehicle of a person who operates a vehicle without insurance and is involved in an accident;
(2) require notice of impoundment under (1), above, to the registered owner and lienholder; and
(3) provide for the return of the vehicle in (1), above, to the owner or lienholder under certain
circumstances or, alternatively, disposition of the vehicle by law enforcement.

H.B. 2687 (Lucio) – County Noise Regulation: would authorize a county to regulate noise in
the unincorporated areas of the county.

H.B. 2690 (Deshotel) – Sale of Real Property: would provide that a political subdivision may –
without bidding or auctioning – donate or sell for less than fair market value a designated parcel
of land or an interest in real property to another political subdivision if: (1) the land or interest
will be used by the political subdivision to which it is donated or sold in carrying out a purpose
that benefits the public interest of the donating or selling political subdivision; (2) the donation
or sale of the land or interest is made under terms that effect and maintain the public purpose for
which the donation or sale is made; and (3) the title and right to possession of the land or interest
revert to the donating or selling political subdivision if the acquiring political subdivision ceases
to use the land or interest in carrying out the public purpose.

H.B. 2693 (Deshotel) – Manufactured Housing: would transfer regulation of manufactured
housing from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs to the Texas
Department of Licensing and Regulation.

H.B. 2694 (W. Smith) – TCEQ: this is the TCEQ sunset bill. The bill would, among other
things: (1) require the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop and
implement a policy to encourage the use of negotiated rulemaking and alternative dispute
resolution procedures; (2) require the TCEQ to develop and implement a program to improve
public access to information about the TCEQ and the matters the agency regulates; (3) make
changes to narrow the scope of the mission of the office of public interest council; (4) authorize
the TCEQ to consider additional factors when reviewing compliance history; (5) increase the
penalties for statute and rule violations under the jurisdiction of the TCEQ, including increasing
minimum daily fines; (6) authorize the TCEQ to approve a city’s supplemental environmental
project in lieu of a fine that is necessary to bring the city into compliance with environmental
laws or remediate environmental harm caused by the city’s alleged violation; (7) require the
TCEQ to develop a policy to prevent a regulated entity from systematically avoiding compliance
through the use of supplemental environmental projects; (8) make changes to the fees, penalties,
and authorized TCEQ action for underground storage tanks; (9) require any water right holder
who impounds, diverts, or otherwise uses state water to maintain water use information on a
monthly basis to be made available to the TCEQ during an emergency water shortage, upon
request; and (10) authorize the TCEQ to order suspension and reallocation of water rights during
a drought or other emergency water shortage. (Companion is S.B. 657 by Huffman.)

H.B. 2696 (Eiland) – Property Tax: would provide that a replacement structure for a structure
that was rendered uninhabitable or unusable by casualty or by wind or water damage is not
considered to be a new improvement for property tax purposes if a building code, fire code, local
ordinance, or government assistance program requires: (1) the square footage of the replacement
structure to exceed that of the replaced structure; or (2) the exterior of the replacement structure
be of higher quality construction and composition than that of the replaced structure.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1205 by Jackson.)
H.B. 2702 (Solomons) – Population Classifications: would update the hundreds of provisions
in state law that brackets certain legislation to cities of a certain population. (Companion bill is
S.B. 1246 by Eltife.)

H.B. 2707 (Burnam) – Alcoholic Beverage License: would prohibit the Texas Alcoholic
Beverage Commission from issuing or renewing a permit for on-premises consumption to a
person with a financial interest in the permit or the premises who, within the three preceding
years, held a license or permit that was canceled or not renewed because of a shooting, stabbing,
or other violent act or an offense involving drugs, prostitution, or human trafficking.

H.B. 2713 (Thompson) – Loans: would allow refinancing of loans made with disaster recovery
funds, including a government loan, if the new loan has a lower interest rate, fees, and points
than the refinanced loan. (Companion bill is S.B. 1391 by Gallegos.)

H.B. 2714 (Thompson) – Affordable Housing: would allow a participant in a federal housing
tenant-based assistance program to seek judicial review of a decision by a housing authority to
terminate the tenant-based assistance. (Companion bill is S.B. 925 by Ellis.)

H.B. 2719 (Harper-Brown) – Sales Tax: would provide that a dealer, distributor, supervisor, or
employer may not be regarded as a retailer or seller for sales tax purposes if the entity, directly or
indirectly, only maintains, occupies, operates, or uses a fulfillment center or a computer server.

H.B. 2729 (Callegari) – Procurement: would provide that: (1) a city may contract with a
private entity to act as the city’s agent in the design, development, financing, maintenance,
operation, or construction, including oversight and inspection, of a facility (any improvement to
real property) or civil works project; and (2) a city entering into such a contract shall select a
private entity on the basis of the entity’s qualifications and experience and enter into a project
development agreement with the entity. (Companion bill is S.B. 1654 by Watson.)

H.B. 2731 (Truitt) – Public Retirement Systems: would: (1) prohibit a public retirement
system, including the Texas Municipal Retirement System (TMRS), from reducing the rate of
member or employer contributions, provide a cost-of-living adjustment, or otherwise increasing
retirement benefits, unless the system can show it is funded as required by the bill; (2) limit the
calculation of a retirement benefit of a member of a public retirement system, including TMRS,
to 125 percent of a period five years from the period that is used to calculate the benefits; (3)
allow the pension review board or the attorney general to review complaints against a person
who provides management or investment services to a public retirement system, including
TMRS and other city systems; (4) require TMRS to receive pension board approval before
entering into a contract with an investment managers or other contracts; (5) provide for ethical
and conflict of interest requirements for members of the governing body of a public retirement
system, including TMRS; and (6) change the way the assets and liabilities of a public retirement
system, including TMRS, are made.

H.B. 2732 (Oliveira) – Permit Vesting: would provide that, for purposes of the permit vesting
statute, “fair notice” means the minimum amount of information necessary to enable a
reasonably prudent person to understand the general nature and objective of a project.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1442 by Shapiro.)

H.B. 2733 (Madden) – Animal Control: would expand the drugs an animal control officer or
other appropriate official may use to euthanize an animal.

H.B. 2737 (N. Gonzalez) – Public Housing: would: (1) allow a criminal justice agency to
disclose certain criminal history record information (CHRI) to a housing authority; (2) provide
that a person who employs individuals to work at a residential dwelling project may: (a) obtain
from the Department of Public Safety (DPS) the employee’s CHRI; and (b) request the employee
to disclose the employee’s CHRI and, with authorization from the employee, verify that
information with DPS; and (3) authorize DPS to adopt rules requiring an affidavit from the
employer with a statement from the employee authorizing the employer to obtain the CHRI.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1553 by Rodriguez.)

H.B. 2738 (N. Gonzalez) – Public Housing: would: (1) allow a criminal justice agency to
disclose certain criminal history record information (CHRI) to a housing authority or housing
project; and (2) provide that a housing authority is entitled to obtain CHRI from the Department
of Public Safety relating to a person who is a tenant, an applicant for housing, or a “covered
person.”

H.B. 2746 (Martinez Fischer) – Property Tax: would provide that real property transferred to
a charitable organization for the improvement of the property for low-income housing is not
subject to an additional tax for the change of the use of the property if the new use of the
property would otherwise be exempt from property taxes.

H.B. 2754 (Martinez Fischer) – Legislative Testimony: would require the Texas Legislative
Council to provide certain means by which a person can submit electronic testimony regarding a
bill or resolution that is pending before a committee or subcommittee of the Senate or House of
Representatives.

H.B. 2756 (Lavender) – Carrying of Handguns: would authorize any person who is licensed to
openly carry a handgun.

H.B. 2760 (Garza) – Sales Tax: would, among other provisions: (1) authorize a quarter-cent
sales tax to be imposed by election to fund species-protection programs in certain parts of the
Edwards Aquifer, Guadalupe River Basin, San Antonio River Basin, and San Antonio Bay and
estuary system; (2) designate the Edwards, Guadalupe-Blanco, and San Antonio River
Authorities as the taxing authorities; and (3) exempt the tax from the two-cent sales tax cap
within a city’s limits. (Companion is S.B. 1595 by Wentworth.)

H.B. 2763 (Farrar) – Solid Waste: would prohibit the Department of Public Safety from
denying the renewal of a driver’s license because of an underlying offense related to a local solid
waste or heavy trash requirement.
H.B. 2774 (Bohac) – Property Tax: would allow the city council of a city in Harris County to
reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten percent to five percent.

H.B. 2778 (Bohac) – Water Utility Rates: would require a city that is the regulatory authority
for a non-municipally-owned water and sewer utility’s rates or the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to set a ratemaking hearing if at least ten percent of the
ratepayers living in the same subdivision or zip code submit a complaint about the proposed rate
change.

H.B. 2780 (Bohac) – Burglary of a Vehicle: would provide, with regard to the offense of
burglary of a vehicle, that: (1) the offense is a state jail felony if the defendant has previously
been convicted of that same offense or the vehicle broken into is a rail car; (2) the amount of
community service work ordered by the judge may not exceed 600 hours; and (3) provisions
providing for the minimum period of community supervision for an offense punishable as a
misdemeanor are repealed. (Companion bill is S.B. 203 by Huffman.)

H.B. 2782 (Callegari) – Sales Tax: would exempt certain firearms, hunting equipment,
ammunition, and related accessories from sales taxes if the sale takes place over the second
weekend in October. (Companion bill is S.B. 1411 by Hegar.)

H.B. 2798 (Bonnen) – Electric Discounts: would, among other things, provide that a
municipally owned electric utility shall discount charges for electric service provided to a school
district that is a 20-percent reduction of the utility’s base rates.

H.B. 2803 (Raymond) – Colonias: would: (1) provide that the secretary of state shall establish
and maintain a statewide system for identifying colonias that must include a method for a city or
county to nominate an area for identification as a colonia and may provide for the review of a
nominated area by the Texas Water Development Board, the office of the attorney general, or
any other appropriate state agency as determined by the secretary of state; (2) to augment
regulatory compliance by political subdivisions, provide that the model subdivision rules may
impose requirements for platting, replatting, or any other method authorized by law; (3)
notwithstanding any other law to the contrary, a political subdivision that has adopted the model
rules may impose the platting requirements of Local Government Code Chapter 212 (city
platting authority) or 232 (county platting authority) to a division of real property that is required
to be platted or replatted by the provisions of the model rules; and (4) before an application for
certain funding may be considered by the Water Development Board, if the applicant is located:
(a) in a city, the city must adopt and enforce the model subdivision rules; (b) in the
extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city, the applicant must demonstrate that the model subdivision
rules have been adopted and are enforced in the extraterritorial jurisdiction by either the city or
the county; or (c) outside the extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city, the county must adopt and
enforce the model subdivision rules. (Companion bill is S.B. 1816 by Zaffirini.)

H.B. 2810 (S. Miller) – Sales Tax: would exempt from sales taxes tangible personal property
incorporated into a commercial dairy-free stall barn, commercial dairy structures, or commodity
structures used to process feed for dairy cows.
H.B. 2811 (Coleman) – Drugs: would allow a city or county to prohibit the sale of any
abusable drug or chemical so long as the drug is not approved by the Federal Food and Drug
Administration.

H.B. 2813 (Christian) – Sales Tax: would require the comptroller to provide notice to a person
who the comptroller considers to be a retailer or seller for sales tax purposes.

H.B. 2815 (L. Taylor) – Prop 2: would exempt from property taxes an energy storage system
or technology used as a facility, device, or method for the control of air pollution.

H.B. 2817 (L. Taylor) – Elections: would, among other things: (1) eliminate the current
provision in state law that requires the secretary of state to either prescribe the terms that a
county elections administrator must accept, or instruct the county elections administrator to
decline to enter into a contract with a city, if a city and county are unable to initially reach an
agreement to furnish election services; (2) provide that an election watcher may not be accepted
for service if the watcher has possession of a device capable of recording images or sound unless
the watcher agrees to disable or deactivate the device; (3) provide that the custodian of keys to
early voting ballot boxes must retain possession of the keys until delivered to the presiding judge
of the central counting station; (4) require that a plan for counting votes cast on an electronic
voting system include a process for comparing the number of voters who signed the combination
form with the number of votes cast for the entire election; (5) require a city to post notice of
dates of the filing period for an application for a place on the ballot not later than the 30th day
before: (a) the first day on which a candidate may file an application; or (b) the last day on which
a candidate may file the application, if the election code does not designate a first day on which
the candidate may file the application: (6) provide that a withdrawal from an election that is not
made in writing and signed by the candidate, or is not timely filed with the appropriate authority
or agent of an authority, has no legal effect and is not considered filed; and (7) require a notice
relating to a local option liquor election that is published in a newspaper to include: (a) the
individual or entity that is applying for the petition to gather signatures for a local option liquor
election; (b) the type of local option liquor election; (c) the name of the political subdivision in
which the petition will be circulated; and (d) the name and title of the person with whom the
application will be filed. (Companion bill is S.B. 849 by Duncan.)

H.B. 2823 (Coleman) – Peace Officer Training: would require a peace officer to complete
eight hours of training on ethical decision making every two years. (Companion bill is S.B. 1676
by Ellis.)

H.B. 2826 (Murphy) – Municipal Setting Designations: would, among other provisions: (1)
require a city with a population of more than two million to give notice and 120 days to pass a
resolution in opposition to a municipal settings designation (MSD) to any city or public utility
within a certain distance from the proposed MSD; and (2) require that no resolution has been
filed in opposition for the MSD to be issued.

H.B. 2833 (White) – Working Dogs: would exempt working dogs, including those used for
police, therapy, or livestock handling, from any ordinance or law regulating: (1) spaying or
neutering; (2) number of pets in households; (3) housing of dogs; (4) insurance requirements; or
(5) breed restrictions.

H.B. 2849 (Simpson) – Mineral Estates: would grant considerable new rights to an owner of
the surface estate in land in connection with mineral exploration and production operations on
the land.

H.B. 2850 (Mallory Caraway) – Law Enforcement Vehicles: would prohibit a city from
selling or transferring a marked patrol car or other law enforcement vehicle to the public unless
the city first removes any equipment or insignia that could mislead a reasonable person into
believing the vehicle is a law enforcement vehicle.

H.B. 2852 (Mallory Carraway) – Red Light Cameras: would provide that: (1) a city shall
install a sign at each intersection at which a photographic traffic monitoring system is in active
use and at which turning right is permissible; and (2) the sign must indicate the location at which
the operator of the vehicle must stop the vehicle when facing a steady red signal.

H.B. 2853 (J. Davis) – Tax Increment Financing: among other things, would: (1) repeal the
requirement that a city adopting a reinvestment zone financing plan mail a copy of the plan to the
governing body of each taxing unit that levies taxes in the proposed zone; (2) allow a city to
designate a reinvestment zone so long as: (a) less than 30 percent of the property in the proposed
zone is used for residential purposes; or (b) the total appraised value of taxable real property in
the proposed zone and in existing zones is less than 25 percent of the total appraised value for a
city with a population of 100,000 or more, or 50 percent of the total appraised value for a city
with a population of less than 100,000; (3) allow a city council that designated a reinvestment
zone by ordinance or resolution to adopt an ordinance or resolution extending the term of all or a
portion of the zone after notice and a hearing; (4) authorize a city council to appoint a
reinvestment board of directors consisting of nine members if fewer than seven taxing units other
than the city are eligible to appoint members of the board of directors; (5) provide that if at least
seven taxing units other than the city are eligible to appoint members of the reinvestment zone’s
board of directors, then the city creating the zone may appoint only one member; (6) allow an
agreement to specify the projects to which a participating taxing unit’s tax increment will be
dedicated and that the taxing unit’s participation may be computed with respect to a base year
later than the original base year of the zone; and (7) provide that an act or proceeding of a city, a
reinvestment zone board, or other entity acting pursuant to a reinvestment zone financing plan is
conclusively presumed valid after two years have passed and a lawsuit to annul or invalidate the
act or proceeding has not been filed.

H.B. 2856 (Gallego) – Felony Forfeiture: would: (1) prohibit prosecutors from executing a plea
bargain agreement that would waive a person’s interest in property seized under the felony
forfeiture laws; (2) provide that post-judgment interest on money seized under the felony
forfeiture laws shall be used for the same purposes as the principal; (3) prohibit the use of felony
forfeiture funds for: (a) political campaigns; (b) donations to certain organizations that do not
assist in the detection, investigation, or prosecution of crime or provide rehabilitation services;
(c) judicial training; (d) certain travel expenses; (e) alcoholic beverages; (f) any expenditure not
approved by the city council if the law enforcement agency head holds elective office and is not
running for reelection or did not prevail in a reelection bid; or (g) a salary, expense, or allowance
increase for an employee of the law enforcement agency that was not approved by the city
council; (3) require more detailed local audits of the expenditure of felony forfeiture funds; (4)
permit the state auditor to investigate at any time the expenditure of felony forfeiture funds; (5)
permit the attorney general to sue a law enforcement agency or prosecutor who misuses felony
forfeiture funds; and (6) permit up to a $100,000 civil fine for misuse of felony forfeiture funds.
(Companion bill is S.B. 316 by Whitmire.)

H.B. 2860 (Y. Davis) – Public Improvement Districts: would provide that: (1) a city may
establish a public improvement district in noncontiguous areas if the areas share a common
characteristic or use; (2) a petition for the establishment of a public improvement district must
state the proposed assessment schedule, the appraised value of taxable real property that is liable
for assessment, and an estimate of property value appreciation for real property in the district for
the period after the district is created and before the deferred assessment will be assessed; (3) if a
proposed assessment schedule in a petition includes a deferred assessment, a city council must
use the services of city employees before the hearing to estimate the appraised value of taxable
real property liable for assessment in the district and the cost of improvement; and (4) the cost of
an improvement may be assessed as a percentage of sales or receipts, or as a percentage of
increased property value attributable to the improvement.

H.B. 2866 (Harper-Brown) – Public Information: would: (1) allow open records letter ruling
requests to be filed electronically with the attorney general’s office; and (2) allow notices,
decisions, and other public information documents to be transmitted electronically by the
attorney general’s office. (Companion bill is S.B. 933 by Ellis).

H.B. 2871 (Aliseda) – Tire Disposal: would require a person who sells new or used motor
vehicle tires to collect at the time of sale a tire disposal fee to be used only for the purpose of
properly disposing of or recycling used or scrap tires.

H.B. 2874 (Geren) – Telecommunications: would provide that: (1) a city may not by rule,
order, or other means directly or indirectly regulate rates charged for, service or contract terms
for, conditions for, or requirements for entry into the market for Voice over Internet Protocol
services or other Internet Protocol enabled services; and (2) the limitation in (1) does not: (a)
affect payment of municipal right-of-way fees applicable to Voice over Internet Protocol
services; (b) affect any person’s obligation to provide video service as defined by S.B. 5
(2005)(the state video franchise bill) under any applicable state or federal law; or (c) require or
prohibit assessment of enhanced 9-1-1, relay access service, or universal service fund fees on
Voice over Internet Protocol service. (Companion bill is S.B. 985 by Carona.)

H.B. 2875 (S. Davis) – Elections: would: (1) provide that a voter who presents a voter
registration certificate indicating that the voter is registered in a different precinct in the same
county in the precinct in which the voter is offering to vote, or a voter who does not present a
voter registration certificate, shall be accepted for provisional voting only if the voter executes an
affidavit; (2) require an election officer to enter the voter’s registration number beside the voter’s
name on the poll list, if applicable; (3) require an election officer to indicate beside the voter’s
name on the poll list that the voter was accepted for provisional voting and enter the voter’s
address; and (4) require a copy of the poll list to be included in Envelope No. 4.

H.B. 2878 (Berman) – Immigration: would: (1) make a person liable to the state for actual
damages for employing or contracting with an unauthorized alien; (2) authorize a private
individual to sue on behalf of the State of Texas for a violation of (1), above (a “qui tam
lawsuit”); (3) identify as contraband and require forfeiture of certain property in relation to
certain criminal offenses involving unauthorized aliens; (4) create the felony offense of criminal
trespass by an unauthorized alien; and (5) create the felony offense of employing or contracting
with an unauthorized alien.

H.B. 2879 (P. King) – Texas Historical Commission: would abolish the Texas Historical
Commission and transfer its duties to the Parks and Wildlife Commission, the General Land
Office, and the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

H.B. 2885 (Workman) – Liquid Propane Tanks: would prohibit a city from enacting or
enforcing an ordinance that prohibits, restricts, or has the effect of prohibiting or restricting a
property owner from installing a liquid propane gas tank of a reasonable size to service the
property above ground on residential property, except that a city may require the owner to screen
the tank from view with reasonable screening materials.

H.B. 2886 (Workman) – Immigration: would: (1) create a resident alien card program for
undocumented immigrants; (2) require an employer, including a city, who employs someone
with a resident alien card to: (a) deduct a state tax equal to the federal income tax from the
individual’s wages; and (b) provide the same benefits to the individual as other employees; (3)
give an employer, including a city, an affirmative defense from federal prosecution for hiring an
undocumented immigrant if the employee has a resident alien card; (4) require a city to give
preference to a lawful resident over a resident alien card holder; (5) create a fine of $10,000 for
hiring an undocumented immigrant who does not have a resident alien card; and (6) give the
taxes collected to local governments, including cities, which provide services to resident aliens.

H.B. 2888 (Munoz) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity (CCNs): would: (1) expand
the situations in which a landowner would be able to petition the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality for release from a CCN; (2) remove a landowner in a platted subdivision
receiving water or sewer service from a rural water supply corporation that has federal debt from
the group of landowners entitled to contest an involuntary certification of property; and (3)
authorize a landowner whose property is within city limits and is receiving water or sewer
service from a rural water supply corporation that has federal debt and has refused or is not
capable of providing service in the same manner that the city would be required to if it held the
certificate to the property to petition for expedited release from a CCN.

H.B. 2889 (Madden) – Expunction of Arrest Records: would require a police department to
expunge all records of the arrest of a person when the office of the attorney who is authorized to
prosecute the offense for which the person was arrested declines to prosecute and does not object
to the court entering an order of expunction. (Companion is S.B. 1473 by Hinojosa.)
H.B. 2891 (Sheets) – Elections: would require the early voting clerk to include a disposable
fingerprint inked strip and instructions for use with balloting materials that are mailed to a voter.

H.B. 2895 (D. Miller) – Water Ratemaking: would: (1) authorize a city council that is the
regulatory authority for water rates for a non-city-owned utility within city limits to authorize
reduced rates for a minimal level of service to be provided to a class or classes of low-income or
elderly customers; and (2) require a city acting as a regulatory authority for water rates to allow
the utility in question to choose whether to have a forward-looking or historical test year used as
part of the calculation of the utility’s expenses during a ratemaking determination.

H.B. 2896 (T. King) – Peace Officer: would require a peace officer to remain at the location of
a damaged fence if: (1) the officer responds to a car accident that damages the fence; and (2) the
officer believes that the fenced area contains livestock.

H.B. 2897 (Naishtat) – Driver Education Courses: would: (1) create requirements for a driver
education course specifically for individuals under twenty-five years of age; and (2) require that
a driver under the age of twenty-five who commits a moving violation and receives a deferred
adjudication or deferred disposition complete a driver education course for drivers under the age
of twenty-five. (Companion is S.B. 1330 by Watson.)

H.B. 2901 (D. Miller) – Property Tax: would provide that a transferee holding a tax lien
assumes the lien priority of the taxing unit for funds advanced to pay taxes, penalties, interest,
and collection costs.

H.B. 2920 (Reynolds) – Elections: would provide that the city council of a type C general law
city with a population of over 10,000 may adopt an ordinance to determine if commissioners
may be elected in alternate years or in the same election year.

H.B. 2925 (Farias) – Consumer Credit: would require a creditor that extends consumer credit
to certain members of the United States armed forces or a member of the Texas National Guard
and their dependents give those persons the same benefits and protections that the creditor is
required to apply to persons covered under the federal John Warner National Defense
Authorization Act.

H.B. 2927 (Farias) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that, for a property that qualifies for a
residence homestead exemption that was acquired by a property owner as a bona fide purchaser
in the preceding year, the appraised value of the property for the first tax year may not exceed
the lesser of: (a) the market value of the property; (b) the appraised value of the property; or (c)
an amount equal to the sum of the purchase price paid by the owner and the market value of all
new improvements to the property; (2) limit re-appraisals of residential homesteads to no more
often than once every three years; and (3) prevent taxable value increases in years in which
homesteads are not re-appraised.

H.B. 2934 (Castro) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would give the members of the
Texas Municipal Retirement System another option when calculating possible increases in
annuities or supplemental benefits given to retirees and beneficiaries of deceased retirees.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1164 by Wentworth).

H.B. 2943 (Coleman) – Debt Instruments: would require a city to report all proposed bond
initiatives and debt to the Bond Review Board, but only if the legislature appropriates state
money for the payment or reimbursement of costs incurred by the city in complying with the
mandate.

H.B. 2944 (Coleman) – Debt Instruments: would require the Bond Review Board to establish
on its Web site a database of outstanding bonds and other debt obligations issued by each local
government.

H.B. 2946 (Coleman) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require coverage for care and
treatment of loss of language or impairment of speech.

H.B. 2949 (Cook) – Municipal Court: would repeal the penalty prohibiting a city from
withholding its ten percent of many state court fines if the city is not in compliance with state fee
reporting and remitting rules.

H.B. 2952 (Cain) – Property Tax: would provide that a city council may not adopt a budget
that exceeds the revenue adopted in the previous year by the lesser of: (1) the growth in the
state’s gross state product; or (2) population growth in the local government plus inflation. The
bill would allow the voters in a city to nullify a limitation on the growth of the budget as
provided by the bill if a majority of the voters in the city vote in a referendum election in favor of
nullification.

H.B. 2957 (J. Davis) – Law Enforcement: would adopt the Law Enforcement Officers’ Due
Process Act, which includes provisions that: (1) limit the way in which a city may conduct a
disciplinary investigation or question an officer; (2) limit the times and places that a peace
officer may be questioned; (3) give the right to counsel to a peace officer under investigation or
questioning; (4) give the right to access to documents related to the investigation to peace
officers; (5) require the employing city to give a notice of investigation or questioning within a
specific period of time; (6) provide for hearing procedures for peace officer investigations and
the resulting employment action; (7) require a written or taped record of any proceedings; and
(7) prohibit peace officers from engaging in political activity while the officer is on duty, in
uniform, or acting in an official capacity.

H.B. 2958 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would provide that: (1) if changes in the items subject to
sales tax would result in an average increase in the amount of sales tax revenue received by a
city, the effective tax rate and rollback tax rate of a city that also imposes a sales tax are reduced
by a rate that would impose an amount of taxes equal to the amount of revenue gained because of
the changes; and (2) if changes in the items subject to sales tax would result in an average
decrease in the amount of sales tax revenue received by a city, the effective tax rate and rollback
tax rate of a city that also imposes a sales tax are increased by a rate that would impose an
amount of taxes equal to the amount of revenue lost because of the changes.
H.B. 2961 (Darby) – Solar Energy: would apply to a municipally owned electric utility (MOU)
with retail sales of more than 500,000 megawatt hours in 2009 and provide – among many other
things – that, beginning not later than March 1, 2012, an MOU shall annually report to the Public
Utility Commission information regarding the efforts of the MOU with regard to its efforts to
promote solar energy generation incentive programs goals.

H.B. 2962 (Bohac) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity: would (1) create a process
allowing sixty percent of the customers in a geographic area to file a petition with the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality to be released from a certificated area; and (2) make the
decision final, unappealable, and not subject to judicial review.

H.B. 2966 (Naishtat) – Public Information: would make confidential any communication or
record that contains identifying information regarding a person who receives a forensic medical
examination that is created by, provided to, or in the control of the Department of Public Safety
in reference to certain sexual assault survivors.

H.B. 2972 (T. Smith) – Street Maintenance Sales Tax: would: (1) allow a city that has already
held two reauthorization elections in which at least 66 percent of the voters in the last two
consecutive elections approved of the tax to call an election to reauthorize the tax for eight years;
and (2) allow revenue from the street maintenance sales tax to be used to maintain and repair
sidewalks.

H.B. 2973 (Hunter) – Litigation: would: (1) provide for the dismissal of a lawsuit if shown by
a preponderance of the evidence that the legal action is based on, relates to, or is in response to
the exercise of the defendant’s right of free speech, right to petition, or right of association; (2)
prohibit dismissal as described in (1), above, if the party bringing the action establishes by clear
and specific evidence a prima facie case for each essential element of the claim; (3) require a
court, if dismissal is ordered as described in (1), above, to award court costs, attorney’s fees, and
expenses, and impose sanctions against the person and attorney who brought the legal action; (4)
require a court, if a motion under (1), above, is found to be frivolous, to award court costs and
attorney’s fees to the responding party; and (5) exempt from the application of this bill: (a) an
enforcement action brought by a city; and (b) certain legal action brought against a person who
sells or leases goods or services. (Companion bill is S.B. 1565 by Ellis.)

H.B. 2974 (Hunter) – Litigation: would: (1) allow a party to a lawsuit to file a motion to
dismiss if the lawsuit relates to the party’s exercise of the right of free speech, right to petition, or
right of association; and (2) award attorney’s fees and expenses to the party if the lawsuit is
dismissed based on the motion.

H.B. 2977 (Hunter) – Open Meetings: would provide that a member or group of members of a
governmental body commits an offense if the member or group of members
knowingly: (1) conspires to circumvent the Open Meetings Act by meeting in numbers less than
a quorum for the purpose of secret deliberations in violation of the Act; or (2) transmits an
electronic communication during a public meeting.           The bill defines an “electronic
communication” as an e-mail, text message, instant message, or posting on an Internet Web site,
and does not apply to an electronic communication that contains only administrative or
ministerial information or that is sent in relation to an emergency situation.

H.B. 2980 (Hunter) – Public Information: would require a court to consider, when assessing
costs of litigation and reasonable attorney’s fees for a suit brought by a governmental body
seeking declaratory relief from an open records letter ruling issued by the attorney general,
whether the conduct of the governmental body had a reasonable basis in law or whether the
litigation was brought in good faith.

H.B. 2981 (Hunter) – Traffic Safety: would provide that, with some exceptions, a person
commits an offense if the person operates a motor vehicle on a highway or street and another
person occupies a boat or personal watercraft being drawn by the motor vehicle.

H.B. 2986 (Parker) – Union Political Expenditures: would: (1) require a union to: (a)
segregate any funds to be used for political expenditures, including expenditures for lobbying,
political advertising, and other political activities; (b) ensure that any contribution to a political
fund is voluntary; (c) ensure that no union dues are used for political expenditures; and (d)
maintain records showing that the union has not engaged in any prohibited practices; (2) prohibit
a public employer, including a city, from deducting from wages any amount for certain political
expenditures including for a union fund created for political expenditures; and (3) allow a public
employer, including a city, to deduct from wages for certain political expenditures if the
employer receives written authorization with specific language.

H.B. 2989 (Deshotel) – Construction Employees: would: (1) require any person who contracts
for construction services, including a city, to ensure that each individual is classified correctly as
either an employee or an independent contractor; (2) provide an administrative penalty if an
individual is incorrectly classified; (3) require a contract between a city and a construction
contractor to include an affidavit that each individual performing services under the construction
contract has been correctly classified as either an employee or independent contractor; and (4)
allow a city to rescind a contract if the city finds that the contractor has incorrectly classified its
workers.

H.B. 2994 (Miles) – Urban Farming: would provide for the creation, operation, and funding of
the urban farm microenterprise support program by the Texas Agricultural Finance Authority.

H.B. 2995 (Miles) – Wastewater Fees: would prohibit a city-owned water or sewer utility from
receiving compensation for wastewater service provided to an owner or operator of an urban
farm when the wastewater is used for farming purposes.

H.B. 2996 (Miles) – Urban Farming: would provide for the creation of the Texas Urban
Agricultural Innovation Authority and, among other things, implement an urban farmer interest
rate reduction program and an urban farmer grant program for certain individuals in cities with a
population of at least 1.5 million.
H.B. 2997 (Miles) – Urban Farming: would require the Texas Department of Agriculture to
establish the urban farming pilot program and would create the Select Committee on Urban
Farming to study the program, urban farming trends, and various related topics.

H.B. 2998 (Miles) – Property Tax: would require the Department of Agriculture to develop
standards for determining whether: (1) an urban farm qualifies for a property tax appraisal as
open-space land; (2) an urban farm or green roof qualifies for a property tax credit; or (3) an
urban farm or green roof qualifies for an abatement of property taxes.

H.B. 3001 (Thompson) – Sex Offenders: would, among several other provisions: (1) require a
city police department designated as the primary registration authority for certain sex offenders
to use a required monitoring system to verify the authenticity of any geographically verifiable
information contained in the offender’s registration form; and (2) require the manufacturer or
vendor of a monitoring system to provide training to a city police department on the equipment.

H.B. 3012 (Giddings) – Sales Tax: would exempt certain school art supplies from sales tax
during limited periods of time.

H.B. 3014 (Oliveira) – Hotel Occupancy Tax: would provide that local hotel occupancy taxes
do not apply to an individual who has the right to use or possess a room in a hotel for at least
thirty consecutive days, so long as there is no interruption of payment during that period of time.

H.B. 3019 (Gutierrez) – Elections: would require an election officer to provide a paper ballot
to a voter who requests one.

H.B. 3020 (Gutierrez) – Personnel: would: (1) require a city who has a contract for
construction services to include in a contract with a contractor to: (a) provide at least a 15-minute
rest break for every four hours of work its employees perform; and (b) ensure that employees do
not work more than three-and-a-half hours without receiving a break; (2) require a city to
develop procedures for administering the bill’s provisions; and (3) allow a city to impose an
administrative penalty if a contractor violates these provisions. (Companion bill is S.B. 1765 by
Rodriguez.)

H.B. 3034 (McClendon) – Warrants: would authorize any magistrate to issue: (1) search and
seizure warrants; and (2) warrants for contraband subject to forfeiture.

H.B. 3036 (Alvarado) – Street Maintenance Sales Tax: would authorize a city to hold an
election to reauthorize the street maintenance sales tax for a ten-year period.

H.B. 3039 (Chisum) – Property Tax: would exempt from property taxes real property used to
provide housing to certain persons with disabilities.

H.B. 3046 (Lucio) – Law Enforcement: would require a city police department to: (1) follow
a plan and procedure enacted by the county commissioners court to monitor the retention,
preservation, and disposition of physical evidence seized in a criminal investigation; and (2)
allow the county commissioners court or its appointee to perform inspections as necessary to
ensure compliance with the procedures enacted by the county.

H.B. 3050 (Lucio) – Forfeiture: would: (1) require a law enforcement agency that seizes or
helps seize property identified as or alleged to be contraband to follow the forfeiture procedures
in Code of Criminal Procedure Article 59.03 or obtain written consent of the attorney
representing the state before submitting the property to a forfeiture proceeding provided by
another law; (2) require an agency that violates (1), above, to forfeit its claim to any proceeds;
(3) provide that the attorney representing the state must enforce (2), above, by filing necessary
legal proceedings.

H.B. 3054 (Pena) – Political Advertising: would: (1) prohibit a person from knowingly causing
to be posted on an in Internet Web site political advertising that does not explain that it is
political advertising and to include information about who paid for or authorized the advertising;
and (2) provide when a payment for posting on an Internet website is considered payment for
political advertising and when such payment must be reported as an expenditure.

H.B. 3055 (Pena) – Elections: would make it a state jail felony for anyone to knowingly
provide false information on an application for an early voting ballot.

H.B. 3056 (Pena) – Elections: would expand the definition of contraband to include any
property involved in the commission of certain election offenses.

H.B. 3064 (P. King) – Disabled Parking Placards: would: (1) impose various requirements to
prevent the fraudulent issuance and use of disabled parking placards; (2) require the owners of a
building or facility used by the public that is constructed, renovated, or modified, in whole or in
part, on or after January 1, 1970, using funds from the state, county, or city to: (a) designate a
person to inspect disabled parking placards of each person who parks a vehicle in parking space
designated for disabled persons to ensure the placard is for the person operating the vehicle or a
person being transported in the vehicle; and (b) limit the use of any van accessible parking
spaces to a person who must use a wheelchair, unless no other parking space designated
specifically for persons with disabilities are available.

H.B. 3066 (Burnam) – Oil and Gas Drilling: would include a structure, device, item,
equipment, enclosure, or appurtenance associated with an oil or gas well in the definition of
“facility” under the Texas Clean Air Act.

H.B. 3072 (Veasey) – Elections: would require a poll watcher to present a form of photo
identification along with the certificate of appointment to the early voting clerk or deputy clerk at
a polling place.

H.B. 3082 (Isaac) – Elections: would, for early voting in an city election that includes a bond
proposition in a county with a population of more than one million: (1) require any mobile voting
station used in early voting to not change locations during a single day within the early voting
period; and (2) require the station to move around the territory covered by the election in order to
allow all of the voters in the territory the same access to the mobile voting station during the
early voting period.

H.B. 3090 (Creighton) – Drinking Water Audits: would: (1) require a city water utility that
provides drinking water to perform and file with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB)
a water audit computing the utility’s system water loss during the preceding year; and (2) require
a similar audit from a city water utility that provides drinking water to a population of 3,300 or
fewer and that does not receive any form of financial assistance from the TWDB to perform and
file with the TWDB once every five years a water audit computing the utility’s most recent
annual system water loss.

H.B. 3092 (Rodriguez) – Local Option Transportation Funding: would authorize Travis
County to utilize various local funding mechanisms to fund specific local projects if approved at
an election in the county.

H.B. 3093 (Lewis) – Elections: would provide that: (1) a person who files a semiannual report
of political contributions and expenditures may amend the report; (2) a semiannual report that is
amended before the eighth day after the date the original report was filed is considered to have
been filed on the date on which the original was filed; and (3) a semiannual report that is
amended on or after the eighth day after the original report was filed is considered to have been
filed on the date on which the original was filed if: (a) the amendment is made before a
complaint is filed regarding the subject of the amendment; and (b) the original report was made
in good faith without the intent to mislead.

H.B. 3095 (Farias) – Graffiti: would require a municipal court to require a juvenile repeat
graffiti offender who made markings on public property to, with the juvenile’s parent or
guardian, restore the public property by removing or painting over any marks made by the child,
with the consent of the governmental entity.

