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					                          GAINESVILLE
                           COLLEGE
                      UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

                                  P.O. Box 1358
                             Gainesville, Georgia 30503
                             Telephone: (770) 718-3639
                               FAX: (770) 718-3643


                           WWW.GC.PEACHNET.EDU




VOLUME XVI                          October 2005                          NUMBER 1




Gainesville College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-
4097: Telephone number 404-679-4500) to award the Associate Degree. Its Business
Division is nationally accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and
Programs for the offering of the Associate Degree in Business Administration.

                                        ****

Gainesville College is an institutional member of the American Council on Education,
American Association of Community Colleges, Georgia Association of Colleges, College
and University Personnel Association, National Association of College and University
Business Officers, National Association of College Auxiliary Services, American
Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, National Association of
Student Personnel Administrators, and Southern Association of Collegiate Registrars
and Admissions Officers.
2 / Gainesville College



                             SPECIAL NOTES
      The statements set forth in this catalog are for informational purposes only and
should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a student and this
institution. While every effort will be made to insure accuracy of the material stated
herein, Gainesville College reserves the right to change any provision listed in this
catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for graduation, without
actual notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to keep students advised
of such changes. Students should refer to our web site at: www.gc.peachnet.edu for the
most recent update of our catalog.
     Information regarding academic requirements for graduation will be available in
the Offices of the Registrar, Dean of the Faculty, and Division Chairs. It is the
responsibility of each student to keep himself or herself apprised of current graduation
requirements for a degree program in which he or she is enrolled.
     The academic and administrative policy of the College subscribes to the
non-discrimination provision of Title V of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which states:
"No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin
be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to
discrimination under any program or activity" of Gainesville College. Gainesville
College also adheres to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 in that it does not discriminate
on the basis of handicap in regard to admission, employment, and access to programs
or activities.
     Additionally, Gainesville College subscribes to provisions as outlined in The
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as revised and/or amended. Accordingly,
Gainesville College will not discriminate in employment, admissions, programs, or
services with regard to any position for which the applicant, employee, or student is
qualified and will make reasonable accommodation for physical and mental limitations.
     The academic and administrative policy of the College also subscribes to the
non-discrimination provision of Title IX of the Higher Education Act of 1972, which
states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from
participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any
educational program or activity" of Gainesville College.
     Gainesville College complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
of the 1974 "Buckley Amendment," by affording students certain rights with respect to
their education records. This Act requires that Gainesville College not disclose
information contained in education records without the student’s written consent,
except under conditions specified in the Act. Refer to the Policies and Procedures
section in the Academic Information chapter of this catalog, or go to
www://gc.peachnet.edu/admin/registrar/ for more information concerning the College’s
responsibility for FERPA compliance.
   Authorization for access by anyone to student records covered by this Act must be
made in writing by the student and addressed to the Gainesville College Registrar.
                                                                    General Information / 3



                           ASSESSMENT/TESTING
     As a part of its internal Assessment Program, Gainesville College occasionally
involves students by way of standardized testing of all entering and exiting students.
These tests assist the College in the on-going process of instructional and curriculum
improvements. Students should be aware that in the interest of the institution and the
educational programs of the College, they are expected to participate in these
assessments.
4 / Gainesville College
                                                                                                   General Information / 5



                              TABLE OF CONTENTS
   I.   The College ........................................................................................................7

  II.   Admissions.......................................................................................................19

 III.   Financial Information.......................................................................................34

 IV.    Financial Aid....................................................................................................42

  V.    Student Development and Enrollment Management ........................................55

 VI.    Academic Information......................................................................................68

VII.    Academic Programs .........................................................................................95

VIII.   Courses of Instruction ....................................................................................182

 IX.    University System of Georgia ........................................................................247

  X.    College Personnel...........................................................................................255

 XI.    Miscellaneous Information.............................................................................280

        Maps...............................................................................................................282

        Directory ........................................................................................................284

        Directory ........................................................................................................285

        Index...............................................................................................................286
6 / Gainesville College
                    I
               THE COLLEGE



HISTORY

MISSION

STRATEGIC GOALS

CORE VALUES

GENERAL EDUCATION

CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS

AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS
  GAINESVILLE COLLEGE FOUNDATION
  GAINESVILLE COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
8 / Gainesville College
                                                                                  The College / 9



