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BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA TROOP 44

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					         Enfield, New
          Hampshire
             USA



BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
      TROOP 44




Scouts and Scouters Handbook



                        Last Updated: January 3, 2007
                                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
      1. OVERVIEW OF TROOP 44 ...................................................................................................... 1
         Mission........................................................................................................................................ 1
         Our Vision................................................................................................................................... 1
         The Three Aims of Scouting:...................................................................................................... 1
           Scout Oath............................................................................................................................... 2
           Scout Law ............................................................................................................................... 2
           The Outdoor code ................................................................................................................... 2
           Scout Slogan ........................................................................................................................... 2
           Scout Motto............................................................................................................................. 2
      2. TROOP 44 MEMBERSHIP ....................................................................................................... 3
         Membership Requirements ......................................................................................................... 3
           Registration, Fees, Dues and Insurance Requirements........................................................... 3
           Scout's Commitment ............................................................................................................... 4
           Parent’s Commitment ............................................................................................................. 4
           Leader’s Commitment ............................................................................................................ 5
      3. UNIFORMS................................................................................................................................ 6
         Scout Class A Uniform Requirements........................................................................................ 7
         Class B Uniform Requirements .................................................................................................. 8
         Scout Class A Uniform Patch Placements .................................................................................. 8
      4. ADVANCEMENT...................................................................................................................... 9
         Boy Scout Ranks......................................................................................................................... 9
         Rank Advancement Verification Procedure ............................................................................. 10
           Scoutmaster Conference ....................................................................................................... 10
           Board of Review ................................................................................................................... 11
           The Board of Review has three main Purposes: ................................................................... 11
         Merit Badges............................................................................................................................. 12
           Overview............................................................................................................................... 12
           Scout Buddy System. ............................................................................................................ 12
           Group Instruction of Merit Badges. ...................................................................................... 12
           Merit Badge Partials from Summer Camp............................................................................ 13
           Basic Requirements and Process .......................................................................................... 13
           Steps for Earning Merit Badges in Troop-44........................................................................ 14
           Common Myths about Merit Badges:................................................................................... 15
         Courts of Honor ........................................................................................................................ 17
         Eagle Courts of Honor .............................................................................................................. 17
         Service Projects......................................................................................................................... 17
      5. TROOP OPERATIONS ........................................................................................................... 18
         The Patrol Leaders Council ...................................................................................................... 18
         Troop Meetings......................................................................................................................... 19
         Troop Elections......................................................................................................................... 19
         Troop Web site.......................................................................................................................... 20
           Other Web Resources ........................................................................................................... 20
         Parent Meetings ........................................................................................................................ 21
      6. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ............................................................................................ 22
TROOP 44                                                                  Enfield, NH                                                                        USA
http://www.BSANHTroop44.org
         Code of Conduct & Discipline Policy ...................................................................................... 22
         Grievances................................................................................................................................. 22
         Fund Raising ............................................................................................................................. 23
           Scout Accounts ..................................................................................................................... 23
      7. OUTINGS/CAMPING TRIPS.................................................................................................. 24
         Required Number of Adults at Outings: ................................................................................... 24
         Tour Permits.............................................................................................................................. 25
         Automobile Insurance............................................................................................................... 25
         Medical Forms/Prescription Medicines .................................................................................... 25
         Trip Plans .................................................................................................................................. 25
         Outing Signup & Cancellation Policy....................................................................................... 25
         Campout Guidelines.................................................................................................................. 26
      8. REVISION REVIEW & APPROVAL ..................................................................................... 27
      APPENDIX A Recommended Personal Camping Equipment..................................................... 28
         Camping in Summer Weather................................................................................................... 28
         Fall and Spring Camping - Summer Camp plus following....................................................... 29
         Winter Camping Same as Fall and Spring................................................................................ 29
      APPENDIX B Camping Equipment Checklist............................................................................. 30
         Three Season Camping ............................................................................................................. 30
      APPENDIX C Scout Leadership Positions and Requirements..................................................... 31
      Appendix D Daniel Webster Council Policies.............................................................................. 34
         POLICIES of DANIEL WEBSTER COUNCIL ...................................................................... 34
           TOUR PERMIT POLICY..................................................................................................... 34
           AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE COVERAGE POLICY ...................................................... 34
           KNIFE POLICY ................................................................................................................... 34
      Appendix E Scout Committee Titles and Responsibilities ........................................................... 35
         What the Troop Committee Organization Does ....................................................................... 35
         Chartered Representative .......................................................................................................... 35
         Committee Chairman ................................................................................................................ 35
         Membership/Relationships (Secretary)..................................................................................... 36
         Finance/Records Chairman (Treasurer).................................................................................... 36
         Advancement Chairman............................................................................................................ 36
         Outdoor/Activities Chairman.................................................................................................... 37
         Health and Safety Chairman ..................................................................................................... 37
         Service and Good Turn Chairman ............................................................................................ 37
         Sustaining Membership/ Enrollment Chairman........................................................................ 37
         Scoutmaster............................................................................................................................... 37
         Assistant Scoutmaster (Activities)............................................................................................ 38
         Assistant Scoutmaster (Physical Arrangements) ...................................................................... 38
         Assistant Scoutmaster (Patrol Advisor) .................................................................................... 38
      Appendix F TROOP 44 GUIDELINES/BYLAWS (ADOPTED 1993) ...................................... 39
         SCOUTERS AND PARENTS.................................................................................................. 39
         GENERAL................................................................................................................................ 39
           PARTICIPATION ................................................................................................................ 40
           TROOP EQUIPMENT ......................................................................................................... 40
           SAFETY ............................................................................................................................... 41
      Revision History ........................................................................................................................... 42


TROOP 44                                                                  Enfield, NH                                                                       USA
http://www.BSANHTroop44.org
       1. OVERVIEW OF TROOP 44

       Troop 44 of Enfield, NH is chartered (originally chartered in 1931) by the
       Enfield ~ Mascoma Lions Club. The lions club continues to be an active
       supporter of Troop-44. The Enfield ~ Mascoma Lions Club has
       sponsored Troop-44 and the youth it serves for more than 50 years. The
       Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters oversee the Scouting program
       under the direct supervision of the Troop Committee as prescribed by
       the National Council of the Boy Scouts of America. The Lions appoint
       an Institutional Representative to be the liaison between the Lions and
       Troop.


       Mission
       The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical
       and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath
       and Law.

       Our Vision
       The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character
       development and values-based leadership training.


       The Three Aims of Scouting:

       Troop 44 endeavors to have its scouts achieve the three Aims of Scouting. These aims
       are to develop; Future leaders of strong character, good citizenship, and physical,
       mental, emotional and moral fitness) as explained in the Scoutmaster Handbook.

       To that end, the Troop will use all of the eight “Methods of Scouting”:

              1.   Scouting is a fun activity leading to personal growth.
              2.   Scouts work in patrols requiring cooperation, teamwork, and organization.
              3.   Patrols and the troop are lead by youth leaders (Scouts).
              4.   The Scoutmaster and his assistants provide guidance and a positive adult
                   example.
              5.   Outdoor activities are fun and give Scouts an opportunity to develop and test
                   new skills, to learn about the outdoors, and to work as patrols.
              6.   The advancement program challenges Scouts to learn new skills, and to gain
                   self- confidence and recognition for their achievements.
              7.   The Scout uniform allows the Scout to identify with the scouting movement
                   and to have a positive self-image. It reflects his commitment to Scouting and
                   its aims.
              8.   The Scout oath, law, slogan, and motto exemplify the ideals of Scouting.

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       Scout Oath          On my honor, I will do my best
                           To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law;
                           To help other people at all times;
                           To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.

       Note that the Boy Scout Oath has traditionally been considered to have three promises.
       Those three promises are delineated by the semicolons in the Oath, which divide it into
       three clauses.

       The three promises of the Scout Oath are, therefore:             1) Duty to God and country,
                                                                        2) Duty to other people, and
                                                                        3) Duty to self

       DUTY TO GOD AND COUNTRY: Your FAMILY and religious leaders teach you to know and serve
       God. By following these teachings, you do your duty to God.
       Men and women of the past worked to make America great, and many gave their lives for their country.
       By being a good family member and a good citizen, by working for your country's good and obeying its
       laws, you do your duty to your country. Obeying the Scout Law means living by its 12 points.
       DUTY TO OTHER PEOPLE: Many people need help. A cheery smile and a helping hand make life
       easier for others. By doing a Good Turn daily and helping when you're needed, you prove yourself a
       Scout and do your part to make this a better world.
       DUTY TO SELF: Keeping yourself physically strong means taking care of your body. Eat the right
       foods and build your strength. Staying mentally awake means learn all you can, be curious, and ask
       questions. Being morally straight means to live your life with honesty, to be clean in your speech and
       actions, and to be a person of strong character.



       Scout Law                                             The Outdoor code
       A Scout is:                                           As an American, I will do my best to -
          • Trustworthy,
          • Loyal,                                               •   Be clean in my outdoor manners
          • Helpful,                                             •   Be careful with fire
          • Friendly,                                            •   Be considerate in the outdoors, and
          • Courteous,                                           •   Be conservation minded.
          • Kind,
          • Obedient,
          • Cheerful,
          • Thrifty,
          • Brave,
          • Clean,
          • and Reverent.
           •
       Scout Slogan - Do a Good Turn Daily!                  Scout Motto - Be Prepared!




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       2. TROOP 44 MEMBERSHIP
       Membership Requirements
       Any boy who has completed fifth grade or is 11 years old or has earned the Arrow of
       Light Award but has not reached his eighteenth birthday may apply for membership in
       Troop 44.

       Parents and future scouts are encouraged to visit the Troop during the inquiry process.
       At this time an informational outline will be given to the parents.