H.B. 3103 (Anchia) – Elections: would provide that a person commits a first-degree felony if
the person knowingly: (1) impersonates or uses the identity of another person and attempts to
vote as that other person; (2) removes the name of an eligible voter from the list of registered
voters or the poll list for an election precinct; (3) prevents the deposit of a marked and properly
folded ballot in the ballot box; (4) provides false information to a voter about voting procedures
resulting in the voter being prevented from casting a ballot that may be legally counted; (5)
places restrictions on a voter’s exercise of the right to vote resulting in the voter being prevented
from casting a ballot that may be legally counted; or (6) impersonates a law enforcement officer
or provides false information about law enforcement procedures for the purpose of intimidating
voters regardless of whether the voter casts a vote. (Companion is S.B. 1283 by Watson.)

H.B. 3104 (Simpson) – Sales Tax: would exempt from sales taxes the sale of any gold, silver,
or numismatic coins, or platinum, gold, or silver bullion.

H.B. 3105 (Keffer) – Regulatory Takings/Oil and Gas: would make a city regulation that
damages, destroys, impairs, or prohibits development of a mineral interest subject to the Private
Real Property Rights Preservation Act, which would: (1) waive sovereign immunity to suit and
liability for a regulatory taking; (2) authorize a private real property owner to bring suit to
determine whether the governmental action of a city results in a taking; (3) require a city to
prepare a “takings impact assessment” prior to imposing certain regulations; and (4) require a
city to post 30-days notice of the adoption of most regulations prior to adoption.

H.B. 3106 (Keffer) – Texas Railroad Commission: would abolish the Texas Railroad
Commission, create the Texas Oil and Gas Commission, transfer of the powers and duties of the
Railroad Commission to the new commission, and provide for various administrative changes.
(Companion bill is S.B. 655 by Hegar.)

H.B. 3108 (Deshotel) – Ambulance Service: would require the Health and Human Services
Commission to ensure that any ambulance service provided to a Medicaid managed care plan
beneficiary is paid for regardless of whether the ambulance provider is in the plan’s network.

H.B. 3114 (V. Gonzales) – County Development Authority: would authorize certain border
counties to regulate development in the unincorporated areas of the county and authorize a city
in those counties to regulate development in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. (Companion
bill is S.B. 1363 by Lucio.)

H.B. 3115 (V. Gonzales) – Colonias: would authorize certain border counties to regulate
development in the unincorporated areas of the county and authorize a city in those counties to
regulate development in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. (Companion bill is S.B. 1364 by
Lucio.)

H.B. 3120 (Thompson) – Sales Tax: would provide that: (1) neither a religious, educational, or
public service organization, nor an individual acting on behalf of the organization, is considered
to be a salesman, representative, peddler, or canvasser for sales tax purposes; and (2) a religious,
educational, or public service organization that holds an authorized tax-free sale or auction is the
seller of a taxable item if the organization purchased the item as evidenced by a contract,
purchase order, invoice, receipt, or other similar document.

H.B. 3126 (Naishtat) – Electricity: would provide, among other things, that the Public Utility
Commission by rule shall require an electric utility, municipally owned utility, electric
cooperative, qualifying facility, power generation company, exempt wholesale generator, or
power marketer to give to the following the same priority that it gives to a hospital in its
emergency operations plan for restoring power after an extended power outage: (1) a nursing
facility; (2) an assisted living facility; and (3) a facility that provides hospice services.
(Companion bill is S.B. 937 by Lucio.)

H.B. 3129 (Price) – E-verify: would: (1) require an employer, including a city, to enroll in and
use E-verify to verify immigration information about new employees; and (2) provide an
administrative penalty for failure to use E-verify.

H.B. 3133 (Rodriguez) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that property transferred by an
organization that received a property tax exemption as an organization constructing or
rehabilitating low-income housing to a charitable organization may not be exempted as property
of the charitable organization after the fifth anniversary of the date the transferring organization
acquired the property; (2) require the chief appraiser to take into account how any limitations
and/or resale restrictions on property sold to a low-income individual or family reduce the
overall market value of the property; and (3) a change in the use of property transferred to a
charitable organization to improve for low-income housing does not result in an additional tax as
otherwise provided by the Tax Code.

H.B. 3138 (Hardcastle) – Property Tax: would allow a dealer of heavy equipment to apply to
the chief appraiser to have the dealer’s heavy equipment inventory appraised for property tax
purposes in a similar way as other types of inventory.

H.B. 3142 (Pickett) – Utility Payments: would provide that a municipally owned electric or gas
utility or a third party acting on the utility’s behalf may not charge a fee for credit card, debit
card, or automated bank draft payment conducted through the Internet for reoccurring charges.

H.B. 3147 (McClendon) – Evidence of Sexual Assault: would: (1) require a law enforcement
agency that receives sexual assault evidence to submit that evidence to an accredited crime lab
for analysis not later than the tenth day after the date on which the evidence is received; (2)
require a law enforcement department that handles sexual assault evidence to maintain the chain
of custody from the time of collection until the time the evidence is destroyed; and (3) require a
law enforcement agency in possession of sexual assault evidence that has not been submitted for
lab analysis to: (a) not later than October 15, 2011, submit to the Department of Public Safety
(DPS) a list of active criminal cases for which sexual assault evidence has not been submitted for
lab analysis; and (b) not later than April 1, 2012, submit to DPS all sexual assault evidence
pertaining to those active cases that have not been submitted for lab analysis.

H.B. 3158 (V. Taylor) – Elections: would require the general custodian of election records to
adopt procedures for testing direct recording electronic voting machine systems to verify that
each contested position, as well as each precinct and ballot style, on the ballot can be voted and
is accurately counted. (Companion bill is S.B. 1398 by Patrick.)

H.B. 3160 (V. Taylor) – Elections: would require an individual to verify citizenship in order to
become a registered voter.

H.B. 3166 (Callegari) – State Agencies: would abolish and consolidate various state agencies
and function, including, among others: (1) transferring the regulatory functions of the Texas
Board of Plumbing Examiners to the Department of Licensing and Regulation; and (2)
consolidating the licensing and regulation of architecture, engineering, landscape architecture,
and land surveying into one new state agency known as the Texas Board of Professional
Services.

H.B. 3170 (Coleman) -- Historic Site Tax Exemption: would: (1) require notice to a historic
site 30 days before any action by a taxing unit, including a city, on a tax exemption related to the
historic site; and (2) void any action taken by a taxing unit if action is taken without the required
notice.
H.B. 3181 (Johnson) – Expunction: would expand the circumstances under which a person
may request expunction of all records of an arrest.

H.B. 3182 (Ritter) – Sales Tax: would provide that manufactured homes used as an oilfield
portable unit are subject to sales taxes.

H.B. 3186 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would provide that a city council may not adopt a tax rate
that exceeds the rollback tax rate without first receiving voter approval.

H.B. 3187 (Dutton) – Matters Affecting Cities: would provide that: (1) a city shall complete its
plan annexation inventory and make it available for public inspection on or before the 90th day
after the date the city receives the required information from the service providers; (2) the
provisions that allow a referendum on time warrants issued by a city of more than 50,000
population apply if the time warrants exceed $150,000; (3) a city imposing an impact fee shall
update the land use assumptions and capital improvements plan at least every three years; (4) in a
city that creates a parking authority, a petition protesting the creation must be signed by a
number of registered voters equal to at least 15 percent of the number of votes cast at the most
recent general municipal election.

H.B. 3188 (Larson) – Air Quality: would prohibit a state agency from implementing or
adopting rules that would implement a greenhouse gas emissions regulatory program required by
federal statute or agency rule.

H.B. 3190 (Oliveira) – County Development Authority/Municipal Building Codes: would
authorize counties to regulate development and impose building codes in certain circumstances
in the unincorporated areas of the county and authorize a city in those counties to regulate
development and impose building codes in certain circumstances in the city’s extraterritorial
jurisdiction. (Companion bill is S.B. 1392 by Lucio.)

H.B. 3200 (Y. Davis) – Electric Reregulation: would, among other things: (1) grant to the
Texas Public Utility Commission (Commission) all necessary jurisdiction to take any action
necessary to effectuate the reregulation of retail electric service in an area in which customer
choice was introduced before January 1, 2012; (2) require the Commission to develop by rule an
integrated resource planning process to provide reliable energy service at the lowest reasonable
system cost; and (3) provide that the Commission may review the state’s transmission system
and make recommendations to electric utilities on the need to build new power lines, upgrade
power lines, and make other necessary improvements and additions.

H.B. 3201 (Y. Davis) – Property Tax: would require the Sunset Commission to evaluate each
property tax exemption provided by state statute at least once every six years and make
recommendations for retaining, repealing, or amending each exemption.

H.B. 3209 (Harless) – Computer Recycling: would create a penalty for the owner or operator
of a municipal solid waste landfill or incinerator who intentionally or knowingly accepts for
disposal or incineration used computer equipment that is eligible for collection under a
manufacturer’s recovery plan.
H.B. 3213 (Burnam) – Electric Aggregation: would provide that an electric aggregator may
not charge a residential customer a fee for consuming less than a minimum electricity
consumption amount set by the aggregator.

H.B. 3215 (Button) – Economic Development: would prohibit a type A or type B economic
development corporation from using revenue for the purpose of recruiting or relocating to the
corporation’s authorizing city a business located in a city in the same or an adjacent county as
the authorizing city.

H.B. 3216 (Otto) – Property Tax: would allow any notice, rendition, application form, or
completed application to be delivered in electronic format between a chief appraiser, an appraisal
district, or an appraisal review board and a property owner or person designated by a property
owner.

H.B. 3218 (Philips) – State Infrastructure Bank: would make various changes to the
administration, financing, and use of the State Infrastructure Bank, which provides loans to
public entities, including cities, to construct, maintain, or finance certain transportation projects.
Of particular interest to cities, the bill would provide that a public entity receiving financial
assistance waives sovereign immunity to suit for the purpose of adjudicating a claim for breach
of the terms of the financial assistance agreement. (Companion bill is S.B. 1395 by Williams.)

H.B. 3219 (Thompson) – Criminal Information: would require a law enforcement agency that
collects, maintains, or discloses intelligence data to: (1) follow extensive procedures when
collecting, maintaining, or disseminating information about individuals and criminal activity; (2)
send an annual report about this information and its use to the criminal justice committees of the
house and the senate; and (3) be subject to attorney general oversight.

H.B. 3223 (Hernandez Luna) – Elections: would provide that: (1) if an election judge cannot
practically direct any voters waiting to enter the polling place at closing time to vote while
closing the poll to others, the election judge shall compile a list of the names of each voter in line
at the time of closing and only permit entry to a person on the list; and (2) the presiding election
judge at a polling place must make an announcement at 6:45 p.m. to voters waiting to enter the
polling place that the time for closing the polls is in 15 minutes.

H.B. 3224 (Hernandez Luna) – Elections: would provide that an applicant’s voter registration
is effective on election day if: (1) the applicant’s registration application is approved; (2) the
applicant submitted the application not later than the 14th day before the first day of early voting
by personal appearance for that election; and (3) the applicant will be 18 years or older on
election day.

H.B. 3227 (Hernandez Luna) – Felony Forfeiture: would permit a law enforcement agency to
set aside up to ten percent of felony forfeiture funds for scholarships for the children of local
officers killed in the line of duty. (Companion bill is S.B. 168 by West.)
H.B. 3228 (Hernandez Luna) – DNA Records: would require a law enforcement agency that
submits a person’s DNA sample to the DNA laboratory of the U.S. Department of Justice or to a
public or private crime laboratory in the state to: (1) inform the laboratory as to whether the
person remains a suspect in a criminal investigation within two years of when the specimen is
submitted; and (2) seek the expunction of any DNA records of a person who is no longer
considered a suspect, if the suspicion of the person was the sole reason for the inclusion of those
records in a database.

H.B. 3229 (Hernandez Luna) – Employee Leave: would require an employer, including a city,
to: (1) allow an employee paid leave to attend court proceedings related to the crime of which the
employee was a victim; (2) not deduct such paid leave from the employee’s vacation time,
compensatory time off, or personal leave, unless required by a collective bargaining agreement;
and (3) not discriminate, suspend, or terminate an employee based on use of such paid leave.
(Companion is S.B. 64 by Zaffirini).

H.B. 3240 (Y. Davis) – E-verify: would: (1) require an employer, including a city: (a) to enroll
in E-verify; (b) receive E-verify training; and (c) post a notice regarding enrollment in E-verify;
(2) provide a complaint process for violations of E-verify requirements; (3) provide a civil
penalty and civil cause of action for violation of E-verify requirements; and (4) make it an
unlawful employment practice if an employer, including a city, that is participating in E-verify
makes an employment decision without following E-verify procedures.

H.B. 3242 (Woolley) – Seized Weapons: would: (1) require that a law enforcement agency
that seizes a weapon in connection with an offense under Chapter 46 of the Penal Code, which
establishes various weapons offenses, or that seizes a weapon while apprehending a person
believed to be mentally ill, shall hold the weapon and provide for disposition of the weapon in
accordance with Article 18.19 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, unless the weapon is a
prohibited weapon; (2) require prohibited weapons, as listed in Section 46.05 of the Penal Code,
to be disposed of pursuant to Article 18.18 of the Code of Criminal Procedure; (3) require that a
law enforcement officer provide written notice to a magistrate of weapons seized while
apprehending a person believed to be mentally ill, regardless of whether the seizure was pursuant
to a search warrant; (4) require a magistrate to make a determination about whether the return of
a weapon seized from a person believed to be mentally ill will pose a substantial risk of harm;
(5) provide that weapons seized and not requested to be returned and weapons that a magistrate
determines will pose a substantial risk of harm under (4), above, shall be destroyed or forfeited;
(6) establishes when a weapon may be returned to certain persons placed on deferred
adjudication for an offense involving the use of the weapon or convicted of certain weapons
offenses.

H.B. 3243 (Elkins) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) create a duty for a merchant to reasonably
cooperate with a police department in the investigation of a fraudulent or unauthorized
transaction on a debit, credit, or stored value card; (2) define “reasonably cooperate,” and (3)
authorize a financial institution to bring an action against a merchant that willfully refuses to
reasonably cooperate with a police department in an investigation of a fraudulent or unauthorized
charge.
H.B. 3246 (Elkins) – Public Improvement Districts: among other things, would: (1) allow a
public improvement district to include two or more noncontiguous areas separated by: (a) right-
of-way or other land dedicated to or owned, leased, or used by a political subdivision or other
governmental entity, tax-exempt entity, public or private utility, or railroad; or (b) not more than
1,000 feet, as measured in a straight line, between the nearest points on the property lines of the
closest situated noncontiguous areas; (2) add to the list of proper public improvement projects:
(a) the right to receive or provide utility service; (b) recreation facilities; (c) facilities and
equipment for firefighters, police, sheriffs, and emergency service providers; and (d) acquisition,
construction, maintenance, or improvement of buildings and other facilities commonly used for
teaching, research, or the preservation of knowledge by an institution of higher education or for
auxiliary purposes of the institution, including administration, student services and housing,
athletics, performing arts, and alumni support; and (3) authorize a city council to issue
certificates of obligation and revenue bonds, in addition to general obligation bonds that are
allowed under current law, to pay costs or refund any bonds or obligations relating to installment
sales contracts, reimbursement agreements, temporary notes, and time warrants.

H.B. 3248 (Elkins) – Electric Market: would provide that an entity – including municipally
owned utility – that offers to sell electricity in a wholesale energy market at a price of more than
$499 per megawatt hour shall disclose the offer to ERCOT at the time the entity makes the offer;
and (2) not more than 48 hours later, ERCOT shall post on its publicly-available Internet Web
site the identity of the entity that made the offer, the price at which the offer was made, and the
market location and period for which the offer was made.

H.B. 3252 (Chisum) – Immigration: would: (1) prohibit an employer, including a city, from
employing an undocumented immigrant; (2) create a complaint process, including hearings and
penalties, for employers that employ undocumented immigrants; and (3) provide immunity from
this type of violation if a city either: (a) received and documented information required by
federal law from the employee within four days of employment; or (b) used E-verify to verify
immigrant status.

H.B. 3253 (Martinez Fischer) – Property Tax: would require the chief appraiser to determine
that the market value of temporary production aircraft located in the state is ten percent of the
published “list price” for property tax purposes.

H.B. 3260 (Strama) – Energy Loans: would provide that a public utility, including a
municipally owned utility, may enter into a loan agreement with a customer to finance the
purchase and installation of an energy improvement for a commercial or residential building to
which the public utility provides service; and (2) provide certain limitations on the amount and
term of such a loan.

H.B. 3269 (Callegari) – Traffic-Control Signalization: would: (1) require grants awarded
under the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s new technology research and
development program (Health and Safety Code Chapter 387) be directed toward a balanced mix
of technologies including traffic-control signalization technologies and programs; and (2) require
the Department of Public Safety to conduct a study regarding the improvement of traffic-control
signalization that takes into account, among other things, the funding sources available to cities
wishing to implement new traffic control programs.

H.B. 3271 (Veasey) – Elections: would prohibit an election officer from removing electronic
voting system equipment or any component of the equipment from the polling place until the
close of voting.

H.B. 3273 (Ritter) – State Water Implementation Fund: would create a state water
implementation fund to be administered by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) to pay
the principal of and interest on, or to make payments under a bond enhancement agreement
entered into by the TWDB with respect to the principal of or interest on, bonds issued for certain
projects included in the state water plan. (Note: please see H.J.R. 138, below.)

H.B. 3275 (Coleman) – Special Districts: would:

   1. with regard to a municipal management district (MMD): (1) allow an MMD to be
      included in a tax increment reinvestment zone, a tax abatement reinvestment zone, an
      enterprise zone, or an industrial district; and (2) provide that a governmental act or
      proceeding of an MMD is presumed valid after the third anniversary of the effective date
      if no litigation is pending in regard to the act or proceeding;
   2. with regard to a public improvement district (PID), allow PIDs in certain counties to
      annex or exclude land and require consent by a city if certain powers have been delegated
      to the PID;
   3. with regard to county assistance districts: (1) provide that the order calling the election to
      create a county assistance district may not authorize a tax rate that would exceed the
      maximum combined rate of sale and use taxes imposed by political subdivisions
      prescribed by the Tax Code; (2) allow an area to be included in a county assistance
      district upon petition by the owners of the land in the area; (3) authorize county
      assistance districts to enter into agreements with cities including agreements regarding
      the duration, rate, and allocation of sales and use taxes; (4) authorize a county assistance
      district to define specific areas to pay for improvements, facilities or services and impose
      different rates of sales and use tax in those areas; and (5) allow a county assistance
      district to increase the rate of sales and use by order if the increased rate does not exceed
      the rate approved at an election;
   4. with regard to municipal utilities: (1) authorize a city to enter into a contract with a water
      district or nonprofit corporation under which the district or corporation will acquire for
      the benefit of and convey to the city one or more projects including a water supply or
      treatment system, a water distribution system, a sanitary sewage collection nor treatment
      system, works or improvements necessary for drainage of land, recreation facilities, roads
      and improvements in aid of roads, or facilities to provide firefighting services; and (2)
      allow a city to make payments under a contract described in (1), above, with revenues
      from city sales and use tax;
   5. with regard to reinvestment zones: (1) prohibit a city from designating a reinvestment
      zone if: (a) more than 30 percent of the property is used for residential purposes; or (b)
      the total appraised value of real property in the zone and existing zones exceeds 25
      percent of the total appraised value of real property in the city and in industrial districts
      created by the city, if the city has a population of 100,000 or more, or 50 percent of the
      total appraised value of taxable real property in the city and industrial districts created by
      the city, if the city has a population of less than 100,000; (2) prohibit a city from
      changing the boundaries of an existing reinvestment zone to include property in excess of
      the restriction on composition of a zone described in (1), above; (3) make changes
      regarding the composition of the board of directors of a reinvestment zone; (4) provide
      that a taxing unit’s payments into a tax increment fund may specify projects to which the
      taxing unit’s tax increment will be dedicated and that the taxing unit’s participation may
      be computed with respect to a base year later than the original base year of the zone; (5)
      change the amount certain school districts must pay into a tax increment fund dependent
      upon receipt of state aid to the district; (6) provide that a governmental act or proceeding
      of a city, the board of directors of a reinvestment zone, or an entity acting to operate or
      administer a reinvestment zone or implement a project plan or reinvestment zone
      financial plan under Chapter 311 of the Tax Code is presumed valid on the second
      anniversary of the effective date of the act or proceeding if there is no pending litigation
      regarding the act or proceeding; and
   6. with regard to special districts operating under Chapter 49 of the Water Code, provide
      that a peace officer contracted by the district through a city is an independent contractor
      and the district is responsible for the actions or omissions of the peace officer only to the
      extent provide by law for other independent contractors.

H.B. 3283 (Guillen) – Development Corporations: would expand the term “project,” in
relation to certain development corporations, to include the land, buildings, equipment, facilities,
improvements, and expenditures required for the development, operation, or expansion of
community libraries.

H.B. 3291 (Harper-Brown) – Health Benefits: would make it a deceptive trade practice for a
health benefit provider, including a government sponsored plan provider, to knowingly make a
false, misleading, or intimidating statement to an insured that would induce the consumer to
obtain prescription drugs from a specific pharmacy.

H.B. 3300 (Cain) – Unfunded Mandates: would: (1) establish the membership of an unfunded
mandates interagency work group; (2) provide that a political subdivision must comply with a
mandate only if the legislature has provided reimbursement; (3) require a state agency that
proposes to adopt or amend a rule that directly affects a political subdivision to solicit comments
and advice regarding the probable cost of the rule from advisory panels with expertise of the
affected subdivision and statewide organizations representing a substantial number of members
of each effected class of political subdivision; and (4) require the Legislative Budget Board to
establish procedures to examine each bill or constitutional amendment to identify and estimate
the impact of any unfunded mandates.

H.B. 3301 (Price) – Elections: would repeal the requirement that the general custodian of
election records conduct a manual count of all the races in at least one-percent of the election
precincts or in three precincts, whichever is greater, in which an electronic voting system was
used in order to ensure the accuracy of the tabulation of electronic voting system results.
H.B. 3306 (Marquez) – Expunction: would expand the situations in which a person convicted
of an offense may have all records and files expunged that relate to the arrest leading to that
conviction.

H.B. 3315 (Schwertner) – Property Tax: would provide that: (1) in order to qualify for a
property tax freeze for the elderly or disabled adopted by a city, and individual’s residence
homestead must both qualify: (a) for either the mandatory exemption of an additional $10,000 by
the school district or an optional exemption of at least an additional $3,000 by any other taxing
unit; and (b) for either the mandatory $3,000 exemption by the county for all homeowners or the
optional exemption of up to 20 percent of value by any other taxing unit for all homeowners; and
(2) if an individual who qualifies for either a mandatory exemption of an additional $10,000 by
the school district or an optional exemption of at least an additional $3,000 by any other taxing
unit dies in the first year in which the individual qualified for the exemption, the surviving
spouse of the individual is entitled to a property tax freeze if one has been adopted by a city.
(Note: please see H.J.R. 139, below)

H.B. 3320 (Hunter) – Vehicle Towing: would repeal Article 18.23 of the Code of Criminal
Procedure, which provides that a law enforcement agency must, in some circumstances, pay the
cost of towing and storing a motor vehicle when the agency directs the towing and storage for
evidentiary or examination purposes.

H.B. 3324 (McClendon) – Criminal Information: would require a law enforcement agency
that collects, maintains, or discloses intelligence data to: (1) follow extensive procedures when
collecting, maintaining, or disseminating information about individuals and criminal activity; (2)
send an annual report about this information and its use to the criminal justice committees of the
house and the senate; and (3) be subject to attorney general oversight.

H.B. 3332 (Pena) – Elections: would allow a poll watcher to serve at the polling place during
the hours the watcher chooses.

H.B. 3334 (Pena) – Vehicle Towing: would provide, in relation to an incident management tow
when the operator of the vehicle is present, that the tow truck operator: (1) present a schedule of
fees to the owner or operator of the vehicle; (2) obtain the name, phone, and address of the owner
or operator of the vehicle; (3) give the owner or operator of the vehicle an information statement
including the name and address of the tow company, the permit number of the tow truck
certificate, the license plate number of the tow truck, the person authorizing the tow, the total
charged for the tow, and the daily rate for vehicle storage and recovery fees associated with the
tow; (4) keep the statement describe in (3), above, for one year after the tow and make it
available to law enforcement upon request; and (5) submit a monthly report to the Texas
Department of Licensing and Regulation regarding each commercial carrier vehicle towed.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1321 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 3337 (V. Gonzales) – Emergency Medical Services: would provide that an emergency
medical services provider has a lien on a cause of action or claim of an individual who receives
emergency medical services for injuries caused by an accident that is attributed to the negligence
of another person.
H.B. 3338 (Smithee) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would: (1) allow a participating
Texas Municipal Retirement System (TMRS) city to adopt a non-retroactive flat rate Cost of
Living Adjustment (COLA); (2) to comply with federal law applicable to qualified plans,
provide that any increased payment to an annuitant resulting from such a COLA adopted by a
city would be limited to the cumulative increase the annuitant would have been entitled to
receive if the 70 percent of CPI limit under TMRS’s existing law had been applied to the
annuity; and (3) require that, if a city adopts an ordinance to either discontinue an annually
repeating COLA or to reduce an annually repeating COLA, the city must give written notice to
members and annuitants at least 60 days prior to the effective date of the change adopted in the
ordinance. (Companion bill is S.B. 642 by Seliger.)

H.B. 3367 (White) – Sales Tax: would repeal all laws relating to the imposition of property
taxes and expand the applicability of state and local sales and use taxes to replace property tax
revenue.

H.B. 3372 (T. King) – Harvested Rainwater: would authorize the use of harvested rainwater
for drinking water and other potable uses in a structure connected to a public water supply
system.

H.B. 3383 (Madden) – DNA Evidence: would: (1) authorize a police department to send DNA
evidence from certain property crimes to a private, accredited DNA laboratory for analysis; (2)
require the police department to pay all costs of the analysis if it is sent to a private lab under that
provision; (3) require a public DNA laboratory to do quality assurance reviews of the private
DNA laboratories in the area, to be paid for in forensic analysis services by the private DNA
laboratory, if the public laboratory lacks the resources.

H.B. 3385 (Madden) – Juveniles: would require school districts and other agencies and courts
that deal with juveniles and juvenile offenders to share more records with other agencies and
courts that deal with juveniles and juvenile offenders. (Companion bill is S.B. 1106 by Harris.)

H.B. 3387 (Rodriguez) – Farmers’ Markets: would: (1) regulate various aspects of the
preparation, storage, distribution and sale of food at farmers’ markets; (2) prohibit a local
enforcement agency from mandating a specific method for complying with temperature control
requirements for food prepared on-site or transported to the farmers’ market; and (3) prohibit a
local enforcement agency from adopting a rule requiring the farmers’ market to pay a permit fee
for conducting a cooking demonstration or providing samples of food for educational purposes.

H.B. 3388 (Fletcher) – Fireworks: would provide that the transport of fireworks in unopened
and original packaging may not be prohibited or regulated.

H.B. 3391 (D. Miller) – Harvested Rainwater: would: (1) encourage a city to promote
rainwater harvesting through incentives such as the provision at a discount of rain barrels or
rebates for water storage facilities; (2) require any city that has adopted impervious cover or
density restrictions to consider the use of harvested rainwater as an on-site water supply source
in determining whether to grant the development a credit against or exemption from the
restrictions; (3) require each member of the permitting staff of a city located wholly or partly in
an area designated as a priority groundwater management area or any city with a population of
more than 100,000 to receive mandatory training on rainwater harvesting at least once every five
years; and (4) prohibit a city from denying a building permit solely because the facility will
implement rainwater harvesting.

H.B. 3394 (Oliveira) – County Development Authority: would make various changes to the
statute that allows certain counties to enforce building codes in certain circumstances, including
provisions that would provide that: (1) if a city located within a county to which the bill applies
has adopted a building code in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction, the building code adopted
by the city controls and county building codes have no effect in the city’s extraterritorial
jurisdiction, provided that the city actively and diligently enforces its adopted building code
within its extraterritorial jurisdiction; and (2) a utility may not serve or connect a residential
dwelling or unit of a residential dwelling with water, sewer, electricity, or gas service unless the
entity receives a determination from the commissioners court that the residential dwelling or unit
is in compliance with the county’s regulations. (Companion bill is S.B. 1362 by Lucio.) (Note:
please see S.J.R. 40, below.)

H.B. 3396 (Hernandez Luna) -- Security Breach: would increase the penalty for the offense of
breach of computer security if the breach involves a government-owned computer facility or a
critical infrastructure facility. (Companion bill is S.B. 808 by Seliger).

H.B. 3402 (Coleman) -- Mandatory Health Benefit: would: (1) create a health insurance
exchange; (2) require certain health benefits carriers to pay the same rate or have the same cost-
sharing arrangements for non-network providers of emergency care as network providers; (3)
prohibit some health benefits carriers from requiring preauthorization for emergency services;
(4) require certain health care plans to allow an individual to use any primary care physician they
choose; (5) limit the reasons why an insurer can rescind health insurance; (6) prohibit a health
benefit provider, including a risk pool, from denying or limiting coverage for a preexisting
condition with respect to an individual who is 19 years of age or younger; (7) require a health
benefit provider, including a risk pool: (a) to approve enrollment for a minor child of an enrollee;
(b) to offer child only plans or lose the ability to offer any plans; (c) to require a deductible or
other cost sharing provision applicable to a preventative item or service, an immunization, or
screenings; or (d) impose a lifetime maximum benefit or coverage amount. (Companion bill is
S.B. 1782 by Ellis).

H.B. 3405 (Chisum) – Scrap Tires: would, before a land reclamation project using scrap tires
may begin, require: (1) a permit for the project from the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ); (2) notice to the governing body of a city if the project is located in its
corporate limits or ETJ; and (3) comments or suggestions from the city’s governing body to the
TCEQ regarding the project. (Companion bill is S.B. 1471 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 3407 (L. Taylor) – Gas Rates: would provide that: (1) in establishing a gas utility’s rates,
the regulatory authority (e.g., a city or the Public Utility Commission) may not allow the utility
to recover through its rates the attorney’s fees or other expenses incurred by any party in a rate
proceeding or in an appeal of a rate proceeding; and (2) a court may not award to a party the
right to recover through a gas utility’s rates the attorney’s fees or other expenses incurred by any
party in a rate proceeding conducted or in an appeal of a rate proceeding.

H.B. 3411 (L. Gonzales) – Sales Tax: would expand the definition of “tangible personal
property” to include a computer program and a telephone prepaid calling card for sales tax
purposes. (Companion bill is S.B. 1519 by Uresti.)

H.B. 3422 (Lozano) – Law Enforcement: would allow a city law enforcement agency to use
unclaimed proceeds from the sale of certain motor vehicles to compensate property owners
whose property is damaged as a result of a pursuit involving the law enforcement agency,
regardless of the agency’s liability.

H.B. 3434 (Raymond) – Municipal Court Education: would: (1) prohibit the court of criminal
appeals from adopting rules that require judges to complete continuing judicial training more
frequently than every two years; (2) create requirements for the timing and contents of judicial
training; and (3) prohibit the court of criminal appeals from approving an organization to sponsor
continuing judicial training for judges in the state unless the organization provides training to
municipal, county court, statutory county court, and district judges.

H.B. 3442 (J. Jackson) – Juveniles: would authorize a municipal court exercising jurisdiction
over a juvenile in a truancy case to access confidential information from the Department of
Public Safety’s juvenile justice information system. (Companion bill is S.B. 1241 by West.)

H.B. 3448 (Aliseda) – Elections: would require an application form for an early voting mail
ballot to include: (1) a statement informing the applicant of the eligibility requirements for early
voting by mail; and (2) a statement informing the applicant of the offense and penalty associated
with providing false information on an application.

H.B. 3449 (Christian) – Oil and Gas Waste: would require any person who applies for a
permit to use land application to treat and dispose of certain oil and gas wastes to provide written
notice to, among others, the mayor of each city in the area in which the ground application will
occur.

H.B. 3450 (Farrar) – Animal Shelters: would: (1) provide that it is the intent of the state to
curtail the killing of savable animals; (2) define “public sheltering agency” (agency) as any
animal shelter or animal adoption group that receives city funding and/or has a contract with a
city under which it accepts stray or owner-relinquished animals; (3) prohibit, with some
exceptions, an agency from selling, adopting, or giving away an animal that has not been spayed
or neutered; (4) provide that a person is subject to civil penalties for falsifying certain spaying or
neutering records and issuing a check for insufficient funds for a spaying or neutering deposit
and that all penalties collected must be retained by the agency bringing the action; (5) exempt a
“feral cat caregiver” from any provision of law that prescribes their feeding or harboring the cats
or limits the number of cats the person can own; (6) prohibit, with some exceptions, an agency
from providing traps to the public to capture cats; (7) subject a person to civil penalties for using
a trap from an agency in an unauthorized manner and provide that all penalties collected must be
retained by the agency bringing the action; (8) require, with some exceptions, a minimum 5-day
holding period for stray animals impounded by an agency; (9) provide special provisions for
owner-relinquished animals; (10) mandate that agencies that kill animals keep a registry of
organizations that will accept animals for the purpose of adoption; (11) prohibit an agency from
killing an animal unless reasonable attempts are made to notify organizations on the registry in
(10), above; (12) mandate that an agency take action to check an animal for identification,
maintain continuously updated lists of animals reported lost, and post all stray animals on the
Internet; (13) require an agency to take and record certain actions to notify an owner of a lost
animal; (14) prohibit an agency from limiting adoption of an animal based on criteria such as
breed, age, or color; (15) require an agency to provide certain public services; (16) prohibit the
procurement or use of a living animal from an agency for medical or biological teaching,
research, or study; (17) forbid hospitals, education or commercial institutions, labs, or animal
dealers from purchasing or accepting animals from an agency, peace officer, or animal control
officer; (18) prohibit an agency, peace officer, or animal control officer from selling, adopting,
transferring, or giving away a living animal to those listed in (17), above; (19) establish
preconditions for euthanasia and euthanasia procedures; (18) establish certain reporting
requirements for an agency; and (20) authorize any appropriate remedy at law to compel
compliance with the bill’s provisions.

H.B. 3452 (Anchia) – Public Improvement Districts: would: (1) authorize a city council to
undertake an improvement project that confers a special benefit on properties that have a
common land use or other common characteristic; (2) expand the list of permissible public
improvements to include the costs of operating and maintaining mass transportation facilities
financed with public improvement district assessments; (3) for any project to be financed
through a deferred payment, require a governing body to prepare an estimate of the appraised
value of the properties in the district and the cost of the improvement before the improvement is
constructed and before a hearing is held; and (4) provide that interest shall accrue on an
assessment or deferred assessment.

H.B. 3474 (Gallego) – Alcohol Offenses: would: (1) expand the offense of “public
intoxication” to include the consumption, possession or purchase of an alcoholic beverage in a
public place by any person younger than twenty-one; (2) expand the definition of “public place”
to include any premises that is accessible by two or more unrelated persons under twenty-one
years old and on which any one of those persons possesses alcohol; (3) create an exception to
prosecution in certain cases for the offense of public intoxication if the person is under twenty-
one and requested emergency medical assistance in response to the possible overdose of the
minor or another person; and (4) require a judge to, in certain situations, require the defendant to
perform community service and attend alcohol awareness classes.

H.B. 3475 (Gallego) – Municipal Judges: would: (1) create a process for a motion for recusal
or disqualification of a municipal judge in a specific case; (2) require that, before further
proceedings in a case where such a motion has been filed, the judge recuse or disqualify himself
or herself or forward the motion to be heard by either the presiding municipal judge in the city or
the county judge; (3) if the judge recuses or disqualifies himself or herself, require the judge to
enter an order of recusal or disqualification and request that the case be heard by either the
presiding judge of the city or another city’s municipal judge as assigned by the county judge; (4)
authorize a judge hearing a motion to recuse who finds that the motion was made solely for the
purpose of delay to find the movant in contempt; and (5) require the city secretary of a city with
a municipal court to notify the Texas Judicial Council of the name of each person who is elected
or appointed as mayor, municipal court judge, or clerk of a municipal court, within thirty days of
the person’s election, appointment, or vacancy from office.

H.B. 3479 (Christian) – Sales Tax: would provide that: (1) the sales tax rate is one percent of
the sales price of tangible personal property purchased by a qualifying data center that is
necessary to manage or operate the data center; and (2) local sales taxes are inapplicable to
tangible personal property purchased by a qualifying data center that is necessary to manage or
operate the data center.

H.B. 3480 (Christian) – TCEQ Enforcement: would prohibit the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality (TCEQ) from imposing a standard or requirement to regulate an activity
under the TCEQ’s jurisdiction that is more stringent than the minimum acceptable standard or
requirement under the applicable federal law or a regulation adopted by the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency to regulate the same activity.

H.B. 3483 (Christian) – Sale of Residential Real Property: would require a person who sells
an interest in residential real property to give the purchaser written notice specifying the nature
of any contamination on or under the property, including the contaminant, the source (if known),
and the location and extent of the contaminant, but would exclude certain property transfers from
the notice requirement, including property transferred to or from a governmental entity.

H.B. 3485 (V. Taylor) – Search and Rescue Animals: would allow the use of human remains
in the training of search and rescue animals by persons certified by a state or local law
enforcement agency to train such animals.

H.B. 3486 (V. Taylor) – Search and Rescue Animals: would prohibit a city from adopting or
enforcing an ordinance, including a leash law, that restricts the ability of a volunteer search and
rescue team to train a service dog for search and rescue or law enforcement purposes.

H.B. 3487 (V. Taylor) – Law Enforcement Canine: would prohibit a commercial lodging
establishment or restaurant from requiring the payment of extra money or a deposit for a service
canine that accompanies an individual to the establishment or restaurant if the individual is a
peace officer or firefighter assigned to a canine unit, a search and rescue canine handler
participating in a search and rescue under authority of a law enforcement agency, or away from
home in the course and scope of duty because of a declared disaster or mutual aid request or
training.

H.B. 3488 (Menendez) – Property Tax: would require an applicant for a property tax
exemption for the residence homestead of an elderly or disabled person who is not specifically
listed on a deed or other recorded instrument to provide an affidavit or other compelling
evidence establishing the applicant’s ownership of an interest in the homestead.