             GAINESVILLE COLLEGE HISTORY
     The genesis of Gainesville College is to be found in a pattern of emerging leadership in
Gainesville and Hall County. For several decades prior to the 1960s, Gainesville-Hall
County had been an agricultural and financial center for Northeast Georgia. Several factors
converged in the 1950s, including the planning and ultimate completion of interstate
highways and other modern thoroughfares between Gainesville and Atlanta and the
completion of the largest man-made lake in Georgia, which made property costs soar.
Gainesville-Hall County then found itself in a position to become the Northeast Georgia
leader in banking, finance, medicine, law, and industry. What was needed to complete the
pattern was a public higher educational institution. In 1962, taking note of the University
System Board of Regents’ policies concerning the establishment of junior colleges, the
people in Gainesville and Hall County established a community college as recommended by
Governor Sanders' Commission to Improve Education. Since an adequate site was required
by the Regents, along with a million dollars for building purposes, the people in Gainesville
and Hall County indebted themselves through a bond issue to make this facility possible.
     The Regents chose a site near a proposed four-lane connector highway six miles
southwest of the City of Gainesville. This site could serve Gainesville and Hall County and
Northeast Georgia while being only forty-five minutes away from the rapidly expanding
metropolitan Atlanta area.
      Gainesville College and Lanier Technical College, located on adjacent campuses,
initially received large amounts of State and Federal monies, thereby tripling the original
local investment. In addition to bond monies, city, county and state forces, as well as private
corporations, made substantial contributions in construction, donations of land, and other
services. Many citizens of this area contributed to the project. The work of the citizens was
coordinated by an educational task force. This representative group was instrumental in the
preparation of the comprehensive educational complex.
      Gainesville College (Gainesville Junior College until 1987) opened in the Fall of 1966
with an enrollment of 419 students, almost double the size predicted. The College began
classes in Gainesville using the Civic Center and the First Baptist Church as a campus but
was able to move into its buildings for Winter Quarter, 1967. The College continued to
enroll more students than had been projected by the long-range studies, necessitating a
tripling of educational facilities during the College's early years. The current enrollment of
the College approaches 6000 students, with 3800 on the Gainesville Campus.
      Enrollment growth in recent years has resulted in the construction and renovation of
several buildings to bring the total number of buildings on the Gainesville Campus to
thirteen. The most recent addition is the state-of-the-art Science, Engineering, and
Technology Building.
      During the Fall of 2000, the Board of Regents granted Gainesville College permission
to establish the Gainesville College University Center on the Gainesville College Campus.
Through the Center, Gainesville College is able to form partnerships with other
baccalaureate degree granting institutions to provide coursework leading to the Bachelor’s
degree on the Gainesville College Campus. Several baccalaureate degree programs as well
as some graduate programs from North Georgia College are currently offered through the
University Center.
10 / Gainesville College


      In Spring 2001, the Board of Regents granted Gainesville College permission to open a
site in Athens, Georgia. This effort was directed at meeting the needs of local residents who
desired the services and support offered by a University System of Georgia two-year
college. Enrollment in the initial term, fall 2001, was more than 200 followed by over 600
the next year.
     In Summer 2003, the College moved to a campus south of Athens in Oconee County.
The Oconee Campus located in Watkinsville currently enrolls about 2000 students,
representing an unprecedented growth that reflects the need for a public two-year college in
Northeast Georgia. Gainesville College does not offer all academic programs on the Oconee
Campus. For a complete list of available programs, please refer to our website at
www.gc.peachnet.edu/admin/registrar/majorsgcoc.htm.