       A parent or guardian should accompany his/her son to a troop meeting at the time the
       decision is made to join Troop 44. A membership packet will be given to the parent for
       review and for completion of the necessary forms. In accordance with Boy Scouts of
       America (BSA), each Scout must complete a registration form which the parent or
       guardian must sign, prior to joining the Troop.

       The Membership Packet includes:

          •    Application & 3rd Class Medical Form
          •    Troop Operations Manual
          •    Troop Roster
          •    Adult Leadership Phone Directory
          •    Troop Monthly Calendar

       Each Scout's parent or guardian is expected and encouraged to participate with the
       Troop and its activities in some way. Many resources and talents are required to
       operate a Troop and to have a quality program. The Troop is in need of your help. The
       Scoutmaster will be happy to discuss ideas of how you may be able to assist the Troop.
       It is expected that each Scout's parent/guardian will contribute time and effort to the
       Troop and its program.


       Registration, Fees, Dues and Insurance Requirements

       Every Scout is automatically re-registered with the troop when the Annual Registration
       Fee is paid in December. This covers the cost of Registration with Council, Insurance,
       and Boy’s Life magazine.

       Dues are $6.00 per month. They can either be paid in full for the entire year or at any
       Troop meeting. Dues help cover costs for advancement recognition, to participate in
       campouts, and other special troop activities. Scouts will not be permitted to participate
       in any Scouting function until he is properly registered, his registration fee is paid, and
       his dues are kept current.

       Each parent or legal guardian is encouraged to have health/accident insurance on his or
       her Scout. All vehicles used to transport Scouts must have the minimum insurance

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       required under B.S.A. Policy as described in Appendix D.

       The Troop Committee and the Scoutmaster recognize that Scouting has become
       expensive and can be a strain on a household budget. Troop 44's program includes a
       variety of activities. No Scout will be prevented from participating for financial reasons
       as long as the Scout actively participates in troop fund raising activities. All financial
       assistance discussions will be held with a limited group consisting of the Committee
       Chair, Scoutmaster, Treasurer and others as required to approve external assistance.
       All financial discussions shall be treated with the utmost confidentiality.


       Scout's Commitment

       When a boy joins a Scout troop he makes a commitment:
         • That he will attend the meetings each week and participate in the monthly
            activities to the best of his ability.
         • He has a responsibility to the other members of his patrol to actively participate
            and to fulfill all duties of positions he currently holds. Scouts must notify their
            Patrol Leader or the Scoutmaster if they are not going to participate in a meeting
            or event.
         • As a member of the Troop, each Scout is expected to attend various community,
            Council, District, and Troop activities held throughout the year. ALL SCOUTS are
            expected to attend as a Troop. These activities include, but are not limited to;
            Campouts, Camporees, Service Projects, Courts of Honor, and Fund Raisers.
         • As a member of the Troop, each Scout is expected to wear the proper scout
            uniform which identifies him as a member of Boy Scout Troop 44 (See Section 3.
            Uniforms)


       Parent’s Commitment

       The parents also make a commitment when the Scout joins the Troop.
          • Proper registration of the scout and payment of dues is necessary for the safety
             of the Scout and the Troop
          • Parents and Scouts are expected to attend Courts of Honor - regardless if their
             son is advancing or not. Courts of Honor are a place where scouts show pride in
             their troop and respect for the achievement of their peers.
          • Parents are requested to ensure that the Scout meets his commitments to the
             Troop and to his Patrol by ensuring that the Scout attends meetings each week
             and activities each month.
          • Parents are requested to register as an adult leader, Committee member,
             become a Merit Badge Counselor or to coordinate or assist at various activities.
             An active troop requires active parents.
          • Parents are encouraged to attend training sessions for Adults if participating as a
             leader. BSA requires parent volunteers to have BSA Youth Protection Training.


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          •   Parents should be available to volunteer to drive to and from Troop activities.
          •   Parents should place the Troop's monthly activities on their family calendar when
              they receive the calendar at the first meeting.
          •   Parents should encourage their Scout to practice the new skills that he will be
              learning and encourage him to continue his advancement.


       Leader’s Commitment

       Leaders also make a commitment when the Scout joins the Troop.

          •   Leaders commit to following all BSA youth protection policies.
          •   Leaders commit to the principle of “two deep leadership”. All outings require that
              at least two leaders will be present with at least one of them registered with the
              BSA.
          •   Leaders will have at least the minimal level of training required for his/her
              position.
          •   Leaders will have Youth Protection Training.
          •   Leaders will endeavor to promote boy leadership of the Troop.




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       3. UNIFORMS
       The Boy Scouts of America has always been a uniformed body. The uniform helps to
       create a sense of belonging. It symbolizes character development, citizenship training,
       and personal fitness. Wearing the uniform gives the youth and adult members a feeling
       of:
           • Personal Equality
           • Identification
           • Achievement
           • Personal Commitment

       When properly and smartly worn, the uniform can build good unit spirit, and when worn
       on correct occasions, can attract new members.

       It is recognized that Scout uniforms are expensive; however a Scout is encouraged to
       obtain a uniform as soon as possible. A new Scout is encouraged to have his Class A
       and Class B Scout shirt within 30 days after joining the troop. The full uniform is
       required within 3 months of joining the troop.

       The troop has a “Uniform Closet” with second hand uniform items that are available to
       its Scouts without charge. If a new uniform item is required, it can be purchased at the
       Council Scout Store at Camp Carpenter in Manchester, New Hampshire. If there are
       economic difficulties in following these uniform guidelines that would prevent a boy from
       joining the troop, please contact the Scoutmaster. We do not want to keep a boy out of
       Scouting because he cannot afford a uniform. As your Scout outgrows uniform parts,
       please donate them to the “Uniform Closet.” Donations of outgrown uniforms are
       encouraged.

       Scouts should be in full Class A uniform at the following activities:
         • Troop Meetings (unless Class B uniform is authorized e.g. Troop Site)
         • Scoutmaster Conferences/Boards of Review
         • Courts of Honor
         • Scout Sunday
         • Camporees (as required)
         • Summer Camp (as required)
         • Color Guard in Flag Ceremony
         • Other activities as specified by Scoutmaster

       When in doubt, the Class A uniform is acceptable at all occasions. If a Scout shows up
       at an activity not dressed properly for the occasion, the Scout may not participate in the
       activity per the discretion of the Senior Patrol Leader, Advancement Chairman,
       Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster.




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       Scout Class A Uniform Requirements
       The following is required:
          • Official BSA khaki shirt (long or short sleeve).
          • Red shoulder loops affixed to epaulets.
          • A Daniel Webster Council patch on left shoulder snug to seam.
          • American flag on right shoulder.
          • Quality Unit Award on right shoulder (current year).
          • Numerals 44 (now available as a single patch from the Troop) on left shoulder
              snug to council patch.
          • BSA Hat (required at certain events at the discretion of the Scoutmaster).
          • Scout rank ("Scout" badge for new Scouts) on left pocket.
          • Troop badge of office on left shoulder snug to troop numeral.
          • Proper footwear in good condition.
          • Arrow of Light Award (if earned) below rank badge.
          • Dark green/olive Scout pants (long or short) or reasonable likeness and color as
              approved by the Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmaster or Senior Patrol Leader.
          • A belt with buckle.
          • Red and green Scout socks for shorts (Scout socks or dark socks are acceptable
              with pants).
          • Scout sash worn over the shoulder at Courts of Honor and other formal events
              (There is no minimum number of merit badges required to wear sash, however, in
              lieu of wearing sash, a scout may wear up to six merit badges on his right
              sleeve).
          • Scout neckerchief worn over the collar. Elastic bands are not permitted. Bolos
              are permitted at Class A meetings only.

          The following is Optional:

          •   Patrol medallion on right shoulder (strongly encouraged).
          •   A Scout belt with buckle (strongly encouraged).
          •   Red and green Scout socks for shorts (Scout socks or dark socks are acceptable
              with pants).
          •   Activity patch on right pocket.
          •   World Crest (round purple and white patch, must be earned) above left pocket.
          •   Den Chief Cord (if earned) is worn over the left shoulder and under epaulet
              (while holding that position).

       Note: Please refer to the front and back covers of the Boy Scout Handbook, BSA
       Insignia Guide or Scoutmaster’s Handbook for proper placement of insignia on the shirt.



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       Class B Uniform Requirements
           •    Troop 44 T-shirt.
           •    Shorts or pants appropriate for the activity.
           •    Footwear appropriate to the activity.

       Scout Class A Uniform Patch Placements




       An unofficial on-line version of the insignia guide can be found at:

       http://www.mninter.net/~blkeagle/boyscout.htm

Scouts and Scouters Handbook                                  8               Revision: 01-03-07
       4. ADVANCEMENT
       Advancement is the process by which Scouts progress from rank to rank in the Scouting
       program. The purpose of advancement is to strengthen character, body, mind, and the
       concept of being a participating citizen. The Boy Scout requirements for rank are the
       basis for advancement.

       There are five steps in the advancement procedure: learning, participation, testing,
       reviewing, and recognition.