H.B. 3492 (Coleman) – County Development Authority:                  would provide that the
commissioners court of a county may adopt: (1) regulations to establish and ensure compliance
with requirements for a buffer zone between an industrial use and a residential or civic use; (2) a
comprehensive plan for the unincorporated area of the county; and (3) a roadway cost recovery
fee. The bill would also impose detailed procedures on a county that takes advantage of the
authority.

H.B. 3495 (Coleman) -- Workers Compensation: would extend workers compensation
benefits to the spouse of a deceased peace officer killed in the line of duty if the spouse: (1)
remarries; and (2) the remarriage ends in death or divorce.

H.B. 3497 (Darby) – Elections: would: (1) before the tenth day after the local canvass is
conducted, require the general custodian of election records to notify the presiding officer of the
local canvassing authority of any discovery of legal ballots that were not counted and included in
the local canvass; (2) require a presiding officer who is notified of uncounted ballots to apply to
a district court of the county in which the canvassing authority is located for disposition of the
ballots; and (3) require the district court to hold a hearing on the application and take any
necessary action to include legal ballots that were not counted in the results of the election.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1675 by Duncan.)

H.B. 3502 (Raymond) – Precious Metals Dealers: would, among other things, provide that the
governing body of a city may license, tax, suppress, prevent, or otherwise regulate cash-for-gold
establishments.

H.B. 3510 (Hamilton) – Vehicle Towing: would: (1) require the Texas Commission of
Licensing and Regulation to adopt requirements for a consent tow, private property tow, and
incident management tow; (2) impose certain requirements regarding the renewal of a license
under Occupations Code Chapter 2308 relating to towing and booting; (3) require a towing
company to file a fee schedule with the Department of Licensing and Regulation at various
times; (4) provide that a boot operator may boot a vehicle in certain circumstances only if the
parking facility owner requests the boot or has a standing written agreement with the boot
operator; and (5) require certain signage before the towing or booting of vehicles under certain
circumstances. (Companion bill is S.B. 1371 by Carona.)

H.B. 3518 (Rodriguez) – Local Option Transportation Funding: would enact the Texas
Local Option Transportation Act. Specifically, the bill would – among many other things: (1)
authorize new transportation funding methods, including a county tax on the sale of motor
vehicle fuel at a rate not to exceed ten cents per gallon and a local-option mobility improvement
fee in an amount not to exceed $60; (2) provide that the commissioners court of a county by
order may call an election on the issue of authorizing one or more funding methods under the bill
for one or more mobility projects located in the county; and (3) provide that a county may not be
penalized with a reduction in traditional transportation funding because of the imposition of a
method of local-option funding under the bill.

H.B. 3520 (Hughes) – Advance Directives: would amend various provisions of the Advance
Directives Act (Chapter 166, Health and Safety Code) and related statutes to ensure that when an
attending physician is unwilling to administer certain treatments, life-sustaining medical
treatment will be provided until the patient can be transferred to a health care provider willing to
provide the treatment requested.

H.B. 3522 (Bonnen) – EMS: would make aggravated assault on emergency services personnel
while the person is providing emergency services a felony of the first degree.

H.B. 3523 (Bonnen) – Municipal Code Enforcement: would: (1) specifically override the
section of the Texas Local Government Code allowing a city to set a fine of up to $2,000 for the
violation of a rule, ordinance, or police regulation that governs fire safety, zoning, or public
health and sanitation; and (2) require that any Class C misdemeanor that is punishable by fine be
punished only by a fine between $25 and $500.

H.B. 3526 (Y. Davis) – Warrants: would require, for warrants issued for the arrest of a person
alleged to have violated certain protective orders for victims of family violence, that the arresting
officer attach to the warrant a written statement identifying the victim of the alleged offense, if
that information is available to the officer.

H.B. 3527 (Y. Davis) – Traffic Fines: would allow a city of less than 5,000 to retain more
money from fines and expenses collected for certain traffic violations if the money is used for
fire, rescue, and emergency medical services.

H.B. 3530 (Ritter) – Texas Water Development Board: this is the Texas Water Development
Board (TWDB) sunset bill. The bill would, among other provisions: (1) require the TWDB to
develop and implement a policy to encourage the use of negotiated rulemaking and alternative
dispute resolution procedures; (2) make changes to the manner in which defaults on TWDB
financial assistance is handled by the board; (3) require the TWDB to create a uniform water use
calculation system for municipal water use and require that the system be used in water
conservation plans and certain other reports required by statute; (4) require the executive
administrator of the TWDB to designate the director of the Texas Natural Resources Information
System to serve as the state geographic information officer and, among other duties, support the
geographic data needs of emergency management responders during emergencies; (5) require the
TWDB to establish advisory committees, including local governmental representative members,
to assist the board with state geographic data issues; (6) require regional water plans to be
consistent with the desired future conditions adopted for the relevant aquifers located in the
regional water planning area; (7) require notice of any meeting or hearing at which the board will
consider or take public comments on the desired future condition for an aquifer to be posted in
several places at least ten days before the hearing; (8) create several new issues that must be
considered in the determination of an aquifer’s desired future condition; and (9) create a public
comment period and public hearing requirement before any vote on the proposed desired future
conditions for an aquifer, and require that an explanatory report be distributed after the adoption
of the desired future conditions. (Companion bill is S.B. 660 by Hinojosa.)

H.B. 3534 (Kleinschmidt) – Permit Vesting: would provide that a political subdivision,
including a city, is liable for damages related to a violation of Chapter 245 of the Local
Government Code (the “permit vesting” statute).
H.B. 3535 (Kleinschmidt) – Permit Vesting: would provide that: (1) a political subdivision,
including a city, that violates Chapter 245 of the Local Government Code (the “permit vesting”
statute) is liable to the state for a civil penalty in an amount of $2,000 per day of violation; and
(2) the attorney general may recover a penalty in a suit brought on behalf of the state, with
money collected being paid to the comptroller for deposit in the general revenue fund.

H.B. 3540 (Phillips) – Property Tax: would, among other things: (1) require each appraisal
district, assessor, and collector to use software certified by the comptroller in connection with the
appraisal of property for tax purposes; (2) provide that an appraisal district is governed by a
board of seven directors, two of whom are elected at the general election for state and county
officers by the voters of the county for which the district is established, and five of whom are
appointed by the taxing units that participate in the district; (3) provide for the election of the
chief appraiser at the general election for state and county officers by the voters of the county for
which the appraisal district is established; (4) require the county judge of each county for which
an appraisal district was established shall appoint an attorney as protest hearing officer to
mediate protest hearings conducted by the appraisal review board.

H.B. 3543 (Farrar) – Environmental Enforcement: would require that criminal convictions
relating to compliance with rules and statutes under the jurisdiction of the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality (TCEQ) from a local government to which the TCEQ refers complaints
for investigation be considered when the TCEQ is examining compliance history.

H.B. 3547 (Alvarado) – Day Care: would provide that: (1) a city or a county may enforce state
law and rules adopted under state law concerning fire safety standards at a licensed group day-
care home or a registered family home; and (2) a city or county shall report to the Department of
Family and Protective Services any violation of fire safety standards observed by the city or
county at a licensed group day-care home or registered family home. (Companion bill is S.B.
1745 by Gallegos.)

H.B. 3550 (Fletcher) – Court Fees: would: (1) create a law enforcement fee of between $500
and $2000 to be paid upon conviction of certain commercial motor vehicle offenses; and (2)
require that any revenue collected from the law enforcement fee be deposited in the general
revenue fund for law enforcement purposes.

H.B. 3552 (Garza) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that a community housing development
organization improving property for low-income and moderate-income housing is considered to
own property for tax exemption purposes if the organization has legal or equitable title to the
property; and (2) provide that an organization constructing or rehabilitating low-income housing
is considered to own property for tax exemption purposes if the organization has legal or
equitable title to the property.

H.B. 3555 (Riddle) – Impact Fees: would provide that an institution of higher education is not
required to pay impact fees, unless the governing body of the institution consents to the payment
of the fees by entering a contract with the political subdivision that imposes the fees.
H.B. 3557 (Lucio) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require a health benefit plan to provide
coverage for autism spectrum disorder until the individual is 17 years of age. (Companion bill is
S.B. 441 by Lucio.)

H.B. 3575 (Thompson) – Gambling: would provide for the operation of casino gaming by
Indian tribes on certain land and authorize a tribe to direct, in the gaming compact with the state,
a portion of the state’s revenue be paid to local governments for government services that benefit
the general public (including public safety), mitigate the impacts of gaming, or promote
commerce and economic development.

H.B. 3576 (Thompson) – Gambling: would: (1) provide for the operation of casino gaming by
Indian tribes on certain land and by operators at horse and greyhound racetracks and licensed
locations; (2) authorize a tribe to direct, in the gaming compact with the state, a portion of the
state’s revenue be paid to local governments for government services that benefit the general
public (including public safety), mitigate the impacts of gaming, or promote commerce and
economic development.

H.B. 3582 (Harless) – Elections: would provide that the allocation of election expenses in a
joint election involving a school district must provide that the school district is responsible only
for the proportion of election expenses that correspond to the total number of registered voters in
the school district as compared to the total numbers of registered voters of all political
subdivisions participating in the election. (Companion bill is S.B. 477 by Patrick.)

H.B. 3583 (Harless) – Coin-Operated Machines: would: (1) provide that information
regarding certain coin-operated machines derived from a book, record, report, or application that
must be made available to a peace officer is confidential, unless it is specifically designated as a
public record; (2) require an owner or operator of a music, or skill, or coin-operated machine
who is required to hold a license or registration certificate to prominently display any certificate
of occupancy or certificate of compliance issued by a city for the premises; (3) make failure to
comply with (2), above, a criminal offense; (4) provide that a peace officer may enter the
premises of a license or registration certificate holder during normal business hours and any
other time a music or skill or pleasure coin-operated machine is available for use; (5) make a
knowing denial or hindrance of entry described in (4), above, a criminal offense; (6) authorize a
peace officer to seal a coin-operated machine under certain circumstances; (7) provide that is an
offense to: (a) falsify, fail to maintain, or refuse or fail to make available certain records of a
coin-operated machine to a peace officer; (b) mislead a peace officer in connection with the
enforcement of certain regulations regarding coin-operated machines; (c) break a seal that is
attached by a peace officer; and (d) remove a coin-operated machine from the location where a
peace officer affixed a seal to a machine.

H.B. 3585 (V. Taylor) – Elections: would implement the federal Military and Overseas Voter
Empowerment Act by requiring the early voting clerk to make registration and absentee ballots
available to overseas military voters in an election held in conjunction with an election involving
a federal or statewide office.

H.B. 3592 (D. Howard) – Fire Flow: would require the Lower Colorado River Authority to
ensure that for any area in which the authority owns or operates the local water supply system,
the water pressure for service to fire hydrants in the area is adequate to protect public safety.

H.B. 3598 (Huberty) – Arson: would require a criminal registration procedure for a convicted
arsonist that is similar to the current sex offender registration program, including required
registration with and required tracking and reporting by a local law enforcement agency.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1191 by Gallegos.)

H.B. 3600 (Garza) – Solid Waste: would subject a private entity that contracts to provide
temporary solid waste disposal services to a construction project to the requirements of Health
and Safety Code Section 364.034 which would give cities increased authority over such
contracts, including the ability to charge certain fees and enforce fee collection.

H.B. 3603 (Garza) – Municipal Court Building Security Fund: would authorize the use of
funds from a city’s municipal court building security fund for warrant officers and related
equipment. (This bill is identical to S.B. 1521 by Uresti.)

H.B. 3604 (Smithee) – Construction Contracts: would provide that a construction insurance
provision is void and unenforceable to the extent that it requires that: (1) a person, including an
indemnitee under an indemnification agreement, be an additional insured; or (2) the insurance
policy be endorsed to provide a waiver of subrogation. The bill would also provide that the bill’s
limitations may not be waived by contract or otherwise.

H.B. 3606 (Kuempel) – Impact Fees: would provide that a political subdivision or other
governmental entity that levies or collects an ad valorem tax is not required to pay impact fees,
unless the governing body of the political subdivision or other governmental entity consents to
the payment of the fees by entering a contract with the political subdivision that imposes the
fees. The contract may contain terms the governing body considers advisable to provide for the
payment of the fees.

H.B. 3607 (Kuempel) – Construction Manager-At-Risk: would provide that: (1) a
construction manager-at-risk contract may not be awarded to: (a) a governmental entity’s
engineer, architect, construction manager-agent, or program director; or (b) a sole proprietor,
corporation, partnership, limited liability company, or other entity that is a subsidiary, parent
corporation, or partner or has any other relationship in which the governmental entity’s engineer,
architect, construction manager-agent, or program director has an ownership interest, or is
subject to common ownership or control, or is party to an agreement by which it will receive any
proceeds of the construction manager-at-risk’s payments from the governmental entity; (2) a
contract awarded in violation of the bill is void as contrary to public policy; and (3) the bill does
not apply to: (a) a public corporation in which three percent or less of the outstanding stock is
owned by a governmental entity’s architect or engineer; or (b) a person who enters into a joint
venture for a project or contract unrelated to the current project for which a construction
manager-at-risk is being selected.

H.B. 3610 (Thompson) – Streamlined Electric Ratemaking: would provide that: (1) the
Public Utility Commission or a regulatory authority (e.g., a city), on the petition of an electric
utility, may approve a tariff or rate schedule in which a nonfuel rate may be periodically adjusted
upward or downward based on changes in the utility’s investment; (2) a periodic rate adjustment
must: (a) be approved in compliance with an expedited procedure that provides for appropriate
updates of information and allows for participation by the Office of Public Utility Counsel and
affected parties; (b) take into account the effect that changes in the number of an electric utility’s
customers, energy consumption, and energy demand have on the amount of revenue recovered
through the electric utility’s base rates; (c) be consistent with the manner in which costs were
allocated to each rate class, as approved by the commission, in an electric utility’s most recent
base rate proceeding; (d) not diminish the ability of the commission, on its own motion or on
complaint by an affected person, after reasonable notice and hearing, to change the existing rates
of an electric utility for a service after finding that the rates are unreasonable or in violation of
law; and (e) be applied by an electric utility on a system-wide basis; (3) an electric utility in the
ERCOT power region, or an unbundled electric utility outside the ERCOT power region in
whose service area retail competition is available, that requests a periodic rate adjustment under
the bill shall: (a) with some exceptions, and to the extent possible, combine all nonfuel rates to
be adjusted in a 12-month period that are charged by the utility to retail electric providers into a
single, annual rate adjustment; and (b) finalize the resulting rates and provide notice to retail
electric providers of the resulting rates not later than the 45th day before the date the rates take
effect; (4) a periodic rate adjustment approved under the bill may not be used to adjust a nonfuel
rate relating to the generation of electricity; and (5) the commission shall adopt rules necessary
to implement the bill. (Companion bill is S.B. 1087 by Carona.)

H.B. 3614 (Hughes) – Property Tax: would change the amount of interest that a city making a
refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an
annual rate that is equal to the auction average rate quoted on a bank discount basis for three-
month treasury bills issued by the federal government.

H.B. 3615 (Hughes) – Property Tax: would prohibit the chief appraiser from increasing the
appraised value of a property in the three tax years following a year in which a property’s
appraised value was reduced in an appeal, unless an increase by the chief appraiser is supported
by clear and convincing evidence.

H.B. 3617 (Madden) -- State Commissions on Public Safety: would abolish the Texas
Commission on Fire Protection, the Texas Commission on Jail Standards, and the Commission
on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education and create the Public Safety Licensing
Commission. (Companion bill is S.B. 1585 by Ogden).

H.B. 3622 (R. Anderson) – Death of a Pet: would make a person liable for intentionally or
negligently causing the death of a pet, but except from this liability the official act or omission of
a nonprofit or governmental unit.

H.B. 3627 (Aliseda) – Elections: would allow an individual to use a mechanical or electronic
means of recording images or sound while at a polling station only if the recording does not
affect the confidentiality of a voter and the voter’s ballot, as determined by the presiding judge.
H.B. 3632 (Hamilton) – Fireworks: would provide that Occupations Code Chapter 2154
governs the regulation of fireworks except that: (1) a city may regulate the sale and use of
fireworks within its city limits and its existing ETJ, if the city prohibited fireworks in the ETJ
before September 1, 2011; (2) after September 1, 2011, a city may not, after annexing an area,
adopt a regulation to prohibit continuing to use the land for the sale and possession of legal
fireworks or beginning to use the land for those purposes, if that use was planned before the 90th
day before the effective date of annexation.

H.B. 3635 (Dutton) -- Sexually Oriented Businesses: would: (1) create a registration and
inspection process for sexually oriented businesses; and (2) impose a tax on these businesses.

H.B. 3636 (Hamilton) – Culverts and Drainage Systems: would, in relation to culverts and
other enclosed flood or drainage systems, require a local government entity: (1) to ensure that
the system is protected by a bar, grate, or covering; (2) to post a sign warning of the hazard for a
child; and (3) to provide a hinged or similar opening to permit emergency services personnel to
access the system.

H.B. 3649 (Otto) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) make changes to the way that grants are
allocated by the Automobile Burglary and Theft Prevention Authority, including changing from
distribution based on geographic rates of auto theft to statewide rates; and (2) authorize the
Texas Commission on Jail Standards to set and collect a reasonable fee to cover the cost of
performing any re-inspection of a municipal jail operated for a city by a private vendor as
required by state law. (Companion bill is S.B. 1583 by Ogden.)

H.B. 3657 (Otto) – Jails: would: (1) authorize the Commission on Jail Standards to set and
collect a reasonable fee to cover the cost of performing any re-inspection of certain city jails that
is required by state law or commission rule or upon request by the city; and (2) repeal provisions
in Government Code section 511.0091 that limit the fees that can be collected by the commission
for the review of construction documents and occupancy and annual inspections.

H.B. 3658 (Otto) – Municipal Court Staff Education: would: (1) specify that the judicial and
court personnel training fund is an account in the general revenue fund which may be
appropriated only to the court of criminal appeals for judicial and court staff training; and (2)
eliminate the current provision requiring any unexpended balance in excess of $500,000 at the
end of each fiscal year to be transferred to the general revenue fund.

H.B. 3659 (Otto) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would require a public retirement
system, including the Texas Municipal Retirement System, to annually pay the State Pension
Review Board fifty cents for each member account.

H.B. 3667 (Pena) -- Immigration: would: (1) prohibit an employer, including a city, from
hiring undocumented immigrants; and (2) impose a fine for knowingly employing an
undocumented immigrant.

H.B. 3668 (Callegari) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity (CCNs): would: (1)
authorize the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to grant a CCN to a retail
public utility within city limits or a city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) if, after 180 days have
passed since a formal request for a CCN for the area was filed, the city is does not enter into a
binding agreement to provide service to the area or the city has refused to provide the service
applied for as evidenced by a formal vote or formal notification by the city; (2) require the
TCEQ to require as a term of the CCN granted within a city’s city limits or ETJ that the
authorized water and sewer facilities be designed and constructed in compliance with the city’s
standards for such facilities; (3) authorize a landowner to elect to exclude some or all of his
property from a city’s CCN expansion beyond its ETJ, but exempt the utility from any
requirement to provide water or sewer service to that excluded area in the future, including the
violation of law or commission rules by the water or sewer system of another person; (4) allow a
landowner to apply for expedited release from a CCN, even if the CCN holder is a borrower
under a federal loan program; (5) require a landowner applying for expedited CCN release to
include information about cost of service provision for the proposed alternate service provider
and requested infrastructure needs, including fire flow, and require the holder of the CCN from
which the landowner is requesting release to prove that it can provide comparable service at
approximately the same cost as the proposed alternative service provider; and (6) authorize the
TCEQ to find only that a proposed alternative service provider is capable of providing the
requested service in order to release a property from another CCN where the holder of that CCN
has never made service available through planning, design, construction of facilities, or
contractual obligations to serve the area the petitioner seeks to have released.

H.B. 3675 (Eiland) – Assessment on Video Providers: would: (1) impose on each video
provider (e.g., cable television services and similar services, as well as satellite service) a state
“assessment” of 6-1/4 percent of gross revenues derived from the provision of subscription video
services in this state (but excluding Internet service); (2) define “gross revenues;” (3) provide
that each video provider is entitled to a credit against the assessment imposed under this bill for
state or local franchise fees paid to cities; (4) provide that the total credit claimed on an
assessment report may not exceed the amount of the assessment due for the report; (5) provide
that the assessment imposed by the bill is due and payable to the comptroller on or before the last
day of the first month following the end of each calendar quarter; (6) require a provider on whom
the assessment is imposed by the bill to maintain the necessary records (which shall be open to
the comptroller at all times), and any other information required by the comptroller, to determine
the amount of the assessment that the provider is required to remit and any credit that the
provider is entitled to claim, the number of subscription video service subscribers in each
incorporated area and in the unincorporated area of each county; (7) provide various penalties
against a provider that violates the provisions of the bill; (8) require that three-fourths of the
revenue collected from the assessment imposed by the bill shall be deposited to the credit of the
general revenue fund and one-fourth of the revenue shall be deposited to the credit of the
subscription video assessment clearance fund created under the bill; (9) provide that the
subscription video assessment clearance fund is a special fund in the state treasury outside the
general revenue fund; (10) provide that, effective on January 1, 2012, not later than the last day
of the second month following a calendar quarter, the comptroller shall calculate the pro rata
share of total subscription video service subscribers for each city and the unincorporated area of
each county according to the most recent subscription report filed by each provider; (11) require
the comptroller to distribute the balance of the amount in the subscription video assessment
clearance fund, less up to a five percent administrative fee in certain circumstances, by issuing a
warrant drawn on the fund to each city with subscription video service subscribers in an amount
equal to the city’s pro rata share of the amount in the fund as of the date the warrant is issued
and each county with subscription video service subscribers outside of an incorporated area in
an amount equal to the county’s pro rata share of the amount in the fund as of the date the
warrant is issued; and (12) provide that the sales tax rate on a taxable item that meets the
definition of “subscription video services” is 5 3/4 percent of the sales price of the taxable item
sold (as opposed to 6 ¼ percent).

H.B. 3676 (F. Brown) – Professional Services: would provide that, when procuring
architectural, engineering, or land surveying services, a governmental entity – including a city –
shall: (1) base its choice on demonstrated competence, knowledge, and qualifications and on the
reasonableness of the proposed fee for the services; and (2) if other considerations are equal, give
preference to a provider of those services whose principal place of business is in this state or who
will manage the contract wholly from an office in this state.

H.B. 3677 (F. Brown) – Information Resources: would authorize the Department of
Information Resources to charge an administrative fee to a city that purchases commodity items
– such as commercial software, hardware, and technology services – through the department in
an amount equal to two percent of the price of the commodity items purchased.

H.B. 3684 (Callegari) – Fiscal Notes and Unfunded Mandates: would: (1) require that a
resolution granting permission to sue the state be accompanied by a fiscal note; (2) require the
Legislative Budget Board to establish a system of fiscal notes identifying the probable costs of a
joint or concurrent resolution; (3) require that, upon request, state agencies prepare fiscal notes
for pending concurrent resolutions; (4) define the term “mandate,” for purposes of Government
Code Chapter 320, to include restrictions, rules enacted by state agencies, and required reports
and exclude a provision of additional flexibility for allocating resources; (5) authorize the Sunset
Advisory Commission, in its review of a state agency that affects political subdivisions, to
include in its report information about mandates on political subdivisions; (6) allow political
subdivisions to present information to the Sunset Advisory Commission about mandates and
conduct periodic reviews of mandates and recommend changes; (7) provide that a fiscal note that
affects a political subdivision include a statement that evaluates whether the proposed rule
creates an additional requirement or restriction on a political subdivision and, if so, whether any
additional time or expenditures will be required; and (8) repeal various statutes, including
Government Code Section 320.003 which requires the interagency work group to prepare a list
of unfunded mandates on political subdivisions. (Companion bill is S.B. 1252 by Williams.)

H.B. 3685 (Aliseda) – Sales Tax: would: (1) allow for the retail sale of alcohol on Sundays
between the hours of noon and 6 p.m.; and (2) provide that an amount equal to two percent of the
proceeds from the collection of the taxes imposed on the retail sale of alcohol during noon and 6
p.m. on a Sunday shall be credited to the state property tax relief fund.

H.B. 3690 (Anchia) – Public Improvement Districts: would allow a public improvement
district to consist of noncontiguous properties that have a common land use or other common
characteristics. (Companion bill is S.B. 1369 by West.)
H.B. 3692 (Gallego) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a peace officer answering an
emergency call to attempt to determine whether any person involved is a person with mental
illness and, if so, and no offense has been committed, require the officer to notify local mental
health authorities and provide assistance to the mentally ill person and authorize the officer take
the person into custody; (2) require a peace officer answering an emergency call to attempt to
determine whether any person involved is a person with mental illness and, if so, and an offense
has been committed, authorize the officer to issue a citation in lieu of arrest or take the person
into custody; (3) provide, in regard to an incompetency trial, that a suggestion of incompetency
is the threshold requirement for an informal inquiry which may be satisfied solely by a
representation from any source; (4) require the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer
Standards and Education to establish minimum curriculum requirements for preparatory and
advanced programs that include training in mental illness.

H.B. 3695 (Gallego) – Juveniles: would make all records, files, and information stored by
electronic means or otherwise from which a record or file could be generated, related to a child
who is convicted and has satisfied the judgment for a fine-only misdemeanor offense other than a
traffic offense confidential, to be released only in certain situations. (This bill is similar to S.B.
1752 by Uresti.)

H.B. 3701 (Fletcher) – Public Information: would except from public disclosure information
contained in a citation for a class C misdemeanor and that relates to the home address, phone,
social security number, or family-member information of a person.

H.B. 3704 (Brown) – Property Tax: would provide that a community housing development
organization is entitled to a property tax exemption for certain buildings and other real and
tangible personal property used exclusively by the organization or a political subdivision of the
state for the acquisition, building, repair, sale, or rental of property.

H.B. 3705 (Hamilton) – Emergency Planning: would, among other things, create the disaster
reconstruction coordination office as an office within the office of the governor. (Companion
bill is S.B. 1461 by Lucio.)

H.B. 3706 (Callegari) – Federal Programs and Mandates: would authorize the lieutenant
governor and the speaker of the house to establish the state sovereignty oversight work group to
identify, monitor, and analyze certain pending or enacted federal legislation and take related
action to educate public officials and citizens about the legislation, implement the legislation,
and identify recommended changes to the legislation.

H.B. 3727 (Hilderbran) – Property Tax: would require the chief appraiser to determine the
market value of temporary production aircraft located in the state to be ten percent of the
published “list price” for property tax purposes.

H.B. 3729 (Martinez) – Extraterritorial Jurisdiction: would provide that a city may expand
its extraterritorial jurisdiction into another city’s existing extraterritorial jurisdiction through
annexation if a written agreement was in place at the time of the annexations that apportioned the
overlapping area to the city conducting the annexation.
H.B. 3731 (Martinez) – Transportation: would provide that: (1) the Texas Transportation
Commission shall adopt provisions relating to the accommodation of bicycles, pedestrians, and
mass transit riders in transportation planning; and (2) a local authority – including a city – shall
establish minimum guidelines to accommodate bicycles, pedestrians, and mass transit riders in
all transportation planning, construction, reconstruction, street or highway improvements, and
transportation facilities, including mass transit facilities, that must conform to the provisions
adopted by the commission.

H.B. 3735 (Martinez) -- Texas Commission on Fire Protection: would: (1) send all fees
collected by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection to a special account dedicated to funding
the commission as opposed to sending half to the account and half to general revenue; and (2)
change the composition of the commission by having at least one fire chief member and one fire
fighter member from a city with less than 150,000 in population. (Companion bill is S.B. 1673
by Gallegos).

H.B. 3736 (Martinez) -- Civil Service: would prohibit a city manager in a civil service city
from being the department head of a fire department or police department, unless the individual
is qualified under civil service requirements.

H.B. 3739 (Morrison) – Sales Tax: would provide that the sale, use, or other consumption of
tangible personal property is exempted from sales taxes if the property is used directly in the
research or development of inventions, products, processes, or technology by a person primarily
engaged in: (1) the manufacturing of tangible personal property for sale; (2) the provision of
telecommunication services; or (3) the performance of scientific or technical services for a
person described by (1) or (2), above.

H.B. 3742 (Schwertner) – Transportation: would provide a procedure whereby a political
subdivision that participates financially in certain Texas Department of Transportation projects
may assist with, and expedite, the environmental review process.

H.B. 3746 (Frullo) – Internet Crimes: would: (1) create a new court cost to be collected from a
person who, upon conviction, is required to register as a sex offender; and (2) transmit the
proceeds from that cost to a special fund known as the Internet Crimes Against Children Fund, to
be appropriated equally to the three Internet Crimes Against Children task forces in the state.
(This bill is similar to S.B. 1843 by Carona.)

H.B. 3748 (Phillips) – Forensic Science: would, among several other provisions: (1) abolish
the Texas Forensic Science Commission; (2) create a Division of Forensic Sciences at the
Department of Public Safety (DPS) , transferring certain duties of the TFSC to the new division;
(3) require the division director for the Division of Forensic Sciences to recommend for DPS
adoption guidelines for collecting forensic evidence and for preserving the integrity of forensic
evidence at all stages of a criminal investigation and for the storage of forensic evidence; and (4)
require a local law enforcement agency to comply with those guidelines.
H.B. 3749 (Oliveira) – Mineral Rights: would grant certain protections to the owners of the
surface estate of property.

H.B. 3757 (Callegari) – Rural and Small Community Initiatives: would work to coordinate
rural and small community initiatives by: (1) authorizing the governor to designate an employee
of the governor’s office as a state rural and small community coordinator; (2) providing for
certain state agency employees to serve as a liaison to the coordinator; and (3) providing for a
task force to develop and adopt a Texas Rural and Small Community Coordinated Plan.
(Companion bill is S.B. 824 by Lucio.)

H.B. 3758 (Giddings) – Juveniles: would: (1) prohibit a police officer from requiring a student
who is younger than twelve years of age to sign a citation issued to the student on school
property during school hours; and (2) require a school administrator or teacher to sign on behalf
of the student as a witness.

H.B. 3767 (Pitts) – Sales Tax: would expand the definition of “sale for resale” for sales tax
purposes to include the sale of tangible personal property to a purchaser who acquires the
property for the sole purpose of transferring it as an integral part of performing a contract with
the federal government if the purchaser: (a) allocates the cost of the property to the contract; (b)
bills the cost of the property to the federal government for reimbursement; and (c) transfers title
to the property to the federal government under the contract. (Companion bill is S.B. 1721 by
Duncan.)

H.B. 3768 (Pena) – EMS: would provide that an emergency medical services provider has a
lien on a cause of action or claim of an individual who receives emergency medical service in a
county with a population of one million or less for injuries caused by an accident that is
attributed to the negligence of another person.

H.B. 3771 (Martinez) – Transportation: would, among other things, provide that: (1) the
Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) will adopt provisions relating to the
accommodation of pedestrians, bicyclists, and mass transit riders in transportation planning; and
(2) a local authority – including a city – shall establish minimum guidelines in accordance with
TxDOT plans to accommodate bicycles, pedestrians, and mass transit riders in all transportation
planning, construction, reconstruction, street or highway improvements, and transportation
facilities, including mass transit facilities.

H.B. 3773 (Pitts) – Municipal Court Fees: would: (1) transfer all municipal court fee
collection and auditing duties from the comptroller’s office to the state Office of Court
Administration; and (2) repeal the penalty prohibiting a city from withholding its ten percent of
many state court fines if the city is not in compliance with state fee reporting and remitting rules.

H.B. 3784 (Callegari) – Financial Disclosure: would: (1) provide that, at the direction of the
state’s legislative audit committee, the state auditor shall conduct an audit or investigation of a
local governmental body – including a city; (2) require a city to file an accounting of its money
with the state comptroller’s office; and (3) apply all state laws relating to the audit of state
agencies to cities.
H.B. 3790 (Pitts) – State Fiscal Matters: This lengthy bill would, among other things, provide
that: (1) notwithstanding any other statute, each state agency is authorized to reduce or recover
expenditures by, among other things, adopting and collecting fees or charges to cover any costs
the agency incurs in performing its lawful functions; (2) the governing board of a public
retirement system shall make an annual contribution to the State Pension Review Board in an
amount equal to 50 cents for each active member and annuitant of the retirement system as of
September 1 of the year for which the contribution is made, payable in a lump sum; and (3)
specify that the judicial and court personnel training fund is an account in the general revenue
fund which may be appropriated only to the court of criminal appeals for judicial and court staff
training and eliminate the current provision requiring any unexpended balance in excess of
$500,000 at the end of each fiscal year to be transferred to the general revenue fund.
(Companion bill is S.B. 1811 by Duncan.)

H.B. 3792 (Burnam) – Gas Pipelines: would provide that: (1) a city may establish conditions
for mapping or taking an inventory of gas pipelines and related appurtenances, including pumps,
compressors, separators, dehydration units, and tank batteries, located in an area in the city’s
extraterritorial jurisdiction; (2) a city may adopt an ordinance that establishes conditions for
mapping, inventorying, locating, or relocating pipelines and related appurtenances, including
pumps, compressors, separators, dehydration units, and tank batteries, located within the city’s
boundaries; and (3) a gas corporation may exercise eminent domain authority in relation to a
municipal street or alley only with the consent of and subject to the direction of the governing
body of the city.

H.B. 3793 (Phillips) – Transportation Funding: would, among other things: (1) provide that
the sales and use taxes imposed on the sale, storage, or use of new and used motor vehicle tires
and new and used motor vehicle parts shall be deposited to the credit of the state highway fund;
and (2) eliminate the funding of the Department of Public Safety from money in the state
highway fund. (Note: please see H.J.R 157, below.)

H.B. 3795 (Elkins) – Public Funds Investment: would require each governing body to invest a
minimum of five percent of their total portfolio in Texas-based, publicly-traded corporations.

H.B. 3801 (S. Davis) – Public Information: would: (1) allow a current or former city employee
or official elect to allow or disallow public access to a personal cellular telephone number,
personal e-mail address, or date of birth; (2) allow a city employee or official to elect to allow or
disallow public access to personal information at any time during the employee’s or official’s
service with the city; (3) require a former employee or officer of the city to state the person’s
choice to allow or disallow public access to personal information within 14 days of ending
service with the city; (4) would make the date of birth of a living person confidential, and allow a
city to redact an individual’s date of birth from any requested information without the necessity
of requesting a decision from the attorney general.

H.J.R. 7 (Bohac) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to allow the city council of a city in Harris County to reduce the property tax appraisal
cap on homesteads from ten percent to five percent.
H.J.R. 9 (Farias) – Sales Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to use the revenue
generated by a tax imposed on certain sweetened beverages for the promotion of children’s
health programs.

H.J.R. 10 (Farias) – Sales Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to use forty-percent of the
revenue generated by a tax imposed on certain sweetened beverages for the promotion of
children’s health programs, with the remainder to the credit of the general revenue fund.

H.J.R. 11 (Farias) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to limit the maximum
appraised value of a residence homestead for property tax purposes to an amount that is less than
the appraised value, but not less than the amount that the owner of the residence homestead paid
for the property.

H.J.R. 15 (Rodriguez) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that: (2) the net revenue from the portions of the rates of motor fuels sales taxes that
exceed the rates of those taxes in effect on January 1, 2011, shall be used for the sole purpose of
designing, constructing, and maintaining public roadways; (2) the state shall impose the motor
fuels taxes at the rate of 30 cents per gallon by increasing the tax by two cents per gallon each
year until August 1, 2020; (3) beginning August 1, 2020, and not later than August 1 of each
subsequent year, the comptroller shall revise the rates of the motor fuels taxes in effect on
August 1 by applying a percentage change to the rates equal to the most recent annual change in
the consumer price index; and (4) in any case, the legislature may raise the rate of the tax or
modify or repeal the tax.

H.J.R. 16 (Riddle) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to allow a county commissioners court to call a county-wide election to reduce the
property tax appraisal cap for all taxing units in the county from ten percent to some percentage
between three and ten. (Note: please see H.B. 23, above.)

H.J.R. 17 (Guillen) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to: (1) permit a city
to adopt a tax freeze (ceiling on total taxes paid) on the homesteads of active duty military
personnel; (2) provide that the military tax freeze may be adopted by action of the city council;
(3) provide that the freeze may also be adopted by popular election, which must be called by the
city council upon receipt of a petition of five percent of the registered voters of the city; and (4)
permit the legislature to statutorily define eligibility for the military tax freeze. (Note: please see
H.B. 26, above.)

H.J.R. 23 (Fletcher) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran.
(Note: please see H.B. 95, above.)

H.J.R. 26 (Legler) – Insurance Associations: would amend the Texas Constitution to prohibit
the legislature from enacting a law that appropriates or diverts any part of the assets of an
association established for the purpose of providing adequate windstorm, hail, and fire insurance
in designated regions of the state, except for certain specified purposes.
H.J.R. 36 (Raymond) – Sales Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that the
legislature may not enact a general law that would impose a new, prospective state tax on the
sale or use of: (1) food or a drink; (2) medicine; or (3) child-care service.

H.J.R. 38 (Berman) – Official Language: would amend the Texas Constitution to: (1)
establish English as the official language for acts of government; (2) prevent the state or a
political subdivision of the state from making a policy that expresses a preference for any
language other than English, subject to certain exceptions; (3) require elected and appointed
officers of the state or a political subdivision of the state to take all reasonable steps to ensure the
role of English as the official language is preserved and enhanced; and (4) prohibit the legislature
or the governing body of a political subdivision from appropriating money to promote the use of
or demonstrate a preference for any language other than English, except as expressly provided.
(Note: please see H.B. 301, above.)

H.J.R. 39 (Callegari) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten to five percent.
(Note: please see H.B. 312, above.)

H.J.R. 40 (Pickett) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran.
(Note: please see H.B. 313, above.)

H.J.R. 41 (Raymond) – Eight Liners: would propose a constitutional amendment giving the
legislature the authority to: (1) allow a local option election by a city, county, or justice precinct
on whether to allow eight liners; (2) impose a fee on eight liners; and (3) allow a city or other
political subdivision to impose a fee on eight liners.