                 GAINESVILLE COLLEGE MISSION
      The mission of Gainesville College is to further the well-being of its students through
intellectual, social, and physical development. Central to the accomplishment of this
mission is the Liberal Arts Curriculum, which serves either as a core for an Associate’s
degree and/or as a transfer unit for those pursuing upper division courses. Gainesville
College seeks to assure the success of its students and contribute to the quality of life in the
surrounding communities through cooperative programs with high schools, technical
colleges, and universities, as well as self-contained career advancement programs. The
institution, with an emphasis on diversity, prepares students to function in a global society.
      The College also takes seriously its role as a service organization that responds to the
economic and educational needs of the community and reaches out to the citizens of
Northeast Georgia. By offering continuing education programs, public service activities,
cultural enrichment experiences, and forums for public discussion, the college expands its
tradition of service beyond its immediate student body and into the community at large.
To accomplish its mission, the College will serve its students by:

   • offering lower-division courses to prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges
      and universities and providing opportunities for University System of Georgia
      institutions to offer appropriate upper-division and graduate courses and programs
      through the College’s University Center;

   • offering a Learning Support Program to enhance student academic success;
   • offering career programs and courses relevant to area employment needs and the
      interests of students;

   • integrating technology into instruction, whereby the College assures the technological
      proficiency of its students; and

   • providing a climate supportive of student success through academic support,
      administrative support, and student development services and activities that
      complement and enhance the instructional program.
To accomplish its mission in meeting the broader needs of the community, the College will:

   • offer continuing education programs, public service activities, and facilities for people
      who want to enrich their lives intellectually, socially, culturally, physically, and
      vocationally; and
                                                                                 The College / 11



  • promote the aspirations of students and their academic preparation through outreach
     programs to the public schools and organizations in the College’s community.
     Gainesville College systematically assesses its effectiveness in reflecting its values,
accomplishing its goals, and promoting its vision, and uses these results to enhance programs
and services.
     In meeting the educational needs of the citizens of Georgia, Gainesville College shares
with all other institutions in the University System of Georgia the following characteristics:

  • A supportive campus climate, necessary services, and leadership and development
     opportunities to educate the whole person and meet the needs of students, faculty, and
     staff;

  • Cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in the faculty, staff, and student body,
     supported by practices and programs that embody the idea of an open, democratic, and
     global society;

  • Technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology,
     student support services, and distance education; and

  • Collaborative relationships with other System institutions, State agencies, local schools,
     technical colleges, and business and industry, to expand and enhance programs and
     services available to the citizens of Georgia.
     Gainesville College and other Associate Degree level colleges of the University System
of Georgia share the following commitments to the citizens of Georgia:

  • A commitment to excellence and outstanding programs that have a magnet effect
     throughout the region or state;

  • A commitment to a teaching/learning environment, both inside and outside the
     classroom, that sustains institutional excellence, functions to provide University System
     access to a diverse student body, and promotes high levels of student learning;

  • A commitment to a high quality general education program that supports a variety of
     Associate programs and prepares students for transfer to Baccalaureate Degree
     programs, Learning Support Programs designed to ensure access and opportunity for a
     diverse student body, and a limited number of certificate or other career programs to
     complement neighboring technical college programs;

  • A commitment to public service, continuing education, technical assistance, and
     economic development activities that address the needs, improve the quality of life, and
     raise the educational level within the college’s scope of influence; and

  • A commitment to scholarship and creative work for the specific purposes of supporting
     instructional effectiveness and enhancing institutionally relevant faculty qualifications.
12 / Gainesville College



          GAINESVILLE COLLEGE CORE VALUES
At Gainesville College we value:

   • Our student-oriented environment focused on student learning and growth.
   • The philosophy that all humans have potential and equal worth.
   • Qualified and dedicated faculty and staff who play a critical role in the education of our
      students.

   • Academic freedom and scholarship.
   • Open and effective communication.
   • A caring and collegial environment.
   • The growth and well-being of employees.
   • Providing a range of opportunities to meet the cultural, educational, and entertainment
      needs of our diverse community.

   • Innovation and experimentation to facilitate progress and to advance knowledge.
   • Teaching, which recognizes the relationship among academic disciplines.
   • The integration of technology into the fabric of the college.
   • A clean, safe, and aesthetically pleasing environment.
   • The cooperative process for carrying out the business of the college.
   • The strong support of our community and alumni.
   • Positive influence of education on improving people’s lives.

    GAINESVILLE COLLEGE STRATEGIC GOALS
The Strategic Goals of Gainesville College are:

   • To affirm the College's core values.
   • To provide access and opportunities for higher education.
   • To maintain academic standards of excellence with accountability.
   • To foster an environment that values and reflects diversity and inclusion.
   • To enhance the friendly and welcoming environment with a focus on students.
   • To promote the growth and well-being of faculty and staff.
   • To facilitate success and educational goal attainment for traditional and non-traditional
      students.