       Boy Scout Ranks are as follows:


                       Scout


                       Tenderfoot


                       Second Class


                       First Class


                       Star


                       Life


                       Eagle

                                      Eagle Palms




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       Rank Advancement Verification Procedure

          •   The Scout must demonstrate that he has acquired the skill or completed the task
              exactly as stated in the requirement.
          •   All sign-offs will be completed in accordance with BSA advancement policy.
          •   For the ranks of Scout through First Class, the Scout should advance at least
              one rank per year.
          •   Scouts should practice all skills that are taught to them immediately. However,
              requirements are not to be signed off immediately. At least one day must elapse
              between when a Scout is taught a skill and when he is tested and signed off.
          •   All requirements on each Advancement must be completed and signed off at
              least two weeks prior to the Court of Honor. This is to allow time for all paperwork
              to be submitted to Council and returned before the Court of Honor.
          •   Senior Patrol Leader or Assistant Senior Patrol Leader can sign off on
              advancement requirements for ranks from Scout to First Class.
          •   Adult leadership may sign off any Scout for rank advancement from Scout to
              Eagle. As outlined in BSA guidelines the requirement of Scout Spirit in all ranks
              is specifically reserved for the Scoutmaster's approval, as part of the
              Scoutmaster's Conference.
          •   Parents may not sign off their own son’s advancement requirements but are
              encouraged to work with their son to learn skills.
          •   Each Scout is encouraged to periodically bring his scout handbook to the
              Advancement Chairperson to review his advancement record. This is the only way
              to verify completed requirements if the scout handbook is lost.
          •   Boy Scout Rank Requirements are set forth in the most current edition of the
              Scout Handbook when the Scout starts working on the requirement.
          •   All Advancement will be recorded in the Troops database (e.g. Troop Master)
              and actively used during the Scouts Advancement program.


       Scoutmaster Conference

       When a Scout believes that he has completed all of the requirements for a rank
       advancement except for Scout spirit signatures, the Scoutmaster conference, or the
       Board of Review, he meets with the Advancement Chairperson or Scoutmaster to insure
       that the records are updated. After that, the Scout schedules a Scoutmaster's
       Conference through the Scoutmaster to take place at least two weeks before the next
       scheduled Board of Review.

       The Scout must wear a class A uniform and have his Boy Scout Handbook for both the
       Scoutmaster’s Conference and Board of Review.

       The Scoutmaster’s Conference helps the Scout and Scoutmaster evaluate his
       accomplishments, set new goals, and allows the Scout to provide feedback. Once this

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       conference is complete, the Scout is prepared for his Board of Review. The Boards of
       Review for the ranks of Tenderfoot to Life are the responsibility of the Troop Committee
       Advancement Chairperson. Boards of Review are scheduled for the 3rd meeting of
       everything month, but a Scout needs to inform the Committee Advancement
       Chairperson that they are ready for a Board of Review.

       The Scoutmaster, at his discretion, may schedule a Scoutmasters Conference at any time
       with a Scout that is not advancing. It is the desire of the BSA and adult leadership
       within Troop 44 to see all scouts advance. Advancement and the recognition provided
       at the Troops Court of Honors ceremonies is vital to a positive scouting experience.

       Board of Review
       A periodic review of the progress of Scouts is vital in the evaluation of the effectiveness
       of the Scouting Program. The Board of Review is a process where the troop committee
       gets an opportunity to assess how the Scout is progressing in the troop. It is not a re-test
       of the skills The Scoutmaster Conference has verified that aspect of the four steps in the
       Scout’s advancement process: Learn, Test, Review, & Recognize.

       The purpose of the Board of Review is as follows:
        •    The purpose is NOT to retest the scout, but to make sure that he has met all
             requirements for the rank, and to chat with him to learn how he feels he’s doing
             with the Troop and with scouting.
        •    Every review should include a discussion of how the Scout is living the Scout Oath
             and Law in his everyday life. The session gives the Scout a chance to bring up any
             questions or problems he may have, and a chance for the board to talk with him
             about such important matters as goals, Scout spirit, and personal growth.
        •    To congratulate him on his progress and urge him to keep going.
        •    Or, if necessary to frankly discuss with him his lack of progress, and to try to help
             him get back “on track.” It is possible that a scout may not pass his Board
             of Review and will be asked to return at the next available Board of
             Review. This allows the scout time for further preparation.
        •    A wisely run board of review can itself reinforce the opportunity for a Scout to meet
             and talk face to face with adults he doesn’t know very well. (from The
             Scoutmaster Handbook)

       The Board of Review has three main Purposes:
            1) To make sure that the work has been learned and completed.
            2) To check to see what kind of experience the boy is having in his patrol and troop.
            3) To encourage the Scout to advance to progress further.

                         A Board of Review usually takes about 15 minutes.
       The Scout must wear a class A uniform and have his Boy Scout Handbook for the Board
       of Review. Scouts not complying with the above two requirements will not be reviewed
       and will forfeit their opportunity for advancement until the next available Board of Review.

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       Merit Badges

       Overview.
       The merit badge program is one of Boy Scouting's basic measurement tools. Earning
       merit badges gives a boy the kind of self-confidence that comes from overcoming
       obstacles to achieve a goal. Through the merit badge program, a boy also learns career
       skills, develops socially, and may develop physical skills and hobbies that give a lifetime
       of healthful recreation.
       The steps to follow in the merit badge program are outlined in the current Boy Scout
       Requirements Book. This book lists the requirements a Scout needs to earn for each of
       the more than 100 merit badges that are available. Scouts must be tested individually,
       and they must meet all the requirements. No additional requirements may be added

       Scout Buddy System.
       A Scout must have a buddy with him at each meeting with a merit badge counselor. A
       Scout's buddy can be another Scout, a parent or guardian, a brother or sister, or a
       relative or friend. From his scoutmaster, the Scout obtains a signed merit badge
       application (blue card) and the name of the appropriate merit badge counselor. The
       Scout sets up his first appointment with the counselor. The counselor should explain the
       requirements to the Scout. The Scout and his buddy then meet as appropriate with the
       counselor until the Scout completes the badge requirements.

       Group Instruction of Merit Badges.
       The question arises as to whether it is permissible to have boys earn merit badges in
       groups. Many subjects may be presented to groups of Scouts without defeating one of
       the purposes of the merit badge plan--working closely with a qualified adult.
       During the year several opportunities are available within the DWC Council for group
       instruction. These events include summer camp, Camporees, Merit Badge University,
       and other situations. While group instruction is permissible, it is discouraged as the sole
       method of earning merit badges.
       The National Executive Board has approved this policy statement on merit badge
       counseling:
          "To the fullest extent possible, the merit badge counseling relationship is a
          counselor-Scout arrangement in which the boy is not only judged on his
          performance of the requirements, but receives maximum benefit from the
          knowledge, skill, character, and personal interest of his counselor. Group instruction
          and orientation are encouraged where special facilities and expert personnel make
          this most practical, or when Scouts are dependent on only a few counselors for
          assistance. However, this group experience should be followed by attention to each
          individual candidate's projects and his ability to fulfill all requirements."




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       Merit Badge Partials from Summer Camp.
       The troop database will be used to track partial merit badges earned while attending
       summer camp with the troop. To complete the badges the Scout will need to make
       arrangements with a merit badge counselor for the badge. While there is no limit to the
       amount of time a merit badge can be open it is the desire of Troop 44 to have partials
       from summer camp completed within one year.

       When a Scout presents a partial completion to a new merit badge counselor, the work
       previously completed may or may not be accepted. Most merit badge counselors will
       discuss with the Scout any work that was previously completed. Based upon this
       discussion, the counselor may or may not choose to accept prior work.


       Basic Requirements and Process
       For each Merit Badge are found in the Boy Scout Requirements Book, or at
       www.meritbadge.com. Each Merit Badge has a pamphlet that addresses the
       requirements specifically for that badge. Scouts should obtain the Merit Badge pamphlet
       for the particular badge. A copy may be available in the Troop library. Check to see if
       the Troop has a copy available or borrow from another Scout. If no copies are available,
       Scouts can purchase pamphlets at the Council store for a nominal fee. It is important to
       verify that the pamphlet to be used is the most recent revision.

       Once the requirements have been completed and the blue card has been signed by the
       Merit Badge Counselor, have the Scoutmaster sign the blue card and return it to the
       Advancement Chairman. Upon review, the Applicant’s Record section will be given to
       the Scout for his records and the Troop’s record will be forwarded to the Advancement
       Chairman and recorded in Troop Master. The completed blue card must be given to the
       Advancement Chairman at least two weeks prior to the next scheduled Court of Honor
       when the merit badge will be awarded.

       Except for Troop level Merit Badges (Merits badges conducted with the entire troop)
       parents should not sign off Merit Badge requirements for their own son if there is
       another qualified and registered Merit Badge Counselor in the Troop.

       The Troop recommends that Scouts work on no more than 5 Merit Badges at any given
       time. This recommendation helps keep the Scout focused on completing the
       requirements for the Merit Badges that he is currently working on, as well as rank
       advancement requirements before taking on additional work assignments.

       The required and non-required Merit Badges necessary for Star, Life and Eagle ranks
       are defined in the description of each Rank in the Boy Scout Handbook. Boy Scout
       Merit Badge Requirements are set forth in the current individual official BSA Merit
       Badge books or Merit Badge Requirements Handbook. They are also viewable at
       www.meritbadge.com.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                      13                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       Steps for Earning Merit Badges in Troop-44
       1.   Scout selects a merit badge of interest.
       2.   Scout and Scoutmaster review the selection and discuss the selection for the
            scouts current rank and maturity level. When the Scout and Scoutmaster agree
            that the merit badge is appropriate, the Scoutmaster will provide the Scout a signed
            blue card and will help in selecting an approved merit badge counselor to work with
            the Scout.
            •  If no merit badge Councilor is available, the Scoutmaster, Advancement
               Coordinator, and Parent Committee will try to find someone qualified in the
               area of study, (who is) willing to register as a councilor.
             • If more than one Councilor is available for the particular merit badge, the Scout
               Master will work with the scout to guide him toward the most appropriate
               Councilor. The focus of this effort will be providing the Scout with the best
               opportunity for timely completion of merit badge, while working with and
               learning from as many different councilors as possible.
       3.   Scout finds a buddy to be present when meeting with a counselor.
       4.   The Merit Badge Councilor communicates intention to begin a merit badge and
            coordinate logistics with the Scoutmaster. This is done as a courtesy to coordinate
            with other Troop or Merit Badge activities which the Merit Badge Councilor may not
            be aware of. Once agreed the Councilor or Scoutmaster will notify the
            Advancement Coordinator.
       5.   If the Merit Badge counselor agrees, the merit badge should be offered to the entire
            troop at the next troop meeting. Any scouts who would like to sign up for the merit
            badge must see their Scoutmaster as outlined in Step 2 above to obtain a blue card.
       6.   When only one Scout signs up to do the badge, the Scout must find a buddy to be
            present when meeting with a counselor.
       7.   Scout makes an appointment to work with the counselor. The counselor should
            NEVER meet with a Scout unless his buddy is present.
       8.   Scout attends all meetings and completes assigned requirements in a timely manner.
       9.   Counselor signs off on requirements as they are done and approves the application
            when all requirements are complete.
       10. Counselor tears off his/her portion of the card and retains for their own record.
       11. Scoutmaster approves the application and gives the Scout their portion of the blue
           card, which he will retain for the duration of his scouting career.
       12. Scoutmaster submits the application to the Advancement Coordinator, who
           completes an advancement report, submits to Council and procures merit badge
           awards.
       13. The Advancement Coordinator and Scoutmaster present merit badge at next Court
           of Honor.
       14. The Scout celebrates their accomplishment.