H.J.R. 44 (Larson) – County Charter: would amend the Texas Constitution to: (1) allow a
county with a population of 100,000 or more, or a county that is included in a federal
metropolitan statistical area and adjacent to a county with a population of 100,000 or more, to
adopt a county charter; and (2) provide procedures for a county that has adopted a charter to
integrate the county with other political subdivisions, including cities. (Note: Please see H.B.
431, above.)

H.J.R. 47 (Kleinschmidt) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran if the property was the residence homestead of the surviving
spouse when the disabled veteran died and the property remains the residence homestead of the
surviving spouse. (Note: Please see H.B. 461, above.)

H.J.R. 48 (Anderson) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving spouse has not remarried; (2) the
property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse when the disabled veteran died;
and (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the surviving spouse. (Note: Please see
H.B. 472, above.)

H.J.R. 51 (Christian) – Mandatory Health Insurance: would: (1) prohibit a city or other
governmental entity from imposing or enforcing a penalty or sanction for an individual’s choice
to have or not have insurance; and (2) protect the right of a city to have a contract for the
provision of health insurance coverage. (H.J.R. 24 by Paxton is identical to this resolution).

H.J.R. 52 (McLendon) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
Legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving spouse has not remarried; (2) the
property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse when the disabled veteran died;
and (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the surviving spouse. (Note: please see
H.B. 526, above.)

H.J.R. 53 (Christian) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to abolish all city,
county, and school district property taxes in Texas as of January 1, 2014.

H.J.R. 56 (Solomons) – Unfunded Mandates: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide
that no bill enacted after January 1, 2012 that imposes on a city, or a special district created by a
city, a duty that requires the expenditure of revenue is effective unless an appropriation or other
form of payment or reimbursement is provided from a resource other than the revenue of the city
or special district.

H.J.R. 57 (Berman) – Municipal Court: would: (1) require a Texas court to uphold the laws
of the Constitution of the United States, the Texas Constitution, federal laws and state laws; and
(2) bar any Texas court from enforcing, considering, or applying religious or cultural law.

H.J.R. 62 (Zerwas) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten to five percent.
(Note: please see H.B. 609, above.)

H.J.R. 64 (Pickett) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that: (1) subject to legislative allocation, appropriation, and direction, three fourths of the
net revenue from the motor fuel tax shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and
maintaining public highways, and one-fourth of the net revenue shall be allocated to school
funding; and (2) for a biennium, the legislature may not appropriate funds derived from the
revenue described (1), above, for a purpose other than acquiring rights-of-way or constructing or
maintaining public roadways in an amount that exceeds the lesser of: (a) the total amount of
those funds appropriated for a purpose other than acquiring rights-of-way or constructing or
maintaining public roadways in the preceding biennium; or (b) the maximum amount that may
be appropriated under (a), above, reduced by 20 percent from the preceding biennium if the
estimate of anticipated revenue from all sources made in advance of the regular session for the
biennium exceeds the total amount of revenue from all sources for the preceding biennium by
more than three times the amount of the reduction.
H.J.R. 66 (Pickett) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that: (1) subject to legislative allocation, appropriation, and direction, three fourths of the
net revenue from the motor fuel tax shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and
maintaining public highways, and one-fourth of the net revenue shall be allocated to school
funding; and (2) for a biennium, the legislature may not appropriate funds derived from the
revenue described (1), above, for a purpose other than acquiring rights-of-way or constructing or
maintaining public roadways in an amount that exceeds the lesser of: (a) the total amount of
those funds appropriated for a purpose other than acquiring rights-of-way or constructing or
maintaining public roadways in the preceding biennium; or (b) the maximum amount that may
be appropriated under (a), above, reduced by 20 percent from the preceding biennium if the
estimate of anticipated revenue from all sources made in advance of the regular session for the
biennium exceeds the total amount of revenue from all sources for the preceding biennium by
more than three times the amount of the reduction.

H.J.R. 69 (Kolkhorst) – Federal Constitutional Amendment: requests a constitutional
convention for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would provide that states have the
sole power to regulate education and health.

H.J.R. 71 (Larson) – Maximum Salary for Elected Public Officers: would amend the Texas
Constitution to provide that the annual salary for an elected public officer in this state, other than
a member of the judiciary, may not exceed the average salary paid to a full-time classroom
teacher in the five school districts in this state with the largest enrollments for the preceding
school year.

H.J.R. 72 (P. King) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
Legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran.
(Note: please see H.B. 781, above.)

H.J.R. 74 (Creighton) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten to five percent.
(Note: please see H.B. 798, above.)

H.J.R. 75 (Paxton) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that, subject to legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction: (1) three-fourths of
the net revenue that is remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of
collection that is derived from taxes on motor fuels and lubricants used to propel motor vehicles
over public highways – and on new and used motor vehicle tires and new and used motor vehicle
part – shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways; and
(2) one-fourth of the net revenue shall be allocated to the available school fund. (Please see H.B.
815, above.)

H.J.R. 76 (Lozano) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize a
complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving spouse or surviving
children of totally disabled veterans. (Note: please see H.B. 833, above.)
H.J.R. 77 (Harper-Brown) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that, beginning on January 1, 2012, the net revenue derived from the tax imposed on the
sale, use, or rental of a motor vehicle shall be allocated as follows: (1) twenty-five percent to the
credit of the state highway fund; and (2) the remainder as provided by the legislature by general
law.

H.J.R. 78 (Harper-Brown) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that, for a state fiscal biennium beginning on or after September 1, 2013 and subject to
legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction: (1) three-fourths of the net revenue that is
remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of collection that is derived
from taxes on motor fuels and lubricants used to propel motor vehicles over public highways
shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways; and (2) one-
fourth of the net revenue shall be allocated to the available school fund.

H.J.R. 79 (C. Howard) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten to five percent.
(Note: please see H.B. 879, above.)

H.J.R. 82 (P. King) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to limit the maximum appraised value of commercial or industrial real property for ad
valorem tax purposes to the lesser of: (1) the most recent market value of the property as
determined by the appraisal entity; or (2) 110 percent or a greater percentage of the appraised
value of the property for the preceding tax year. (Note: please see H.B. 1079, above.)

H.J.R. 83 (Paxton) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to extend the ten-percent appraisal cap to business property. (Note: please see H.B.
1104, above.)

H.J.R. 84 (Larson) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide
that, subject to legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction: (1) three-fourths of the net
revenue that is remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of collection
that is derived from taxes on motor fuels and lubricants used to propel motor vehicles over public
highways – and on new and used motor vehicle tires and new and used motor vehicle part – shall
be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways; and (2) one-fourth
of the net revenue shall be allocated to the available school fund. (Please see H.B. 1131, above.)

H.J.R. 86 (Murphy) – Immigration: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that a
person taken into custody for committing a felony shall be denied release on bail pending trial if
a judge or magistrate, following a hearing, determines that the person is not a citizen or national
of the United States and is not lawfully present in United States.

H.J.R. 87 (Legler) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to reduce the property
tax appraisal cap from ten to five percent, and apply the five percent cap to all property, not just
to residential homesteads. (Note: please see H.B. 1184, above.)
H.J.R. 93 (Christian) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to exempt the total
appraised value of residential real property from property taxes.

H.J.R. 99 (Ritter) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to exempt from property taxes real property sold to a person for use as a school.

H.J.R. 103 (Fletcher) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to allow the
legislature to adopt a statute providing for a credit against the ad valorem taxes imposed by a
taxing unit on property based on the costs the owner of the property has contracted to pay to have
a building constructed on the property that is to be used for commercial or industrial purposes.
(Note: Please see H.B. 1685, above.)

H.J.R. 106 (Christian) – Offense Against Public Administration: would amend the Texas
Constitution to give the attorney general authority to represent the state in the prosecution of
criminal and civil offenses classified by law as offenses against public administration (including
ethics offenses) or as offenses involving insurance fraud. (Note: please see H.B. 1712, above.)

H.J.R. 107 (Ritter) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to include water
stewardship as a category of open-space land to be taxed on the basis of its productive capacity.
(Note: Please see H.B. 1733, above.)

H.J.R. 108 (Madden) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to allow the
Legislature to limit the maximum appraised value of a residence homestead for property tax
purposes if the homestead is owned by a veteran of the armed services of the United States and
was donated to or renovated for the veteran at no charge to the veteran. (Note: Please see H.B.
1880, above.)

H.J.R. 110 (Y. Davis) – Eminent Domain: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that
adequate compensation for the taking of property that is a homestead or farm, if the taking makes
relocation of the homestead or farm necessary, includes the cost of relocation from the
condemned property to another property that allows the property owner to: (1) have a standard of
living comparable to the property owner's standard of living immediately before the taking, if the
property taken is a homestead; or (2) operate a comparable farm, if the property taken is a farm.

H.J.R. 111 (Woolley) – Gambling: would amend the Texas Constitution to: (1) authorize a
state video lottery system to operate video lottery games at certain horse and greyhound
racetracks; (2) prohibit political subdivisions from taking action to repeal or revoke a previous
authorization by its voters approving the legalization or conduct of pari-mutuel wagering on
horse or greyhound races at a racetrack in the political subdivision if the track may be authorized
to operate video lottery games; and (3) provide that generally recognized Indian tribes are not
prohibited from conducting games of chance on certain Indian lands. (Please see S.J.R. 33,
below, and H.B. 2111, above.)

H.J.R. 112 (Menendez) – Gambling: would provide for an election for a constitutional
amendment that would: (1) authorize forms of casino gaming; (2) give 1/30th of the revenue
received by the state for gaming to the city in which the casino is located; (3) preempt any city
ordinance or regulation that would disallow a gaming establishment within the city; (4) allow a
city to regulate a gaming establishment through building codes and health and safety ordinances;
(5) disallow a casino from being located in an area zoned exclusively residential; (6) prohibit a
city from imposing a tax or fee on a gaming establishment; (7) require a county wide vote before
a casino can be located in a county; and (8) require that state revenue from regulation of gaming,
after paying for administrative costs go to the property tax relief fund in the general revenue
fund. (Companion joint resolution is S.J.R. 112 by Ellis).

H.J.R. 114 (Munoz) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to define the term “disabled” for purposes of eligibility for a local property tax
exemption or local property tax freeze on the residence homestead of a disabled person.

H.J.R. 117 (Bonnen) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to adopt a statute allowing a property owner to apply for an extension of a residence
homestead exemption for up to three tax years following the tax year in which the owner ceases
to occupy a residence if the former residence homestead: (1) is not occupied or leased to any
person; (2) is being actively offered for sale; and (3) is not used for any business or commercial
purpose.

H.J.R. 119 (Thompson) – Gambling: would amend the Texas Constitution to: (1) authorize
the operating of video gaming by persons and organizations licensed to conduct bingo or lease
bingo premises; (2) limit video gaming operations to gaming operations in certain locations,
including incorporated cities and towns, that have held elections in which the conduct of bingo
games in the jurisdiction was approved by the voters; and (3) provide that federally recognized
Indian tribes are not prohibited from conducting gaming on certain Indian lands. (Companion
resolution is S.J.R. 35 by Van de Putte.) (Note: please see H.B. 2424, above.)

H.J.R. 120 (Munoz) – Vacancy on Governing Body: would amend the Texas Constitution to
authorize a home-rule city to provide in its charter the procedure to fill a vacancy on the city
council where the unexpired term is 24 months or less.

H.J.R. 128 (Beck) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to allow the
legislature to provide that the surviving spouse of a firefighter or peace officer killed in the line
of duty is entitled to a property tax exemption for the total appraised value of the surviving
spouse’s residence homestead for a period of five consecutive years.

H.J.R. 131 (Rodriguez) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that, subject to legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction: (1) three-fourths of
the net revenue that is remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of
collection that is derived from taxes on motor fuels and lubricants used to propel motor vehicles
over public highways – and on new and used motor vehicle tires and new and used motor vehicle
part – shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways and for
the purpose of constructing, maintaining, and operating passenger rail, transit, and freight rail.

H.J.R. 134 (Oliveira) – County Development Authority: would amend the Texas Constitution
to provide that a county may exercise limited ordinance-making authority for the purpose of
regulating land development in the unincorporated area of the county if approved by a majority
vote of the county voters and that regulations adopted after the election may include regulations
relating to land use compatibility, public safety and fire hazards, land density, and use or
conservation of water and other natural resources.

H.J.R. 135 (Phillips) – Religion: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that the
government may not directly, indirectly, or incidentally, substantially burden an individual’s or a
religious organization’s conduct that is based on a sincerely held religious belief, unless the
government is acting further a compelling government interest and using the least restrictive
available means to do so.

H.J.R. 137 (Ritter) – State Water Plan: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that:
(1) if the legislature requires the Texas Water Development Board to adopt a state water plan, the
legislature shall provide for the imposition by the state of one or more fees, the proceeds of
which must be deposited to the credit of a special fund in the state treasury to be known as the
state water implementation fund for Texas, funds in which may be used only to fund projects
included in the state water plan; and (2) the Texas Water Development Board may issue general
obligation bonds, at its determination and on a continuing basis, for one or more accounts of the
Texas Water Development Fund in amounts such that the aggregate principal amount of the
bonds issued by the board that are outstanding at any time does not exceed $6 billion.

H.J.R. 138 (Ritter) – State Water Plan: would amend the Texas Constitution to: (1) create the
state water implementation fund for Texas in the state treasury to provide a method for financing
projects included in the State Water Plan; (2) provide that the legislature: (a) shall provide for the
imposition by the state of a fee or tax, the proceeds of which must be deposited to the credit of
the fund and may provide for the deposit of other sources of revenue to the credit of the fund;
and (b) may prescribe the manner in which money in the fund may be used; and (3) provide that
a law dedicating revenue to the fund prevails over any law enacted in the same session of the
legislature that purports to abolish dedications of revenue in the state treasury for a particular
purpose, regardless of the relative dates of enactment. (Note: please see H.B. 3273, above.)

H.J.R. 139 (Schwertner) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that:
(1) in order to qualify for a property tax freeze for the elderly or disabled adopted by a city, and
individual’s residence homestead must both qualify: (a) for either the mandatory exemption of an
additional $10,000 by the school district or an optional exemption of at least an additional $3,000
by any other taxing unit; and (b) for either the mandatory $3,000 exemption by the county for all
homeowners or the optional exemption of up to 20 percent of value by any other taxing unit for
all homeowners; and (2) if an individual who qualifies for either a mandatory exemption of an
additional $10,000 by the school district or an optional exemption of at least an additional $3,000
by any other taxing unit dies in the first year in which the individual qualified for the exemption,
the surviving spouse of the individual is entitled to a property tax freeze if one has been adopted
by a city. (Note: please see H.B. 3315, above.)

H.J.R. 142 (White) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution prohibit a political
subdivision from imposing property taxes and expand the applicability of state and local sales
and use taxes to replace property tax revenue.
H.J.R. 146 (V. Taylor) – Automatic Resignation: would amend the Texas Constitution by
repealing the resign to run provisions applicable to certain county, city, or district officeholders.
(Companion resolution is S.J.R. 37 by Van de Putte.)

H.J.R. 150 (Kleinschmidt) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to allow the
legislature to provide that the chief appraiser of an appraisal district serve a term not to exceed
four years.

H.J.R. 156 (C. Howard) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that
the “market value” of land for property tax appraisal purposes is frozen at the 2009 appraised
value until the land is sold or new construction takes place.

H.J.R. 157 (Phillips) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that, subject to legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction: (1) the net revenue
that is remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of collection that is
derived from motor vehicle registration and on new and used motor vehicle tires and new and
used motor vehicle parts shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining
public highways; (2) three fourths of the net revenue from the motor fuel tax shall be used for the
sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways, and one-fourth of the net revenue
shall be allocated to school funding; and (3) for a biennium, the legislature may not appropriate
funds derived from the revenue described (1) and (2), above, for a purpose other than acquiring
rights-of-way or constructing or maintaining public roadways in an amount that exceeds the
lesser of: (a) the total amount of those funds appropriated for a purpose other than acquiring
rights-of-way or constructing or maintaining public roadways in the preceding biennium; or (b)
the maximum amount that may be appropriated under (a), above, reduced by 25 percent from the
preceding biennium if the estimate of anticipated revenue from all sources made in advance of
the regular session for the biennium exceeds the total amount of revenue from all sources for the
preceding biennium by more than three times the amount of the reduction. (Note: please see
H.B. 3793, above.)

S.B. 9 (Wentworth) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a police officer to verify the
immigration status of any person who is arrested based on being charged with an offense; (2)
require an officer verifying the immigration status to notify the federal government if the officer
is unable to verify a person's immigration status; (3) add a $100 law enforcement fee to a
conviction for a misdemeanor drug offenses; (4) require a city to keep separate records of the law
enforcement fee and send the fees to the state comptroller for law enforcement purposes; (5)
require a city to file a report to the comptroller regardless of whether any fee is collected; and (6)
allow the Department of Public Safety to create driver's license and financial responsibility
checkpoints in conjunction with local law enforcement authorities.

S.B. 11 (Williams) – Immigration: this bill is the same as H.B. 12, above.)

S.B. 13 (Huffman) – Litigation: would: (1) state that a statute does not create a cause of action
unless the statute does so in clear and unambiguous language; (2) limit the recovery of attorney’s
fees to the prevailing party; (3) add deposition costs to the list of litigation costs that can be
recovered; and (4) require the Supreme Court of Texas to adopt rules for the early dismissal of
civil actions.

S.B. 14 (Fraser) – Elections: would: (1) require the voter registrar of each county and the
secretary of state to provide notice of voter identification requirements and to educate voters
about the requirements through certain programs by publishing notice on certain websites; (2)
require a voter under 70 years of age to present to an election officer at the polling place a voter
registration certificate and an acceptable form of identification; (3) provide that, if a voter does
not present acceptable identification, the voter shall be accepted for provisional voting only; (4)
modify the types of acceptable voter identification documents; (5) make an offense under this
section a second degree felony or a state jail felony if the person is convicted of attempt; (6)
provide that a voter who presents a voter registration certificate indicating that the voter is
currently registered in the precinct, but whose name is not on the precinct list of registered
voters, shall be accepted for voting if the voter’s identity can be verified from the proof
presented; and (7) provide that a provisional ballot may be accepted only if: (a) the voter presents
acceptable proof of identification at the time the ballot is cast; or (b) the voter submits a copy of
the identification to the voter registrar by personal delivery or by mail for examination by the
early voting ballot board not later than the sixth business day after the date of the election.

S.B. 15 (Fraser) – State Energy Policy: would create the Texas Energy Policy Council to
develop and present a statewide energy policy plan to the legislature that includes information
relating to electric transmission, energy efficiency technology, energy reserves, and the
environment.

S.B. 18 (Estes) – Eminent Domain: would do the following:

   1. provide that a governmental or private entity may not take private property through the
      use of eminent domain if the taking is not for a “public use.”

   2. require a record vote with specific procedures and wording to take each parcel of land
      through the use of eminent domain.

   3. require that any entity authorized to exercise the power of eminent domain must submit
      to the state comptroller, by December 31, 2012, a letter stating that the entity is
      authorized to exercise the power of eminent domain and identifying the provision or
      provisions of law that grant the entity that authority, and would provide that the entity’s
      authority to use eminent domain will expire if the letter is not sent by the deadline.

   4.    provide, among other things, that an entity with eminent domain authority that wants to
        acquire real property shall disclose to the property owner any and all appraisal reports
        produced or acquired by the entity relating specifically to the owner’s property and
        prepared in the 10 years preceding the offer.

   5.    provide that: (1) an entity seeking to acquire property may not include a confidentiality
        provision in an offer or agreement to acquire the property; and (2) the entity shall inform
        the owner of the property that the owner has the right to: (a) discuss any offer or
   agreement regarding the entity’s acquisition of the property with others; or (b) keep the
   offer or agreement confidential (subject to the requirements of the Texas Public
   Information Act).

6. require an entity with eminent domain authority that wants to acquire real property for a
   public use to make a bona fide offer to acquire the property from the property owner
   voluntarily, and list specific criteria that must be met to meet the bona fide offer
   requirement.

7. provide that a court that determines that a condemnor did not make a bona fide offer to
   acquire the property from the property owner voluntarily must abate the suit, order the
   condemnor to make a bona fide offer, and order the condemnor to pay costs and
   attorneys’ and other professionals’ fees.

8. provide that a condemnation petition must state with specificity the public use for which
   the entity intends to acquire the property and that the city made a bona fide offer to
   acquire the property voluntarily.

9. provide, among other things, that each party has a reasonable period to strike one of the
   three special commissioners appointed by the judge in the case, with the judge appointing
   a replacement.

10. provide that the special commissioners shall consider an injury or benefit that is peculiar
    to the property owner and that relates to the property owner’s ownership, use, or
    enjoyment of the particular parcel of real property, including a material impairment of
    direct access on or off the remaining property that affects the market value of the
    remaining property, but they may not consider an injury or benefit that the property
    owner experiences in common with the general community, including circuity of travel
    and diversion of traffic.

11. require a city, as a cost of acquiring real property, to: (a) provide a relocation advisory
    service for an individual, a family, a business concern, a farming or ranching operation,
    or a nonprofit organization that is compatible with the Federal Uniform Relocation
    Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act; and (b) pay moving expenses and
    rental supplements, make relocation payments, provide financial assistance to acquire
    replacement housing, and compensate for expenses incidental to the transfer of the
    property if an individual, a family, the personal property of a business, a farming or
    ranching operation, or a nonprofit organization is displaced in connection with the
    acquisition.

12. provide that an entity that is not subject to the Public Information Act, such a gas pipeline
    operator, must disclose certain information relating to its use of eminent domain upon
    request.

13. modify the current provisions that allow a property owner to repurchase the property if it
    isn’t used by the condemnor within ten years of the date of acquisition.
   14. provide that a city council may adopt a development plan for a public use project at a
       public hearing to toll the 10-year right to repurchase.

   15. modify the standard for determination of the fair value of the state’s interest in access
       rights to a highway right-of-way to be the same legal standard that is applied by the
       Texas Transportation Commission according to the Texas Transportation Code, which
       may include the impairment of highway access to or from real property where the real
       property adjoins the highway.

(Companion bill is H.B. 279 by Geren. This bill is identical to S.B. 180 by Estes.)

S.B. 20 (Williams) – Clean Air: would create grant programs to: (1) replace on-road heavy-
duty motor vehicles with equivalent natural gas vehicles; and (2) make natural gas fueling
stations available on the routes between Houston, San Antonio, and Dallas/Fort Worth.

S.B. 44 (Zaffirini) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) give a peace officer who takes a person
into custody without a warrant because the officer believes the person is mentally ill and may
harm himself the option of transporting the person to a medical or other facility that the local
mental health authority deems suitable; (2) establish that a jail or facility used to detain persons
charged with crimes is not a facility suitable for a person believed to be mentally ill or held under
a protective custody order unless other suitable facilities are unavailable or more than 75 miles
away; (3) allow the detention of a person believed to be mentally ill or held under a protective
order in a jail for no longer than 12 hours and require the officer responsible for the jail to
document when the detention begins, how long it lasts, the reason for detention, and the time a
representative of a local mental health authority arrives at the facility; (4) prohibit detaining a
person believed to be mentally ill or person held under protective custody order with a person
charged or convicted of a crime; and (5) allow restraint of a detained or committed patient only
during apprehension, detention, or transport of the patient and require that the patient be able to
sit in an upright position without undue difficulty.

S.B. 46 (Zaffirini) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit the operator of a motor vehicle from
using a wireless communication device to read, write, or send a text-based communication while
operating a motor vehicle, unless the vehicle is stopped, and would define text-based
communication to include text messages, instant messages, and electronic mail.

S.B. 52 (Zaffirini) – Sales Tax: would exempt college text books from sales taxes during two,
two-week periods, one in August and one in January.

S.B. 59 (Zaffirini) – Ethics: would: (1) permit, but not require, a city, an officeholder, or
candidate for city office to use Texas Ethics Commission software and other resources to file
certain campaign reports; and (2) permit the commission to assist local governments in adopting
their own software for managing campaign disclosures.

S.B. 61 (Zaffirini) – Juvenile Case Managers: would require the Texas Juvenile Probation
Commission to create for juvenile case managers: (1) minimum training requirements; (2)
minimum education requirements; and (3) an ethics code, all of which would be similar to
current rules for juvenile probation officers.

S.B. 64 (Zaffirini) – Employee Leave: would require an employer, including a city, to: (1)
allow an employee paid leave to attend court proceedings related to the crime of which the
employee was a victim; (2) not deduct such paid leave from the employee’s vacation time,
compensatory time off, or personal leave, unless required by a collective bargaining agreement;
and (3) not discriminate, suspend, or terminate an employee based on use of such paid leave.

S.B. 84 (Nelson) – Immigration: would require a city to: (1) participate in the federal
immigration verification program (“e-verify”); (2) verify that each new employee is eligible for
employment; (3) terminate an employee who is responsible for e-verify if the employee fails to
comply with the bill; and (4) verify that any city contractor participates in e-verify.

S.B. 86 (Nelson) – Traffic Fines: would authorize a general law city to enter into a contract
with the county tax assessor-collector to provide information regarding the nonpayment of traffic
fines or the failure to appear in municipal court for traffic offenses, thus authorizing the assessor-
collector to refuse to register or re-register the vehicle of the person in question.

S.B. 93 (Lucio) – Workers’ Compensation: would, among other things, provide that: (1) in a
trial initiated by a workers’ compensation carrier, at the request of the claimant the court shall
appoint an attorney to represent the claimant; and (2) the carrier is liable for the attorney's
reasonable and necessary fees as determined by the trier of fact in the case.

S.B. 100 (Van de Putte) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 111, above.

S.B. 103 (Davis) – Gas Wells/Wastewater Pipelines: would provide, among other things, that
a gas well operator or similar entity is entitled to lay, maintain, and operate a wastewater pipeline
in connection with well operations through, under, along, or across a controlled access state
highway only if: (1) the pipeline complies with any safety regulations adopted by the Texas
Railroad Commission and any applicable federal regulations; (2) the pipeline complies with all
applicable state rules and all applicable federal regulations on the accommodation of utility
facilities on the highway or right-of-way, including rules and regulations relating to the
horizontal and vertical location of the pipeline; and (3) the highway and associated facilities are
promptly restored to their former condition of usefulness after the installation or maintenance of
the pipeline, as applicable, is complete. The bill also provides that a city, county, or the Texas
Transportation Commission may require a well operator to relocate a facility at the cost of the
operator to accommodate construction or expansion of a highway or for any other public work
unless the operator has a property interest in the land occupied by the facility to be relocated. The
bill may not be construed to limit the authority of a well operator to use a public right-of-way
under any other law, and the bill may not be construed to affect the authority of a city to regulate
the use of a public right-of-way under any other law or to require payment of any applicable
franchise fee.

S.B. 104 (Davis) - Natural Gas Release Prevention: would, for gas wells on the Barnett Shale:
(1) create several requirements for natural gas wells to minimize the risk of release of gas and
other associated vapors; (2) require the Texas Railroad Commission to implement rules to
enforce those requirements; and (3) allow a city to create an ordinance to implement the
requirements.

S.B. 106 (Davis) – Gas Wells/Eminent Domain: would provide that: (1) a pipeline operator
with eminent domain authority that wants to acquire an easement on real property owned by a
city shall provide notice to the city of the city’s right to consent to the pipeline placement or
suggest a feasible alternative placement for the pipeline based on the city's consideration of
several factors; (2) a city's proposal for alternative placement must not unreasonably prevent a
pipeline operator from accomplishing the purpose for which the pipeline operator seeks to
acquire the property; and (3) if a pipeline operator and a city are unable to agree on the
placement of a pipeline, the pipeline operator may file a condemnation petition, and the city may
move that the court determine whether the suggested placement is reasonable. The bill would
also provide that a city by ordinance may regulate the placement, inspection, and maintenance of
and construction materials used for, the following items used by a gas pipeline operator: (1) gas
pipelines used as gathering lines; (2) pumps; (3) compressors; (4) separators; (5) dehydration
units; and (6) tank batteries.

S.B. 107 (Davis) - Gas Distribution Leaks: would: (1) require a "prompt response" to any gas
leak, gas odor, or damage to a city's gas distribution pipelines; (2) require, in response to a major
leak, that a "person with training, experience, and knowledge in the field of leak classification
and investigation" determine if the leak rises to the level of a Grade 1 leak; and (3) create
requirements for operator response in case of a Grade 1 leak, including several enumerated on-
site actions and biannual reporting of any such leaks.

S.B. 119 (Uresti) – Cell Phone Ban: would prohibit an operator from using a wireless
communication device to read, write, or send a text-based communication while operating a
motor vehicle unless the vehicle is stopped.

S.B. 121 (Ellis) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a police department, with officers who
conduct photograph or live lineup identification procedures in the routine performance of their
duties, to adopt a detailed written model policy, or a policy that conforms to a model policy,
regarding photograph and live lineup identification procedures; (2) require the Blackwood Law
Enforcement Management Institute of Texas to develop the model policy and associated training
materials; (3) require the model policy be based on certain research, policies, and guidelines and
address specific topics; (4) require the Institute to conduct an annual review of the model policy
and training materials; and (5) make evidence regarding compliance or noncompliance with the
policy adopted by the police department relevant and admissible in a criminal case but not
prohibit eyewitness testimony if substantial compliance with the policy is not achieved.

S.B. 123 (Ellis) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a police department to make an audio
or audiovisual electronic recording of custodial interrogations of persons suspected of or charged
with certain offenses; (2) set out good cause reasons that make electronic recording infeasible;
(3) require preservation of the electronic recording for a specified time; (4) require a prosecutor
to provide a defendant with a copy of the recording; (5) exempt the electronic recording from
release under the Texas Public Information Act except when it must be released under the law
enforcement exception; and (6) make evidence regarding compliance or noncompliance with the
recording requirement relevant and admissible evidence before a trier of fact.

S.B. 124 (Patrick) – Immigration: this bill is the same as H.B. 113, above.

S.B. 126 (Patrick) – Immigration: would provide that: (1) a peace officer shall inquire into the
lawful presence of any person who is lawfully stopped, detained, or arrested on other grounds if
the officer has a reasonable suspicion to believe the person has violated a criminal provision of
the federal immigration laws; (2) if a peace officer has probable cause to believe the person has
committed a violation, the officer may arrest the person and shall identify and report the person
to United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement after any arrest made; (3) a local
ordinance, regulation, or policy that interferes with the ability of a peace officer to carry out a
duty related to the bill is void; and (4) a governmental entity and a peace officer or other
employee of the entity are immune from suit and liability for any cause of action, claim, or
damages arising from the performance of an action authorized or a duty mandated under the bill.

S.B. 129 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads
from ten to five percent. (Note: please see S.J.R. 7, below.)

S.B. 135 (Wentworth) – Transportation Funding: would provide that: (2) the state highway
fund may no longer be used to finance with Texas Department of Public Safety; and (2) money
in the state highway fund or loans from the state infrastructure bank may be used only to
improve the state highway system.

S.B. 136 (Wentworth) – County Development Authority: would: (1) grant counties additional
authority over transportation planning through the subdivision process; and (2) in a subdivision
that is not served by fire hydrants as part of a centralized water system certified by the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality as meeting minimum standards for water utility service,
allow a commissioners court to require a developer to construct a limited fire suppression system
for certain subdivisions.

S.B. 137 (Wentworth) – County Development Authority: would provide that: (1) the
commissioners court of a county may call an election to authorize certain land use regulations in
the unincorporated area of the county; (2) if the election results are favorable, the commissioners
court may regulate, by order, land development in the unincorporated area of the county by: (a)
requiring a limited fire suppression system that necessitates a developer to construct a certain
amount of water storage; (b) requiring a buffer zone between certain land uses and residential
areas; and (c) requiring a developer, before the county approves a plat filed by the developer, to
determine the need for and construct certain roadway improvements attributable and roughly
proportionate to the subdivision’s impact, if necessary; (3) a county may not zone property; and
(4) certain uses would be exempt from regulations adopted under the bill.

S.B. 138 (Wentworth) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) prohibit use of a wireless communication
device while operating a motor vehicle; (2) provide an affirmative defense to prosecution if the
device is used to make an emergency call to an emergency response service, a hospital, a fire
department, a health clinic, a doctor’s office, an individual to administer first aid, or a law
enforcement agency; (3) except from the prohibition an operator of an authorized emergency
vehicle or a person licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to operate a radio
frequency device or wireless communication device; and (4) repeal current requirements to post
signs at school crossing zones regarding use of wireless communication devices.

S.B. 142 (West) – Property Owners’ Associations: would limit the authority of property
owners’ associations in various ways and make the associations subject to limited open
government provisions.

S.B. 154 (Huffman) – Fines: would require that fines relating to offenses arising out of the same
criminal action run consecutively.

S.B. 161 (Shapiro) – Transportation Funding: would provide that, among other things: (1) the
Texas Transportation commission shall adopt rules creating funding formulas for highway
projects that consider the input of planning organizations, transportation officials, and local
government officials; and (2) the Texas Department of Transportation shall develop criteria to
determine the feasibility of highway projects to be included in local transportation improvement
plans and the statewide transportation improvement plan.

S.B. 168 (West) – Felony Forfeiture: would permit a law enforcement agency to set aside up to
ten percent of felony forfeiture funds for scholarships for the children of local officers killed in
the line of duty.

S.B. 172 (West) – Licensing/Dwellings: would prohibit a city from requiring an individual to
acquire a license or permit issued by the city as a condition for occupying or leasing a dwelling.

S.B. 173 (West) – Substandard Buildings: would provide that: (1) a city may bring a civil
action in rem (against the property) for, among other things, the enforcement of a building
standards ordinance (Note: the effect of an in rem action is a judgment against the structure as
well as a judgment against the defendant, which can aid in enforcement against subsequent
purchasers); (2) a home rule city may bring an action in district court against an owner of
property that is not in substantial compliance with municipal ordinances regarding: (a) the
materials or methods used to construct a building or other structure or improvement; (b) the
preservation of public health or the fire safety of a building or other structure or improvement;
(c) dangerously damaged or deteriorated structures or improvements; (d) conditions caused by
accumulations of refuse, vegetation, or other matter that creates breeding and living places for
insects and rodents; or (e) point source effluent; and (3) with some exceptions, a court may
appoint as a receiver for substandard property a nonprofit organization or an individual with a
demonstrated record of rehabilitating properties if the court makes certain findings.

S.B. 174 (Nichols) – Eminent Domain: would: (1) prohibit a state agency, political subdivision,
or a corporation created by a governmental entity from taking private property through the use of
eminent domain if the taking is for a recreational purpose, including a parks and recreation
system or a specific park, greenbelt, or trail; and (2) provide that the determination by the entity
proposing to take the property that the taking does not involve an act or circumstance prohibited
by the bill does not create a presumption with respect to whether the taking involves that act or
circumstance.

S.B. 175 (Nichols) – Property Tax: would: (1) reduce the property tax appraisal cap on
homesteads from ten percent to five percent; (2) authorize a county commissioners court to call
an election to increase the homestead appraisal cap for all taxing jurisdictions in the county back
to some percentage between six and ten; and (3) prohibit a subsequent election from occurring
for ten years after such an election is held. (Note: please see S.J.R. 11, below.)

S.B. 178 (Fraser) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 248, above.)

S.B. 180 (Estes) – Eminent Domain: would do the following:

   1. provide that a governmental or private entity may not take private property through the
      use of eminent domain if the taking is not for a “public use.”

   2. require a record vote with specific procedures and wording to take each parcel of land
      through the use of eminent domain.
   3. require that any entity authorized to exercise the power of eminent domain must submit
      to the state comptroller, by December 31, 2012, a letter stating that the entity is
      authorized to exercise the power of eminent domain and identifying the provision or
      provisions of law that grant the entity that authority, and would provide that the entity’s
      authority to use eminent domain will expire if the letter is not sent by the deadline.

   4. provide, among other things, that an entity with eminent domain authority that wants to
      acquire real property shall disclose to the property owner any and all appraisal reports
      produced or acquired by the entity relating specifically to the owner’s property and
      prepared in the 10 years preceding the offer.

   5. provide that: (1) an entity seeking to acquire property may not include a confidentiality
      provision in an offer or agreement to acquire the property; and (2) the entity shall inform
      the owner of the property that the owner has the right to: (a) discuss any offer or
      agreement regarding the entity’s acquisition of the property with others; or (b) keep the
      offer or agreement confidential (subject to the requirements of the Texas Public
      Information Act).

   6. require an entity with eminent domain authority that wants to acquire real property for a
      public use to make a bona fide offer to acquire the property from the property owner
      voluntarily, and list specific criteria that must be met to meet the bona fide offer
      requirement.

   7. provide that a court that determines that a condemnor did not make a bona fide offer to
      acquire the property from the property owner voluntarily must abate the suit, order the
      condemnor to make a bona fide offer, and order the condemnor to pay costs and
      attorneys’ and other professionals’ fees.
   8. provide that a condemnation petition must state with specificity the public use for which
      the entity intends to acquire the property and that the city made a bona fide offer to
      acquire the property voluntarily.

   9. provide, among other things, that each party has a reasonable period to strike one of the
      three special commissioners appointed by the judge in the case, with the judge appointing
      a replacement.

   10. provide that the special commissioners shall consider an injury or benefit that is peculiar
       to the property owner and that relates to the property owner’s ownership, use, or
       enjoyment of the particular parcel of real property, including a material impairment of
       direct access on or off the remaining property that affects the market value of the
       remaining property, but they may not consider an injury or benefit that the property
       owner experiences in common with the general community, including circuity of travel
       and diversion of traffic.

   11. require a city, as a cost of acquiring real property, to: (a) provide a relocation advisory
       service for an individual, a family, a business concern, a farming or ranching operation,
       or a nonprofit organization that is compatible with the Federal Uniform Relocation
       Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act; and (b) pay moving expenses and
       rental supplements, make relocation payments, provide financial assistance to acquire
       replacement housing, and compensate for expenses incidental to the transfer of the
       property if an individual, a family, the personal property of a business, a farming or
       ranching operation, or a nonprofit organization is displaced in connection with the
       acquisition.

   12. provide that an entity that is not subject to the Public Information Act, such a gas pipeline
       operator, must disclose certain information relating to its use of eminent domain upon
       request.

   13. modify the current provisions that allow a property owner to repurchase the property if it
       isn’t used by the condemnor within ten years of the date of acquisition.