   • To remain a leader in incorporating technology.
                                                                                The College / 13



  • To maintain, enhance, and expand safe and aesthetically pleasing facilities.
  • To continue developing sources of funding.
  • To maintain sound fiscal standards.
  • To provide a broad array of opportunities and services to the community.

                        GENERAL EDUCATION
      General Education at Gainesville College is a shared set of curricular and co-curricular
experiences that cultivates in students the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary for
lifelong learning and productive citizenship in a dynamic and multi-cultural society.
As a result of their experiences at Gainesville College, students will be able to:
     1.   Communicate effectively through reading, listening, writing, and speaking or
          other means appropriate to the setting;
     2.   Perform basic arithmetic and algebraic operations and use mathematical
          concepts to comprehend, interpret, and communicate quantitative information;
     3.   Demonstrate a basic understanding of systematic methods of inquiry and will
          be able to apply those principles and procedures to investigate problems;
     4.   Demonstrate knowledge of history and political systems and their implications
          in the local, national, and international contexts;
     5.   Become acquainted with cultures different from their own;
     6.   Demonstrate the knowledge necessary to plan and execute a personal wellness
          program;
     7.   Use computers to perform a variety of tasks;
     8.   Develop an awareness of aesthetic experiences as a dimension of life;
     9.   Participate effectively in groups engaged in the identification, exploration, and
          solution of problems;
     10. Gain enrichment in professional and personal areas of their lives.

                    CAMPUSES AND BUILDINGS
                        GAINESVILLE CAMPUS
     The Gainesville Campus is located six miles southwest of Gainesville on Mundy Mill
Road (Highway 53), and near Exit 16 of Interstate Highway 985. The campus contains
approximately 150 acres. Eighty additional acres, contiguous to the original campus, have
been made available for educational use through a gift from Johnson & Johnson to the
Gainesville College Foundation.

DUNLAP-MATHIS BUILDING
     This building was recently renovated for the Gainesville College University Center,
which assists with delivering selected four-year Bachelor’s Degrees and some Graduate
courses on the Gainesville College Campus. It also houses the Art Department, Foreign
14 / Gainesville College


Language Department, Childcare Solutions, Testing Lab, Information Technology
Department, and Registrar.

ACADEMIC BUILDING II
     In this building are located the offices and classrooms for the Humanities and Fine Arts
and Social Sciences and Education Divisions. It also contains two computer labs and several
multimedia computer classrooms.

ACADEMIC BUILDING III
     This building houses the offices and classrooms for the Mathematics and Computer
Science Division, the Communications Department, the Learning Support/ESL Department,
and the Academic Computing, Tutoring, and Testing Center (ACTT Center).

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
     This building houses the Offices of the President, Vice President for Academic Affairs
and Dean of the Faculty, Vice President for External Programs, Vice President for Business
and Finance, and Director of Development (Foundation and Alumni Affairs).

BUSINESS/CONTINUING EDUCATION/PERFORMING ARTS
      This 40,000-square-foot building contains two wings, one with offices and classrooms
for the Business Division as well as for continuing education/public service activities and the
other for classrooms and related instructional space to support drama and speech. The wings
are connected to a common lobby which is the center of many College activities. A 300-seat
teaching theatre is included as well as the Roy C. Moore Art Gallery.

JOHN HARRISON HOSCH LIBRARY
      The Hosch Library provides professional staff to assist students in locating information
resources and in the effective use of these resources. Assistance is provided in using
GALILEO, the award-winning collection of databases provided by the University System of
Georgia, and in using GIL, the online catalog. GIL provides access to over 80,000 books,
videos, and other items housed at the Hosch Library and the Oconee Library/ACTT, as well
as to resources in other University System of Georgia Libraries. Inside the library are
various types of student areas – individual study carrels, tables, study rooms for group work,
a large multi-purpose room, and a smaller classroom/meeting room. Students are offered a
large number of computers on the first floor for their use. Major emphasis is placed on
supporting the curriculum by providing basic works in all subject areas and by subscribing to
periodicals, newspapers, indexes, bibliographies, microfilm, and similar tools of scholarship.
Library instruction is available to individuals and to classes. A joint agreement with Student
Activities provides popular books for recreational reading. The cordial atmosphere of the
library makes it a popular center for study and relaxation.