Scouts and Scouters Handbook                           14                               Revision: 01-03-07
       Common Myths about Merit Badges:
       •   A Scout must complete a merit badge within one year.
           False. A Scout can continue to work on any merit badge until he reaches age 18. It
           is the responsibility of the Scout to maintain proficiency through the entire Merit
           Badge process.

       •   The Merit Badge Councilor must offer the badge to the entire troop.
           False. There is no National requirement that a Merit Badge must be open to the
           entire troop. However a Scout is courteous and helpful. Offering a Merit Badge to
           the entire troop is encouraged, though the councilor, at their discretion, may limit the
           number of scouts with whom they are working, to what they feel is a manageable
           number. Scouts will be accommodated on a first come, first serve basis in terms of
           signing up.

       •   At least two Scouts must work together on a merit badge. This is called the "Buddy
           System".
           False. A Scout must present himself to a counselor with a buddy being present;
           however, his buddy can be a friend or relative, male or female, adult or youth.

       •   A Scout can only work on "X" number of merit badges at one time.
           False. He can work on as many as he desires beginning the day he joins the troop.
           However, the Scoutmaster helps to coach the Scout on the appropriate number of
           merit badges to be worked on at any given time.

       •   A Scout can only take merit badges after achieving the rank of First Class Scout.
           False. The Scout can request to take a merit badge as soon as he is a registered
           member of the troop.
           Consistent with National BSA policy it is the desire of Troop 44 that a scout works on
           fundamental Scout skills until reaching the rank of first class. There are no merit
           badge requirements to reach to rank of first class. Merit Badge request prior to the
           rank of First Class are discouraged.
       •   A parent cannot be their son’s merit badge counselor.
           False. While one of the purposes of earning a merit badge is to expose the Scout to
           association with other adults, it is possible for a parent to counsel their son (as long
           as he/she is a registered counselor for that badge).

       •   A Scout can only take two merit badges with one merit badge counselor.
           False. There is no limit to the number of merit badges a scout can take with one
           counselor. However one of the primary goals of scouting is adult association and
           positive role models. One of the means to accomplish this is through the BSA merit
           badge program. Consistent with National BSA guidelines it is the desire of Troop 44
           that a Scout tries to not do more than 2-3 merit badges with one merit badge
           counselor. The Scoutmaster will help coach the Scout on the appropriate number of
           merit badges to be worked on with any one merit badge counselor.



Scouts and Scouters Handbook                         15                                   Revision: 01-03-07
       •   Similar tasks performed for one merit badge or rank advancement cannot be used
           for another.
           False. As long as the Scout has completed the task as stated in the requirements,
           he has completed the task, unless specific requirements prohibit state otherwise.

       •   A Scout must have approval from his Scoutmaster prior to meeting with a merit
           badge counselor.
           True. The Scoutmaster should provide a list of valid counselors that have committed
           to working with the Scouts of his troop. The Scoutmaster must approve the blue
           card prior to this meeting.

       •   Merit badge counselors have a lot of leeway as to deciding if a requirement has truly
           been completed.
           True. No tasks should be added to or deleted from the national requirements,
           however, the counselor must show discretion when accepting or rejecting a Scout’s
           task completion.
       •   Merit badge counselors are subject to the decisions of the troop committee or
           Scoutmaster when in doubt concerning a requirement.
           False. If a merit badge counselor has a question concerning his/her understandings
           of a merit badge requirement, they should contact the council advancement
           chairman. No unit has the authority to change or modify any requirement for any
           reason.

       •   If the unit advancement coordinator suspects that the counselor did not follow the
           guidelines and approved an application, the merit badge can be withheld.
           False. If a registered merit badge counselor approves a merit badge, it must be
           awarded. There is no unit review process for merit badges. If a counselor is
           suspected of not following the guidelines, the council advancement chairman should
           be notified immediately. Merit badge counselors serve at the council level, even if
           they only work with Scouts from a single unit.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       16                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       Courts of Honor

       The Troop will have two - three Courts of Honor during the Scouting year to give peer
       recognition as well as parental and Troop Committee recognition to those Scouts who
       have earned awards, advanced in rank or attained a leadership position. These
       ceremonies are scheduled and communicated in the annual calendar. All parents,
       family members, Troop Committee members and friends are encouraged to attend and
       support their Scout. All Scouts are EXPECTED to attend all Courts of Honor regardless
       if they are being recognized or not. Scouts receiving awards and recognition, in addition
       to those Scouts attending the Court of Honor, are expected to be in complete, properly
       worn Class A uniform (see Section 3 – Uniforms). Scouts who are not in uniform will not
       receive their recognition until the next regular scheduled Court of Honor.


       Eagle Courts of Honor

       The Troop may have Eagle Courts of Honor during the Scouting year to give peer
       recognition as well as parental and Troop Committee recognition to those Scouts who
       have earned the highest rank in Scouting. These ceremonies are scheduled as needed.
       All parents, family members, Troop Committee members and friends are encouraged to
       attend and support the Eagle Scout. All Scouts are EXPECTED to attend all Eagle
       Courts of Honor and are expected to be in complete, properly worn Class A uniform
       (see Section 3 – Uniforms).


       Service Projects

       Since 1910 the scouting movement has been dedicated to service. Guided by the
       ideals of the Scout Oath and Law, Scouts have come to the aid of their neighbors and
       communities in ways both large and small.

       Whether it’s planting victory gardens, promoting literacy or donor awareness, or coming
       to the aid of disaster victims, the Boy Scouts of America built a tradition of service that
       helped shape the nation.

       Service to others is required for advancement to each rank from Second Class to Eagle.
       The Troop participates in many Service Projects throughout the year. All Scouts must
       attempt to participate in as many service projects throughout the scouting year as
       possible. The Troop strives to have 100% participation in the more significant projects
       such as Scouting for Food, Eagle service projects, Community green-up days, and
       Adopt-a-Hwy.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                        17                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       5. TROOP OPERATIONS
       Troop 44 is run in accordance with BSA policies and guidelines. It is a boy-run troop led
       by the Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders and the Patrol Leaders.
       One of the main purposes of Scouting is to develop youth leadership, and we feel
       strongly that this can be done best by making as many opportunities as possible
       available to the boys to do the leading and for the boys to learn by experience. The
       adult leaders are mainly there to guide and advise the boy leaders.

       The Troop Committee is comprised of parents who provide administrative and other
       support to the Scouts, Parents, Scoutmaster and the Unit.

       The Scoutmaster and his Assistants serve to provide a quality program for the Scouts.
       The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster is a senior youth leader appointed by the
       Scoutmaster.

       The Senior Patrol Leader is the senior youth leader and all other youth leadership is
       subordinate to this position except the Junior Assistant Scoutmaster. The Senior Patrol
       Leaders and Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders are the role models for the Troop and set
       the pace for growth and development of the “Patrol Method” of scouting as described
       herein.

       The patrol is the smallest unit in the troop. It is made up of five to ten Scouts lead by a
       Patrol Leader. This young man is normally elected by his patrol to represent them at
       the Patrol Leaders' Council. A Patrol functions as a team and does many activities
       together. Competitive events between Patrols are a way of building Patrol spirit and
       keeping the Troop strong. During Troop meetings, the Patrols are often assigned
       separate rooms or areas (often referred to as “patrol corners”) where they participate in
       the activity for that meeting. Patrols should start each patrol corner activity by reciting
       the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

       New, younger Scouts may additionally be assigned to a special group under the
       leadership of the Troop Guide, (an older, experienced Scout) who will help the new
       Scouts get a good start in the Troop) and an Assistant Scoutmaster to help new Scouts
       in the transition from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts.


       The Patrol Leaders Council

       The boy leaders of Troop 44 are known as the Patrol Leaders Council. The Patrol
       Leaders Council is led by the Senior Patrol Leader. Working under the guidance of the
       Scoutmaster or his/her designee, the Patrol Leaders Council is responsible for the
       Troop program. This includes planning and carrying out Troop meetings and outdoor
       programs.

       The Patrol Leaders Council meeting is held once a month and includes the Senior Patrol
       Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders, all Patrol Leaders, all Troop Level positions,


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       Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmasters and the Junior Assistant Scoutmaster.

       The Senior Patrol Leader is responsible for conducting the meeting. Each Patrol Leader
       must attend or have representation at each Patrol Leaders Council meeting to represent
       the patrol. He must participate in all aspects of the Troop's planning and decision-making,
       and help plan events.

       The Senior Patrol Leader or the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader in his absence, will
       preside over this meeting and will call for any votes. Other youth and adults may be
       invited to the Patrol Leaders Council by the Senior Patrol Leader to assist with planning
       of activities as needed. The Senior Patrol Leader and Patrol Leaders will vote on all
       issues and proposals at the Patrol Leaders Council via simple majority.