   14. provide that a city council may adopt a development plan for a public use project at a
       public hearing to toll the 10-year right to repurchase.

   15. modify the standard for determination of the fair value of the state’s interest in access
       rights to a highway right-of-way to be the same legal standard that is applied by the
       Texas Transportation Commission according to the Texas Transportation Code, which
       may include the impairment of highway access to or from real property where the real
       property adjoins the highway.

S.B. 181 (Shapiro) – Water Conservation: would require the Texas Water Development Board
and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to: (1) develop uniform methodology and
guidance for calculating and reporting municipal water use and conservation; (2) develop
guidance for water utilities for using service populations (municipal, commercial, power, etc.)
when developing per-capita based calculations; and (3) incorporate the new methodology and
guidance into the water conservation plans required for new water rights permittees receiving
more than 1000 acre-feet per year, retail public utilities with 3,300 connections or more, and
applicants to the Texas Water Assistance Program.

S.B. 201 (Uresti) – Property Tax: would establish a specific formula to calculate the tax due on
a residence homestead of a totally disabled veteran when an individual terminates the exemption
for one property and qualifies a different property for the exemption in the same year.

S.B. 202 (Shapiro) – Fiscal Notes: would require the Legislative Budget Board to attach to the
fiscal note of each bill that authorizes the spending or diversion of state funds: (1) a statement of
the purposes of the bill; and (2) a set of reasonable benchmarks that measure whether the bill’s
purposes have been achieved that are to be used by the board and legislature to review statutes
that do not meet the requisite benchmarks.

S.B. 204 (Zaffirini) – Mandatory Health Benefits: would require that certain health benefit
plans, including those offered by a governmental risk pool, provide coverage for devices that
facilitate insulin therapy and enhance glucose control.

S.B. 209 (Zaffirini) – Juvenile Case Managers: would: (1) require the judge of a municipal
court that has a juvenile case manager to either directly supervise the case manager or delegate
the duty to another officer of the court who is authorized to conduct hearings under the Family
Code; and (2) prohibit the judge from delegating the duty of supervising a juvenile case manager
to the clerk of the court.

S.B. 211 (Ellis) – Elections: would: (1) provide that an election officer serving an early voting
polling place is a deputy voter registrar and has the same authority as a regular deputy registrar;
(2) allow for the registration of eligible voters during early voting upon the submission of certain
documentation; and (3) prescribe registration procedures that must be followed by the voter
registrar.

S.B. 212 (Ellis) – Elections: would provide that: (1) an election officer commits a state jail
felony if the officer removes the name of an eligible voter from the list of registered voters or
otherwise prevents an eligible person from voting; (2) an individual commits a class B
misdemeanor if the individual knowingly deceives another person regarding the time, place, or
manner of conducting an election or qualifications governing voter eligibility for an election in
the state; (3) a person may report a suspected violation to the secretary of state; (4) the secretary
of state must notify the attorney general of a violation if the secretary determines there is
reasonable cause to suspect that an offense was committed; (5) the attorney general or a person
harmed by a violation under this section may bring a civil action seeking a permanent or
temporary injunction, restraining order, or other appropriate order; and (6) the secretary of state
must submit all reported violations of this section to the legislature each year.

S.B. 213 (Ellis) – Elections: would: (1) require that two voter registrars be present at each
polling place while the polls are open; and (2) provide that a person who would be eligible to
vote in an election, but for the requirement to be a registered voter, shall be accepted for voting
in the precinct of the person's residence if on the day the person wishes to vote the person
submits a voter registration application and presents proof of identification.

S.B. 214 (Ellis) – Elections: would provide that: (1) with the exception of a person who is
certified for participation in the address confidentiality program administered by the attorney
general that does not submit a registration application by personal delivery, any qualified person
who will be absent from his/her county on election day is eligible for early voting by mail; and
(2) a person who is in jail on a misdemeanor charge is eligible for early voting by mail in certain
circumstances.

S.B. 231 (Nelson) – Intoxication Offenses: would require, with some exceptions, a court to
order the Texas Department of Safety to permanently revoke the driver's license of a person
convicted of certain intoxication offenses.

S.B. 241 (Ellis) – Mandatory Health Benefits: would generally require health benefit plans to
provide coverage for HIV tests.

S.B. 244 (Patrick) – Peace Officer Training: would allow the Bill Blackwood Law
Enforcement Institute of Texas (LEMIT) to establish and offer a continuing education program
for second-in-command staff that would exempt the second in command staff from the
continuing education standards in the Occupations Code.

S.B. 259 (Harris) – Immigration: would provide that: (1) a peace officer shall inquire into the
immigration status of any person under arrest on other grounds; and (2) if a person is under
arrest and the person has also violated a civil or criminal provision of the federal immigration
laws, the arresting peace officer shall identify and report the person to United States Immigration
and Customs Enforcement.

S.B. 262 (Carona) – Mandatory Health Benefits: would require the issuer of a health benefit
plan to provide coverage for orally administered anticancer medication at the same level that it
provides coverage for intravenously administered or injected cancer medications. (Companion
bill is H.B. 438 by Thompson).

S.B. 275 (Uresti) – Hunting: would allow the capture, trapping, or hunting of a reptile,
amphibian, or insect on a public road or right-of-way.

S.B. 280 (Davis) –Employment Discrimination: tracks the language of the Federal Lilly
Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and would: (1) extend the statute of limitations on pay discrimination
claims every time an individual is paid based on a past discriminatory decision made by an
employer; and (2) allow back pay and benefits for up to two years preceding the date of filing a
complaint of pay discrimination.

S.B. 296 (Wentworth) – Residential Development: would, among other things: (1) authorize a
school district to mitigate the effects of certain residential development by allowing the Texas
Education Commissioner to purchase, for fair market value, a percentage of the real property
acreage within the residential development site if the commissioner determines that the
development is likely to significantly increase elementary school student enrollment in a school
district and that the increase in enrollment warrants the construction of a new elementary school
facility to accommodate the increased elementary school population; (2) provide that a city may
not grant final approval to a plat or replat of a residential development or issue permits required
for a residential development unless the developer presents evidence of having complied with the
mitigating measures; and (3) provide that any other law that requires a city to approve and plat,
replat, or permit within a certain is tolled until the developer presents evidence of having
complied with the mitigating measures.

S.B. 299 (Wentworth) – Property Tax: would require real property sales price disclosure upon
the filing of deeds at the county clerk’s office.

S.B. 305 (Huffman) – Burglary of a Vehicle: would make burglary of a vehicle a state jail
felony offense and provide that the amount of community service work ordered by a judge may
not exceed 200 hours for a Class A misdemeanor offense or any other misdemeanor for which
the maximum permissible confinement exceeds six months or the maximum permissible fine
exceeds $4,000. (Companion bill is H.B. 20 by Riddle).

S.B. 313 (Seliger) – Special Districts: would allow the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ) to adopt rules regarding the inclusion of all or part of the land within an existing
priority groundwater management area in a new or existing special district.

S.B. 315 (Carona) – Criminal Street Gangs: would: (1) require a juvenile justice agency to
compile criminal information into an intelligence database for the purpose of investigating or
prosecuting criminal street gangs; and (2) include local law enforcement representatives on the
Texas Violent Gang Task Force.

S.B. 316 (Whitmire) – Felony Forfeiture: would: (1) prohibit prosecutors from executing a
plea bargain agreement that would waive a person’s interest in property seized under the felony
forfeiture laws; (2) provide that post-judgment interest on money seized under the felony
forfeiture laws shall be used for the same purposes that the principal is used; (3) prohibit the use
of felony forfeiture funds for: (a) political campaigns; (b) donations to certain organizations that
do not assist in the detection, investigation, or prosecution of crime or provide rehabilitation
services; (c) judicial training; (d) certain travel expenses; (e) alcoholic beverages; (f) any
expenditure not approved by the city council if the law enforcement agency head holds elective
office and is not running for reelection or did not prevail in a reelection bid; or (g) a salary,
expense, or allowance for an employee of the law enforcement agency that was not approved by
the city council; (3) require more detailed local audits of the expenditure of felony forfeiture
funds; (4) permit the state auditor to investigate at any time the expenditure of felony forfeiture
funds; (5) permit the attorney general to sue a law enforcement agency or prosecutor who
misuses felony forfeiture funds; and (6) permit up to a $100,000 civil fine for misuse of felony
forfeiture funds.

S.B. 319 (Carona) – Electricity: would, among other things, provide that: (1) until a
municipally owned utility or electric cooperative implements customer choice, the utility or
cooperative may not reduce in any manner programs already offered to assist low-income
electric customers; (2) the Public Utility Commission shall adopt and enforce rules requiring
transmission and distribution utilities to establish a low-income electric customers program fund
under commission oversight; and (3) the commission by rule shall impose a nonbypassable low-
income electric customers program fund fee in an amount not to exceed 63 cents per megawatt
hour, allocated to customers based on the amount of kilowatt hours used, on the retail electric
customers of a municipally owned utility or electric cooperative beginning on the first day of the
sixth month preceding the date on which the utility or cooperative implements customer choice.

S.B. 321 (Hegar) – Firearms: would: (1) preclude an employer from prohibiting an employee
who has a concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm or ammunition in a
locked, privately owned vehicle in a parking lot, garage, or parking area provided for employees;
but (2) provide that the bill’s restriction on an employer do not apply to a vehicle owned or
leased by the employer and used by the employee, unless the employee is required to transport or
store a firearm in the official discharge of the employee’s duties.

S.B. 326 (Duncan) – Property Tax: would modify the Super-Freeport property tax exemption
to clarify that the exemption is not available for goods stored at a warehouse that is in “any way”
owned or controlled by the owner of the goods.

S.B. 330 (Watson) – Renewable Energy: would provide: (1) for the establishment of additional
goals for renewable energy capacity in the state; (2) that the Public Utility Commission shall
adopt rules necessary to administer and enforce the goals; and (3) that, at a minimum, the rules
shall establish the minimum annual renewable energy requirement for each retail electric
provider, municipally owned utility, and electric cooperative operating in this state in a manner
reasonably calculated by the commission to produce, on a statewide basis, compliance with the
requirements.

S.B. 331 (Shapiro) – Synthetic Derivative of Marihuana: would make any quantity of a
synthetic chemical compound that is a cannabinoid receptor agonist and that mimics the
pharmacological effect of naturally occurring cannabinoids subject to Penalty Group 2 of the
Texas Controlled Substances Act. (Companion bill is H.B. 597 by Madden.)

S.B. 332 (Fraser) – Groundwater: would: (1) create a vested ownership interest in, and a right
to produce, groundwater below the surface of a landowner’s real property, and (2) prohibit an
aquifer authority from depriving or divesting the landowner or his lessee of that right.

S.B. 333 (Fraser) – Water Supply Corporations: would, among other things, provide for
qualifications and election procedures for directors of non-profit water supply corporations.

S.B. 339 (Gallegos) – Air Quality: would require the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ) to: (1) after receiving a report of an unauthorized emission of air contaminants
from one or more emissions points at a regulated entity, provide notice of the emissions event to
officials who represent the area in which the event occurred, including a mayor of any city in the
area; and (2) maintain a list of recent emissions events on TCEQ’s Web site that is easily
accessible by the public.
S.B. 344 (Gallegos) – Civil Service: would: (1) repeal the statutory provision allowing a fire or
police department to maintain a separate protected personnel file; (2) include failure to maintain
a certification or fulfill a condition of employment as a civil service rule subjecting a disciplinary
action taken on these bases to the civil service disciplinary procedure; (3) allow a city with civil
service to pay seniority pay and longevity pay to an individual temporarily assigned to a higher
classification if the city offers both seniority and longevity pay; (4) allow a city less than 1.5
million in population to pay both seniority and longevity pay; and (5) require a city to pay
seniority pay, if adopted, in a nondiscriminatory fashion.

S.B. 348 (Estes) – Salvia Divinorum: would: (1) make the sell or delivery of salvia divinorum,
Salvinorin A, or a product containing salvia divinorum or Salvinorin A to a person younger than
18 years of age a Class C misdemeanor; and (2) provide that it is a defense to prosecution for the
offense described in (1) above if the person presents an apparently valid proof of identification
indicating, among other things, that the person is 18 years of age or older.

S.B. 350 (Williams) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would: (1) combine the
municipality accumulation fund, employees saving fund, and current service annuity reserve
fund into one fund to be called the benefit accumulation fund; and (2) require all benefits to be
paid into and out of the benefit accumulation fund. (Note: This bill summary has been slightly
revised from the previously-published summary.)

S.B. 355 (Ellis) – Statewide Smoking Ban: would: (1) prohibit smoking in most public places,
in places of employment, and in seating areas at outdoor events; (2) provide that the bill’s
provisions preempt and supersede a local ordinance, rule, or regulation that prohibits smoking to
a lesser degree; (3) provide that a local ordinance, rule, or regulation that prohibits or restricts
smoking to a greater degree than the bill is not preempted; (4) require the Texas Department of
State Health Services to annually request other government agencies to establish local operating
procedures to comply with the bill, including urging all federal, state, county, and municipal
governments as well as independent school districts to update existing smoking control
regulations to be consistent with the current health findings regarding secondhand smoke; and
(5) require any entity that grants business licenses, including a city, to provide notice of the state
smoking law to each license applicant.

S.B. 357 (Van de Putte) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead
property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving
spouse has not remarried; (2) the property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse
when the disabled veteran died; and (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the
surviving spouse. The bill would also provide a complete residence homestead property tax
exemption for the owner of a property if: (1) the property remains the principal residence of one
or more of the disabled veteran’s surviving children who are under the age of 18 and unmarried;
and (2) the property was the principal place of residence for the children when the disabled
veteran died. (Note: please see S.J.R. 14, below.)

S.B. 358 (Wentworth) – Governmental Immunity: would waive municipal sovereign and
governmental immunity from suit and liability for damages in any amount.
S.B. 359 (Wentworth) – Emergency Services Districts: would repeal Chapter 776 of the
Texas Health and Safety Code, which governs emergency services districts in counties with a
population of 125,000 or less, and convert all existing districts in counties of 125,000 or less into
a district operated under Chapter 775 of the Texas Health and Safety Code.

S.B. 360 (Fraser) – Rural Water Assistance Fund: would expand the permitted uses of the
Texas Rural Water Assistance Fund.

S.B. 361 (Duncan) – Construction Contracts: would essentially eliminate “broad form”
indemnification in construction contracts by, among other things, providing: (1) that a provision
in a construction contract, or in an agreement collateral to or affecting a construction contract, is
void and unenforceable as against public policy to the extent that it requires an indemnitor to
indemnify, hold harmless, or defend another party to the construction contract or a third party
against a claim caused by the negligence or fault, the breach or violation of a statute, ordinance,
governmental regulation, standard, or rule, or the breach of contract of the indemnitee, its agent
or employee, or any third party under the control or supervision of the indemnitee, other than the
indemnitor or its agent, employee, or subcontractor of any tier; (2) for an exception to (1), above,
for a provision in a construction contract that requires a person to indemnify, hold harmless, or
defend another party to the construction contract or a third party against a claim for the bodily
injury or death of an employee of the indemnitor, its agent, or its subcontractor of any tier; (3)
that provision in a construction contract that requires the purchase of additional insured
coverage, or any coverage endorsement or provision within an insurance policy providing
additional insured coverage, is void and unenforceable to the extent that it requires or provides
coverage the scope of which is prohibited for an agreement to indemnify, hold harmless, or
defend; (4) for certain exclusions from (1), above; and (5) that the provisions of the bill may not
be waived by contract or otherwise.

S.B. 364 (Ogden) – Law Enforcement: would require any police department that enforces
intoxication laws to report information regarding arrests for intoxication offenses to the Texas
Department of Public Safety.

S.B. 366 (Ogden) – Public Information Act: would repeal the exception to the Public
Information Act that protects information relating to competitive matters of a public power
utility.

S.B. 370 (Seliger) – Texas Water Development Board Assistance: would prohibit an
applicant for financial assistance or loans from the Texas Water Development Board from
receiving assistance if the applicant has failed to satisfactorily complete a request by the
agency’s executive administrator or a regional planning group for information relevant to the
project for which the assistance is being requested, including a water infrastructure financing
survey.

S.B. 374 (Wentworth) – Law Enforcement Fees: would increase the fee paid by a defendant
for executing or processing an issued arrest warrant, capias, or capias pro fine to $75, to be paid
to the executing or processing law enforcement agency after conviction, upon the agency’s
request.
S.B. 375 (Wentworth) – Public Information Act: would provide that certain types of
information are expressly public unless they are made confidential under the Public Information
Act or other law.

S.B. 383 (Harris) – Court Costs: would: (1) require a defendant to pay a $45 fee as a cost of
court on conviction of certain intoxication offenses; and (2) authorize a county that maintains a
certified breath alcohol testing program to keep the fee, in addition to other court costs relating to
a breath alcohol testing program to which the county is entitled.

S.B. 389 (Williams) – Water Utilities: would require a water utility that serve 250 connections
or more in Harris County and certain surrounding counties to make certain plans and provisions
for operations during an emergency, including an extended power outage.

S.B. 393 (Patrick) – Sales Tax: would do the following regarding the reallocation of city sales
tax revenues due to a mistake: (1) allow a taxpayer to amend a tax report for a previous
reporting period within the statute of limitations; (2) grant cities a right to notification and
independent audit review regarding reallocation decisions; and (3) allow cities to view certain
information concerning the pending reallocation, regardless of whether the information is
confidential. (Companion bill is H.B. 590 by Thompson.)

S.B. 395 (Patrick) – Intoxication Offenses: would make changes and add requirements to
deferred adjudication guidelines, nondisclosure order petitions, and enhancement for certain
intoxication offenses.

S.B. 396 (Deuell) – Firefighter Death Investigation: would broaden the state fire marshal’s
authority to investigate firefighter deaths including any factors that may have contributed to a
death in connection with an on-duty incident.

S.B. 402 (West) – Community Land Trusts: would provide that the governing body of a city
or county by ordinance or order may create or designate one or more community land trusts
(CLTs), including a housing finance corporation or a land trust operated by a community
housing development organization certified by the city or county, to operate in the city or county.
(Note: A CLT is an affordable housing tool generally used in gentrifying areas in which the
CLT acquires title to land, sells or leases housing units located on the land, and leases the land
through ground leases with terms of at least 50 years.) Land in a CLT would be tax-exempt.

S.B. 403 (Eltife) – Gas Ratemaking: would – among other things – provide that, in establishing
a gas utility's rates, the regulatory authority (a city or the Railroad Commission) shall allow
expenses for pension and other postemployment benefits, as determined by actuarial or other
similar studies in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, in amounts the
regulatory authority finds reasonable and necessary.

S.B. 404 (Hegar) – Health Care Benefit: this bill is the same as H.B. 816, above).
S.B. 409 (Estes) – Property Tax: would: (1) require the State Soil and Water Conservation
Board, with the assistance of the comptroller, to develop standards for determining whether land
qualifies for appraisal based on water-stewardship use; (2) provide that the chief appraiser an
appraisal review board shall apply the standards adopted by the State Soil and Water
Conservation board and comptroller.

S.B. 412 (West) – Public Improvement Districts: would, among other things, provide that
costs of improvements in a public improvement district may be paid or reimbursed by any
combination of certain methods if the improvements are dedicated, conveyed, leased, or
otherwise provided to a city, county, or related entity for the benefit of the city, county, or related
entity.

S.B. 417 (West) – Municipal Court Records: would prohibit a municipal court from disclosing
to the public any information that is the subject of an order of nondisclosure.

S.B. 422 (Duncan) – Assessments: this bill is the same as H.B. 1058, above.

S.B. 423 (Lucio) – Survivor Benefits: would make a survivor of an individual killed in the line
of duty: (1) eligible to purchase health benefits from the deceased officer’s employer’s benefits
carrier even if the survivor has health benefits with another employer; and (2) eligible to apply
for health benefits until September 1, 2012, if the officer died after September 1993.
(Companion bill is H.B. 983 by Menendez).

S.B. 432 (Jackson) – Property Tax: would reduce the penalty for failure to make a timely
installment payment of ad valorem taxes on property in a disaster area from twelve percent for
each month the tax remains unpaid, to six percent for each month the tax remains unpaid, plus
interest. (Companion bill is H.B. 803 by Bonnen.)

S.B. 437 (Nelson) – Municipal Utility Districts: would provide that, to be eligible to vote in an
election to confirm the creation of a municipal utility district or to authorize the district’s first
bond issuance, a person must reside in the district for at least one year immediately preceding the
date of the election.

S.B. 440 (Lucio) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require all individual health benefit
plans to cover certain mental illnesses.

S.B. 441 (Lucio) – Mandatory Health Benefit: would require a health benefit plan to provide
coverage for autism spectrum disorder until the individual is 17 years of age.

S.B. 442 (Wentworth) – Geospatial Data: would require a city to provide certain notice on
each geospatial data product (including any basic map) that: (1) is created or hosted by the city;
(2) appears to represent property boundaries; and (3) was not produced using information from
an on-the-ground survey conducted under the supervision of a registered professional land
surveyor.
S.B. 449 (Watson) – Property Tax: would: (1) require the State Soil and Water Conservation
Board, with the assistance of the comptroller, to develop standards for determining whether land
qualifies for appraisal based on water-stewardship use; (2) provide that the chief appraiser and
appraisal review board shall apply the standards adopted by the State Soil and Water
Conservation board and comptroller; and (3) provide that land is not eligible for appraisal on the
basis of use for water stewardship if: (a) the land was appraised as qualified open-space land or
qualified timber land at the time the water-stewardship use began; and (b) was developed to a
degree that precludes the land from eligibility for appraisal on a basis other than use for water
stewardship or under the subchapter relating to qualified timber land.

S.B. 454 (Ellis) – Energy Conservation: would, among other things, require that a city annually
report to the State Energy Conservation Office regarding the entity’s efforts and progress relating
to energy conservation, including information regarding the city’s seasonal-specific thermostat
settings and thermostat settings for nonpeak or off hours.

S.B. 455 (Ellis) – Air Quality: would impose certain restrictions on the location and operation
of concrete crushing facilities.

S.B. 459 (Seliger) – Property Assessments: would: (1) authorize a city to create a voluntary
property assessment in order to finance certain water improvements; (2) require a city that
authorizes contractual assessments for water or energy efficiency improvements to file written
notice of each assessment in the real property records of the county in which the property is
located; (3) provide that a contractual assessment for water or energy efficiency improvements
has the same priority as a lien for city property taxes. (Companion bill is H.B. 659 by Villareal.)

S.B. 462 (West) – Expunction: would expand the situations in which an individual would be
entitled to have all records and files relating to an arrest expunged.

S.B. 474 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would extend the current ten-percent appraisal cap to
business property. (The cap currently applies only to residential homesteads.)

S.B. 477 (Patrick) – Elections: would provide that the allocation of election expenses in a joint
election involving a school district must provide that the school district is responsible only for
the proportion of election expenses that correspond to the total number of registered voters in the
school district as compared to the total numbers of registered voters of all political subdivisions
participating in the election.

S.B. 480 (Hegar) – Municipal Court: would provide that, for a conviction from a municipal
court of record, an appellant has the right to appeal to the court of appeals if: (1) the fine
assessed against the defendant exceeds $100 and the judgment is affirmed by the appellate court;
or (2) the sole issue is the constitutionality of the statute or ordinance on which a conviction is
based.

S.B. 492 (Fraser) – Solar Power Incentives: would, among many other things, provide that:
(1) the bill applies only to an electric cooperative or municipally owned utility with retail sales of
more than 500,000 megawatt hours in 2007; (2) electric cooperatives and municipally owned
utilities administer incentive programs that increase the amount of solar generation capacity
installed in this state in a cost-effective, market-neutral, and nondiscriminatory manner;
(3) customers of electric cooperatives and municipally owned utilities will have access to
incentives for the installation of distributed solar generation; (4) electric cooperatives and
municipally owned utilities expend funds to increase the amount of solar generation capacity at a
total funding level consistent with the requirements for investor owned electric utilities in this
state; (5) beginning not later than September 1, 2014, an electric cooperative or municipally
owned utility must report annually to the state energy conservation office information regarding
the efforts of the municipally owned utility or electric cooperative related to solar power; and
(6) an electric cooperative or municipally owned utility may recover the costs imposed by the
bill through a nonbypassable fee or another cost recovery mechanism as determined by the
governing body of the electric cooperative or municipally owned utility.

S.B. 494 (Fraser) – Finance: would allow a local governmental entity, including a city, to
borrow money for purposes of a hospital owned or operated by the entity at a rate not to exceed
the maximum annual percentage rate allowed by law at the time the loan is made.

S.B. 500 (Jackson) – Red Light Cameras: would: (1) prohibit a local authority, including a
city, from implementing or operating an automated traffic control system with respect to a
highway or street under its jurisdiction (but would grandfather certain, existing contracts); (2)
repeal a municipal court’s jurisdiction over cases involving photographic traffic signal
enforcement offenses; (3) repeal provisions of the Health and Safety Code that establish regional
trauma accounts; (4) repeal provisions of the Transportation Code that establish the amount of
and direct the deposit of civil and administrative penalties collected as a result of a photographic
traffic signal enforcement system; and (5) repeal Chapter 707 of the Transportation Code, which
authorizes a photographic traffic signal enforcement system.

S.B. 504 (Davis) – Electric Utility Rates: would add school districts and charter schools to the
current list of entities that are entitled to a discounted rate for electric service provided by an
electric utility or a municipally owned utility.

S.B. 513 (Ellis) – Transportation: this bill is the same as H.B. 1105, above.

S.B. 515 (Patrick) – Mandated Health Benefits: would prohibit the issuance of a penalty for
an individual who refuses to enroll in a health benefit plan.

S.B. 516 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since
the death of the disabled veteran. (Note: please see S.J.R. 21, below.)

S.B. 519 (Hegar) – Municipal Court: would extend the period after the rendition of judgment
and sentence in municipal court during which a motion for new trial must be made to five days.

S.B. 520 (Hegar) – County Assistance Districts: this bill is the same as H.B. 1107, above.)
S.B. 521 (Carona) – Mandated Health Benefits: would prohibit a health benefit provider from
dropping an enrollee because the enrollee uses an out of network doctor.

S.B. 523 (Nichols) – Transportation Funding: would provide that, beginning in ten percent
increments in 2013 and being complete in 2022, the net revenue derived from the state sales tax
imposed on the sale of a motor vehicle sold in this state shall be deposited to the credit of the
state highway fund. (Note: Please see S.J.R. 22, below.)

S.B. 526 (Whitmire) – Felony Forfeiture: would: (1) prohibit prosecutors from executing a
plea bargain agreement that would waive a person’s interest in property seized under the felony
forfeiture laws; (2) provide that post-judgment interest on money seized under the felony
forfeiture laws shall be used for the same purposes that the principal is used; (3) prohibit the use
of felony forfeiture funds for: (a) political campaigns; (b) donations to certain organizations that
do not assist in the detection, investigation, or prosecution of crime or provide rehabilitation
services; (c) judicial training; (d) certain travel expenses; (e) alcoholic beverages; (f) any
expenditure not approved by the city council if the law enforcement agency head holds elective
office and is not running for reelection or did not prevail in a reelection bid; or (g) a salary,
expense, or allowance for an employee of the law enforcement agency that was not approved by
the city council; (3) require more detailed local audits of the expenditure of felony forfeiture
funds; (4) permit the state auditor to investigate at any time the expenditure of felony forfeiture
funds; (5) permit the attorney general to sue a law enforcement agency or prosecutor who
misuses felony forfeiture funds; and (6) permit up to a $100,000 civil fine for misuse of felony
forfeiture funds.
S.B. 513 (Ellis) – Transportation: this bill is the same as H.B. 1105, above.

S.B. 515 (Patrick) – Mandated Health Benefits: would prohibit the issuance of a penalty for
an individual who refuses to enroll in a health benefit plan.

S.B. 516 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would provide a complete residence homestead property
tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since
the death of the disabled veteran. (Note: please see S.J.R. 21, below.)

S.B. 519 (Hegar) – Municipal Court: would extend the period after the rendition of judgment
and sentence in municipal court during which a motion for new trial must be made to five days.

S.B. 520 (Hegar) – County Assistance Districts: this bill is the same as H.B. 1107, above.)

S.B. 521 (Carona) – Mandated Health Benefits: would prohibit a health benefit provider from
dropping an enrollee because the enrollee uses an out of network doctor.

S.B. 523 (Nichols) – Transportation Funding: would provide that, beginning in ten percent
increments in 2013 and being complete in 2022, the net revenue derived from the state sales tax
imposed on the sale of a motor vehicle sold in this state shall be deposited to the credit of the
state highway fund. (Note: Please see S.J.R. 22, below.)

S.B. 527 (Fraser) – Air Quality: This bill is the same as H.B. 1145, above.)
S.B. 531 (Davis) – Sobriety Checkpoints: would authorize sobriety checkpoints by the Texas
Department of Public Safety, the sheriff's department of a county with a population of 250,000 or
more, or the police department of a city with a population of 500,000 or more; and (2) provide
detailed guidelines for checkpoint operations, including – among many others – requirements
that: (1)the mayor of a city approve a checkpoint operated by the police department of the city;
(b) the law enforcement agency record in writing and publish on an appropriate publicly
accessible Internet Web site the procedures used to implement the bill; (c) before beginning the
operation of a sobriety checkpoint, the law enforcement agency shall publicize through the use of
the media the date and time for the operation of the checkpoint but is not required to disclose the
location of the checkpoint; and (d) not later than January 15 of each calendar year, each law
enforcement agency that operated a sobriety checkpoint during the preceding calendar year shall
report the operation of the checkpoint to the traffic safety section of the traffic operations
division of the Texas Department of Transportation. (Companion bill is H.B. 439 by T. Smith.)

S.B. 536 (Davis) – Law Enforcement: would require a city peace officer who acts as a school
resource officer under a memorandum of understanding between the school district and the city
to comply with the use of confinement, restraint, seclusion, and time-out provisions outlined in
the Education Code.

S.B. 538 (Nichols) – Transportation Reinvestment Zones: would amend the law relating to
transportation reinvestment zones (TRZs) to provide that: (1) an ordinance designating an area as
a TRZ must, among other things, designate the base year for purposes of establishing the tax
increment base of the municipality; (2) from taxes collected on property in a TRZ, the city shall
pay into the tax increment account the tax increment produced by the city, less any amount
allocated under previous agreements; (3) all, or the portion specified by the city, of the money
deposited to a tax increment account must be used to fund the transportation project for which
the TRZ was designated, and any remaining money deposited to the tax increment account may
be used for other transportation projects or for improvements in the TRZ; (4) the governing body
of a city may contract with a public or private entity to develop, redevelop, or improve a
transportation project in a TRZ and may pledge and assign all or a specified amount of money in
the tax increment account to that entity; (5) to accommodate changes in the scope of the project
for which a TRZ was designated, the boundaries of a zone may be amended, with certain
exceptions; and (6) county TRZ authority is expanded.

S.B. 540 (Van de Putte) – Property Tax: would: (1) require the comptroller to study the fiscal
impact that would have been created during the preceding ten years by the adjustment of the
maximum amount of the exemption to which a disabled veteran and the surviving spouses and
children of disabled veterans, and certain members of the armed forces, are entitled; and (2)
require a local government to provide information and assistance at the request of the
comptroller.

S.B. 541 (Carona) – Cruelty to Animals: would provide that when an animal’s owner has
cruelly treated the animal and been divested of ownership: (1) a court could order the animal to
be given to a city or county animal shelter; (2) a court must order the owner to pay any costs
incurred by a city or county animal shelter in housing and caring for the animal; (3) a court must
set the amount of bond for an appeal to include the estimated costs to house and care for the
impounded animal as provided by the city, county, or a nonprofit; (4) an officer that is unable to
sell the animal at auction may give the animal to a city or county animal shelter; and (5) the
owner may appeal the divestment order and the court shall provide either a transcript, clerk’s
record, or audio recording of the proceedings, depending upon whether the court is or is not a
court of record. (Companion bill is H.B. 963 by Hartnett.)

S.B. 542 (Hegar) – Police Chief Trainning: would provide that a police chief shall complete
the initial training and continuing education required under the Texas Education Code.
(Companion bill is H.B. 621 by Fletcher.)

S.B. 543 (Hegar) – Probate: would prohibit the charging of certain probate fees for the filing of
the will of an officer killed in the line of duty.

S.B. 545 (Seliger) – Police Education: would: (1) require a police chief to indicate that an
officer was terminated when filing a report to the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement
Officer and Education; (2) allow an officer to dispute a report stating that the officer was
terminated in an appeal to the State Office of Administrative Hearings; and (3) allow the
Commission to assess an administrative penalty against a police chief who fails to make a
correction to an employment termination report after being ordered to do so by the State Office
of Administrative Hearings. (Companion bill is H.B. 520 by Driver.)

S.B. 549 (Ellis) – TCEQ Permits: would require an applicant for certain new facility or
expansion of facility permits to, depending on the location of the facility in community with
certain percentages of minority inhabitants or inhabitants below the federal poverty level to: (1)
submit an environmental justice report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
(TCEQ); (2) file a public participation plan with the TCEQ, (3) if within city limits, consult with
the mayor to evaluate the need for a community environmental benefit agreement in order to
mitigate adverse effects on the community; and (4) participate in a public hearing.

S.B. 551 (Williams) – Property Tax: would provide that back taxes assessed on an
improvement to real property do not incur interest if: (1) the property on which the improvement
is located did not escape taxation in the year the improvement escaped taxation; (2) the appraisal
district had actual or constructive notice of the presence of the improvement the year the
improvement escaped taxation (constructive notice can be acquired if building permit is issued
for an improvement); and (3) the property owner pays all back taxes on the improvement within
120 days of when the tax bill for back taxes on improvement is sent to property owner.
(Companion bill is H.B. 234 by Otto.)

S.B. 552 (Carona) – Energy Efficiency: would, among many other things: (1) establish the
state-level Energy Efficiency Council (EEC); (2) provide that the EEC shall collect information
regarding energy savings and demand reduction by reviewing energy efficiency programs in the
state and submit the information collected to the Texas A&M energy systems laboratory, the
State Energy Conservation Office (SECO), and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas; (3)
authorize an area emissions reduction organization to establish an energy efficiency market
emission reduction credit program through which a utility, municipal utility, electric cooperative,
or state or local government may register savings from that entity’s energy efficiency measures
as emission reduction credits and sell or trade the credits in an effort to reduce emissions of air
pollutants in urban areas of this state; (4) provide that, to achieve energy conservation in the
construction of, renovations to, and additions to all residential, commercial, and industrial
buildings in this state, SECO, in consultation with the Texas A&M energy systems laboratory,
shall adopt the International Energy Conservation Code, as published at the end of each three-
year code development cycle, as the minimum requirements for those buildings; (5) provide that
SECO shall set an effective date for an energy code adopted under (4), above, that is not later
than nine months after publication of a new edition of the code at the end of each three-year code
development cycle of the International Energy Conservation Code; (6) mandate that a city
establish procedures for the administration and enforcement of the code, to ensure that code-
certified inspectors shall perform inspections and enforce the code in the inspectors’
jurisdictions, and to track and report to SECO on implementation of the code; (7) provide that a
city’s report must include a description of the measures taken to enforce the most recently
adopted version of the International Energy Conservation Code and an assessment of the rate of
compliance; (8) provide that a city or county may establish procedures to adopt local
amendments to the International Energy Conservation Code; (9) require the energy systems
laboratory to: (a) provide to counties and cities suggestions for modifications to the code to
increase energy efficiency by 15 percent above the efficiency achieved under the unamended
code; (b) provide technical assistance to a local government considering whether to adopt the
suggested modifications; (c) report its findings to the council, county, or city, including an
estimate based on suggested local amendments of any energy savings potential above the
unamended code and any resulting reduction in the emission of air pollutants; and (10) beginning
April 1, 2012, provide that a municipally owned utility must report each year to SECO
information regarding the combined effects of the energy efficiency activities of the utility from
the previous calendar year, including the utility’s annual goals, programs enacted to achieve
those goals, and any achieved energy demand or savings goals.

S.B. 555 (Watson) – LP Gas: would: (1) provide that an LP gas utility is a person that owns or
operates for compensation in this state equipment and facilities connected to a contiguous piping
system through which LP gas is supplied to residential and commercial end users; and (2) subject
an LP gas utility to the jurisdiction of the Texas Railroad Commission. (Note: This bill would
appear to preempt municipal regulation of LP gas utilities. Any city that regulates LP gas
utilities within its city limits should review the bill carefully.)

S.B. 572 (Nichols) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity: would: (1) broaden the group
of landowners required to be listed in an application for a certificate of convenience and
necessity (CCN); (2) broaden the group of landowners to whom notice of a CCN application
must be mailed; (3) require the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to create a
form that must be used to provide notice to landowners; (4) require the express consent of the
owner of a tract of land that is at least ten acres, any part of which in included in the proposed
area of the CCN, before any part of the land may be included in the CCN; and (5) in a city larger
than 500,000 population (or in that city’s ETJ), an owner of a tract of land of more than ten acres
may be included without consent, but retains the right to contest the inclusion at a public hearing
held by the TCEQ.
S.B. 573 (Nichols) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity: would: (1) broaden the group
of landowners eligible for expedited release from a certificate of convenience and necessity
(CCN); and (2) broaden the situations in which a landowner could petition for expedited release
from a CCN.

S.B. 574 (Van de Putte) – Mandated Health Benefit: would require coverage of serious
emotional disturbance of a child by group health benefit plans.

S.B. 577 (Duncan) – Facsimile Signatures: this bill is the same as H.B. 1250, above.

S.B. 578 (Fraser) – Municipal Court: would require a municipal court to take certain steps and
make certain provisions for witnesses testifying in a case.

S.B. 582 (Harris) – Property Tax: would allow a city to serve notice of delinquent property
taxes to a domestic or foreign limited liability company whose right to transact business in the
state was forfeited by the comptroller, or on a limited liability company that was involuntarily
terminated or had its registration revoked.

S.B. 589 (Uresti) – Property Tax: would: (1) clarify that only a citizen of the United States is
eligible to serve on an appraisal review board; (2) provide that appraisal review board members
are appointed by the local administrative district judge in the county in which the appraisal
district is established; and (3) provide that members of a consolidated appraisal review board are
appointed jointly by the local administrative district judges in the counties in which the appraisal
districts that are parties to the contract are established. (Companion bill is H.B. 1088 by C.
Howard.)

