Docstoc

Common Childhood Rashes - ihcMed

Document Sample
Common Childhood Rashes - ihcMed Powered By Docstoc
					                     COMMON CHILDHOOD RASHES

RASH WITHOUT BUMPS
     MEASLES (RUBEOLA) – all red rash starting on scalp/face and moves down to trunk and
      extremities; accompanied by “salt like” white rash in mouth
     RUBELLA (GERMAN MEASLES) – pink spots start on face and fade as rash spreads to
      trunk and extremities
     ROSEOLA INFANTUM – most common in kids under 3
     ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM (FIFTH DISEASE) – with a “slapped cheek” appearance
     SCARLET FEVER – rash appears 1-2 days after sore throat, accompanied by a “strawberry
      tongue” (whitish with prominent red dots)


RASH WITH BUMPS:
     CONTACT DERMATITIS – (poison ivy, oak or sumac, or irritants such as saliva, nasal
      discharge, sweat, harsh soap)
     URTICARIA (“HIVES”) – itching, swelling usually lasts less than 24 hours; if having
      trouble breathing go to emergency room
     SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS – common on scalp, face, behind ears; itchy and red with
      yellowish, greasy scaling
     ATOPIC DERMATITIS – dry and severely itchy; often associated with asthma, allergies, or
      hives
     PSORIASIS – often inherited and can see periods of remission; red plaques with a silvery
      sheen at center, not usually itchy
     YEAST – in warm, moist areas
         o CANDIDA INFECTION – “beefy red” skin with sharp borders and “satellite” spots
           outside of border; often child also has Thrush (white curd-like plaques in mouth)
         o TINEA INFECTION
                    “RINGWORM” – seen on body (also occurs on head, nails, feet or groin)
                    TINEA VERSICOLOR – dark or light spots on arms or trunk
     PITYRIASIS ROSEA – starts with a single patch, then in 2-3 days may have a “Christmas
      tree “ pattern on back
     ACNE – common on face, neck and back; “folliculitis” is seen around hair shaft
     INSECTS – mites (scabies), chiggers (especially southern states), ticks, lice, mosquitoes,
      spiders, fleas
     HOT TUB DERMATITIS – “swimmers itch”, “seabathers eruption”: due to different
      organisms, rash usually appears under bathing suit area
     WARTS – commonly on hands and feet – may be raised or flat
     MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM – itchy, pearly or flesh colored bumps containing milky-
      white material; often on trunk, under arms and on face


RASHES WITH FLUID-FILLED BLISTERS:
     CHICKEN POX (VARICELLA) – usually starts at head/face and moves toward trunk and
      extremities
     HERPES ZOSTER (SHINGLES) – reoccurrence of chicken pox, especially if child had first
      infection before age 1; often seen on trunk
     HERPES SIMPLEX (COLD SORES) – often in or near mouth
     IMPETIGO – commonly near nose or on extremities, highly contagious
     SCABIES – often between fingers and toes and skin folds; may see lines with a bump at the
      end; very itchy especially at night
     HAND FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE – named for where you may see the vesicles


COMMON INFANT RASHES
     DIAPER RASH – irritation from moisture or chemicals; Candida infection, seborrheic
      dermatitis, psoriasis or bacterial infections
     MILIA – white dots on newborn’s nose, checks, forehead after birth; lasts about three months
     NEONATAL ACNE – red bumps on infants cheeks, chin or forehead
     SALMON PATCH – flat, dull-pink spot on neck, forehead, eyelids or under nose
     MONGOLIAN SPOT – flat, brown, gray or blue spot; often on low-back, buttocks, or lower
      limbs
     MILIARIA (“PRICKLY HEAT”) – often on neck, underarms, and trunk
     SEB. DERM. (“CRADLE CAP”) – yellowish, greasy plaque on scalp
     SUCKING BLISTER – commonly on upper lip of infant; may be on fingers or other areas
      where baby sucks
     STRAWBERRY HEMANGIOMA – raised, red, firm spot; usually on face, scalp, or chest
     CAFÉ AU LAIT SPOT – light brown spots, usually not more than one
CALL YOUR CHILDS DOCTOR WHEN:
      SKIN IS ITCHY
      CHILD LOOKS SICK
      FEVER LASTS MORE THAN 24 HOURS
      ANY FEVER IF CHILD IS UNDER 3 MONTHS OLD
      RASH BEGINS AFTER TAKING MEDICATION
      VESICLES (FLUID FILLED BLISTERS) PRESENT
      ANY RASH OCCURING WITH RED OR BROWN URINE
      RASH IS BLUE OR TENDER TO TOUCH
      RED STREAKING IS PRESENT
      RASH IS CRONIC



RESOURCES
1. Ambulatory Pediatric Care 3rd Edition, Dershewitz, M.D. p. 392 - 449
2. Dermatology lectures, Dr. Kevin Conroy, Bastyr University faculty.

				
DOCUMENT INFO