       Each Scout member of the Patrol Leaders Council will have one vote and there will only
       be one vote allowed per Patrol. Issues concerning policy, equipment purchase, or Troop
       events must be first voted on by the Patrol Leaders Council, and then be ratified and
       approved by the Scoutmaster and finally by the Troop Committee.


       Troop Meetings

       Troop meetings are every Thursday evening from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM at Troop site
       during the summer months and LaSalette shrine during the winter months. Please
       arrange pick up at 8:30 PM unless otherwise noted.

       When there is no school due to vacation, summer vacations excluded, or inclement
       weather no troop meetings will be held (No School, No Scouts!). Exceptions to this will
       be communicated by Patrol Leaders and email when necessary..

       Parents are encouraged to attend the final 15 minutes of the troop meeting to listen to
       final announcements. Background conversations are disruptive, and Parents and
       Scouts should refrain from them. Parents are not encouraged to stay for the entire
       meeting unless they are participating in the scheduled events as an adult leader.


       Troop Elections
       Troop elections will be held semi-annually via secret ballot. Troop wide elections will be
       held in December and in June. Following Troop wide elections the individual Patrols will
       elect Patrol level positions. All scouts are encouraged to hold positions as leadership is
       a requirement for advancement.

       The elected positions must be elected by a simple majority of the youth members
       present at the election. No adult leaders may vote.

       The term of elected positions will commence the week following the election and will
       terminate at the next election approximately six months later. In the event of a vacancy,
       the Senior Patrol Leader and Scoutmaster will appoint a successor.


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       Troop Web site

       The Troop Web Site is the primary means of communications with the Scouts and their
       parents. The purpose of the website is to keep the parents and Scouts informed of the
       troop's upcoming activities as well as give them an idea of what we do in these
       activities. Parents and scouts are encouraged to check the website for the most up-to-
       date information.

       The website is updated on a monthly basis with the current and next months calendars.


                                 Boy Scouts of America
                                    Enfield, NH USA

                                www.BSANHTroop44.org


       Other Web Resources

        Boy Scouts of America National Site
                          www.scouting.org


                       Daniel Webster Council
                       Boy Scouts of America
                               (603) 625-6431
                              www.dwcbsa.org


                           Sunapee District
                   Daniel Webster Council
            www.dwcbsa.org/districts/sunapee/


                      Good Turn for America
                   www.goodturnforamerica.org


                           Town of Enfield, NH
                             www.enfield.nh.us

            Mascoma Valley Regional School
                                    District
             http://www.mascoma.k12.nh.us




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                      20                                 Revision: 01-03-07
       Parent Meetings

       In addition to the website, we also have occasional parents' meetings each year. We
       strongly encourage that at least one parent attend these meetings. The main purpose is
       to provide the best Scouting program possible for our Scouts. It also provides an
       opportunity for the parents to communicate with the Scoutmaster and his adult staff and
       to ask questions and make comments about the Troop, the program, Scouting or
       anything that is of concern or interest to you. You may call the Scoutmaster, or the
       Committee Chairperson at home to discuss anything about the troop.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                      21                                 Revision: 01-03-07
       6. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
       The Troop will follow and incorporate all the policies, rules, procedures and bylaws of
       the Boy Scouts of America in the implementation of this Scouting program. For safety
       related issues, the Troop will adhere to the guidelines in the most current BSA Guide to
       Safe Scouting. This guide can be found on the Web at:
       http://www.scouting.org/pubs/gss/toc.html.


       Code of Conduct & Discipline Policy

       Very simply - when at any troop or patrol function, a Scout is expected to live up to the
       Scout Oath and Law. If he is not complying with the Oath or Law, his Patrol Leader will
       speak to him. If his Patrol Leader is unsuccessful, the Senior Patrol Leader will speak to
       the Scout. If these actions are unsuccessful, an Adult Leader will be notified and will
       speak to the Scout. If an Adult Leader must speak to a Scout due to a breach of
       conduct, the Scout’s parents will be notified at the discretion of the Adult Leader.

       If an Adult Leader needs to speak to a Scout twice within one month, the scout’s parents
       will be notified. If this is repeated, the Parent Committee Chairperson will be informed
       for review and follow-up action.

       When the breach of conduct involves the safety of the Scout or anyone else or gross
       misconduct, the parent may be required to pick up the Scout from the event and the
       incident will be referred to the Parent Committee Chairperson for review and follow-up
       action.

       Grievances

       Scouts should use the chain-of-command for reporting grievances.

       For minor grievances, Scouts should first talk with their Patrol Leader, who may take the
       matter up with the Senior Patrol Leader.

       The Senior Patrol leader, in turn may utilize an Adult Leader to settle disputes or resolve
       issues.

       Similarly, Assistant Scoutmasters are encouraged to bring issues to the Scoutmaster's
       attention for resolution. The Scoutmaster may utilize the Committee Chairman.

       For major grievances, disputes, and infractions of the Code of Conduct, the Scout may
       go to any Adult Leader directly for resolution.

       Parents who wish to discuss any issue, are encouraged to speak with the Scoutmaster or
       Committee Chairman to resolve any concerns.

       All grievances unresolved within the Troop leadership are to be taken to the Committee.


Scouts and Scouters Handbook                        22                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       Fund Raising

       The annual registration fee and dues only support part of what it costs to fully fund a
       year of scouting. Additional operating funds are required for the cost of campouts, food,
       advancements, registration fees, insurance, supplies, camping equipment, special
       activities, etc.

       Each Scout is expected to actively participate in Fund Raising efforts. During the year
       the Troop will have two to three fund-raisers. Some of the funds may be made available
       to the Scout for Scouting activities.

       All Scouts are encouraged to earn their own way to summer camp through the various
       fundraising activities done by the Troop and Daniel Webster Council. Should for any
       reason a scout not have the resources available to attend an outing they or their parents
       are encouraged to speak confidentially with the Scoutmaster or with the Parent
       Committee Chairperson.


       Scout Accounts

       These funds will be put into a boy's unit account that is segregated from the normal
       troop funds. Rules concerning the boy's scout accounts are as follows:

       •   Individual accounts may be used for summer camp, major trips, annual registration,
           dues or Scout uniform purchases, personal camping gear and other scouting
           activities.
       •   Any request to utilize funds must be addressed to the Treasurer and are subject to
           the approval of the Scout Master.
       •   If a Scout quits the Troop, the funds in his account from fund raising events go to
           the Troop’s general fund.
       •   If a Scout transfers to another troop within 3 months of quitting the Troop, any
           money left in his account minus any fees owed will be sent to his new scout troop
           for his account.
       •   A Scout may inquire as to his balance at any time by asking the Troop Treasurer




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       23                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       7. OUTINGS/CAMPING TRIPS
       Outings are the heart of Troop 44's Scouting Program and the Troop plans one outing
       per month, RAIN, SNOW or SUNSHINE. Scouting requires that a boy learn to live in the
       out-of-doors. In order to advance in Scouting, a boy must go camping regularly. A Scout
       who does not advance soon loses interest. Parents are welcome to participate in
       outings, but should be aware that the Scout will be expected to tent with his patrol.


       Required Number of Adults at Outings:

       All outings require a sufficient number adult leaders to be present. For backpacking and
       hiking the number of adult leaders required is as follows:


              No. of Scouts                      No. of Adult leaders Required



        8 or less                 Minimum of 2 Adult Leaders

        9 to 12                   Minimum of 3 Adults* (2 must be Adult Leaders)

        13 to 20**                Minimum of 4 Adults* (2 must be Adult Leaders)

       *All adults must have Youth Protection Training.
       **20 scouts is the maximum size for backpacking and hiking outings.

       For overnight camping, the number of adult leaders required is as follows:

             No. of Scouts                       No. of Adult leaders Required



        8 or less                 Minimum of 2 Adult Leaders

       9 to 15                    Minimum of 3 Adults* (2 must be Adult Leaders)

       15 to 24                   Minimum of 4 Adults* (2 must be Adult Leaders)

       25 to 35                   Minimum of 5 Adults* (2 must be Adult Leaders)

       *All adults must have Youth Protection Training.

       The BSA “two deep leadership policy” will pertain to all Troop outings. All Scouts and
       Adult Leaders will adhere to the Outdoor Code, which is found in the Boy Scout
       Handbook.


Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       24                                 Revision: 01-03-07
       Tour Permits

       Tour permits will be required per the policy documented by Daniel Webster Council in
       Appendix D.


       Automobile Insurance

       Refer to Appendix D for the policy relating to insurance requirements for vehicles
       transporting Scouts to and from Outings or Campouts.


       Medical Forms/Prescription Medicines

       Each Scout will have a Class 3 (or greater) medical form on file prior to going on any
       outings. The most current medical form on file will accompany the Adult Leader
       coordinating the outing. The taking of prescription medication is the responsibility of the
       individual taking the medication and/or that individual's parent or guardian.


       Trip Plans

       Before going on an outing, a patrol, unit or any collection of scouts will prepare a Trip
       Plan per the guidelines established in the Boy Scout Handbook and leave at least one
       copy with an adult not going on the outing. In addition, it is strongly recommended that
       the outing leadership go through the trip plan in detail with everyone going on the
       outing and the adult not going on the outing who has a copy of the trip plan.


       Outing Signup & Cancellation Policy

       The following policy is required to effectively plan/execute Troop outings and meet
       Council insurance regulations.

       A Permission Slip is required for each outing. The Permission Slip will include the dates,
       times, signup cutoff dates and cost of scout cancellation. Also included is “permission to
       treat” and contact information. A scout may not participate in a scouting event without a
       completed Permission Slip.

       For many outings, the Troop picks up the cost of participation for all participating scouts.
       If a Scout cancels after the signup cutoff or fails to show up at the event, he will be
       required to reimburse the Troop for the amount specified in the Permission Slip.