S.B. 592 (Pitts) – State Auditor: would authorize the state auditor to perform an audit of any
local governmental entity or political subdivision that received funding under the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. (Companion bill is H.B. 593 by Pitts.)

S.B. 600 (Rodriguez) – Immigration Status: would prohibit a peace officer from inquiring
about the nationality or immigration status of a victim or witness to a criminal offense, except as
necessary to investigate the offense.

S.B. 602 (Rodriguez) – Public Information: would: (1) authorize a governmental body to
redact certain motor vehicle record information without the necessity of requesting a decision
from the attorney general; (2) authorize a governmental body to redact a credit card, debit card,
charge card, or access device number without the necessity of requesting a decision from the
attorney general; (3) make a public information request that is modified in response to the
requirement of a deposit or bond a separate request that is considered received on the date the
governmental body receives the modified request; and (4) provide that if a governmental body
receives a written request by mail and cannot establish the actual date of receipt, the written
request is considered to be received on the third business day after the date of the postmark.
S.B. 608 (Rodriguez) – Fireworks: would: (1) authorize a county to impose a fee on a person
who sells fireworks in the unincorporated area of the county; and (2) make the explosion or
ignition of a firework in a public place or near a private residence a criminal offense.

S.B. 617 (Rodriguez) – Municipal Waste: would require a person who generates, collects,
conveys, transports, processes, stores, or disposes of municipal sewage sludge, grit trap waste, or
grease trap waste, to follow certain guidelines with regard to recordkeeping.

S.B. 618 (Rodriguez) – Sales Tax: would exempt from sales tax the sale, use, or installation of
a solar energy device that is installed on a retail customer’s side of the meter

S.B. 624 (Whitmire) – Driver Responsibility Program:                would repeal the state driver
responsibility program.

S.B. 627 (Davis) – Property Tax: would: (1) require a taxing unit to make a payment to the tax
increment fund not later than the 90th day after the later of: (a) the delinquency date for the unit’s
property taxes; or (b) the date the city or county that created the zone submits to the taxing unit
an invoice specifying the amount the taxing unit is required to pay into the tax increment zone;
and (2) allow a county commissioners court that enters into an agreement with a city council to
also enter into an agreement with the city council for payment into the tax increment fund on
behalf of a taxing unit other than the county if the property tax rate of the other taxing entity
must be approved by the commissioners court, or if the commissioners court is expressly
required by statute to levy the ad valorem taxes of the other entity.

S.B. 635 (Nichols) – Water Rates: would allow the executive director of the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to establish interim rates during an appeal of
water rates to the TCEQ.

S.B. 637 (Nichols) – Water and Sewer Rates: would prohibit the ratemaking authority (either a
city or the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality) from including legal expenses incurred
by a privately owned water and sewer utility during a contested ratemaking case or appeal in the
calculation of water rates, unless the proceeding or appeal results in the approval of the utility’s
proposed rate.

S.B. 640 (Seliger) – Procurement: this bill is the same as H.B. 1283, above.

S.B. 641 (Seliger) – Property Tax: would change the amount of interest that a city making a
refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an
annual rate that is equal to the auction average rate quoted on a bank discount basis for three-
month treasury bills issued by the federal government. (Companion bill is H.B. 1090 by
Gonzalez.)

S.B. 642 (Seliger) – TMRS: would: (1) allow a participating Texas Municipal Retirement
System (TMRS) city to adopt a non-retroactive flat rate Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA); (2)
to comply with federal law applicable to qualified plans, provide that any increased payment to
an annuitant resulting from such a COLA adopted by a city would be limited to the cumulative
increase the annuitant would have been entitled to receive if the 70 percent of CPI limit under
TMRS’s existing law had been applied to the annuity; and (3) require that, if a city adopts an
ordinance to either discontinue an annually repeating COLA or to reduce an annually repeating
COLA, the city must give written notice to members and annuitants at least 60 days prior to the
effective date of the change adopted in the ordinance.

S.B. 646 (Nichols) – Texas Forest Service: would: (1) allow the Texas Forest Service (TFS) to
provide incident management training to local fire personnel to develop the all-hazard response
capability of the state; (2) allow the director of the TFS to establish guidelines for volunteer fire
departments to assist TFS with wildfires when local firefighting resources are exhausted; (3)
allow TFS to compensate volunteer firefighters if resources are available; (4) require TFS to
enact a wildfire protection plan; (5) require TFS to review the frequency, size, and severity of
past wildfires or future wildfires when determining funding to volunteer fire departments; and
(6) allow TFS to designate a portion of the volunteer fire department assistance fund to be used
by local volunteer fire departments to be federal matching grant requirements.

S.B. 649 (Hinojosa) – Affordable Housing: would continue the existence of the Texas State
Affordable Housing Corporation for 12 years.

S.B. 655 (Hegar) – Texas Railroad Commission: would abolish the Texas Railroad
Commission, create the Texas Oil and Gas Commission, transfer of the powers and duties of the
Railroad Commission to the new commission, and provide for various administrative changes.

S.B. 657 (Huffman) – TCEQ: this bill is the same as H.B. 2694, above.

S.B. 658 (Huffman) – Workers Compensation: would: (1) provide for a contested case hearing
if a party has a medical dispute regarding workers compensation that is not resolved by an
independent review; (2) allow judicial review of the case after the contested case hearing if there
is still a dispute; (3) change the authority on who can allow an employee to seek an alternate
doctor from the workers’ compensation division to the workers’ compensation insurance carrier;
(4) change the authority on who can accelerate workers compensation benefits from the workers’
compensation division to the workers’ compensation insurance carrier; (5) subject to
administrative review: (a) denial of an alternate doctor subject to administrative review; (b)
denial of accelerated benefits; (c) a dispute as to the amount of benefits; (d) denial of
supplemental benefits; (e) medical fee dispute; and (6) change the way administrative violations
by workers’ compensation insurance carriers are treated. (Companion bill is H.B. 2605 by L.
Taylor.)

S.B. 660 (Hinojosa) – Texas Water Development Board: this bill is the same as H.B. 3530,
above.

S.B. 661 (Nichols) – Public Utility Commission: would extend the Public Utility Commission
for 12 years, and make various administrative changes to the commission. Of particular interest
to cities, the bill would transfer jurisdiction over water rates and services, and certificates of
convenience and necessity, from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to the
commission.
S.B. 665 (Hinojosa) – Department of Housing and Community Affairs: this bill is the same
as H.B. 2608, above.

S.B. 666 (Hinojosa) – Fire Hydrants: would provide that: (1) each public water system
responsible for any hydrant (e.g., a fire hydrant or a metal flush valve that looks like a fire
hydrant) shall: (a) paint all or the cap of the hydrant white if the hydrant is available to be used
only to fill a water tank on a fire truck used for fire suppression services; and (b) paint all or the
cap of the hydrant black if the hydrant is unavailable for use by the entity providing fire
suppression services in a fire emergency; (2) a hydrant is unavailable for use in a fire emergency
if it is unavailable for pumping directly from the hydrant or is unavailable for use in filling a
water tank on a fire truck used for fire suppression services; (3) a public water system may place
a black tarp over the hydrant or use another means to conceal the hydrant instead of painting all
or the cap of the hydrant black if the hydrant is temporarily unavailable for use in a fire
emergency for a period not to exceed 45 days; (4) not later than the 45th day after the date a
hydrant is concealed, the public water system responsible for the hydrant shall, depending on its
status, remove the tarp or other means of concealment paint all or the cap of the hydrant black;
(5) the bill’s provisions do not apply within the jurisdiction of a governmental entity that
maintains its own system for labeling or color coding its hydrants to any public water system that
has entered into a contract with a city or volunteer fire department to provide a water supply for
fire suppression services if the contract specifies a different system for labeling or color coding
hydrants; (6) the fact that all or the cap of a hydrant for which a public water system is
responsible is not painted black or concealed does not constitute a guarantee by the public water
system that the hydrant will deliver a certain amount of water flow at all times; and (7) a public
water system is not liable for a hydrant’s inability to provide adequate water supply in a fire
emergency.

S.B. 667 (Duncan) – Groundwater: would: (1) recognize the right of a landowner to seek and
attempt to capture the groundwater that underlies the surface of the land; (2) clarify that a
recognition of such rights shall not be construed to prohibit the reasonable regulation,
preservation, and conservation of groundwater by a groundwater management district; and (3)
outline the types of limitations a groundwater conservation district would be allowed to put on
the production of groundwater.

S.B. 669 (Wentworth) – Public Information: would: (1) define “manipulation,” for purposes
of the Public Information Act, to include a search of an e-mail or text message account and the
retrieval and transfer of e-mails or text messages into a paper or other format that can be
provided to or inspected by a requestor; (2) provide that time deadlines related to providing an
itemized estimate of charges toll deadlines to request an attorney general decision beginning on
the date the itemized or updated itemized statement is considered sent and ending on the date the
governmental body receives a response; and (3) provide that if a requestor modifies a request in
response to the requirement for a deposit or bond, the modified request is a separate request
considered received on the date the written modified request is received.

S.B. 670 (Gallegos) – Halfway Houses: would: (1) require that a private entity that proposes to
construct or operate a halfway house within 1,000 feet of a residential area, primary school,
secondary school, park, or public recreation area give written notice to a city that includes within
its boundaries all or part of the land within the 1,000 foot area; (2) require the private entity to
post an outdoor sign at the proposed location of the halfway house indicating that a halfway
house is intended to be located on the premises; (3) authorize the private entity to operate the
halfway house within the 1,000 foot area unless local consent is denied; and (4) provide that
local consent to a halfway house is granted unless, not later than 60 days after receiving notice,
the city council determines by resolution that it is not in the best interest of the city.

S.B. 672 (Gallegos) – Air Quality: would require the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ) to: (1) establish and maintain an air pollutant watch list; (2) adopt guidelines for
effects screening levels for air contaminants as determined by the TCEQ; and (3) provide notice
of certain emissions events.

S.B. 673 (Gallegos) – Environmental Enforcement: would expand the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality’s (TCEQ) supplemental environmental project program by authorizing
the TCEQ to approve a supplemental environmental project in lieu of a fine that is necessary to
bring the city into compliance with environmental laws, remediate environmental harm caused
by the city’s alleged violation, or that the city has already agreed to perform under a preexisting
agreement.

S.B. 677 (Gallegos) – Public Information: would authorize the imposition of a civil penalty,
not to exceed $1,000, for each violation of the Public Information Act by a governmental body
and provide that each day a violation continues is a separate violation.

S.B. 682 (Huffman) – Criminal History Records: would: (1) entitle an appraisal district to
obtain criminal history record information from the Texas Department of Public Safety for a
person who is an applicant for appointment to the appraisal review board; and (2) allow the
appraisal district to provide the criminal history record information to the local administrative
district judge or to the appraisal review board commissioners if they are appointed by the local
administrative district judge.

S.B. 687 (Huffman) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) make various changes to the law
regarding the interception of wire, oral, or electronic communications for law enforcement
purposes; (2) provide that in order to be eligible to intercept a wire, oral, or electronic
communication in a circumstance that is not an immediate life-threatening situation, a designated
law enforcement agency must adopt a written policy and submit the policy to the director of the
Department of Public Safety (director) for approval; (3) require that, if the director approves the
policy described in (2), above, chief law enforcement officers, including police chiefs, would
submit to the director a written list of peace officers authorized to possess, install, monitor, or
operate wire, oral, or electronic communications interception equipment in a non-life-threatening
situation; (4) would authorize the department to conduct audits of law enforcement agencies to
ensure compliance with the written policy described in (2), above; and (5) require that a peace
officer is authorized to operate or monitor the interception of a wire, oral, or electronic
communication in a non-life-threatening situation only is the officer completes at least 16 hours
of related training.
S.B. 694 (West) – Metal Recycling: would, among many other things: (1) add various items,
including fire hydrants, an item with the logo of a governmental entity or utility, and wire that
has been burned to remove the insulation, to the list of regulated metals under state law; (2)
provide that a county, city, or other political subdivision may require the record of purchase of
regulated metals to contain a clear and legible thumbprint of a seller; (3) provide that a county,
city, or other political subdivision that issues a license or permit to a metal recycling entity shall
issue a notice to an owner or operator that is operating without the license or permit informing
the owner or operator that the owner or operator may be subject to criminal and civil penalties if
the owner or operator does not submit an application for the appropriate license or permit; (4)
provide that a person commits a misdemeanor if the person owns or operates a metal recycling
entity and does not submit an application for the appropriate license or permit; (5) authorize the
Department of Public Safety (DPS) to enter into contracts relating to the operation of the
statewide electronic reporting system and database; and (6) from fines collected and distributed
to the DPS for violations of metal recycling laws, mandate that DPS by rule establish and
implement a grant program to provide funding to assist local law enforcement agencies in
preventing the theft of regulated metals.

S.B. 695, S.B. 699, S.B. 702, S.B. 703 (Watson) – State Finances: would provide for greater
accountability and transparency in the state budget process.

S.B. 697 (Watson) – State Budget Plan: would create the State Budgeting Plan Legislative
Advisory Committee, which could include a member nominated by the American Federation of
State, County, and Municipal Employees as one of its 17 members, to develop a comprehensive
state budgeting plan consisting of recommended state budgeting guidelines and processes the
implementation of which are anticipated to foster the state’s current and long-term economic
health.

S.B. 705 (Watson) – Unfunded Mandates: would, among other things, provide that: (1) the
unfunded legislative mandates interagency work group is created, and consists of seven
members, including: (a) one current or former officer or employee of a political subdivision
appointed by the lieutenant governor; and (b) one current or former officer or employee of a
political subdivision appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives; (2) on or before
the September 1 following a regular session of the legislature and on or before the 90th day after
the last day of a special session of the legislature, the interagency work group shall publish a list
of legislative mandates for which the legislature has not provided reimbursement and that were
enacted by the legislature during that legislative session; (2) by the same date, the interagency
work group shall: (a) remove from the list of legislative mandates for a previous legislative
session those legislative mandates for which the legislature has provided reimbursement, those
that are no longer subject to reimbursement, and those that are no longer in effect; and (b) add to
the list a legislative mandate from a previous legislative session for which reimbursement was
provided in the previous session but for which reimbursement was not provided in the most
recent regular session or in any subsequent special sessions; (3) during the regular session
immediately following the issuance of a report prepared by the interagency work group, the
legislature by law may continue the legislative mandate for a period not to exceed three years, by
law may repeal the legislative mandate, or may take no action on the legislative mandate; (4) the
legislature may continue a legislative mandate either by general law or by identifying the
legislative mandate in the General Appropriations Act and providing a mechanism to provide
money to political subdivisions that may be used to comply with the legislative mandates; and
(5) if the legislature does not continue or repeal the legislative mandate, the legislative mandate
expires on September 1 following the regular session. (Note: Please see S.J.R. 24, below)

S.B. 719 (Van de Putte) – Juveniles: would: (1) authorize a municipal judge to require a
juvenile who is assessed a fine or costs for a class C misdemeanor occurring on the grounds of a
school in which the juvenile was enrolled at the time to participate in community service work or
a tutoring program; (2) require that the community service work required be done for a
governmental entity or certain nonprofit organizations; (3) require a governmental entity that
accepts a defendant as a community service volunteer to supervise the defendant and report on
his work to the judge; (4) place limits on the community service or tutoring required; and (5)
protect a municipal court judge from certain damages that may arise during completion of the
community service or tutoring.

S.B. 720 (Williams) – Property Tax: would: (1) reduce the property tax rollback rate from 108
percent to 105 percent; and (2) permit an individual city to raise its rollback rate back to 108
percent if: (a) any part of the city is located in an area declared a disaster by the governor or
president; or (b) the city council finds that the higher rate is necessary to protect the health,
safety, or property of persons in the city, provided such finding is in the form of a resolution,
includes a description of the expected harm, and is approved by a record vote of the council.

S.B. 722 (Williams) – Appraisal Districts: would: (1) authorize a majority of the group of
taxing units composed of the cities, school districts, and county participating in an appraisal
district to request an audit of the performance of the appraisal district, or the discontinuance of
that audit; (2) change the makeup of an appraisal district board to include one elected, rather than
appointed, director from each of the four commissioners precincts of the county for which the
district is established; (3) make other changes to the eligibility requirements and manner of
filling a vacancy in the position of director on an appraisal board.

S.B. 725 (Williams) – Property Tax: would permit citizens to sue appraisal districts for failure
to follow appraisal procedures if the failure to follow procedure results in either a substantial
economic harm to the citizen or a denial of a statutory or constitutional right of the citizen.

S.B. 726 (Rodriguez) – Court Fees: would: (1) create a $10 fee to be collected by municipal
courts for judicial access and improvement, to be used to fund basic civil legal service and
criminal defense for indigents and electronic filing in court; (2) require that courts remit the
collected fees to the comptroller; and (3) permit a city to retain five percent of the total fee
collected.

S.B. 729 (Seliger) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 1436, above.

S.B. 732 (Nichols) – Tree Preservation: this bill is the same as H.B. 1388, above.

S.B. 745 (Davis) – Saltwater Pipelines: would allow the Texas Railroad Commission to
regulate saltwater pipelines.
S.B. 756 (Seliger) – Water Transport: would: (1) prohibit a person, including a city, from
transporting surface water or groundwater more than seventy-five miles from the water’s source;
and (2) authorize the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to assess an administrative
penalty against a person who violates the prohibition on transport.

S.B. 758 (Deuell) – Sales Tax: would require the state comptroller, upon request, to provide to a
city information relating to the amount of sales tax paid to the city during the preceding calendar
year by each entity doing business in the city who remits annual sales tax payments of more than
$500 to the comptroller.

S.B. 760 (West) – Interlocal Agreements: would allow an interlocal contract between a city
and another city or county to be for a specified term of years.

S.B. 763 (Ellis) – Banking Development Districts: would provide that: (1) a city, in
conjunction with a financial institution, may submit an application to the Finance Commission of
Texas for the designation of a banking development district; (2) a city council in a city in which
a banking development district has been designated may adopt a resolution designating a
financial institution located in the district as a banking district depository; (3) a city may deposit
public funds with a financial institution designated as a banking district depository regardless of
whether the institution is designated as a state depository by the comptroller; (4) a city council
may enter into a tax abatement agreement with a financial institution that owns property in a
banking development district; and (5) the designation of an area as a banking development
district constitutes designation of the area as a reinvestment zone without further hearing or other
procedural requirements, except that the property is eligible for tax abatement only if the
property is owned by a financial institution.

S.B. 766 (Estes) – Discharge of Firearms: this bill is the same as H.B. 1595, above.

S.B. 771 (Davis) – Swimming Pool Alarms: would: (1) require residential swimming pools to
have an alarm that indicates when a gate is left open when the pool is constructed or remodeled;
and (2) limit the enforceability of city ordinances that are less stringent on the issue of
residential swimming pool alarms than state law.

S.B. 774 (Zaffirini) – Disabled Peace Officers: would require the governing board of an
institution of higher education to exempt a student from the payment of tuition and fees for a
course for which space is available if, among other things, the student is permanently disabled as
the result of an injury suffered during the performance of a duty as a peace officer and is unable
to continue employment as a peace officer.

S.B. 779 (Whitmire) – Animal Cruelty: would: (1) create a registration system similar to that
in place for sex offenders for those convicted of certain animal cruelty offenses, including a
requirement that such offenders register with the city police department where they live; (2)
create a procedure by which a peace officer may check certain identifying information against a
state database to determine if a person is required to register under this system; and (3) authorize
a police department to release to the public certain information regarding a person required to
register under this program and limit the police department’s liability for such a release.

S.B. 806 (Hinojosa) – Historically Underutilized Businesses: would provide that a veteran
with a service-connected disability is eligible to be listed as a historically underutilized business
by the state. (Companion bill is H.B. 888 by Guillen.)

S.B. 808 (Seliger) – Security Breach: would increase the penalty for the offense of breach of
computer security if the breach involves a government owned computer facility or a critical
infrastructure facility.

S.B. 812 (Zaffirini) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would modify the reemployment
provisions related to retirement under the Texas Municipal Retirement System.

S.B. 823 (Carona) – Municipal Court: would require a municipal prosecutor to complete at
least six hours of training, including training on mental illness and substance abuse.

S.B. 825 (Lucio) – Affordable Housing: would require the Texas Department of Housing and
Community Affairs to establish an Office of Rural Community and Small Municipality Housing
Initiatives in order to provide training, establish pilot projects, and fund housing initiatives that
impact low-income housing in rural areas.

S.B. 826 (Lucio) – Rural Economic Development: would establish grant, loan, and training
programs designed to promote economic development and business innovation in rural areas.

S.B. 829 (Patrick) – Professional Services: would provide that: (1) a governmental entity,
including a city, may not provide through its officers or employees a commercially available
service (e.g., the practice of engineering or architecture, construction services, or construction
management services) for an improvement to real property that is not owned or leased by the
entity; and (2) a governmental entity, including a city with a population of 50,001 or more, that
provides through its officers or employees a commercially available service for an improvement
to real property owned or leased by the entity shall provide and make available to the public an
accounting of the cost of performing that service. (Companion bill is H.B. 611 by Murphy.)

S.B. 838 (Patrick) – Driving While Intoxicated: would make the offense of driving while
intoxicated a Class A misdemeanor if it is shown in trial that the person had an alcohol
concentration level of 0.15 or higher.

S.B. 843 (Patrick) – Failure to Identify: would provide that a person commits the offense of
failure to identify if the person intentionally refuses to give the person’s name, address, or date of
birth to a peace officer who has lawfully detained the person and requested the information.

S.B. 844 (Patrick) – Escape from Custody: would provide that a person commits the offense
of escape from custody if the person escapes from custody when the person is lawfully detained
for an offense.
S.B. 849 (Duncan) – Elections: would, among other things: (1) eliminate the current provision
of state law that requires the secretary of state to either prescribe the terms that a county elections
administrator must accept, or instruct the county elections administrator to decline to enter into a
contract with a city, if a city and county are unable to initially reach an agreement to furnish
election services; (2) provide that an election watcher may not be accepted for service if the
watcher has possession of a device capable of recording images or sound unless the watcher
agrees to disable or deactivate the device; (3) provide that the custodian of keys to early voting
ballot boxes must retain possession of the keys until delivered to the presiding judge of the
central counting station; (4) require that a plan for counting votes cast on an electronic voting
system include a process for comparing the number of voters who signed the combination form
with the number of votes cast for the entire election; (5) require a city to post notice of dates of
the filing period for an application for a place on the ballot not later than the 30th day before: (a)
the first day on which a candidate may file an application; or (b) the last day on which a
candidate may file the application, if the election code does not designate a first day on which the
candidate may file the application: (6) provide that a withdrawal from a election that is not made
in writing and signed by the candidate, or is not timely filed with the appropriate authority or
agent of an authority, has no legal effect and is not considered filed; and (7) require a notice
relating to a local option liquor election that is published in a newspaper to include: (a) the
individual or entity that is applying for the petition to gather signatures for a local option liquor
election; (b) the type of local option liquor election; (c) the name of the political subdivision in
which the petition will be circulated; and (d) the name and title of the person with whom the
application will be filed.

S.B. 854 (Duncan) – Electric Transmission Lines: would provide that, in addition to the
notices provided by current law, the Public Utility Commission by rule shall require an applicant
for an electric transmission line to provide notice by certified mail to each owner of land that
would be affected by the line.

S.B. 861 (Rodriguez) – County Development Authority: this bill is the same as H.B. 1649,
above.

S.B. 862 (Rodriguez) – Noise: would: (1) create more stringent daytime noise level
requirements for the offense of disorderly conduct; and (2) specifically outline defenses to
prosecution for a noise-related disorderly conduct offense, including compliance with city
ordinances.

S.B. 763 (Ellis) – Banking Development Districts: would provide that: (1) a city, in
conjunction with a financial institution, may submit an application to the Finance Commission of
Texas for the designation of a banking development district; (2) a city council in a city in which
a banking development district has been designated may adopt a resolution designating a
financial institution located in the district as a banking district depository; (3) a city may deposit
public funds with a financial institution designated as a banking district depository regardless of
whether the institution is designated as a state depository by the comptroller; (4) a city council
may enter into a tax abatement agreement with a financial institution that owns property in a
banking development district; and (5) the designation of an area as a banking development
district constitutes designation of the area as a reinvestment zone without further hearing or other
procedural requirements, except that the property is eligible for tax abatement only if the
property is owned by a financial institution.

S.B. 875 (Fraser) – MTBEs: would create an affirmative defense for a person who is subject to
an action brought for nuisance or trespass stemming from certain environmental offenses if the
person’s actions that resulted in the alleged nuisance or trespass were authorized by a rule,
permit, order, license, certificate, registration, approval, or other form of authorization issued by
the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) or the federal government or a federal
agency, and: (1) the person was in general compliance with that rule, permit, order, license,
certificate, registration, approval, or other form of authorization while the alleged nuisance or
trespass was occurring; or (2) the person received enforcement discretion from the TCEQ or
federal government or an agency of the federal government for the actions that resulted in the
alleged nuisance or trespass.

S.B. 898 (Carona) – Energy Efficiency Programs: would provide that: (1) each political
subdivision, institution of higher education, or state agency shall establish a goal to reduce the
electric consumption by the entity by at least five percent each state fiscal year for 10 years,
beginning September 1, 2011; (2) a political subdivision, institution of higher education, or state
agency that does not attain the goals established under (1), above, must provide justification to
the State Energy Conservation Office that the entity has already implemented all available
measures; (3) the Texas A&M energy systems laboratory shall calculate, based on the evaluation
and forms submitted to SECO, the amount of energy savings and estimated reduction in
pollution achieved as a result of the implementation of programs; and (4) the laboratory shall
share the information with the United States Environmental Protection Agency and ERCOT to
help with long-term forecasting and in estimating pollution reduction.

S.B. 901 (Hegar) – Disposal of Ambulances: would require that recipients of certain grants for
the purchase of an ambulance obtain approval from the Department of State Health Services to
dispose of the ambulance if the recipient attempts to do so before the fourth anniversary of the
date the grant is awarded.

S.B. 904 (Patrick) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 1697 and H.B. 1773, above.

S.B. 908 (Fraser) – Plastic Bags: this bill is the same as H.B. 1913, above.

S.B. 911 (Lucio) – Fire/Police Civil Service: would amend Chapter 143 of the Local
Government Code to limit the way in which a civil service city may investigate a complaint
against a police officer or firefighter, including: (1) limiting the times at which a police officer or
firefighter may be interrogated; (2) not allowing interrogation of a police officer or firefighter at
his/her home; (3) specifying the individuals who may perform the investigation; and (4) limiting
the way in which an interrogation of a police officer or firefighter may be conducted.
(Companion bill is H.B. 43 by Menendez.)

S.B. 913 (Estes) – Pseudoephedrine: would, among other things, provide that: (1) a business
establishment may not sell to a person who makes over-the-counter purchases of one or more
products containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine more than nine grams
of those substances within a 30-day period; (2) before completing an over-the-counter sale of a
product containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine, a business
establishment shall transmit the sale information to a real-time electronic logging system used by
pharmacies and law enforcement agencies and personnel, such as the National Precursor Log
Exchange, that is administered by a nonprofit organization involved in the prevention and
investigation of prescription drug diversion , if such a system is available to the establishment at
no cost; and (3) a business establishment may not complete an over-the-counter sale of a product
containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine if a real-time electronic logging
system returns a report that the completion of the sale would result in the person obtaining an
amount greater than allowed by the bill or current law, regardless of whether all or some of the
products previously obtained by the buyer were sold at another business establishment.
(Companion bill is H.B. 1137 by Darby.)

S.B. 917 (Wentworth) – Emergency Services Districts: would: (1) allow for the consolidation
of emergency services districts if the board of each district determines that consolidation would
allow the districts to provide services more efficiently and adopts a joint order of consolidation;
(2) require each emergency services commissioner to complete a training course provided or
approved by the Texas Department of Rural Affairs; and (3) authorize the board of directors of
an emergency services district to contract with a volunteer fire department, local government, or
other district to provide staff, facilities, equipment, programs, or services the board considers
necessary to provide emergency services.

S.B. 924 (Carona) – Municipally Owned Electric Utilities: would provide that: (1) beginning
April 1, 2012, a municipally owned utility must report each year to the State Energy
Conservation Office (SECO), on a standardized form developed by SECO, information
regarding the combined effects of the energy efficiency activities of the utility from the previous
calendar year, including the utility’s annual goals, programs enacted to achieve those goals, and
any achieved energy demand or savings goals; (2) SECO shall provide the reports to the Texas
A&M energy systems laboratory, which shall calculate the energy savings and estimated
pollution reductions that resulted from the reported activities; (3) the energy systems laboratory
shall share the results of the analysis with the Public Utility Commission of Texas, ERCOT, the
United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality.

S.B. 925 (Ellis) – Affordable Housing: would allow a participant in a federal housing tenant-
based assistance program to seek judicial review of a decision by a housing authority to
terminate tenant-based assistance.

S.B. 933 (Ellis) – Public Information: would: (1) allow open records letter ruling requests to be
filed electronically with the attorney general’s office; and (2) allow notices, decisions, and other
public information documents to be transmitted electronically by the attorney general’s office.

S.B. 937 (Lucio) – Electricity: would provide, among other things, that the Public Utility
Commission by rule shall require an electric utility, municipally owned utility, electric
cooperative, qualifying facility, power generation company, exempt wholesale generator, or
power marketer to give to the following the same priority that it gives to a hospital in its
emergency operations plan for restoring power after an extended power outage: (1) a nursing
facility; (2) an assisted living facility; and (3) a facility that provides hospice services.

S.B. 938 (Lucio) – Workers’ Compensation: this bill is the same as H.B. 1739, above.

S.B. 952 (Davis) – Property Tax: would require the assessor for a taxing unit to deliver a tax
bill by electronic means to a person listed on the tax roll and that person’s authorized agent if: (1)
the assessor has implemented procedures to permit delivery of a bill by electronic means; and (2)
on or before September 15 the person or person’s authorized agent submits a written request to
receive an electronic tax bill to the assessor. An assessor who delivers a tax bill electronically
under this section does not need to mail the same bill. (Companion bill is H.B. 843 by Geren.)

S.B. 968 (Nelson) – Municipal Court: would: (1) require a judge during a trial of an offense
under the Penal Code to make an affirmative finding of fact and enter the affirmative finding in
the judgment if the judge determines that the victim or intended victim was younger than
seventeen years of age at the time of the offense; (2) in a case where the victim or intended
victim is found to have been younger than seventeen years of age at the time of the offense,
require the person convicted of the offense to pay $50 and the city to send all but ten percent of
that fee to the state for inclusion in a fund for administrative contracts with volunteer child court
advocates.

S.B. 971 (Hinojosa) – Emergency Communications: would: (1) require the Emergency
Management Division, with cooperation from the Texas Department of Transportation and
emergency management directors, to create an emergency information network system
consisting of at least 200 digital displays that will display local public health and safety
information and availability of fuel, food, lodging, and pharmacy services in certain urban areas;
(2) require the division to contract with vendors who will erect and maintain the signs within city
limits or within extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city; (3) allow the vendors to display commercial
messages when emergency information is not being displayed; (4) require the vendors to share
2.5 percent of gross revenue to any city in which a sign is in the city limits or extraterritorial
jurisdiction and 2.5 percent to the state for general revenue; (4) allow local law enforcement to
provide emergency information that must be shown on the signs; and (4) allow the erection of
such signs without requiring compliance with municipal sign ordinances or permission from the
city in which the sign is located. (Companion bill is H.B. 1765 by S. Miller.)

S.B. 979 (Carona) – Energy Efficiency: would provide that: (1) an area emission credit
reduction organization may establish an energy efficiency market emission reduction credit
program through which a utility, municipal utility, electric cooperative, state or local
government, or energy service company that has a program of energy efficiency measures
established in a nonattainment or near nonattainment area may register savings from that entity’s
energy efficiency measures as emission reduction credits and sell or trade the credits in an effort
to reduce emissions of air pollutants in urban areas of this state; and (2) each organization shall
file with the Texas A&M energy systems laboratory a report including any transactions related to
the creation of an energy efficiency market emission reduction credit program.
S.B. 980 (Carona) – Telecommunications: would provide, among other things, that: (1) a city
may not by rule, order, or other means directly or indirectly regulate rates charged for, service or
contract terms for, conditions for, or requirements for entry into the market for Voice over
Internet Protocol services or other Internet Protocol enabled services; and (2) the limitation in (1)
does not: (a) affect payment of municipal right-of-way fees applicable to Voice over Internet
Protocol services; (b) affect any person’s obligation to provide video service as defined by S.B. 5
(2005)(the state video franchise bill) under any applicable state or federal law; or (c) require or
prohibit assessment of enhanced 9-1-1, relay access service, or universal service fund fees on
Voice over Internet Protocol service.

S.B. 985 (Carona) – Telecommunications: would provide that: (1) a city may not by rule,
order, or other means directly or indirectly regulate rates charged for, service or contract terms
for, conditions for, or requirements for entry into the market for Voice over Internet Protocol
services or other Internet Protocol enabled services; and (2) the limitation in (1) does
not: (a) affect payment of municipal right-of-way fees applicable to Voice over Internet Protocol
services; (b) affect any person’s obligation to provide video service as defined by S.B. 5
(2005)(the state video franchise bill) under any applicable state or federal law; or (c) require or
prohibit assessment of enhanced 9-1-1, relay access service, or universal service fund fees on
Voice over Internet Protocol service.

S.B. 990 (Carona) – High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes: would: (1) authorize an executive
committee by resolution to provide that violations regarding improper entrance into, exit from, or
vehicle occupancy in high occupancy vehicle lanes operated, managed, or maintained by a
regional transportation authority incur a penalty, not to exceed $100; and (2) provide that a
person commits a class C misdemeanor offense if the person fails to pay the penalty authorized
in (1), above. (Companion bill is H.B. 1762 by Harper-Brown.)

S.B. 994 (Ogden) – Municipal Court Fees: would require a municipal court to collect a $100
fee if a person is convicted of a class C drug-related misdemeanor, and to remit the entire fee to
the state for credit to the general revenue fund to be used for law enforcement purposes.

S.B. 997 (Shapiro) – Elections: would provide that a copy of an application for a ballot to be
voted by mail is not available for public inspection, except to the voter seeking to verify that the
information pertaining to the voter is accurate, until the first business day after election day.

S.B. 1002 (Van de Putte) – Municipally Owned Utilities: would include bill payment
assistance programs for certain disabled veterans to be included in the first lien against the
revenue of a municipally owned gas or utility system in a city with a population of more than one
million.

S.B. 1004 (Lucio) – Beverage Tax: would impose a tax on each retail sale of a soft drink and
require the revenue from the tax to be deposited in the state’s general revenue fund.

S.B. 1012 (Huffman) – Juvenile Case Manager: would expand the permitted uses of the
juvenile case manager fund to include training expenses, travel expenses, costs of office supplies
and other operating and maintenance costs of the juvenile case manager. (This bill is identical to
H.B. 903 by Thompson.)

S.B. 1013 (Davis) – Sex Offender Registration: would require a change to the sex offender
registration form to allow a city to require the palm print of a person required to register as a sex
offender as part of local registration.

S.B. 1018 (Davis) – Motor Vehicle Stops: would: (1) require that a report required for a motor
vehicle stop include the race or ethnicity of each passenger; and (2) impose requirements as to:
(a) components of the statewide transportation plan; and (b) the establishment of a uniform
program for hazardous materials transportation registration and permitting in order to maximize
federal funding for certain transportation projects.

S.B. 1024 (Rodriguez) – Theft of Service: would provide, in regard to the offense of theft of
service, that if compensation is or was to be paid on a periodic basis, the intent to avoid payment
for a service may be formed at any time during or before a pay period, and the partial payment of
wages alone is not sufficient evidence to negate the actor’s intent to avoid full payment for a
service.

S.B. 1030 (Carona) – Sexually Oriented Businesses: would require a sexually oriented
business to post an outdoor sign if the business applies for a license or permit for a location that
is not currently licensed or permitted.

S.B. 1031 (Carona) – Energy Efficiency: would – among many other things – provide that: (1)
to achieve energy conservation in the construction of, renovations to, and additions to all
residential, commercial, and industrial buildings in this state, the State Energy Conservation
Office (SECO), in consultation with the Texas A&M energy systems laboratory, shall adopt the
International Energy Conservation Code, as published at the end of each three-year code
development cycle, as the minimum requirements for those buildings; (2) SECO shall set an
effective date for an energy code adopted under (1), above, that is not later than nine months
after publication of a new edition of the code at the end of each three-year code development
cycle of the International Energy Conservation Code; (3) a city shall establish procedures for the
administration and enforcement of the code, to ensure that code-certified inspectors shall
perform inspections and enforce the code in the inspectors’ jurisdictions, and to track and report
to SECO on implementation of the code; (4) a city’s report must include a description of the
measures taken to enforce the most recently adopted version of the International Energy
Conservation Code and an assessment of the rate of compliance; (5) a city or county may
establish procedures to adopt local amendments to the International Energy Conservation Code;
and (6) the energy systems laboratory shall: (a) provide to counties and cities suggestions for
modifications to the code to increase energy efficiency by 15 percent above the efficiency
achieved under the unamended code; (b) provide technical assistance to a local government
considering whether to adopt the suggested modifications; (c) report its findings to the council,
county, or city, including an estimate based on suggested local amendments of any energy
savings potential above the unamended code and any resulting reduction in the emission of air
pollutants.
S.B. 1033 (Seliger) – Elections: would provide that the governing body of a political
subdivision, other than a county, that holds its general election for officers on a date other than
the November uniform election date may, not later than December 31, 2012, change the date on
which it holds its general election for officers to the November uniform election date.
(Companion bill is H.B. 1545 by Lewis.)

S.B. 1037 (Carona) – Sexually Oriented Businesses: would: (1) impose a gross receipts tax
on admissions fees charged by sexually oriented businesses; (2) transfer the tax proceeds to the
foundations school fund, general revenue fund, and sexual assault program fund; and (3) repeal
the $5 sexually oriented business admissions fee.

S.B. 1039 (Ellis) – Elections: would, if the director of the census determines that a political
subdivision must provide election materials in a language other than English or Spanish, require
a political subdivision to provide the election materials in the same manner in which the political
subdivision would be required to provide materials in Spanish under current law.