MAINTENANCE COMPLEX
     This complex is composed of storage sheds for mobile equipment and one large
building which contains a warehouse, machine shop, mobile equipment service and repair
shop, the Campus Security Office, and the Office of the Superintendent of Buildings and
Grounds.
                                                                                The College / 15



MUSIC BUILDING
      This structure houses the Music Department and the support facilities. This includes
the lecture room, electronic-piano laboratory, sound-proof practice rooms, applied-music
studios, offices, and space for equipment storage.

SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY BUILDING
      The state-of-the-art 50,000 square foot Science, Engineering, and Technology facility
contains faculty Offices for the Division of Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Technology,
as well as four lecture halls, five classrooms, two class/lab rooms, a microcomputer based
physics lab, three chemistry labs, a microbiology lab, three biology labs, two multipurpose
labs, and analytical chemistry instrument room, a research lab, a soil/rock prep lab, a
Geographic Information Science lab, and Integrated Technology lab, and a large general-use
Multimedia Science Computer lab.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COMPLEX
      The Physical Education Complex houses the Health, Wellness, and Physical Education
Division and includes the gymnasium, indoor heated swimming pool, sauna bath, steam
room, fully equipped Fitness Center, classroom, weight room, dressing facilities, and
multiple-purpose rooms. A lift is available upon request to assist handicapped persons
getting into and out of the pool. Outside facilities include all-weather track, bike trail,
exercise trail, intramural field, tennis courts, golf range, game field, mini-field house, and
fishing lakes. These facilities are widely used by students, faculty, and community groups.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
     At the heart of the campus is the Student Activities Building which houses many
convenient accommodations for students, faculty members, and other groups who seek
workshop, seminar, or general meeting rooms. Student Government Association Offices,
recreational areas, game room, food service, and the bookstore are located in this building.
The facility also includes the Student Development and Enrollment Management Office,
Admissions, Counseling and Career Services Center, Disability Services, Student Activities
Office, Financial Aid Office, Academic Advising Center, and the Cyber Café/Gameroom.

                             OCONEE CAMPUS
    The Oconee Campus is located on Bishop Farms Parkway in Watkinsville on
Watkinsville off Highway 53 (Experiment Station Road) and also easily accessible from
Highway 441. The campus contains 14 acres in a pastoral setting of rolling hills. The
Campus was acquired in 2003 with the first classes offered summer semester 2003.

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
     This building houses the Office of the Executive Dean of the Oconee Campus, business
services, testing lab, some faculty Offices along with all Enrollment Management and
Student Development Offices.

STUDENT RESOURCE CENTER BUILDING
     The Library/ACTT Center, Information Technology, and the Office of Student Life are
located in this building. Faculty offices, a science lab and classrooms are also contained in
the building.
16 / Gainesville College


      The Library/ACTT Center on the Oconee Campus combines the best features of the
separate Hosch Library and ACTT Center on the Gainesville Campus. The Library/ACTT
Center houses a collection of over 10,000 books, videos, and other academic materials and
provides professional staff to assist students in locating the information resources they need.
Oconee students also have easy access to library resources on the Gainesville Campus. A
large group of computers provides access to GALILEO, the widely-acclaimed collection of
online databases, to GIL, the catalog, to an extensive array of software applications on the
campus network, and to the Internet. Professional and peer tutors provide assistance in
Math, English, foreign languages, and a variety of other subjects. Student employees of the
Information Technology Department provide computing assistance. The Library/ACTT
Center also provides Regents’ Test Skills Courses, administers make-up tests, and has
TV/VCRs available to support class work, as well as study materials which faculty make
available to students on a reserve basis.

CLASSROOM BUILDING
     Classrooms, computer labs, science labs, and faculty Offices are located in this
building.