       Troop campouts - The signup cutoff date for troop campouts will be the Thursday night
       of the full week before the campout (8 days before the campout) - no exceptions.

       Camporees or District events such as Klondike - The signup cutoff date and
Scouts and Scouters Handbook                        25                                   Revision: 01-03-07
       cancellation date for council and District events will be determined one month prior to
       the event.

       Excursions such as the annual big trip, Summer Camp, etc. - These outings require
       significant or full deposits in advance of the cutoff date. Some deposits will not be
       refundable.

       In extreme circumstances, exceptions may be made to the cancellation fees and will
       require approval of the Committee Chair, Scoutmaster and Treasurer. In these cases,
       the Scout must request that an exception be made in writing addressed to the
       Committee with specifics as to why.


       Campout Guidelines
       Attendance – A scout will remain at the outing for its duration unless explicitly stated and
       approved in advance by the parents or guardian on the Permission Slip.

       Campout Meal Expense Policy – Scouts and adults participating will be responsible for
       reimbursing the Quartermaster for their share of the food costs for an event. These
       expenses should not total more than $3 per meal per person Scouts should purchase
       store brands if at all possible, buy only enough for the Scouts on the campout, avoid
       individual packages and bring small quantities from home - remember, a Scout is
       thrifty.

       Equipment - The Patrol Leader will be responsible for coordinating with the Troop
       Quartermaster to make sure that his Patrol has adequate tentage and Troop furnished
       equipment for each camping trip. This should be done on the Thursday prior to the day
       of departure.

       Following the campout, the Patrol Leader will be responsible for assigning to different
       Scouts equipment that needs to be carried home for cleaning or drying. All cooking
       equipment must be clean and all Patrol equipment must be maintained in proper
       condition. The Patrol Leader will keep a written list of equipment assignments and turn a
       copy in to the Quartermaster whenever he requests it. If any damage to Troop
       equipment is done in a willful or negligent manner, the Scout will be expected to replace
       such equipment or pay for repair.

       Knives, Axes and Saws - are to be used by those Scouts who have earned the BSA
       Totin-Chit Card and then only for a task that requires the use of an ax or saw using
       prescribed BSA safety rules regarding clearance, designated area, etc. (i.e. axe yard).
       For additional information, see the Knife Policy in Appendix D.

       Footwear - All Scouts should bring a sturdy pair of hiking shoes or winter boots to every
       campout. Bare feet are never allowed except in water front areas, or for swimming.
       Sandal type shoes will be allowed for aquatic activities. At no time are open toe shoes
       to be worn in the axe yard or during meal preparation.

       Electronics - Radios, tape players, video games, cell phones, and any other electronics
Scouts and Scouters Handbook                         26                                    Revision: 01-03-07
       are not a part of the scouting experience and therefore will not be allowed at troop
       meetings, outings, camping trips or summer camp. Exceptions to this policy may be
       made in the case of a long trip and will be specified well in advance of the excursion. In
       the event that a scout brings electronics on any outing, the adult leaders are not
       responsible for these items under any circumstances.

       Campsite Condition - The campsite WILL be left cleaner than it was found and the troop
       will adhere to “Leave No Trace” camping principles and to the Outdoor Code.

       Supplies - Each Patrol will supply its own paper products, soap, food items, trash bags,
       etc.

       Menus - Each Patrol will develop their own approved menu and duty roster and have
       them approved by the Senior Patrol Leader or Assistant Senior Patrol Leader at least one
       week prior to the campout and have them posted during the campout. Patrol wide
       cooking may be chosen depending on the number of participants.

       No Scout will ride on the OUTSIDE of any motor vehicle. This restriction includes
       hanging or riding on bumpers, in trailers, in the beds of pickups, etc.

       Scout Drivers - Any Scout who drives a vehicle to a Troop event or campout must
       possess a valid driver’s license and have his parents’ or Guardian’s permission in
       writing prior to departure. He will do so only in accordance with the provisions of the tour
       permit for the event. Upon reaching the destination, the Scout will park his car and leave
       it parked until it is time to return. He will not transport any other Scout (other than his
       brother) to or from the event. For all trips outside Enfield, NH, all drivers must be 18
       years of age. The Troop will travel to and from events / campouts as a unit except when
       permission for alternate travel is granted by the Scoutmaster.

       Equipment - See Appendix A for a recommended list of equipment.

       8. REVISION REVIEW & APPROVAL
       The Troop Committee will revise and approve troop guidelines and procedures with
       input from the Scoutmaster and other adult leaders on an as necessary basis or as
       necessary.




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                                   APPENDIX A
                      Recommended Personal Camping Equipment

       Camping in Summer Weather

              Sleeping Bag - Lightweight or winter bag with a sheet so you can sleep on top of the
              bag.
              Mosquito Net
              Swim Trunks
              Hiking Boots - sturdy enough to give ankle support, preferably leather and definitely
              waterproofed.
              Windbreaker just in case of a high wind-chill area.
              Poncho - large enough to cover Scout while wearing pack or appropriate rainsuit.
              Back Pack - Lightweight external or internal frame pack with padded hip strap. Pack
              must be right size for Scout - Do NOT get a pack that is too big.
              Scout Uniform - complete. Required at summer camp.
              Underwear - one change per night plus an extra.
              Shirt(s) - at least one long sleeve and one or more short sleeve.
              Socks - wool or wool/poly blend are good all year - no cotton if hiking. Number as in
              Underwear above.
              Toilet articles - Towel (2 for summer camp), soap in container, tooth brush/paste,
              washcloth, comb.
              Mess Kit and Utensils - Scout type or Lexan – Cup/Bowl and utensils at a minimum.
              Handkerchief - 2 large.
              Sneakers or moccasins - for around camp, not for hiking.
              Plastic Bag - at least 2 large trash size and 3 small bags (the kind that most stores
              use).
              Flashlight or Headlamp - smaller is better in most cases, the type with 2 AA batteries
              is fine. Large ones are too heavy. Put extra batteries and bulb in a small bag, can be
              kept in the pocket on a night outing.
              Canteen/Water bottle - metal or plastic, the kind that hook on a belt or pack.
              Scout knife - Per the Daniel Webster Council Policy on Knives in Appendix D.
              Compass - liquid filled orienteering type is best. Carried on person. Put on a string to
              keep around neck.
              Insect repellent - small plastic squeeze bottle is good. No aerosol sprays. (Check
              sensitivity to DEET).
              Wallet - with ID and emergency phone #.
              Personal Survival and First Aid Kit - check Scout Handbook for contents.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       28                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       Fall and Spring Camping - Summer Camp plus following

          Jacket - with good insulation, many synthetic fillers now are as good as down. Water
          resistant cover or separate cover. BE PREPARED FOR ANYTHING in Sep, Oct, Nov, and
          Mar, Apr, May.
          Mittens or gloves – wool or fleece with a leather or waterproof cover.
          Cap - Wool or Poly/wool blend is good for spring, summer and fall. Wearing a cap will
          help to keep your feet warm.
          Sleeping Bag - good 3 season bag rated to 20 degrees. Summer weight bag with a wool
          blanket or separate liner for inside and a waterproof cover or sack will be OK for most
          spring and summer camping.


       Winter Camping Same as Fall and Spring
       Winter camping is fun if you are prepared - guaranteed to be miserable if you are not.

          Sleeping Bag - Mummy style winter type rated for zero or below (Target 15 below). Two
          3-season 20 degree bags could be combined to get to this level. The new synthetic fibers
          are good and still insulate when wet. Down is lighter and more expensive but will not
          insulate if it gets wet.
          Mittens - wool or fleece are best and a waterproof cover helps. Two pairs are essential
          since the first will get wet. The wool/poly blend of glove with bare fingers and an attached
          mitten are great.
          Underwear – polypro or wool blends are good - NO cotton (it wicks away heat).
          Shirt and Pants - Layer up with wool, poly pro or the wool blends. NO BLUE JEANS.
          Facemask - pullover wool or fleece type is best in the wind
          Boots – Waterproof, insulated winter boots with removable liner, some have a built in
          gaiter or cover to tie around the bottom of the pants, which prevent snow from getting into
          boots. Snowmobile boots are good for winter camping. Boots must not fit tight with extra
          socks as poor circulation means cold feet.
          Complete Change of Sleeping Clothes - It is extremely important for the scout to
          change into a dry set of clothes (including socks) when going to bed, otherwise he will be
          cold all night long.
          Wind Shell – Layer of pants and coat to block wind.