S.B. 1040 (Ellis) – Sales Tax: would exempt various energy-efficiency products from sales tax
if sold on Memorial Day weekend.

S.B. 1048 (Jackson) – Public/Private Partnerships: would create a program with detailed
criteria to encourage public and private facilities and infrastructure.

S.B. 1049 (Davis) – Gas Drilling: would provide that: (1) the Railroad Commission shall adopt
rules requiring the owner or operator of a gas well on which hydraulic fracturing treatment
operations have been performed or a person who has performed hydraulic fracturing treatment
operations on a well to disclose to the commission in writing information regarding the
operations, following the completion of those operations; and (2) the rules must meet certain
criteria as laid out in the bill.

S.B. 1051 (Ellis) – Taxes: would create a “select commission on periodic tax review” and
charge the commission with periodically reviewing all state and local taxes and other revenue
sources and making recommendations as to whether the taxes or revenue sources should be
continued or repealed. (Companion bill is H.B. 1308 by Villarreal.)

S.B. 1060 (Van de Putte) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) authorize a city to create a first
offender prostitution prevention program; and (2) authorize such a program to collect a fee not to
exceed $1,000 to cover the costs of the program, five percent of which would go to the police
department in the city in order to provide training on domestic violence, prostitution, and human
trafficking. (This bill is identical to H.B. 1994 by Weber.)

S.B. 1061 (Harris) – Property Tax: would require a court to issue a tax warrant authorizing the
seizure of personal property for the payment of property taxes if the applicant for the warrant has
reason to believe that personal property owned by the property owner will be sold at a liquidation
sale in connection with the cessation of a business. (Companion bill is H.B. 930 by Darby.)

S.B. 1065 (Williams) – Emergency Management: this bill is the same as H.B. 2040, above.
S.B. 1070 (Jackson) – Prop 2: would provide that representatives of school districts required to
take action to equalize the district’s wealth level must sit on TCEQ’s permanent advisory
committee regarding property tax exemptions for pollution control property.

S.B. 1073 (M. Jackson) – Rainwater: would authorize the use of harvested rainwater for
potable indoor purposes, so long as the structure in which it is used has appropriate cross-
connection safeguards.

S.B. 1075 (Jackson) – Plumbing: would, among other things, provide that a political
subdivision that requires a responsible master plumber or an agent of a responsible master
plumber to obtain a permit before performing plumbing in the political subdivision shall verify
through the board’s Internet Web site, or by contacting the board by telephone, that the
responsible master plumber has on file with the board a certificate of insurance.

S.B. 1076 (Ellis) – Law Enforcement: would expand the situations in which certain drug
offenders may petition the court for an order prohibiting a police department from disclosing to
the public criminal history record information related to the original drug-related offense.

S.B. 1080 (Williams) – Texas Department of Rural Affairs: would transfer the Texas
Department of Rural Affairs to the Office of Rural Affairs within the Department of Agriculture
and abolish the board of the Texas Department of Rural Affairs. (Companion bill is H.B. 1912
by Bonnen.)

S.B. 1082 (Hegar) – Special Districts: would: (1) provide that a city may enter into a strategic
partnership agreement only with certain conservation and reclamation districts; and (2) to be
annexed for limited purposes under a strategic partnership agreement, an area must be in the
city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction and contiguous to the corporate or limited purpose boundaries
unless the district consents to noncontiguous annexation pursuant to a strategic partnership
agreement with the city. (Companion bill is H.B. 1979 by Laubenberg.)

S.B. 1083 (Hegar) – Development Agreements: would amend the current law relating to
development agreements (which includes by reference non-annexation agreements for
agriculture-exempt property) to: (1) provide that a city may make a written contract with an
owner of land that is located in the extraterritorial jurisdiction of the city; and (2) provide that the
contract may include only those lawful terms and conditions that the city and the land owner
agree to, including among other things: (a) a guarantee of the continuation of the extraterritorial
status of the land and its immunity from annexation for any period up to 45 years (i.e., the bill
would delete the 15-year term limit in current law); and (b) providing that the total duration of
the contract may not exceed 45 years. (Companion bill is H.B. 1643 by Zerwas.)

S.B. 1087 (Carona) – Cable and Video Service: would provide that: (1) beginning September
1, 2011, a cable service provider or video service provider that was not allowed to or did not
terminate a municipal franchise under the current state franchise law (S.B. 5 (2005)) may elect to
terminate that franchise and seek a state-issued certificate of franchise authority for the area
served under the municipal franchise by providing written notice to the Public Utility
Commission and the affected city before January 1, 2012;(2) a cable service provider that elects
to terminate an existing municipal franchise is responsible for remitting to the affected city
before the 91st day after the date the municipal franchise is terminated any accrued but unpaid
franchise fees due under the terminated franchise;(3) a city may review the business records of a
cable service provider or video service provider to the extent necessary to ensure compensation
in accordance with a state-issued franchise, provided that the city may only review records that
relate to the 48-month period preceding the date of the last franchise fee payment; (4) if a city
uses the one-percent public, education, and governmental (PEG) channel fee for a purpose that is
not authorized by federal law, the fees are chargeable as a credit against the state-issued
franchise fee payments;(5) a city that receives PEG fees: (a) shall maintain revenue from the fees
in a separate account established for that purpose; (b) may not commingle revenue from the fees
with any other money; (c) shall maintain a record of each deposit to and disbursement from the
separate account, including a record of the payee and purpose of each disbursement; and (d) not
later than January 31 of each year, shall provide to each certificate holder that pays a fee to the
city a detailed accounting of the deposits to and disbursements from the separate account made
in the preceding calendar year; (6) once a local franchise is terminated under the bill, cable
services to community public buildings, such as municipal buildings and public schools, no
longer have to be provided; (7) on the expiration or termination of a local franchise agreement,
a provider that provides such services may deduct from the franchise fee to be paid to the city an
amount equal to the actual incremental cost of the services if the city requires the services after
that date; and (8) where technically feasible, the holder of a state-issued certificate of franchise
authority that is not an incumbent cable service provider and an incumbent cable service
provider, including an incumbent cable service provider that holds a state-issued certificate of
franchise authority issued after terminating pursuant to the bill, shall use reasonable efforts to
interconnect their cable or video systems for the purpose of providing PEG programming.
(Note: this bill is apparently meant to be part of a “paired package” with H.B. 259, above. In
addition, H.B. 256 is substantially similar to this bill.)

S.B. 1089 (Rodriguez) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that the surviving spouse of a
member of the armed forces of the United States who dies while on active duty is entitled to an
exemption from property taxation of the total assessed value of the property; and (2) provide that
an exemption from taxation to which a surviving child of the deceased active duty member of the
armed forces is entitled is computed by dividing the greater of the assessed value of the property
or $5,000 by the number of eligible children.

S.B. 1095 (Rodriguez) – Cell Phone Ban: would: (1) except a city from the requirement to post
a sign at a school crossing zone regarding the prohibited use of a wireless communication device
if the city prohibits the use of a wireless communication device while operating a motor vehicle
throughout its jurisdiction; and (2) authorize political subdivisions, including a city, to regulate
the use of a wireless communication device by the operator of a motor vehicle. (Companion bill
is H.B. 1899 by Pickett.)

S.B. 1097 (Eltife) – Certificates of Convenience and Necessity: would modify the law
allowing a city to obtain single certification to provide water service in an annexed area to allow
the city to obtain the certificate for that area from any public utility, rather than only non-profit
water supply corporations, special utility districts, or fresh water supply districts.
S.B. 1099 (Van de Putte) – Smoke Alarms and Fire Extinguishers: would make several
changes to the law regarding smoke alarms and fire extinguishers in residential rental units,
including that: (1) a local ordinance could not require that a smoke alarm powered by alternating
current, rather than battery, be installed in a dwelling unit built before September 1, 1987, unless:
(a) the interior of the unit is repaired, remodeled, or rebuilt at a projected cost of more than
$5,000 and requires a building permit; or (b) an addition occurs to the unit at a projected cost of
more than $5,000; (2) if a dwelling unit was occupied as a residence before September 1, 2011,
or a certificate of occupancy was issued before that date, a smoke alarm may be powered by
battery, alternating current, or other power source and is not required to be interconnected with
other smoke alarms but that the alarm must comply with any local ordinance in effect at the time
the unit was first occupied or a certificate of occupancy was issued requiring the alarm be
powered by alternating current or other power source. (Companion bill is H.B. 1168 by D.
Miller.)

S.B. 1101 (Wentworth) – Professional Services: would provide that a governmental entity (not
including a city), may not provide through its officers or employees a commercially available
service (e.g., the practice of engineering or architecture, construction services, or construction
management services) for an improvement to real property that is not owned or leased by the
entity.

S.B. 1102 (Wentworth) – Bus Only Lanes: this bill is the same as H.B. 2327, above.

S.B. 1106 (Harris) – Juveniles: would require school districts and other agencies and courts
that deal with juveniles and juvenile offenders to share more records with other agencies and
courts that deal with juveniles and juvenile offenders.

S.B. 1108 (W. Davis) – Child Pornography: would require a computer technician to report
images of child pornography to a local or state law enforcement agency or a “Cyber Tipline” and
provide a criminal penalty for failure to make such a report.

S.B. 1115 (Wentworth) – “Qui Tam” Lawsuits: would authorize a private individual to sue a
city on behalf of the State of Texas, alleging that the city defrauded the state by making a false
claim for state funds or property.

S.B. 1117 (Whitmire) – Failure to Attend School: would require a parent to intentionally fail
to require a child to attend school as required by law in order to commit the offense of
contributing to the nonattendance of a public school student.

S.B. 1118 (Hinojosa) – Gambling: this bill is the same as H.B. 2111, above.

S.B. 1119 (Ellis) – Recycling: this bill is the same as H.B. 2114, above.

S.B. 1120 (Seliger) – Property Tax: this bill is the same as H.B. 2100, above.
S.B. 1122 (Estes) – Property Tax: would: (1) allow a city to sell a delinquent tax receivable at
any time through a negotiated sale or competitive bidding on terms that the city determines are in
its best interest; and (2) provide that the sale of a delinquent tax receivable does not alter or
affect the duty or authority of a local government to collect a delinquent tax receivable.
(Companion bill is H.B. 1903 by Keffer.)

S.B. 1128 (Jackson) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 2194, above.

S.B. 1133 (Hegar) – Electric Generation: would provide that the Public Utility Commission,
in consultation with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, shall prepare a report on the
weatherization and preparedness of generators within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas to
be available prior to the summer and winter of each year.

S.B. 1134 (Hegar) – Oil and Gas Regulation: would: (1) require the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to perform certain environmental and air quality analyses before
adopting a new permit or amending an existing permit relating certain oil and gas facilities; and
(2) authorize the TCEQ to authorize planned maintenance, startup, or shutdown activities from
certain oil and gas facilities.

S.B. 1135 (Hegar) – Gas Pipelines/Municipal Jurisdiction: would create the Gas Pipeline
Regulatory Act, which would – among other things – provide that: (1) the Railroad Commission
has exclusive original jurisdiction over the rates and services of a gas pipeline that transmits,
transports, delivers, or sells natural gas or synthetic natural gas to a gas utility that distributes the
gas to the public; (2) the commission is vested with all the authority and power of the state to
ensure compliance with the obligations of gas pipelines; (3) detailed requirements apply to,
among other things, records, audits, inspections, establishment of rates, services standards, and
other facets of gas pipelines; (4) a city maintains the rights and powers of a city to grant or refuse
a franchise to use the streets and alleys in the city or to make a statutory charge for that use; (5) a
city that performs a regulatory function may make each charge that is authorized by a state law
or the applicable franchise agreement; (6) a franchise agreement may not limit or interfere with a
power conferred on the commission by the bill; (6) the governing body of a city participating in a
ratemaking proceeding may engage rate consultants, accountants, auditors, attorneys, and
engineers to: (a) conduct investigations, present evidence, and advise and represent the
governing body; and (b) assist the governing body with litigation or a gas pipeline ratemaking
proceeding before the railroad commission or court.; (7) the gas pipeline in the ratemaking
proceeding shall reimburse the governing body of the city for the reasonable cost of the services
of a such person to the extent the commission determines reasonable; (8) provide that: (a) a city
has standing in each case before the commission that relates to a gas pipeline's rates and services
in the city; (b) a city's standing is subject to the right of the commission to consolidate that city
with another party on an issue of common interest; and (c) a city is entitled to judicial review of
a commission order relating to a gas pipeline's rates and services; (8) with regard to a gas
pipeline’s costs of relocating a facility to accommodate construction or improvement of a
highway, road, street, public way, or other public work by or on behalf of the United States, this
state, a political subdivision, or another entity having the power of eminent domain, a gas
pipeline may recover its relocation costs through a surcharge on gas volumes sold and
transported to customers in the service area where the relocation occurred by applying to the
commission for a new rate schedule or tariff; (9) a surcharge application must include sufficient
documentation to demonstrate the requirement for each relocation, the entity requiring the
relocation, costs incurred for relocation of comparable facilities, surcharge computations,
and that reasonable efforts have been made to receive reimbursement from the entity requiring
the relocation, if applicable; (10) not later than the 35th day after the date a surcharge application
is received, the commission shall administratively grant or deny the application, or the
application is automatically approved. (Companion bill is H.B. 1968 by Chisum.)

S.B. 1156 (Lucio) – Fireworks: would: (1) authorize a retail fireworks permit holder to sell
fireworks beginning on the fourteenth day preceding Memorial Day and ending at midnight on
Memorial Day; (2) require the Texas Forest Service to make its services available each day
during the Memorial Day fireworks season to determine whether drought conditions exist; and
(3) require that an order of a commissioners court prohibiting or restricting the sale or use of
fireworks be adopted before May 5 for the Memorial Day fireworks season.

S.B. 1160 (Seliger) -- Trespassers: would provide that an owner, lessee, or occupant of land: (1)
owes a duty to refrain from injuring a trespasser willfully, wantonly, or through gross
negligence; and (2) may, under certain circumstances, be liable for injury to a child younger than
16 years of age caused by a highly dangerous artificial condition on the land. (Companion bill is
H.B. 1971 by J. Jackson).

S.B. 1162 (Wentworth) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) require a mental health professional
to report to law enforcement personnel and disclose confidential information relating to a patient
if the professional has reason to believe and does believe that the patient or another person is
mentally ill and intends to attempt suicide by provoking a lethal response by a police officer or
cause serious bodily injury to a government official or other individual; (2) authorize a peace
officer to take a person into custody without a warrant if the officer receives such a report from a
mental health professional; (3) require a peace officer who takes a person into custody upon
receipt of a report from a mental health professional to file a written report with the Department
of Public Safety; and (4) require a local police department to establish departmental procedures
to ensure that each officer has adequate access to reports of individuals who have been reported
as a risk to themselves or others.

S.B. 1164 (Wentworth) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would give the members of
the Texas Municipal Retirement System (TMRS) another option when calculating possible
increases in annuities or supplemental benefits given to retirees and beneficiaries of deceased
retirees.

S.B. 1172 (Deuell) – Sales Tax: would require the comptroller to establish guidelines allowing
for the use of an automated sales tax remittance system for retailers to remit sales taxes.

S.B. 1174 (Deuell) – Workers Compensation: would require that a city ensure that a police
officer or firefighter who is injured in the line of duty be provided with necessary medical care,
compensation to pay for health care services to cure or relieve the injury and any effects
naturally resulting from the injury, and any necessary artificial body part within ten days of
receiving notice of a compensable injury. (Companion bill is H.B. 1961 by Deshotel).
S.B. 1187 (Watson) – Eminent Domain: would provide that a notice of lis pendens is effective
only from the time it is indexed by the county clerk.

S.B. 1191 (Gallegos) – Arsonist Registration: would create a program for registration of
convicted arsonists with local police departments very similar to that in place for sex offenders.

S.B. 1199 (Patrick) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 2191, above.

S.B. 1201 (Patrick) – Regulatory Takings: would make most city regulations subject to the
Private Real Property Rights Preservation Act, which would: (1) waive sovereign immunity to
suit and liability for a regulatory taking; (2) authorize a private real property owner to bring suit
to determine whether the governmental action of a city results in a taking; (3) require a city to
prepare a “takings impact assessment” prior to imposing certain regulations; and (4) require a
city to post 30-days notice of the adoption of most regulations prior to adoption. The bill would
also define a “taking” as: (a) a governmental action or series of actions that affects private real
property, in whole or in part or temporarily or permanently, in a manner that requires the
governmental entity to compensate the private real property owner as provided by the federal or
state constitutions, affects an owner's private real property that is the subject of the governmental
action, in whole or in part or temporarily or permanently, in a manner that restricts or limits the
owner's right to the property that would otherwise exist in the absence of the governmental
action, and is the cause of a reduction of at least 25 percent in the market value of the affected
private real property; or (b) a governmental action or series of actions that has the effect of
limiting the overall impervious cover of any development or use of an owner's private real
property to less than 35 percent of the surface area of the property in most instances. The bill
would also: (1) provide that the Act does not apply to certain governmental actions, such as an
action taken to prohibit or restrict a condition or use of private real property if the governmental
 entity proves that the condition or use constitutes a public or private nuisance as defined by
background principles of nuisance and property law of this state; an action taken out of a
reasonable good faith belief that the action is necessary to prevent a grave and immediate threat
to life or property; or an action that is designed to significantly advance a health and safety
purpose; (2) extend the statute of limitations for a claim under the Act from 180 days to two
years; (3) change the current remedies in the Act to allow for a property owner to seek
invalidation of the governmental regulation and money damages from the governmental entity
that imposes the regulation; (4) provide that a court shall award a governmental entity that
prevails in a suit or contested case filed under the Act reasonable and necessary attorneys’ fees
and court costs, but only if the court determines that the private real property owner knew that
the suit or contested case had no merit at the time the owner filed the suit; and (5) provide that a
proposed governmental action that requires a takings impact assessment may be stayed by a
court if an assessment is not prepared or if the assessment is not in compliance with guidelines
developed by the attorney general under the Act.

S.B. 1205 (Jackson) – Property Tax: would provide that a replacement structure for a structure
that was rendered uninhabitable or unusable by a casualty or by wind or water damage is not
considered to be a new improvement for property tax purposes if a building code, fire code, local
ordinance, or government assistance program requires: (1) the square footage of the replacement
structure to exceed that of the replaced structure; or (2) the exterior of the replacement structure
be of higher quality construction and composition than that of the replaced structure.

S.B. 1210 (Whitmire) – Peace Officer Identification Card: would make various changes to
the peace officer identification card requirements, including requiring a law enforcement agency
to provide an identification card to any honorably retired peace officer and allow the card to be
issued without an expiration date.

S.B. 1212 (Van de Putte) – Gambling: this bill is the same as H.B. 2424, above.

S.B. 1216 (Estes) – Arbitration: would: (1) require a court to promptly determine whether an
agreement to arbitrate is valid and enforceable against a party seeking to avoid arbitration; and
(2) allow a court to order arbitration only if the court determines the agreement to arbitrate is
valid and enforceable.

S.B. 1217 (Estes) – Underground Excavations: would provide, among other things, that the
“call before you dig” requirements in current law do not apply to an emergency excavation that
is necessary to respond to a situation that endangers life, health, or property, and provide
procedures and increased penalties for certain violations under the bill.

S.B. 1224 (Estes) – Gift to Public Servant: would: (1) generally provide for the treatment of
contributions made and personal services rendered to public servants; and (2) provide that an
individual’s personal service, if the individual receives no compensation for the service, does not
constitute a gift to a public servant or the offer of a gift to a public servant under the Penal Code.

S.B. 1237 (Williams) –Driver’s License Information: would provide that a person who is
certified, or otherwise authorized, to take or analyze a breath specimen is not prohibited from
accessing or using electronically readable information derived from a driver’s license,
commercial driver’s license, or personal identification certificate. (Companion bill is H.B. 1391
by Deshotel.)

S.B. 1238 (Carona) – Emergency Notification: would: (1) allow a public service provider,
including a city, to use an emergency notification system to notify the provider’s customers,
governmental entities and other affected persons of: (a) a disaster or emergency; and (b) actions
to take during a disaster or emergency; (2) require an emergency notification system to use a
dynamic information database for simultaneous transmission of the information; and (3) give a
provider the right to receive confidential 9-1-1 contact information to use the emergency
notification system.

S.B. 1240 (West) – Substandard Housing: would provide that, if a city or a county revokes a
certificate of occupancy for a leased premises because of the landlord’s failure to maintain the
premises, the landlord is liable to a tenant who is not in default under the lease for: (1) the full
amount of the tenant’s security deposit; (2) the pro rata portion of any rental payment the tenant
has paid in advance; (3) the tenant’s actual damages, including any moving costs, utility
connection fees, storage fees, and lost wages; and (4) court costs and attorney’s fees arising from
any related cause of action by the tenant against the landlord. (Companion bill is H.B. 1862 by
Anchia.)

S.B. 1241 (West) – Juveniles: would authorize a municipal court exercising jurisdiction over a
juvenile in a truancy case to access confidential information from the Department of Public
Safety’s juvenile justice information system.

S.B. 1245 (Zaffirini) – Eight Liners: would: (1) authorize a commissioners court and – in some
instances – a city, to order, on proper petition, a local option election to legalize or prohibit the
operation of eight-liners; and (2) authorize the imposition of a fee on eight-liner owners and
provide for the allocation of the fee revenue as follows: (a) thirty percent to the state’s general
revenue fund; and (b) seventy percent to a city in which the eight-liner is located. (Companion
bill is H.B. 1183 by Raymond.)

S.B. 1246 (Eltife) – Population Classifications: would update the hundreds of provisions in
state law that bracket certain legislation to cities of a certain population.

S.B. 1252 (Williams) – Fiscal Notes and Unfunded Mandates: would: (1) require that a
resolution granting permission to sue the state be accompanied by a fiscal note; (2) require the
Legislative Budget Board to establish a system of fiscal notes identifying the probable costs of a
joint or concurrent resolution; (3) require that, upon request, state agencies prepare fiscal notes
for pending concurrent resolutions; (4) define the term “mandate,” for purposes of Government
Code Chapter 320, to include restrictions, rules enacted by state agencies, and required reports
and exclude a provision of additional flexibility for allocating resources; (5) authorize the Sunset
Advisory Commission, in its review of a state agency that affects political subdivisions, to
include its report information about mandates on political subdivisions; (6) allow political
subdivisions to present information to the Sunset Advisory Commission about mandates and
conduct periodic reviews of mandates and recommend changes; (7) provide that a fiscal note that
affects a political subdivision include a statement that evaluates whether the proposed rule
creates an additional requirement or restriction on a political subdivision and, if so, whether any
additional time or expenditures will be required; and (8) repeal various statutes, including
Government Code Section 320.003 which requires the interagency work group to prepare a list
of unfunded mandates on political subdivisions.

S.B. 1258 (Duncan) – Solid Waste: would provide that the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality may issue a permit by rule to authorize the governing body of a county or
city with a population of 10,000 or less to dispose of demolition waste from an abandoned
building or building found to be a nuisance if the disposal occurs on land that: (1) the county or
city owns or controls; and (2) would qualify for an arid exemption under commission rules.
(Companion bill is H.B. 2013 by Hardcastle.)

S.B. 1265 (Uresti) -- Emergency Medical Personnel Training: would: (1) prohibit the
Department of State Health Services (DSHS) from requiring an emergency medical services
course or training to be accredited by a national organization before 2018; (2) require DSHS to
partner with a testing entity for paramedic examines; and (3) require the testing entity to charge
any cost or fee to the examinee. (Companion bill is H.B. 2369 by Quintanilla.)
S.B. 1269 (Wentworth) – Honoraria: would: (1) remove an honorarium from the definition of
a “political contribution,” and (2) would create an exemption for honoraria under the offenses
relating to offering gifts to public servants and accepting gifts by public servants.

S.B. 1270 (Wentworth) – Public Information: among other things, would: (1) make
confidential a report required by the federal Bank Secrecy Act that is obtained by a governmental
body for a law enforcement purpose; and (2) allow a governmental body to sign a confidentiality
agreement that covers information in a report required by the federal Bank Secrecy Act that
requires: (a) the information not be disclosed outside the governmental body; (b) the information
be labeled as confidential; and (c) the information be kept secure.

S.B. 1271 (Duncan) – Litigation: this bill is the same as H.B. 2479, above.

S.B. 1274 (Williams) – Roofing Contractors: would provide: (1) that a person may not perform
or offer to perform roofing services unless the person holds a certificate issued by the Texas
Department of Licensing and Regulation; (2) detailed procedures and penalties; and (3) exempt
an authorized employee or representative of a city from the bill’s requirements.

S.B. 1276 (Williams) – Energy Efficiency Programs: would transfer certain energy assistance
programs, including the state low income energy assistance program, from the Texas Department
of Housing and Community Affairs to the Public Utility Commission of Texas.

S.B. 1283 (Watson) – Elections: would provide that a person commits a first-degree felony if
the person knowingly: (1) impersonates or uses the identity of another person and attempts to
vote as that other person; (2) removes the name of an eligible voter from the list of registered
voters or the poll list for an election precinct; (3) prevents the deposit of a marked and properly
folded ballot in the ballot box; (4) provides false information to a voter about voting procedures
resulting in the voter being prevented from casting a ballot that may be legally counted; (5)
places restrictions on a voter’s exercise of the right to vote resulting in the voter being prevented
from casting a ballot that may be legally counted; or (6) impersonates a law enforcement officer
or provides false information about law enforcement procedures for the purpose of intimidating
voters regardless of whether the voter casts a vote.

S.B. 1288 (Watson) – Property Tax: would instruct the state comptroller to study the
feasibility of a property tax “circuit breaker” law. (Circuit breakers are defined in the bill as
limitations on a residential homestead property taxes based on the owner’s annual income.)

S.B. 1289 (Watson) – Photo Identification: would require all health care professionals,
including an emergency services providers, to wear a photo identification badge at all times
unless sterilization or isolation protocols preclude it.

S.B. 1292 (Hegar) – Driver’s Licenses for Peace Officers: would require the Department of
Public Safety to adopt procedures for the issuance of a driver’s license to a peace officer that
omits the officer’s actual residence address and includes, as an alternative, an address that is in
the city or county of the peace officer’s residence.
S.B. 1294 (Hegar) – Railroad Commission Fines: would raise the limits on various fines that
may be imposed by the Texas Railroad Commission.

S.B. 1298 (Hinojosa) – Enterprise Zones: would allow a county commissioners court to
nominate a project or activity of a qualified business as an enterprise project if the business is
located both in the county and in the extraterritorial jurisdiction of a city primarily located in
another county. (Companion bill is H.B. 1560 by Scott.)

S.B. 1301 (Deuell) – MTBEs: would: (1) provide standards for a manufacturer, processor,
distributor, recycler, or seller of certain anti-freeze or engine coolant additives; (2) limit the
liability of an entity listed in (1), above; and (3) provide that a political subdivision may not
adopt or enforce an ordinance that is inconsistent with or more restricted than the standards in the
bill. (Companion bill is H.B. 437 by E. Rodriguez.)

S.B. 1302 (Deuell) – Elections: would provide that a person commits a class A misdemeanor if
the person: (1) compensates another person based on the number of voters assisted by that
person; (2) presents another person with a quota of voters to be assisted; (3) engages in another
practice that causes another person’s compensation from or employment status with the person to
be dependent on the number of voters assisted; or (4) accepts compensation for (1), (2), or (3),
above.

S.B. 1306 (Hegar) – Groundwater: would make significant changes to the process for
determining desired future conditions and managed available groundwater.

S.B. 1309 (Hinojosa) – Gas Rates: would provide that, in establishing a gas utility’s rates, the
regulatory authority may and is encouraged to approve a tariff or rate schedule in which the rate
for gas utility service is adjusted based on changes in the gas utility’s revenues, expenses, or
investments. (Companion bill is H.B. 2435 by Deshotel.)

S.B. 1321 (Hinojosa) – Vehicle Towing: this bill is the same as H.B. 3334, above.

S.B. 1323 (Watson) – Transportation: would provide a procedure whereby a political
subdivision that participates financially in certain Texas Department of Transportation projects
may assist with, and expedite, the environmental review process.

S.B. 1330 (Watson) – Driver Education Courses: this bill is the same as H.B. 2897, above.

S.B. 1331 (Watson) – Juveniles: would create an exception to the offense of consumption of
alcohol by a minor in certain situations where the minor requested emergency medical assistance
in response to the possible alcohol overdose of a minor.

S.B. 1337 (Van de Putte) – Construction Insurance: would: (1) authorize the use of a
“consolidated insurance program” under which a principal provides insurance on a construction
project for several contractors; and (2) provide specific procedures that must be followed to use
such a program. (Companion bill is H.B. 2093 by Thompson.)
S.B. 1341 (Seliger) – Property Tax: would provide that: (1) a taxing unit may not be made a
party to a suit to compel the appraisal review board to order a change in an appraisal roll; (2) the
movant in a suit to compel an appraisal review board to order a change in an appraisal roll must
mail notice of a hearing to the collector for each taxing unit that imposes taxes on the property at
issue; and (3) a taxing unit that imposes taxes on the property at issue may intervene in a suit
filed to compel an appraisal review board to order a change in an appraisal roll for the limited
purpose of determining whether the property owner has forfeited a remedy due to the
nonpayment of taxes. (Companion bill is H.B. 1435 by Elkins.)

S.B. 1345 (Davis) – Sales Tax: would repeal the state law prohibiting the state comptroller from
crediting to the Parks and Wildlife Department or the Texas Historical Commission any amount
of taxes imposed on the sale of sporting goods in excess of the amounts appropriated to the
department or commission, respectively. (Companion bill is H.B. 1628 by Larson.)

S.B. 1346 (Davis) – Transportation Funding: would provide that the Texas Department of
Transportation shall send each fee collected for a permit issued by the department for oversize
and overweight vehicle permits, including administrative, highway maintenance, and vehicle
supervision fees, to the comptroller for deposit to the credit of the state highway fund.

S.B. 1354 (Carona) – County Sign Authority: would give a county the authority to prohibit
new off-premise signs in the unincorporated areas of the county. (Companion bill is H.B. 1360
by Coleman.)

S.B. 1358 (Lucio) – Emergency Detention: would authorize a judge or magistrate who issues a
warrant for emergency detention to electronically transmit the warrant with a digital signature as
defined by state law.

S.B. 1362 (Lucio) – County Development Authority: this bill is the same as H.B. 3394, above.
(Note: please see S.J.R. 40, below.)

S.B. 1363 (Lucio) – County Development Authority: this bill is the same as H.B. 3114, above.

S.B. 1364 (Lucio) – Colonias: this bill is the same as H.B. 3115, above.

S.B. 1366 (West) – Sex Offender Registration: would, among several other changes to the sex
offender registry program: (1) prohibit a city from adopting an ordinance that restricts the
location of the residence of an individual who is required to register as a sex offender; and (2)
limit the current registered sex offender database Web site to law enforcement and other
governmental entities and create a separate Web site for the public with information about
registered sex offenders, which would include only information regarding offenders with a risk
level of two or higher.

S.B. 1369 (West) –Public Improvement Districts: this bill is the same as H.B. 3690, above.

S.B. 1371 (Carona) – Vehicle Towing: this bill is the same as H.B. 3510, above.
S.B. 1375 (Estes) – Local Option Elections: would provide that, if a city annexes area on or
after the date a local option liquor election petition is submitted, the city may hold the election
only if the petition has enough signatures after including the voters in the annexed area.
(Companion bill is H.B. 1401 by Laubenberg.)

S.B. 1376 (Shapiro) – Radar Interference Device: would make it a Class C misdemeanor
offense for a person, other than a law enforcement officer in the discharge of his official duties,
to use a radar interference device in a motor vehicle. (Companion bill is H.B. 1116 by Harper-
Brown.)

S.B. 1382 (Wentworth) – Litigation: would expand the liability of a city in a contract dispute
by allowing parties prevailing against a city to be awarded interest on disputed payments.
(Companion bill is H.B. 345 by Kleinschmidt.)

S.B. 1384 (Lucio) – Property Tax: would change the amount of interest that a city making a
refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an
annual rate of interest paid by the bank on funds deposited in the account maintained by the tax
collector for the taxing unit from which refunds are disbursed as of the date on which the final
determination of the appeal is made, so long as that rate does not exceed eight percent.
(Companion bill is H.B. 2218 by Oliviera.)

S.B. 1385 (Lucio) – Property Tax: would allow a chief appraiser or collector to waive penalties
for the failure to file certain documents only if: (1) the taxpayer seeking the waiver files a written
application for the waiver with the chief appraiser or collector, as applicable, not later than the
30th day after the date the declaration or statement was required to be filed; and (2) the taxpayer’s
failure to file or timely file was a result of a natural disaster that rendered it impossible to comply
with the filing requirement, or an event beyond the control of the taxpayer that destroyed the
property or records. (Companion bill is H.B. 2208 by Oliviera.)

S.B. 1386 (Lucio) – Motor Vehicles: would: (1) authorize a city to enter into a contract with the
county assessor-collector to provide information so that the assessor-collector can make a
determination of whether to refuse to register a motor vehicle because of an outstanding warrant
for failure to pay a fine for violation of a traffic law; and (2) authorize a city that has a contract
described in (1), above, to impose an additional $20 fee on a person who has an outstanding
warrant to use to reimburse the Department of Motor Vehicles or the county assessor-collector
for its expenses for providing services under the contract. (Companion bill is H.B. 2204 by
Oliveira).

S.B. 1389 (Gallegos) – Construction Safety: would provide that: (1) to the extent consistent
with federal law, a governmental entity – including a city – that enters into a construction
contract must require that the contractor ensure that all employees working on the general
construction site have completed construction safety training, as shown by a certificate of
training completion for the employee; and (2) a governmental entity shall include in the contract
various notice and penalty provisions.
S.B. 1391 (Gallegos) – Loans: this bill is the same as H.B. 2713, above.

S.B. 1392 (Lucio) – County Development Authority/Municipal Building Codes: this bill is
the same as H.B. 3190, above.

S.B. 1393 (Seliger) – Electricity: would add “electricity” to the definition of the term personal
property in the Public Finance Act, which allows governing body of a governmental agency to
execute, perform, and make payments under a contract with any person for the use or the
purchase or other acquisition of any personal property, or the financing thereof.

S.B. 1395 (Williams) – State Infrastructure Bank: this bill is the same as H.B. 3218, above.

S.B. 1398 (Patrick) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 3158, above.

S.B. 1399 (D. Patrick) – Foundation Repair Contractors: would: (1) establish a foundation
repair contractors advisory board, the membership of which must include one city official; (2)
require the Texas Commission of Licensing and Regulation to establish standards for the practice
of foundation repair, insurance requirements, licensure requirements, and prohibited practices;
(3) authorize the Department of Licensing and Regulation to contract with political subdivisions
for enforcement; (4) require licensees to provide notice to a city that the person has a license and
authorize a city to charge a related fee; (5) exempt certain persons from licensure but not from
city permit, inspection, or approval requirements; (6) provide that an individual who holds a
license is not required to hold a license issued by a city to engage in foundation repair
contracting in the city; and (7) provide that a person commits a class C misdemeanor if the
person knowingly engages in foundation repair contracting without holding a license.
(Companion bill is H.B. 2530 by Legler.)

S.B. 1402 (Williams) – Motor Vehicles: would, among many other things, provide that a
vehicle used by law enforcement under an alias for covert criminal investigations is exempt from
the payment of a registration fee. (Companion bill is H.B. 2357 by Pickett.)

S.B. 1406 (Hinojosa) – County Development Authority: would provide that a county may by
order establish minimum standards for property maintenance in the unincorporated area of the
county and establish limitations, procedures, and enforcement authority relating to the standards.

S.B. 1411 (Hegar) – Sales Tax: this bill is the same as H.B. 2782, above.

S.B. 1412 (Hegar) – On-Site Sewage Disposal Systems: would: (1) authorize certain
commercial developments to permit small commercial development sewage collection,
treatment, and disposal systems as on-site sewage disposal systems; (2) require that such systems
be recorded with the county; and (3) placing joint and several responsibility for maintenance and
permit violations on the owners of the units served by the system.

S.B. 1419 (Hinojosa) – DNA Lab: would provide that the Texas Forensic Science Commission
must establish a DNA lab audit program to conduct periodic unannounced audits of DNA labs
and provide procedures to implement the bill.
S.B. 1420 (Hinojosa) – Department of Transportation: this bill is the same as H.B. 2675,
above.

H.B. 1428 (Ogden) – Transportation Finance Zones: would provide that: (1) the Texas
Transportation Commission may designate a transportation finance zone that is adjacent to the
right-of-way of an existing or proposed state highway project and within two miles on either side
of the centerline of the state highway; (2) the designation of a zone is not effective until the
legislature has reviewed and approved the designation and boundaries of the zone; (3) the
proceeds from the collection of state sales and use taxes imposed in a zone shall be deposited in
the state infrastructure bank or similar revolving fund authorized by law, to be used for the
repayment of financial assistance provided from the revolving fund for highway projects; (4) the
proceeds from the collection of taxes deposited to the credit of a revolving fund may only be
used for the repayment of financial assistance provided to the Texas Department of
Transportation for tolled or non-tolled highway projects within the zone ( and may not be used to
provide financial assistance for a project developed, constructed, or operated by a private entity
under a comprehensive development agreement); and (5) in any state fiscal year, the comptroller
may not deposit more than $250 million to the credit of a revolving fund. (Note: please see
S.J.R. 42, below.)

S.B. 1440 (Ellis) – Property Tax: would provide that: (1) a delinquency date applies only to the
amount of taxes required to be paid on the portion of taxable value of the property that is the
subject of a motion to change the appraisal role to correct an error that is not in dispute before
the delinquency date; and (2) after filing an oath of inability to pay the taxes at issue, a property
owner may be excused from the requirement of prepayment of tax as a prerequisite to the
determination of a motion if the appraisal review board finds that such prepayment would
constitute an unreasonable restrain on the property owner’s right of access to the board.
(Companion bill is H.B. 2220 by Y. Davis.)

S.B. 1442 (Shapiro) – Permit Vesting: this bill is the same as H.B. 2732, above.

