Another PA Poster by fjzhangxiaoquan

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									MUSC PA Student Wins for
Interprofessional Research Poster
Tina Ellis, 2nd year PA student presented her research poster at Student Research Day on November 7th.
Tina has been working in collaboration with Dr. Dana King from the MUSC Department of Family
Medicine, conducting secondary data analysis from the National Health and Nutrition Examination
Survey (NHANES) datasets for 1988-1994 and 2001-2006. They compared the rates of medication use
for diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia in the two time periods among adults age 40-74, and
in addition, compared medication use by race.

The data reflects that rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia are rapidly increasing
among American adults; the use of medications to control symptoms of diabetes, hypertension, and
hypercholesterolemia is increasing among American adults of every race. Coupled with the increase in
the prevalence of the underlying conditions, these findings have broad implications for future estimates of
healthcare expenditures and the potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions

The MUSC College of Graduate Studies sponsors the annual Student Research Day and all classes are
cancelled so students can attend this great function where students present their varied research interests.
The poster session lasts from 8:30 AM till noon wherein 126 posters were presented and evaluated by
teams of faculty and researchers. There are nine categories of research posters and the PA students won
for Clinical Professions/Masters degree. There were 84 oral presentations of research projects in the
afternoon.

Judging is conducted by teams of judges who evaluate the a) scientific approach to the subject b) clarity
and quality of delivery and c) ability to answer questions related to the research. Cash prizes are awarded
for 1st and 2nd place posters among the nine categories and for the seven categories of oral presentations.

Another PA Poster:
Kara Larson, Rebecca Obenza, Sarah Belden, Christopher McLaren, Meghan McQuiston, and Jessie
VanDerveer, 2nd year PA students presented their poster “Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Physician
Assistants, and Postgraduate Education: A Prospective Survey”.


Medication Use for Diabetes, Hypertension, and Hypercholesterolemia,
from 1988-1994 to 2001-2006
Tina Ellis, PA-S

Abstract:

Background: The prevalence of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes continues to increase
among American adults. The extent to which prescription medication use has increased to control the
symptoms of these conditions has not been well documented.
Methods: We analyzed data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
datasets for 1988-1994 and 2001-2006. We compared the rates of medication use in the two time periods
among adults age 40-74 that are in the peak years for developing diabetes, hypertension, and
hypercholesterolemia. We also compared medication use by gender and race.

Results: Prevalence rates increased for all three conditions over the study time period: diabetes (7.9%
to10% of US adults age 40-74), hypertension (33% to 36.2%) and hypercholesterolemia (30.2% to 37.1%,
all p<.05). Overall medication use increased 62% from 1988-94 to 2001-2006 (p<.05). Diabetes
medication use increased from 5.3% to 8.7%, anti-hypertension medication use increased from 23.0% to
32.4%, and cholesterol-lowering medication use increased from 4.5% to 16.7% (all p<.05). By race,
diabetes medication use increased the most among Hispanics (7.2% to 13.2%), anti-hypertension
medication use was greatest among Non-Hispanic Blacks (30.8% and 39.6%), and cholesterol-lowering
medication use increased the most in Non-Hispanic Whites (4.9% to 17.8%) ( all p<.05).

Conclusion: There has been an increase in medication use for diabetes, hypertension, and
hypercholesterolemia between 1988-1994 and 2001-2006. These findings have broad implications for
future estimates of healthcare expenditures and the potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions.


Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Physician Assistants, and Postgraduate
Education: A Prospective Survey
Kara Larson, Rebecca Obenza, Sarah Belden, Christopher McLaren, Meghan McQuiston, and Jessie
VanDerveer, Paul F. Jacques

Abstract:

Purpose: The current patient-provider disproportion in the subspecialty of Pediatric Emergency
Medicine (PEM) significantly hinders the field’s expansion1. Physician Assistants (PAs) offer a solution
to this shortage and may be utilized to provide quality care for children in Pediatric Emergency
Departments (PED) around the country. This study investigates the country’s 146 PEDs by approximating
the number of PAs currently practicing PEM, understanding attitudes concerning the efficacy of PAs, and
assembling rationale for the lack of PA utilization. The goal of this study is to determine the probability
that a post-graduate PA program in PEM would increase the number of PAs employed in PEM on a
national level.

Methods: A list of the nation’s 146 PEDs was retrieved from the National Children’s Hospital
Association. PED Medical Directors were surveyed via emails, faxes, or personal phone calls. Survey
questions focused on the amount and type of PA utilization. On the occasion that the PED did not hire
PAs, the director responded with a reason for not employing PAs, and also answered whether PAs’
completion of a postgraduate training program in PEM would increase the likelihood of the department’s
hiring PAs. All directors responded concerning the PED’s trauma status and yearly patient volume.

Results: Sixty-three PED Medical Directors responded to the survey (43% response rate) with 22
responding that they employ PAs (35%). PEDs hiring PAs responded positively on the use of PAs with
86% stating that PAs positively impact the health care demands of the PED. In addition, 82% reported
that PAs increase volume capacity. Two common reasons stated for not hiring PAs were “no interest
among medical staff” (23%) and “PA education does not prepare them for PEM” (23%). Sixty-six percent
of the PED respondents who do not employ PAs reported they would more likely hire a PA who had
completed a post-graduate program in PEM.

Conclusions: Currently, PAs practicing PEM represent a very small subset of PAs across the country, but
there is significant room for growth in this subspecialty. When comparing PED type, location, trauma
level designation, and volume there was no statistically significant difference between PA employment
versus no PA employment. This reality demonstrates the universally appropriate use of PAs in PEM
across the country in all types of PEDs. The significance of the increased likelihood of employing PAs
with postgraduate PEM education points to the perceived need for establishment of a PA PEM
postgraduate education.

								
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