                     AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS
                 THE GAINESVILLE COLLEGE FOUNDATION
     The Gainesville College Foundation was established in 1967 to generate and administer
private financial support of the College. Overseeing the funds raised by the Foundation is a
continuing responsibility of a forty-six member Board of Trustees which operates through an
Executive Committee. With our new campus in Oconee County, the Foundation has
identified alumni in that area to serve on the Trustee Board. Our goal is to gather additional
support from that community for our Scholarship Program for Oconee students.
     Funds provided through the Foundation continue to increase annually and are used
primarily for student scholarships, faculty and staff development, as well as important
technology upgrades for students and faculty. Currently over 450 students annually receive
scholarship assistance through the Foundation. In recent years increased emphasis has also
been placed upon endowment development. The Foundation currently has an endowment
base of over $8 million. Anyone wishing further information about the Foundation may call
the College Development Office.

             GAINESVILLE COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
     The Gainesville College Alumni Association was established in 1985 and is affiliated
with the Gainesville College Foundation. The Association's activities on behalf of the
College are coordinated with those of the Foundation. The activities of the Alumni
Association are coordinated by an Alumni Council with representatives from throughout
Northeast Georgia. Membership is free and open to anyone who has attended Gainesville
College. The primary objectives of the Association are to maintain contact with alumni and
to encourage their continuing support of the institution.
     Among its activities, the Association is responsible for the Starlight Concert and
Fireworks Show. This event has grown each year in attendance to the amazing number of
4,000 people. A parking fee is collected to help offset the costs of the evening. This annual
event takes place the second Saturday in June and is open to alumni and community
members.
                                                                               The College / 17


     Other activities include the Alumni & Friends Golf Tournament, Anchors Away - an
alumni newsletter, alumni recognition at graduation, and a variety of other events throughout
the year. The proceeds from all alumni events support scholarships provided through the
Gainesville College Foundation.
18 / Gainesville College
                            II
                        ADMISSIONS



GENERAL ADMISSION PROCEDURES

ADMISSION FROM HIGH SCHOOL
   Full Freshman Admission
   Provisional Freshman Admission

OTHER ADMISSION CLASSIFICATIONS
   Transfers from Other Colleges
   Learning Support Tranfer
   Non-Traditional Adults
   GED Students
   Home Schooled Students
   ACCEL Program for High School Students
       Including Postsecondary Options/ACCEL Program
   Transient Students
   International Students
   Special Students
   Audit Students
   Persons 62 Years of Age or Older

READMISSION OF FORMER GC STUDENTS

DEFINITION OF LEGAL RESIDENCE (for Tuition Purposes)

                                  PLEASE NOTE

   Admission requirements change periodically in response to changes mandated by
   the University System of Georgia Board of Regents or Gainesville College.
   Prospective students are encouraged to submit an application for admission and
   contact an Admissions Counselor to discuss the admission process.
20 / Gainesville College
                                                                                  Admissions / 21


     Gainesville College operates under the philosophy that all students who desire an
education beyond high school and who have demonstrated the ability to take advantage of
such an opportunity should have that chance. The College recognizes a need for both career
preparation and the provision of groundwork for two-year and four-year college-level work.
The College's admissions policies reflect this understanding.
     Applicants are reviewed on the basis of their qualifications and evaluated with their
potential in mind. Gainesville College complies with the Civil Rights Act of 1991 and is an
Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity institution. Admission and employment
are not influenced by race, sex, color, religion, national origin, or handicap.
     The Admissions Office is located in the Student Activities Building.

           GENERAL ADMISSION PROCEDURES
      Applicants must complete and return all required forms and credentials to the College
by the established semester deadline. Because the College may find it necessary to stop
accepting applications for a specific semester, students are encouraged to apply or update
their applications well in advance of the deadline. Late applications may be considered at the
discretion of the Director of Admissions. The following items are required of all applicants:
  1. Completed application for admission and a non-refundable, one time only
     application processing fee of $35 with paper application or $25 with on-line
     application. Applications may be requested from the Admissions Office at the
     Gainesville Campus, the Administration Building at the Oconee Campus, or online at
     www.gc.peachnet.edu.
  2. Official high school and/or college transcripts. Documents must be mailed directly
     from the sending institution to the Admissions Office at the Gainesville Campus.
  3. Social Security number. Applications for Social Security numbers may be obtained
     from any United States Post Office.
  4. Certificate of Immunization. Certificates may be obtained from the Admissions
     Office, or a copy may be printed online at www.gc.peachnet.edu.
      Final acceptance or denial of each applicant is determined by the Director of
Admissions, subject to the applicant's right of appeal as provided by the policies of the
College and the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Applicants will be
notified of their acceptance when the application process is completed. Delays in acceptance
will occur if application materials are received in several segments and/or if the applicant
must be reminded to submit certain documents.
     The College reserves the right to rescind admission prior to or following
enrollment if the applicant/student becomes ineligible as determined by the standards
of the College and/or Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.
     Students with disabilities should be accepted two semesters before their desired
semester of enrollment if they need special accommodations. As soon as they have been
accepted, they should contact the Office of Disability Services.
     An application is valid only for the semester for which it is submitted. Applications
submitted by students who do not enroll are retained in an inactive file for a maximum of
one year. If, prior to the end of that year, the student wishes to reactivate the application to
22 / Gainesville College