S.B. 1445 (Zaffirini) – Elections: would require a political report to include the purchase price
and amount of proceeds received from a sale of an investment purchased during the reporting
period with money received as a political contribution or interest earned on political
contributions.

S.B. 1450 (Zaffirini) – Precious Metals Dealers: would, among other things, provide that the
governing body of a city may license, tax, suppress, prevent, or otherwise regulate cash-for-gold
establishments.

S.B. 1451 (Zaffirini) – Political Expenditures: would allow a corporation or labor organization
to make a direct campaign expenditure for a public office.

S.B. 1460 (Harris) – Energy Savings Contracts: would: (1) authorize a contract for the
installation or implementation of energy savings equipment in new or existing facilities; and (2)
provide that the governing body of a local government may use any available money, other than
money borrowed from the state, to pay the provider of the energy or water conservation
measures; and (3) provide that the governing body is not required to pay for energy or water
conservation measures solely out of the savings realized under an energy saving performance
contract. (Companion bill is H.B. 1728 by Keffer.)

S.B. 1461 (Lucio) – Disaster Reconstruction: would: (1) create the disaster reconstruction
coordination office in the office of the governor; (2) create a task force that would advise the
disaster reconstruction coordination office that would include two officials from small cities; and
(3) create the disaster contingency fund.

S.B. 1467 (Lucio) – Coin-Operated Machines: would increase the occupation tax that cities
may impose on certain coin-operated machines and require the city treasurer to distribute half the
revenue collected to the municipal tax assessor-collector to offset the costs of assessing and
collecting the tax.

S.B. 1471 (Hinojosa) – Scrap Tires: would, before a land reclamation project using scrap tires
may begin, require: (1) a permit for the project from the Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ); (2) notice to the governing body of a city if the project is located in its
corporate limits or ETJ; and (3) comments or suggestions from the city’s governing body to the
TCEQ regarding the project.

S.B. 1473 (Hinojosa) – Expunction of Arrest Records: this bill is the same as H.B. 2889,
above.

S.B. 1482 (Wentworth) – Property Tax: would make a property tax lien inferior to a perfected
purchase-money security interest. (Companion bill is H.B. 2409 by Kuempel.)

S.B. 1485 (West) – School Bus Cameras: would: (1) authorize a school district to implement a
school bus monitoring system that takes live or recorded images, including images of vehicles
that pass a stopped school bus; (2) allow for the imposition of a civil penalty for the offense of
passing a stopped school bus and provide other penalties for failure to comply with the bill; and
(3) establish procedures for the implementation of the system including authorization for a
school district to enter into an interlocal agreement with a city regarding administrative hearings
required under the bill.

S.B. 1489 (Whitmire) – Truancy: would: (1) require a police officer serving as an attendance
officer to file a complaint against a student in municipal or justice court if the student has a
certain number of absences and the student is seventeen years of age or older; (2) create
additional situations where a complaint against the parent of a truant child under the age of
seventeen must be filed in justice or municipal court; and (3) remove most failure to attend
school cases for students under the age of seventeen to juvenile courts.

S.B. 1494 (Uresti) – Municipal Records: would require the officer or employee responsible for
maintaining the records of the city to notify the Texas Judicial Council of the name of each
person who is elected or appointed as presiding officer of the city, municipal court judge, or
clerk of a municipal court, not later than the thirtieth day after the person’s election or
appointment.

S.B. 1505 (Uresti) – Property Tax: would change the method by which a real property interest
in oil and gas in place is appraised by: (1) using the average price of the oil or gas interest for the
preceding two calendar years; and (2) eliminating the comptroller-computed market condition
factor multiplier. (Companion bill is H.B. 889 by Lewis.)

S.B. 1506 (Uresti) – Property Tax: would change the method by which a real property interest
in oil and gas in place is appraised by using actual price data, as available, and market-based data
and a market-based methodology to calculate the statewide average price for oil or gas.

S.B. 1517 (Van de Putte) – Animal Control: would: (1) authorize a city to enact more
stringent sterilization requirements than state; (2) exempt certain animals from state sterilization
requirements; (3) require that dog and cat owners have their animals sterilized subject to limited
exemptions; and (4) require a local animal control authority to issue intact animal permits to
owners of animals that are exempt from state sterilization requirements.

S.B. 1519 (Uresti) – Sales Tax: this bill is same as H.B. 3411, above.

S.B. 1521 (Uresti) – Municipal Court Building Security Fund: would authorize the use of
funds from a city’s municipal court building security fund for warrant officers and related
equipment.

S.B. 1526 (Hinojosa) – Municipal Court: would, among other provisions: (1) require a either
party in a criminal case before a municipal court to disclose, as soon as practicable after
receiving a timely request from the other party, most evidence pertaining to a criminal case to the
other party’s attorney; (2) require the court to permit an attorney representing the parties to make
copies of the evidence; (3) permit the city to assert exceptions to required disclosure that is
believed to be confidential by law; (4) require a municipal prosecutor to supplement or amend
this information as needed; (5) require a defendant who intends to use an alibi defense to file a
good faith notice of intent to raise the defense with the court; (6) permit a court to enter a
protective order restricting a specific disclosure or permit an in camera review of the documents;
(7) create sanctions for violation of the disclosure requirements. (Companion is H.B. 1647 by
Gallego.)

S.B. 1527 (Hinojosa) – Property Tax: would provide that either an opinion by an independent
auditor and licensed certified public accountant included in an audit, or a determination of tax-
exempt status by the United States Internal Revenue Service of a community housing
development organization or other organization constructing or rehabilitating low-income
housing, is prima facie evidence of the facts stated in the opinion or determination for purposes
of determining tax exempt status. (Companion bill is H.B. 1576 by Garza.)

S.B. 1528 (Hinojosa) – Property Tax: would: (1) provide that the legal owner of property that
is not a public facility corporation is exempt from property taxation if: (a) a public facility
corporation owns 100 percent of the legal owner of the property; or (b) the legal owner of the
property is exclusively controlled by the corporation and is organized under state law, has its
principal place of business in this state, and has equitable title to the property; (2) provide that
property owned by a public facility corporation is exempt from property taxes if the property is
owned by a tax credit partnership or limited liability company and the general partner or member
is controlled by a public facility corporation. (Companion bill is H.B. 2000 by Garza.)

S.B. 1529 (Hinojosa) – Law Enforcement: would require a police department to report an
arrest to the Texas Department of Public Safety not later than the second day after the arrest.

S.B. 1537 (Watson) – Fiscal Notes: would: (1) require a state agency to assign an estimated
dollar amount for any cost to a state or local government in enforcing or administering a
proposed rule; and (2) prohibit a state agency from determining the cost to a state or local
government of administering a proposed rule is insignificant because the state or local
government can pass on the cost to a customer or other third party associated with the proposed
rule.

S.B. 1539 (Watson) – Renewable Energy: would provide that: (1) It is the intent of the
legislature that by January 1, 2015, an additional 5,000 megawatts of generating capacity from
renewable energy technologies will have been installed in this state; (2) the cumulative installed
renewable capacity in this state shall total 5,880 megawatts by January 1, 2015, and the Public
Utility Commission shall establish a goal of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity
by January 1, 2025; (3) the cumulative installed renewable capacity in this state shall total 5,256
megawatts by January 1, 2013, and 5,880 megawatts by January 1, 2015; and (4) a certain
amount of that technology must include generating capacity other than wind energy
technologies.

S.B. 1542 (Watson) – Governmental Immunity: would waive governmental immunity for a
city or other governmental entity in a suit where a nurse alleges the city took adverse
employment action against the nurse in retaliation for a report required by state laws governing
nurse conduct. (Companion bill is H.B. 884 by Howard).

S.B. 1546 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would: (1) require an appraisal review board to reschedule
a tax appeal hearing if the property owner or agent fails to attend due to human error; and (2)
require the comptroller to appoint a peer review committee to review and respond to property tax
complaints.

S.B. 1553 (Rodriguez) – Public Housing: this bill is the same as H.B. 2737, above.

S.B. 1558 (Carona) – Purchasing: would provide that: (1) if a change order involves a decrease
or an increase of $50,000 or less and is for work within the original bid, the governing body may
authorize an administrative official of the municipality to approve the change order; (2) a
governing body may authorize an official or employee responsible for purchasing or
administering a contract to approve a change order that involves a change of $50,000 or less; and
(3) similar changes shall apply to civic center authorities and certain other local governmental
entities. (Companion bill is H.B. 679 by Button.)
S.B. 1565 (Ellis) – Litigation: this bill is the same as H.B. 2973, above.

S.B. 1570 (Estes) – Sale of Leased Land: would: (1) authorize governmental entities, including
cities, to sell surplus land that it owns to a person leasing the land without notice or bid and
prohibit a governmental entity from selling the land to any other person except a bulk purchaser;
(2) exempt the sale of a leased tract from platting requirements; (3) exempt the sale of an
individual leased tract from various requirements including chapter 272 of the Local Government
Code (which generally governs the sale of city property); (4) authorize a governmental entity to
suspend a lessee’s right to purchase leased land in order to pursue a bulk sale of the leased land;
(5) provide for the method of purchase and valuation of the land; (6) require that certain roads be
transferred to the county; and (7) provide a procedure for a lessee to purchase the leased tract
from the bulk purchaser. (Companion bill is H.B. 1729 by Keffer.)

S.B. 1571 (Watson) – Public Information: would: (1) change the definition of “public
information” to include: (a) information that is created, possessed, used and relied upon under a
law or ordinance or in connection with the transaction of official business by any person,
including a government agency, board, or institution or an individual, corporation or other
business entity, or nonprofit that performs a public function, provides research or consulting
services, or conducts a study at the request of a governmental body; and (b) information stored in
electronic format that contains public documents, public records, or a communication of official
business, regardless of whether it is stored on a server or in a computer facility owned or
maintained by a governmental body; (2) define, for purposes of the Public Information Act
(PIA), the terms “administer,” and “public function;” (3) provide that the term “public funds” for
purposes of the PIA includes funds received from the federal government or from
intergovernmental transfers; and (4) require that a contract between a governmental entity that
receives state funds and business entity or nonprofit to perform a public function involving the
exchange or creation of public information must be drafted in consideration of the requirements
of the PIA.

S.B. 1577 (Ellis) – Hotel Occupancy Tax: would define “price” for purposes of the amount
paid for a hotel room as the retail price paid by a person for right to use or posses the room,
including any booking, handling, or similar fee or charge paid by or on behalf of the person.
(Companion bill is H.B. 1454 by Murphy.)

S.B. 1583 (Ogden) – Law Enforcement: would: (1) make changes to the way that grants are
allocated by the Automobile Burglary and Theft Prevention Authority, including changing from
distribution based on geographic rates of auto theft to statewide rates; and (2) authorize the
Texas Commission on Jail Standards to set and collect a reasonable fee to cover the cost of
performing any re-inspection of a municipal jail operated for a city by a private vendor as
required by state law.

S.B. 1593 (Wentworth) – Law Enforcement: would prohibit the admission of any evidence
obtained solely as the direct result of a request made in good faith for emergency medical
services in response to a person’s possible overdose of alcohol or of a controlled substance in
order to show that a person was intoxicated or possessed or consumed alcohol or a controlled
substance.
S.B. 1595 (Wentworth) – Sales Tax: this bill is the same as H.B. 2760, above.

S.B. 1600 (Whitmire) -- Private Security Officers: would expand the exemptions for
individuals from the requirements for private security officers if the individual: (1) a peace
officer; and (2) is employed by a company licensed as a private security company.

S.B. 1606 (Seliger) – Groundwater: would: (1) require the Texas Water Development Board
(TWDB) to work with groundwater conservation district to adopt rules that would require all
owners or operators of any well, including wells exempt from permitting under other statute, to
report groundwater withdrawals using reasonable and appropriate reporting methods and
frequency; (2) require groundwater withdrawals to be reported annually to the groundwater
conservation district or, where no district is established, directly to the TWDB.

S.B. 1612 (Ogden) – Texas Municipal Retirement System: would: (1) repeal the law that
allows a city to issue obligations to fund its retirement benefits; (2) require a public retirement
system, including the Texas Municipal Retirement System (TMRS), to pay the State Pension
Review Board fifty cents annually for each member account; and (3) allow the pension review
board to require TMRS or other public retirement systems to complete an actuarial experience
study every five years.

S.B. 1613 (Ogden) – Electric Utilities: would: (1) repeal the current definition of “competitive
matter” relating to public power utilities; (2) define a “competitive matter,” which can be
deliberated by a public power utility in a closed meeting and is not generally subject to public
disclosure, as a matter reasonably related to: (a) generation unit specific and portfolio fixed and
variable costs, capital improvement plans for generation units, and generation unit operating
characteristics and outage scheduling; (b) bidding and pricing information for purchased power,
generation and fuel, and Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) bids, prices, offers, and
related services and strategies; (c) effective fuel and purchased power agreements and fuel
transportation arrangements and contracts; (d) risk management information, contracts, and
strategies, including fuel hedging and storage; (e) plans, studies, proposals, and analyses for
system improvements, additions, or sales, other than transmission and distribution system
improvements inside the service area for which the public power utility is the sole certificated
retail provider; and (f) customer billing, contract, and usage information, electric power pricing
information, system load characteristics, and electric power marketing analyses and strategies;
and (3) would provide that a “competitive matter,” may not be deemed to include, among other
things: (a) any tariff of general applicability regarding rates and other matters; (b) salaries and
total compensation of all employees of a public power utility; or (c) information publicly
released by the ERCOT to a law, rule, or protocol generally applicable to similarly situated
market participants.

S.B. 1615 (West) – Sexting: would: (1) create the offense of electronic transmission of certain
visual material depicting a minor; (2) provide that is an affirmative defense to prosecution of the
offense described in (1), above, if the defendant, among other things, reports receipt of the
material to a law enforcement agency not later than 48 hours after receiving the visual material
from another minor; and (3) allow courts, including a municipal court, to order a defendant
guilty of the offense described in (1), above, to attend and complete an educational program
about the consequences of the offense and require the defendant or the defendant’s parent to pay
the cost of the program if financially able.

S.B. 1616 (West) – Evidence: would require the Department of Public Safety (DPS) to adopt
rules: (1) relating to a law enforcement agency that collects, stores, preserves, or retrieves any
biological evidence in relation to an investigation or prosecution of a felony offense specifying
how the evidence must be retained, for how long it must be retained, and procedures involved;
and (2) authorizing a county with population of less than 100,000 to promptly deliver such
evidence to DPS for storage.

S.B. 1632 (Birdwell) – DNRs and Advance Directives: would make various revisions to the
law relating to in-hospital and out-of-hospital do-not-resuscitate orders, including those
contained in an advance directive.

S.B. 1636 (Davis) – Evidence: would: (1) require a law enforcement agency that receives
sexual assault evidence to submit that evidence to an accredited crime laboratory for analysis not
later than the tenth day after it is received; and (2) would require a laboratory to complete its
analysis of sexual assault evidence not later than the ninetieth day after it is received.
(Companion bill is H.B. 3147 by McClendon.)

S.B. 1638 (Davis) – Public Information: would: (1) authorize an employee or official of a
governmental body and each former employee or official to choose whether to allow public
access to their emergency contact information; (2) except emergency contact information from
public disclosure for certain employees, officers, and former employees and officers; (3) make
emergency contact information confidential and not subject to public disclosure for certain
officers and employees; (4) except from public disclosure a motor vehicle operator’s or driver’s
license or permit and a motor vehicle title or registration issued by another state or country; and
(5) make a photocopy or other copy of an identification badge issued to an official or employee
of a governmental body confidential.

S.B. 1641 (W. Davis) – Gas Drilling: would require the Texas Railroad Commission to conduct
certain hearings relating to gas wells in the Barnett Shale in that area.

S.B. 1647 (Uresti) – Property Tax: would provide that if revenues from a producing mineral
interest are held by an entity other than the legal owner of the interest, then the property taxes
due on the interest shall be paid by the entity which holds the funds.

S.B. 1654 (Watson) – Procurement: this bill is the same as H.B. 2729, above.

S.B. 1659 (Lucio) – Fire Suppression: would authorize a water supply or sewer service
organization to provide a water supply to a city or volunteer fire department for use in fire
suppression. (Companion bill is H.B. 1814 by Lucio.)

S.B. 1673 (Gallegos) -- Texas Commission on Fire Protection: This bill is the same as H.B.
3735, above.
S.B. 1675 (Duncan) – Elections: this bill is the same as H.B. 3497, above.

S.B. 1676 (Ellis) -- Peace Officer Training: This bill is the same bill as H.B. 2823, above.

S.B. 1677 (Ellis) – Municipal Court Building Security Fund: would increase the optional
municipal court building security fee to $4. (Companion bill is H.B. 904 by Thompson.)

S.B. 1678 (Ellis) – Municipal Court: would increase the amount a city may collect under the
municipal court technology fee to $5. (Companion is H.B. 1261 by Thompson.)

S.B. 1690 (Lucio) – Water Utility Financial Assistance: would, among other related
provisions, authorize the Texas Water Development Board to require a city applying for financial
assistance in order to provide service to an economically distressed area to provide a written
determination by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality on the city’s capability to
plan, build, and operate the system for which assistance is being requested.
S.B. 1691 (Lucio) – Housing: would establish a rural housing land assemblage program to
allow participating cities and counties to enter into interlocal agreements to acquire, hold, and
transfer real property for the purpose of providing affordable housing for low-income
households.

S.B. 1692 (Lucio) – City Budget: would require the comptroller to provide on its Internet Web
site a link to the Web site of each city that contains budget information for the city.

S.B. 1693 (Carona) – Streamlined Electric Ratemaking: this bill is the same as H.B. 3610,
above.

S.B. 1695 (Williams) – Gangs: would expand the situations in which a person may be
prosecuted for engaging in organized criminal activity relating to street gangs.

S.B. 1701 (Williams) – Forfeiture: would: (1) provide that a rebuttable presumption that
property is subject to forfeiture is established if the state shows by a preponderance of the
evidence that the conduct giving rise to the forfeiture occurred and the conduct giving rise to the
forfeiture is the only likely source or explanation for that property; (2) prohibit a court from
suppressing evidence solely because it is acquired pursuant to a search or seizure that violates the
right of the owner or interest holder; and (3) authorize a court to order the forfeiture of substitute
assets, that otherwise are not subject to forfeiture, if the court finds that property that has been
forfeited cannot be located, has been transferred, conveyed or sold to a third-party, has been
placed beyond the jurisdiction of the court, has been substantially diminished in value, or has
been commingled with other property and cannot be separated.

S.B. 1713 (Whitmire) – Crime Victim’s Fund: would allow the use of the compensation to
victims of crime fund to reimburse the reasonable costs of a forensic medical exam for family
violence.

S.B. 1721 (Duncan) – Sales Tax: this bill is the same as H.B. 3767, above.
S.B. 1737 (Van de Putte) -- Employee Leave: would allow an individual who is eligible for
paid leave for military training or duty to carry forward any leave to the next year so long as the
maximum hours carried forward from one year to the next does not exceed 45 workdays.

S.B. 1741 (Fraser) – Tree Mitigation Fees: would provide that: (1) if a city requires as a
condition for the approval of a permit that the applicant pay to the city or to a third party a tree
mitigation fee, the amount of the tree mitigation fee shall be roughly proportionate to the impacts
of the activity on the public; and (2) provide procedures to appeal the amount of the fee.

S.B. 1745 (Gallegos) – Child-Care Facilities: this bill is the same as H.B. 3547, above.

S.B. 1752 (Uresti) – Juveniles: would make all records, files, and information stored by
electronic means or otherwise from which a record or file could be generated, related to a child
who is convicted and has satisfied the judgment for a fine-only misdemeanor offense other than a
traffic offense confidential, to be released only in certain situations. (This bill is similar to H.B.
3695 by Gallego.)

S.B. 1757 (Uresti) – Property Tax: would exempt from property taxes a charitable organization
that serves a religious, charitable, scientific, literary, or educational purposes that promotes the
athletic or academic development of boys or girls under the age of 18 years old.

S.B. 1758 (Lucio) – Affordable Housing: would: (1) require the governing board of the Texas
Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA) to establish field offices in rural areas
to assist political subdivisions in developing or administering affordable housing programs; (2)
require TDHCA to establish an office to support rural community and small city housing
initiatives to: (a) work with each regional council of government to match housing sponsors to
the housing needs of rural communities and small cities; (b) identify sources of funds for housing
needs, (c) coordinate efforts to discuss and establish an online clearinghouse of best practices for
rural community and small city housing initiatives; (d) establish regional nonprofit housing
development organizations; (e) provide training to elected officials and others regarding housing
programs, techniques to increase housing opportunities in rural communities and small cities,
and funding for housing programs; and (f) assign, on request of a city council, an employee or
independent contractor to assist the city in developing comprehensive housing plans, supporting
housing development, and identifying financial resources.

S.B. 1765 (Rodriguez) – Personnel: This bill is the same bill as H.B. 3020, above.

S.B. 1771 (Williams) – Property Tax: would do the following: (1) eliminate the requirement
that appraisal value notices must include estimated tax liability based on an application of last
year’s tax rate to this year’s appraised value; (2) require tax assessors to submit the appraisal roll
to a city not later than 21 days after the date the appraisal roll is certified to the assessor; (3)
require a city to calculate its effective tax rate, same services tax rate, and rollback tax rate not
later than 30 days after it receives the certified appraisal roll from the assessor; (4) require the
person who calculates the effective tax rate, same services tax rate, and rollback rate to submit
the rate to the city council within five days of making the calculation; (5) require an officer or
employee designated by the city to either mail to each property owner, or publish in the
newspaper, tax rate information at least 14 days before the date of the first meeting of the city
council to consider the budget; (6) amend various sections of state law to include the application
of a same services tax rate; (7) extend from 60 to 90 days the deadline for a city to adopt its tax
rates after receiving a certified appraisal roll; (8) provide that if the requirements of number 5,
above, are not met due to circumstances beyond the city’s control, such as a natural disaster, the
city must adopt a default property tax rate for the year that is the lower of the same services tax
rate or last year’s adopted rate; (9) eliminate the application of the default tax rate provision in
cases where the city council fails to meet the statutory deadline for adopting a tax rate (Note: it
appears that the confusing provisions in numbers 8 and 9, above, may be unintended features of
this bill); and (10) require a city council, before giving notice of tax increase hearings, to take a
record vote on the proposal to increase taxes and that the motion for that vote must be as follows:
“I move that a proposal to increase property taxes by the adoption of a tax rate of (specify tax
rate) be placed on the agenda for the meeting to be held on (date at which the governing body
anticipates adopting the tax rate).” (Companion bill is H.B. 874 by Howard.)

S.B. 1773 (Williams) – Property Tax: would expand to certain counties a pilot program
authorizing a property owner to appeal certain appraisal review board determinations to the State
Office of Administrative Hearings.

S.B. 1774 (Williams) – Property Tax: would: (1) redefine the effective property tax rate
calculation in a way that excludes many of the adjustments necessary to hold cities harmless for
exemptions and mandates (Note: concerned city finance officers may wish to use the new
formulas in the bill to re-calculate their effective rates going back several years and communicate
the results to Bill Longley at bill@tml.org); (2) require the designated officer or employee of a
city to electronically deliver certain tax rate information to the comptroller; and (3) require a city
to publish certain tax rate information in a local newspaper of general circulation in a format
prescribed by the comptroller.

S.B. 1782 (Ellis) -- Mandatory Health Benefit: This bill is the same as H.B. 3402, above.

S.B. 1783 (Ellis) – Smoking: would provide that an owner, operator, manager, or other person in
control of a building that the public is invited or allowed to enter and in which smoking is
permitted shall post clearly and conspicuously at each public entrance to the building a sign that
reads: “WARNING: SMOKING IS PERMITTED INSIDE THIS BUILDING” and make the
failure to post the sign a class C misdemeanor.

S.B. 1787 (Patrick) – Blood and Breath Specimens: would require an officer, before
requesting a person to submit to the taking of a specimen, to inform the person orally and in
writing that if the person refuses, the officer may apply for a warrant authorizing a specimen to
be taken from the person. (Companion bill is H.B. 1743 by Martinez Fischer.)

S.B. 1798 (West) – Sales Tax: would provide that, for sales tax purposes, there is a rebuttable
presumption that a retailer is engaged in business in this state if the retailer: (1) enters into an
agreement with a Texas resident under which the resident receives a commission or other
consideration for the referral of potential customers by any means, including by a link on an
Internet Web site; and (2) received at least $10,000 during the previous four calendar quarters in
cumulative gross receipts from sales to consumers located in Texas who were referred to the
retailer by an agreement under (1), above. (Companion bill is H.B. 1317 by Naishtat.)

S.B. 1808 (Lucio) – EMS: would: (1) require EMS personnel to attend continuing education
training in the management and care of pediatric patients and complete a certain number of hours
– depending upon their status as a basic, intermediate, or paramedic technician – of the training
every two years of the four-year certification period; (2) require an EMS vehicle be equipped
with essential pediatric equipment and supplies; and (3) require that minimum standards be
adopted for essential pediatric equipment and supplies for EMS vehicles.

S.B. 1811 (Duncan) – State Fiscal Matters: This bill is the same as H.B. 3790, above.

S.B. 1814 (Zaffirini) – Public Nuisance: would give a person 15 days after receipt of notice to
abate a public nuisance. (Companion bill is H.B. 1132 by Larson.)

S.B. 1816 (Zaffirini) – Colonias: this bill is the same as H.B. 2803, above.

S.B. 1825 (Gallegos) – Low-Water Crossings: would require the Texas Transportation
Commission to include in the sign manual for state highways provisions for the design and
installation of a uniform low-water crossing sign, but would not require a local authority to
replace low-water crossing signs installed before January 1, 2012.

S.B. 1826 (Gallegos) – Open Meetings: would provide that, as defined by the Open Meetings
Act: (1) the term “deliberation” means an exchange, whether oral or written, between a quorum
of a governmental body, or between a quorum of a governmental body and another person,
concerning an issue within the jurisdiction of the governmental body or any public business; (2)
the term “deliberation” includes an e-mail, letter, or other written communication that is
produced by or originates from a member of the governmental body, is circulated among a
quorum of the governmental body, concerns an issue within the jurisdiction of the governmental
body or any public business; and (3) the term “meeting” includes a gathering: (a) that is
conducted by the governmental body or for which the governmental body is responsible; (b) at
which a quorum of members of the governmental body is present or actively participating;
(c) that has been called by the governmental body; and (d) at which the members receive
information from, give information to, ask questions of, or receive questions from any third
person, including an employee of the governmental body, about the public business or public
policy over which the governmental body has supervision or control.

S.B. 1827 (Gallegos) – Flood-prone Areas: would authorize a city to enter and inspect property
in a flood-prone area at any time to determine if the property is being maintained in compliance
with state law or any regulations of the city.

S.B. 1829 (Wentworth) – Public Information: would exclude from the term “governmental
body,” as used in the Public Information Act, a chamber of commerce or a non-profit corporation
that provides economic development services to a governmental body.
S.B. 1834 (Ellis) – Property Tax: would provide that if no claimant establishes entitlement to
excess proceeds from a property tax foreclosure sale, that the excess proceeds shall be remitted
to the comptroller for deposit in the state fair defense account. (Note: state law currently
provides that the excess proceeds from a property tax foreclosure sale be proportionally
distributed to each taxing unit participating in the sale.)

S.B. 1843 (Carona) – Internet Crimes: would: (1) create a new court cost to be collected from
a person who, upon conviction, is required to register as a sex offender; and (2) transmit the
proceeds from that cost to a special fund known as the Internet Crimes Against Children Fund, to
be appropriated equally to the three Internet Crimes Against Children task forces in the state.
(This bill is similar to H.B. 3746 by Frullo.)

S.B. 1844 (Lucio) – Traffic Citations: would: (1) require an arresting officer issuing a citation
in lieu of magistration to specify that the person receiving the citation must appear before the
magistrate in the precinct in which the offense is alleged to have been committed; and (2) require
a magistrate to dismiss the cause and bar the refilling of a complaint if the officer fails to
comply.

S.B. 1848 (Hegar) – EMS Service Fees: would make various changes to the distribution of the
emergency service fee for wireless telecommunications connections and the prepaid 9-1-1
emergency service fee.

S.B. 1853 (Deuell) – EMS: would: (1) require, not later than the third business day after the
date a hospital or EMS provider files a written notice of a lien in a cause of action or claim of an
individual who receives emergency medical services for injuries caused by an accident that is
attributed to the negligence of another person, the hospital or EMS provider to send a copy of the
notice to each third-party payor of which they have knowledge; and (2) provide that failure to
comply with the requirement in (1), above, would void the lien.

S.B. 1856 (Deuell) – EMS: would provide that the recovery of medical or health care expenses
in a civil action is limited to the amount that is actually paid by or on behalf of the claimant to a
physician or health care provider.

S.B. 1859 (Ellis) – Air Quality: would provide various measures to address air quality issues,
including requiring the Texas Board of Health to establish voluntary guidelines for air quality of
common outside areas connected to or immediately contiguous to indoor areas of government
buildings. (Companion bill is H.B. 2306 by Alvarado.)

S.B. 1861 (Van de Putte) -- Employee Leave: would: (1) require a city to grant unpaid leave
to an employee, who is not exempt, from overtime for purposes of meeting with school officials
or attending a child’s school activity if the employee has worked for the city at least 90 days; (2)
require an employee desiring such leave to give reasonable notice and provide documentation of
the activity; (3) require a city to post notice of employees’ rights under this law; and (4) prohibit
a city from suspending or terminating an employee for exercising rights under this law.
S.B. 1866 (Davis) – Professional Services: would provide that, unless inconsistent with the
criteria relating to qualifications of a professional service provider: (1) in selecting a provider of
professional services or a group or association of providers, a governmental entity – including a
city – may consider the impact on the ability of the entity to comply with laws, rules, and
policies of the entity relating to historically underutilized and/or minority businesses, the entity’s
small business development program, or another contracting program approved by the entity, if
any; and (2) the entity may also consider the provider’s or group or association of providers’
principal place of business if, in the entity’s governing body’s judgment, the location of the
principal place of business will impact the most efficient and economical provision of the
services.

S.J.R. 3 (Fraser) – Texas Water Development Board Bonds: would authorize the Texas
Water Development Board to issue general obligation bonds for one or more accounts of the
Texas Water Development Fund II, with certain restrictions.

S.J.R. 7 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to authorize the
legislature to reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten to five percent.
(Note: please see S.B. 129, above.)

S.J.R. 8 (Wentworth) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that, subject to legislative allocation, appropriation, and direction, three fourths of the net
revenue from the motor fuel tax shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and
maintaining public highways, and one-fourth of the net revenue shall be allocated to school
funding. (Note: please see S.B. 135, above.)

S.J.R. 11 (Nichols) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to: (1) reduce the property tax appraisal cap on homesteads from ten percent to five
percent; and (2) authorize a county commissioners court to call an election to increase the
homestead appraisal cap for all taxing jurisdictions in the county back to some percentage
between six and ten. (Note: please see S.B. 175, above.)

S.J.R. 14 (Van de Putte) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
Legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran if: (1) the surviving spouse has not remarried; (2) the
property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse when the disabled veteran died;
and (3) the property remains the residence homestead of the surviving spouse. Would also
amend the Texas Constitution to permit the Legislature to provide a complete residence
homestead property tax exemption for the owner of a property if: (1) the property remains the
principal residence of one or more of the disabled veteran’s surviving children who are under the
age of 18 and unmarried; and (2) the property was the principal place of residence for the
children when the disabled veteran died. (Note: please see S.B. 357, above.)

S.J.R. 15 (Wentworth) –U.S. Constitution: would apply to the Congress of the United States
to call a convention to propose amendments to the U.S. Constitution to provide for: (1)
congressional term limits; (2) the line-item veto; (3) a balanced federal budget; (4) a limit on
federal debt; and (5) the repeal of federal law by two-thirds of the several states.
S.J.R. 16 (Estes) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to include water
stewardship as a category of open-space land to be taxed on the basis of its productive capacity.

S.J.R. 17 (Carona) – Unfunded Mandates: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide
that no bill enacted on or after January 1, 2012 that imposes on a city, or a special district created
by a city, a duty that requires the expenditure of revenue is effective unless an appropriation or
other form of payment or reimbursement is provided from a resource other than the revenue of
the city or special district.

S.J.R. 20 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to apply a ten-percent appraisal cap to business property. (Note: please see S.B. 474,
above.)

S.J.R. 21 (Patrick) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the
legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving
spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran.
(Note: please see S.B. 516, above.)

S.J.R. 22 (Nichols) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide
that: (1) beginning in increments in 2013 and being complete in 2022, the net revenue derived
from the state sales tax imposed on the sale of a motor vehicle sold in this state shall be
deposited to the credit of the state highway fund and may be appropriated only for the purpose
of: (a) acquiring rights-of-way; (b) constructing and maintaining public roadways; or
(c) repaying the principal and interest on general obligation bonds; and (2) number 1, above,
does not apply to any revenue that was required to be used to fund school property tax
reductions. (Note: Please see S.B. 523, above.)

S.J.R 23 (Wentworth) – Transportation Funding: would amend the constitution to, among
other things: (1) raise the state motor fuels tax annually to an amount that coincides with the
change in the consumer price index; and (2) provide that any increased revenue generated by (1),
above, be spent for the sole purpose of designing, constructing, and maintaining public
roadways.

S.J.R. 24 (Watson) – Unfunded Mandates: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide
that: (1) a political subdivision is exempt from a legislative mandate during a period in which the
mandate is unfunded; (2) the legislature may authorize a commission to identify legislative
mandates and determine whether a legislative mandate is considered unfunded for a specific
period; and (3) the legislature, by statute, may enact a method by which an unfunded legislative
mandate is suspended or expires. (Note: Please see S.B. 705, above.)

S.J.R. 25 (Hinojosa) – Bonds: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide for the issuance
of additional general obligation bonds by the Texas Water Development Board.
S.J.R. 26 (West) – Interlocal Agreements: would allow a city to enter into a multiyear
interlocal contract with another city or county without having to meet interest and sinking fund
requirements, even if such contract creates a debt.

S.J.R. 30 (Ogden) – Transportation Funding: would amend the constitution to provide that:
(1) the net revenue derived from the portions of the rates of the taxes imposed on gasoline and
diesel fuel that exceed the rates of the taxes imposed on January 1, 2011, but not to exceed a
portion of the rates equal to five cents, for each net gallon or fractional part on which the taxes
are imposed, shall be allocated to a separate account in the state highway fund; and (2) revenue
allocated to the account in the state highway fund under the bill and interest on the revenue may
be appropriated only to repay the principal of and interest on: (1) notes issued and loans obtained
for transportation purposes; and (2) bonds and other public securities issued, and bond
enhancement agreements entered into for transportation purposes.

S.J.R. 32 (Rodriguez) – Property Tax: would amend the Texas Constitution to allow the
spouse and children of any member of the United States Armed Forces who dies while on active
duty to be granted an exemption from taxation for property valued at up to the total assessed
value of the property.

S.J.R. 33 (Hinojosa) – Gambling: this resolution is the same as H.J.R. 111, above. (Note:
please see S.B. 1118, above.)

S.J.R. 34 (Ellis) – Gambling: would provide for an election for a constitutional amendment that
would: (1) authorize forms of casino gaming; (2) give 1/30th of the revenue received by the state
for gaming to the city in which the casino is located; (3) preempt any city ordinance or regulation
that would disallow a gaming establishment within the city; (4) allow a city to regulate a gaming
establishment through building codes and health and safety ordinances; (5) disallow a casino
from being located in an area zoned exclusively residential; (6) prohibit a city from imposing a
tax or fee on a gaming establishment; (7) require a county wide vote before a casino can be
located in a county; and (8) require that state revenue from regulation of gaming, after paying for
administrative costs go to the property tax relief fund in the general revenue fund. (Companion
joint resolution is H.J.R. 112 by Menendez.)

S.J.R. 35 (Van de Putte) – Gambling: this resolution is the same as H.J.R. 119, above. (Note:
please see S.B. 1212, above.)

S.J.R. 37 (Van de Putte) – Automatic Resignation: this joint resolution is the same as H.J.R.
146, above.

S.J.R. 38 (Davis) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide
that: (1) subject to legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction, three-fourths of the net
revenue that is remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of collection
that is derived from taxes on motor fuels and lubricants used to propel motor vehicles over public
highways shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways;
and (2) for a biennium, the legislature may not appropriate those funds for a purpose other than
acquiring rights-of-way or constructing or maintaining public roadways in an amount that
exceeds the lesser of the total amount of those funds appropriated for a purpose other than
acquiring rights-of-way, constructing, or maintaining public roadways in the preceding biennium
or a slightly less amount in certain circumstances.

S.J.R. 40 (Lucio) – County Development Authority: would amend the Texas Constitution to
provide that a county may exercise limited ordinance-making authority for the purpose of
regulating land development in the unincorporated area of the county if that authority is
approved by a majority vote of the qualified voters voting in an election called by the
commissioners court of the county for that purpose. (Note: please see S.B. 1362, above.)

S.J.R. 41 (Hinojosa) – Vacancy on Governing Body: would amend the Texas Constitution to
authorize a home-rule city to provide in its charter the procedure to fill a vacancy on the city
council where the unexpired term is 24 months or less. (Companion resolution is H.J.R. 120 by
Munoz.)

S.J.R. 42 (Ogden) – Transportation Finance Zones: would amend the constitution to: (1)
allow for the Texas Transportation Commission or its successor to designate as a transportation
finance zone an area that is adjacent to the right-of-way of an existing or proposed state highway
project; (2) provide that the designation of an area as a transportation finance zone must be
reviewed and approved by the legislature before the designation may take effect; (3) allow the
legislature to authorize proceeds of a state tax that is imposed in the zone on the sale of a taxable
item or on the storage, use, or other consumption of a taxable item purchased from a retailer for
storage, use, or other consumption to be deposited into a revolving fund; and (4) provide that
money deposited to the credit of the revolving fund may only be used for the repayment of
financial assistance provided from the revolving fund for highway projects within the zone.
(Note: please see S.B. 1428, above.)

S.J.R. 49 (Patrick) – Religion: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that the
government may not directly, indirectly, or incidentally, substantially burden an individual’s or a
religious organization’s conduct that is based on a sincerely held religious belief, unless the
government is acting further a compelling government interest and using the least restrictive
available means to do so.

								
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