       Optional equipment: Scout Handbook, Scout Fieldbook, camera, sunglasses, pillow,
       and nature book.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       29                                  Revision: 01-03-07
                                      APPENDIX B
                               Camping Equipment Checklist

                                     Three Season Camping
          Underwear                                    Backpack Cover or large trash bag

          Socks                                        Back Pack

          Shirt(s)                                     Toilet articles - Towel (2 for summer
                                                       camp)
          Pants or Shorts                              Handkerchief/Bandanas

          Sneakers or moccasins                        Mess Kit and Utensils

          Hiking Boots                                 Plastic Bags

          Rain jacket or Poncho.                       Two 1 liter water bottles – Lexan

          Windbreaker                                  Scout knife

          Jacket                                       Compass

          Mittens or gloves                            Insect repellent

          Cap                                          Sunscreen

          Wallet with ID & Emergency Phone #s

                         OPTIONAL                                     OPTIONAL

          Scout Uniform - complete                   ❑ Sunglasses

          Mosquito Net                               ❑ Pillow

          Swim Trunks                                ❑ Nature book

          Scout Handbook, Scout Field Book           ❑ Camera




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                    30                                   Revision: 01-03-07
                                    APPENDIX C
                     Scout Leadership Positions and Requirements
       The following positions comprise the scout leadership positions. These job
       requirements/descriptions in addition to the basic job requirements as described in the BSA
       Scoutmaster’s Junior Leader Training Kit (ISBN 0-8395-3422-1):

                               Senior Patrol Leader: Shall be elected by the majority of Scouts
                               registered in the Troop. His term, which can start at any time, will be for
                               a period not to exceed six months, after which an election must be held
                               to determine the next Senior Patrol Leader. The Senior Patrol Leader
                               may be re-elected and there is no limit to the number of terms he can
                               serve. He shall preside over the Patrol Leaders Council. He guides the
                               Patrol Leaders and other junior leadership positions. In addition, the
                               following prerequisites are necessary:

                                  •       Commitment to at least 75% attendance at meetings
                                  •       Commitment to at least 75% attendance at campouts
                                  •       Must be nominated and elected.
                                  •       Must have served one term as either Assistant Senior Patrol
                                          Leader or Patrol Leader
                                  •       Must be Star rank or higher
                                  •       Must be 14 years or older

                               Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders: There may be between one and
                               four Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders in the Troop at any time. Assistant
                               Senior Patrol Leaders are appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader with
                               the approval of the Scoutmaster, and must meet all the requirements of
                               the Senior Patrol Leader. In the event that the current Senior Patrol
                               Leader leaves the Troop or is unable to continue in that capacity, the
                               Scoutmaster will appoint one of the Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders to
                               the position.

                               Patrol Leader: Shall be elected by a majority vote of the members of
                               his individual patrol by secret ballot. His term can start at any time; will
                               be for a period of six months, after which an election must be held to
                               determine the next Patrol Leader. There is no limitation to the number
                               of times he can hold the office. In addition, the following prerequisites
                               are necessary:

                                      •   Commitment to at least 75% attendance at meetings
                                      •   Commitment to at least 75% attendance at outings
                                      •   1st class or higher
                                      •   Must be 12 years or older
                                      •   Commitment to provide his patrol with excellent leadership.
                                      •   Completed Junior Leader Training (JLT) or has committed to
                                          attend the next scheduled training.



Scouts and Scouters Handbook                           31                                   Revision: 01-03-07
       Scouts who are planning long absences should seek alternative leadership positions. If the
       attendance requirements are not met, the scout may be removed from the position at the
       discretion of the Scoutmaster. All Assistant Patrol Leaders will be promoted at the discretion
       of the Scoutmaster.



                               Assistant Patrol Leader: Appointed by the Patrol Leader to assume
                               the duties of the Patrol Leader in his absence.



                               Junior Assistant Scoutmaster: The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster is
                               by invitation of the Scoutmaster to assist him with troop operations. The
                               Junior Assistant Scout Master supports special projects as assigned by
                               the Scoutmaster and be a role model for younger scouts. The following
                               prerequisites are necessary:

                                          •   Must be 15 years or older
                                          •   Must be of either Life or Eagle Rank
                                              •    Outstanding Leadership and Maturity



       Other Troop level Scout Leadership Positions are elected by a majority vote of the
       members of his individual patrol by secret ballot.
       They include the following:



                               Scribe - The Troop secretary. Keeps a log of all Patrol Leaders Council
                               decisions and maintains meeting minutes, weekly attendance logs and
                               incentive point records.



                               Quartermaster - Responsible for Troop equipment and supplies.
                               Keeps record of Patrol and Troop equipment and keeps it in good
                               repair. He is responsible for checking out equipment and sees to it that
                               it is returned in good order. He will make recommendations to the
                               Senior Patrol Leader as to the needs of new equipment.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                         32                                  Revision: 01-03-07
                               Historian - Collects and maintains troop memorabilia and information on
                               former Troop members.




                               Librarian - Keeps troop record books, pamphlets, magazines,
                               audiovisuals, and Merit Badge counselor list available for use by troop
                               members.




                               Instructor - Teaches one or more advancement skill requirements.




                               Chaplain Aide - Assist in Troop religious services and promotes
                               religious emblems programs.




                               Troop Guide - Advisor and guide to new Scout Patrol




                               Den Chief - Works with a Cub Scout or Webelos den as a guide.




                               Order of the Arrow Representative – Serves as a communication link
                               between the Order of Arrow Lodge/Chapter and the Troop, encourages
                               Scout participation in community service projects, leadership activities,
                               and other scouting activities, strives to promote Scout spirit by setting
                               the standard for other Scouts.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                         33                                  Revision: 01-03-07
                                        Appendix D
                               Daniel Webster Council Policies
       Incorporated by Reference from the DWC Program Resources CD


       POLICIES of DANIEL WEBSTER COUNCIL
       In addition to all National Boy Scouts of America policies, the following policies have been
       approved by the Daniel Webster Council Executive Board.

       TOUR PERMIT POLICY
       If a unit plans a trip within 500 miles of the home base, it is important that the unit obtain a
       local tour permit. A national tour permit is required for trips in excess of 500 miles from home
       or outside the continental United States.

       Tour permits have become recognized by national parks, military institutions, and other
       organizations as proof that a unit activity has been well planned and organized and is under
       capable and qualified leadership. These organizations may require the tour permit for entry.

       Most short, in-town den trips of a few hours do not require a tour permit as well as trips to
       District and Council-wide events; however, it is recommended that permission slips are
       obtained from parents.

       The application must be filed with the local council service center two weeks in advance of
       the scheduled trip for proper processing time.

       The application must be signed by two committee members, preferably the tour leader and a
       member of the unit committee, both required adults need to be age 21+. The vehicle
       insurance information on the back of the Local Tour Permit is also very important and must
       be completed. If parents are providing transportation for each of their own children, or if a
       bussing company is providing the transportation, please note either of these circumstances on
       the vehicle information section.

       AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE COVERAGE POLICY
       All vehicles carrying passengers involved in any Scouting function must be covered by a
       public liability and property damage liability insurance policy. The minimum insurance
       coverage limits must be $50,000/$100,000/$50,000. It is recommended unit leaders update
       vehicle insurance records yearly.

       KNIFE POLICY
       Folding knives with a blade length not to exceed four and one half (4 ½) inches are
       appropriate for all legal and practical uses at Council activities including encampments, hikes,
       meetings, demonstrations, competitive and service events. Therefore, sheath knives - fixed
       blades - (of any length) including machetes, bayonets, swords, cleavers, death stars,
       stilettos, switch blades, etc. are not allowed for youth or adult member use at Daniel Webster
       Council functions. The only exception to this rule will be the chef’s knife included in each
       patrol kitchen for the purpose of meal preparation. See App. E for Eagle Scout exception.


Scouts and Scouters Handbook                        34                                   Revision: 01-03-07
              Appendix E Scout Committee Titles and Responsibilities
                               TROOP COMMITTEE RESPONSIBILITIES

       The following position descriptions are from the Scout Committee Handbook put out by the
       Boy Scouts of America and are provided of reference for adult members and volunteers.
       These roles and responsibilities may need to be modified depending on the size of the troop
       and the resources available. In all cases units should strive to be consistent with BSA
       National guidelines.

       What the Troop Committee Organization Does
          •   Provide adequate meeting facilities.
          •   Advise Scoutmaster on policies relating to the Boy Scout program and the chartered
              organization.
          •   Carry out the policies and regulations of the Boy Scouts of America.
          •   Encourage leaders in carrying out the Boy Scout program.
          •   Be responsible for finances, adequate funds, and disbursements in line with the
              approved budget plan.
          •   Obtain, maintain, and care properly for troop property.
          •   Provide adequate camping and outdoor program (minimum 10 days and nights per
              year).
          •   See that adult leadership is assigned in case the Scoutmaster is absent or is unable to
              serve.
          •   Operate troop to ensure permanency.

       Chartered Representative
          •   Serve as head of "Scouting Department".
          •   Secure committee chairman and encourage training.
          •   Maintain a close liaison with troop committee chairman.
          •   Help recruit the right leadership.
          •   Be an active and involved member of the district board. Represent your organization
              and its goals and needs.
          •   Encourage graduation of youth members from unit to unit:
          •   Webelos to Blazer Scouts
          •   Blazer Scouts to Scouts
          •   Scouts to Varsities
          •   Organize and staff enough units.
          •   Use "Two-Deep Leadership."
          •   Assist with Unit Rechartering.
          •   Encourage service to the organization.

       Committee Chairman
          •   Organize the committee to see that all functions are delegated, coordinated, and
              completed.
          •   Assist in the recruitment of the best individuals available for Scoutmaster and
              Assistants.
          •   Maintain a close relationship with the Chartered Representative.
          •   Interpret national and local council policies to the troop.


Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       35                                 Revision: 01-03-07
          •   Work closely with the Scoutmaster in preparation of agenda for Troop Committee
              Meetings.
          •   Call, preside, and promote attendance at monthly troop committee meetings and any
              special meetings that may be called.
          •   Ensure troop representation at monthly roundtables.
          •   Secure topflight, trained people for camp leadership.
          •   Arrange for charter review and recharter the annually.

       Membership/Relationships (Secretary)
          •   Keep minutes of meetings and send out committee meeting notices.
          •   Handle publicity.
          •   Conduct parent orientation for new families.
          •   Prepare family newsletter of troop events and activities.
          •   Work with troop historian.
          •   Assist in annual membership inventory and inspection program.
          •   Arrange for proper welcome of Webelos Scouts graduating into the troop.
          •   Invite all Webelos Scout families to assist with troop program.
          •   Conduct boy-fact survey and troop resource survey.
          •   Plan for family night programs and family activities.
          •   See that the troop sets membership goals and adopts and carries out a troop
              recruiting plan.
          •   Plan charter presentation program.