a future semester, he or she must notify the Admissions Office by the established
application deadline. If the student has attended another college in the interim, an official
transcript must be sent directly from that college to the Admissions Office at the Gainesville
Campus.

                 ADMISSION FROM HIGH SCHOOL
Freshmen:

      •     must request that an official transcript of all high school work completed, stating
            the graduation date, be sent directly to the Admissions Office. Students who are
            granted acceptance pending graduation must submit another official transcript
            upon completion of high school graduation requirements.

      •     who passed the General Educational Development (GED) exam must submit
            official results of the GED test as well as the official high school transcript. A
            student with a GED must be at least 18 years old, or the GED student's class must
            have graduated from high school. A passing score on the GED is sufficient for
            admission.
Effective for the entering class of fall, 2005 the following NEW policy is in effect.

      •     Freshman must have either a High School Diploma or GED. No exceptions.
            GED students must be either 18 years old, or the GED student's class must have
            graduated from high school. Students who have a Certificate of Performance or a
            Special Education Diploma are not considered to be high school graduates.

      •     High school students with a college prep diploma must have a minimum 2.0 GPA
            (Grade Point Average) on academic coursework.

      •     Students with a tech prep diploma must have a minimum 2.2 GPA on academic
            coursework.

      •     Regardless of the diploma earned in high school and accepted for admission, each
            student will be evaluated to determine satisfactory completion of the 16 units of
            the USG College Prep Curriculum (see below).
The following high school courses are minimum requirements for College Prep Curriculum
(CPC) completion:

               Course (Units)                         Instructional Emphasis

                     English (4)                           Grammar and usage
                                                     Literature (American and World)
                                                       Advanced Composition skills


                                                 Two courses/units in Algebra (I and II)
                 Mathematics (4)
                                                        and one in Geometry
                                                                       Admissions / 23


  *Effective for 2001 High School
                                        *Fourth Math must be higher level than
Graduates. Three units required for
                                                     Algebra II.
   graduates earlier than 2001.


           Science (3)                             Physical Sciences
                                                  Laboratory Sciences
                                               Other Approved Sciences


        Social Science (3)                         American History
                                                     World History
                                             Economics and Government


      Foreign Language (2)                    Skill-building courses (units)
                                           Emphasizing speaking, listening,
                                                reading and writing.


  •   Students who have not completed 16 CPC units must take additional courses to
      make up for the CPC deficiencies (see below).

      Area of Deficiency                    Prescribed Remediation
                                            The student must pass Compass
                                        placement tests in Reading and English
             English
                                         or complete Learning support Reading
                                                      and English

                                         The student must pass the compass
                                          placement test in Mathematics or
           Mathematics
                                             complete Learning Support
                                                   Mathematics.

                                        The student must complete SSCI 1100
                                         with a grade "C" or better. Must be
             Science
                                             taken concurrently with ISCI
                                                    1101/1101L.

                                       The student must complete HIST 1111
                                         or HIST 1112 or HIST 1121 or HIST
          Social Science
                                       1122 or ECON 1100 with a grade "C" or
                                                       better.

                                       The student must complete FREN 1001
        Foreign Language               or GRMN 1001 or RUSS 1001 or SPAN
                                          1001 with a grade of "C" or better.
24 / Gainesville College


      All CPC deficiencies must be made up before the student has earned 20 semester hours
of college-level credit. College courses taken to satisfy CPC deficiencies cannot be used to
fulfill Core Curriculum or degree requirements, but they are calculated in the cumulative
grade point average. Transfer students who satisfy CPC requirements at another institution
of the University System of Georgia will be acknowledged as having met those
requirements.