       Finance/Records Chairman (Treasurer)
          •   Handle all troop funds. Pay bills on recommendation of Scoutmaster and authorization
              of troop committee.
          •   Maintain checking and saving accounts.
          •   Keep adequate records in the Troop Financial Record Book.
          •   Supervise money-earning projects including obtaining proper authorization.
          •   Supervise the camp saving plan.
          •   Report to the troop committee at each meeting.
          •   Give leadership to the preparation of the annual troop budget.
          •   Have a simple annual audit of the troop finances.

       Advancement Chairman
          •   Encourage all Scouts to advance in rank.
          •   Promote First Class emphasis in the troop.
          •   Arrange monthly troop boards of review.
          •   Conduct Star-Life boards of review.
          •   Arrange for Eagle Scout board of review.
          •   Conduct courts of honor following boards of review.
          •   Develop and maintain merit badge counselor list.
          •   Make prompt report on advancement to council service center following each troop
              board of review.
          •   Secure badges and certificates.
          •   Work with Scoutmaster or assistant and troop scribe in maintenance of all Scout
              advancement records.
          •   Work with librarian in building and maintaining a troop library of merit badge
              pamphlets.

Scouts and Scouters Handbook                      36                                Revision: 01-03-07
       Outdoor/Activities Chairman
          •   Supervise and help procure camp equipment.
          •   Work with the Scoutmaster or Assistant and Quartermaster on inventory, storage, and
              proper maintenance of troop equipment.
          •   Help in securing permission to use camping sites.
          •   Serve as transportation coordinator.
          •   Encourage monthly outdoor activities or special activities.
          •   Promote National Camping Award and Fair Way camp promotion plan.
          •   Promote-through family meetings-attendance at troop camps, camporees, and
              summer Scout camp to reach the goal of 10 days and nights of camping for each
              Scout.
          •   Coordinate family camping.

       Health and Safety Chairman
          •   Arrange medical health history/examinations.
          •   Supervise meeting place inspections for safety.
          •   Secure tour permits.
          •   Be responsible for an insurance program.
          •   Promote good health and safety conditions in meeting place and sites used for outdoor
              activities.
          •   Coordinate first aid, aquatics, and safety program resources.

       Service and Good Turn Chairman
          •   Stimulate community Good Turns and service projects.
          •   Serve as counselor for advancement service projects.
          •   Approve Eagle Scout service projects.
          •   Promote an emergency service plan.
          •   Encourage personal Good Turn.
          •   Promote service projects for chartered organization.

       Sustaining Membership/ Enrollment Chairman
          •   Participate in the orientation meeting.
          •   Enroll as sustaining member.
          •   Select, train, and enroll needed personnel to conduct the troop's enrollment.
          •   Attend district kickoff meetings.
          •   Follow up until all cards are accounted for.
          •   Conduct report meetings.
          •   Give recognition to contributors and enrollees.
          •   Work closely with public relations person (secretary).


       Scoutmaster
          •   Train and guide boy leaders to run their troop.
          •   Work with and through responsible adults to give Scouting to boys.
          •   Help boys to grow by encouraging them to learn for themselves.
          •   Guide boys in planning the troop program.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       37                                  Revision: 01-03-07
       Assistant Scoutmaster (Activities)
          •   Serve as the troop leader in the absence of the Scoutmaster.
          •   Be responsible to the Scoutmaster for program and activities of the troop.
          •   Work with the assistant senior patrol leader.
          •   Coordinate joint Webelos den-troop activities.



       Assistant Scoutmaster (Physical Arrangements)
          •   Be responsible to the Scoutmaster for troop physical arrangements.
          •   Work with the troop quartermaster and outdoor committee member.
          •   Arrange for use of troop equipment by Webelos den.
          •   Be responsible for the care and neat appearance of all equipment.
          •   Be responsible for health and safety in all troop affairs.



       Assistant Scoutmaster (Patrol Advisor)
          •   Serve as adviser for a patrol or leadership corps.
          •   Serve as a resource person for the patrol pr corps.
          •   Recruit others to assist.
          •   Support the patrol leader with advice and counseling.
          •   Support the patrol; leader with advice and counseling.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       38                                  Revision: 01-03-07
                                        Appendix F
                               TROOP 44 GUIDELINES/BYLAWS
                                     (ADOPTED 1993)

       SCOUTERS AND PARENTS
       Much volunteered time was given in preparation of this letter. Please read it together as a
       family.

       For the well being of each member of Troop 44, and their parents, specific rules and
       regulations must be adhered to.


       GENERAL

          1. Any problem at any time should be brought to the attention of the scoutmaster,
             assistant scoutmaster or committee chairman, even if you consider it a trivial situation,
             so as we are aware of it and can take proper action before it gets out of hand.
          2. Within 30 days of membership, it is expected that a boy will have his scout shirt,
             neckerchief, and hat. Within 3 months, each boy must have a full uniform. It is
             encouraged that a boy earns his uniform.
          3. As a properly functioning unit, each boy will have the due respect for one another as
             well as the scoutmaster, assistance scoutmaster, senior patrol leader, patrol leader,
             and all personnel with designated authority.
          4. All troop leaders are expected to provide an excellent program for their boys weekly.
          5. During troop meetings, no food or beverages will be allowed. Eating or drinking may
             distract or interrupt what has been planned for the meeting.
          6. Troop 44 will not tolerate favoritism in any shape, form, or manner within any part of
             the patrols, individuals, or troop. Each boy is to be treated equally. If such an event
             exists with a leader, he shall be replaced and utilized in a position of lesser
             responsibility.
          7. If at any time a parent or boy feels that they have been mistreated or unfairly judged,
             they may request a troop committee meeting to properly resolve the situation. This is
             also applicable if a parent feels that a scoutmaster or assistance scoutmaster is not
             treating their son fairly.
          8. The scoutmaster at his/her discretion, may bar a boy from troop meetings or functions
             for a period of two (2) weeks, for misconduct (Committee and parent will be notified).
             Any action for more than two (2) weeks must be taken up with the committee for
             disposition.
          9. Any scoutmaster, assistance scoutmaster or committee member not abiding by the
             rules of the committee may be asked to submit his/her resignation.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                       39                                   Revision: 01-03-07
       PARTICIPATION

          1. Scouts and parents are expected to support and participate in troop fund raising
             activities.
          2. Parents must be willing to help with transportation and activities as needed or the
             event scheduled must be cancelled.
          3. Scouts must attend three meetings prior to campouts or other troop activities to be
             eligible to participate in that activity, unless excused by the scoutmaster.
          4. Participation is part of advancement; scouts who continually do not attend planned
             functions need to rethink if they really want to be scouts.
          5. Two weeks prior to campout, those planning to attend will be asked to pay for their
             food. Should the individual change his mind or not be able to go, after notifying the
             scoutmaster, one of two actions may be take:
              i. If food has been purchased, he shall forfeit his fair share of the cost and will be
                 refunded the difference;
              ii. If the purchase has not been made, a complete refund is applicable.
          6. As a member of Troop 44, all property (where we meet) shall be utilized with respect,
             bearing in mind that it is through these facilities that we are able to be a troop.

              We should always be prepared to be of assistance. A cheerful smile or a courteous
              hello to members of these institutions costs nothing, but definitely signifies your
              appreciation and knowledge of the Scout Law and Oath.



       TROOP EQUIPMENT

          1. All troop equipment will/must be signed out by the quartermaster.
          2. All boys and leaders taking home equipment are responsible for that equipment until
             such time as it is returned to the troop quartermaster.
          3. Troop equipment taken home will be returned within a reasonable amount of time (2
             weeks), clean and in good condition.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                        40                                   Revision: 01-03-07
       SAFETY

          1. Scouts are not permitted to possess firearms at scouting functions.
          2. Drinks or food in glass containers is prohibited on hikes, campouts, or troop meetings.
          3. Patrol leaders will be with their respective patrols at all times on campouts and are not
             permitted to separate into small groups.
          4. Only boys with the rank of eagle will be allowed to bring a sheath knife to campouts.
             No other scouts will be allowed sheath knifes.
          5. Scout jackknifes may be used only after a boy has earned and receives his “Totem
             Chip Card.”
          6. Hand axes will be allowed only after receipt of his Totem Chip Card. Inclusive of this,
             the hand axe may only be used in a roped-off wood yard designated as such, and the
             boy having received permission and approval from his patrol leader or assistant.
             There will be exceptions when a boy will be permitted to use his hand axe outside the
             wood yard, with the approval of the scoutmaster or assistant scoutmaster.
          7. Matches, candles, or any open flames of any kind are not permitted in tents.
          8. Only adult Troop leaders will be allowed to light gas lanterns. Only boys that are
             properly supervised shall have a gas lantern in their camp area. No gas lanterns will
             be allowed near or inside a tent.
          9. All troop activities will have two (2) deep leadership.
          10. It shall be mandatory that each patrol have among their possessions a first aid kit on
              hikes and campouts.
          11. Striking or hitting of another person within scouting is not only a troop violation, but a
              national scout violation as well.
          12. Driver of vehicles transporting scouts must be 21 years of age and carry
              $100,000/$300,000 liability coverage. This is also a national scout policy.
          13. Transportation of personnel in the rear of any truck during a scouting function is strictly
              forbidden. Trucks may be used for transportation of equipment only.


       We sincerely hope that these subject matters are quite clearly spelled out, and should you
       have any questions, please feel free to contact your scoutmaster, committee chairperson, or
       charter institution representative.


       Yours in Scouting
       Troop 44
       Enfield, NH




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                         41                                    Revision: 01-03-07
                                           Revision History
       Appendix F, Revision 01-03-07

       General 2     Page -39, changed uniform guidelines to 30 days and 3 months from six
                     months and 1-year respectively.

       General 5     Page-39, This period is programmed and takes away from time and knowledge
                     with interruptions. Eating or drinking may distract or interrupt what has been
                     planned for the meeting.
       General 7     Page-39 (added) , is not treating their son fairly.




Scouts and Scouters Handbook                         42                              Revision: 01-03-07

				
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