      •     All students are required to take the Compass Exams prior to registration in order
            to determine specific requirements for remediation in English, reading and
            mathematics.

      •     Students that have SAT or ACT scores may submit those scores and exempt
            placement testing if they meet Gainesville College's minimum requirements and
            meet the 16 CPC unit requirements: SAT English (now Critical Reading) 480 and
            Math 460 or ACT English 21 and Math 19. Effective spring 2006, only
            nationally administered SAT/ACT scores will be accepted.

           OTHER ADMISSION CLASSIFICATIONS
TRANSFERS FROM OTHER COLLEGES
     Applicants who have attended other colleges are classified as transfer students. Students
admitted from other colleges are required to meet all general requirements regarding
examinations and application deadlines. Students planning to transfer from other colleges
must request that the Registrar's Office at each college previously attended forward an
official transcript to the Admissions Office at Gainesville College. Official transcripts are
required whether or not the applicant wishes to receive transfer credit. Documents must
be mailed directly from the other college to the Gainesville College Admissions Office.
     Transfer credit is usually awarded for courses that are designed to be part of a
baccalaureate degree program and are completed with satisfactory grades in regionally
accredited colleges. Such courses must generally correspond to the length, time and content
of those offered in the curricula at Gainesville College.
     Transfer students are required to earn a grade of "C" or better in English 1101 and 1102
(or equivalents) in order for these courses to transfer. Other courses earned at accredited
institutions may be permitted to transfer with grades of "D", to the extent that the grades on
all credits accepted for transfer average at least 2.0. All "D" grades in Core Curriculum
courses taken within the University System of Georgia are transferable, with the exception
of English 1101 and 1102.
    Transfer applicants who have fewer than 30 semester or 45 quarter hours of transferable
college credit must submit high school transcripts in addition to all college transcripts and
must satisfy College Preparatory Curriculum requirements.
    Applicants on academic suspension, dismissal, or exclusion at the last college or
university attended are required to serve a one-semester suspension before they are
considered for admission to Gainesville College. If transfer admission is granted before final
grades are received by the Admissions Office and a supplemental transcript shows that the
student has been suspended, the student's acceptance to Gainesville College will be
rescinded until he or she serves the required one-semester suspension. Accepted transfer
students who are not in good academic standing at their previous colleges or universities
                                                                                Admissions / 25


must maintain the minimum grade point average specified under the Academic Standing
heading in the Academic Information section of this Catalog.

LEARNING SUPPORT TRANSFER
   Students who complete Learning Support Reading, English, or Mathematics at another
University System institution are exempt from that/those area(s) at Gainesville College.
Those students who begin Learning Support courses, but do not complete them at another
University System institution are placed in the equivalent courses at Gainesville College.
     Terms of enrollment in Learning Support courses at another University System
institution are counted toward the maximum allowed for completion of Gainesville College
Learning Support courses. If transfer applicants have more than the maximum number of
attempts allowed at Gainesville College, those applicants will not be accepted.
    Any students who have been placed on Learning Support Suspension from another
System institution will be admitted to Gainesville College at the end of the three year
suspension in accordance with University System Policy.
     Students who transfer in fewer than 30 hours of college credit are subject to all the
requirements of entering freshmen. Students who transfer in 30 or more hours of college
credit are exempt from CPC requirements, but if they do not transfer in a college course for
which a Learning Support course is a prerequisite, they are subject to COMPASS testing and
placement if they have not completed the Learning Support requirement at the prior
institution.
    Gainesville College Learning Support students are not allowed transient permission to
take Learning Support courses at other institutions nor does Gainesville College admit
transient students into its Learning Support courses.

NON-TRADITIONAL ADULTS
     Individuals who have not been enrolled in an accredited high school or college within
the past five years may be considered non-traditional. Applicants must either have graduated
from high school or satisfied requirements for the General Educational Development (GED)
Equivalency Certificate. Non-traditional students are exempt from College Preparatory
Curriculum (CPC) requirements.
    Non-traditional applicants are required to take the Compass Exam in reading, English,
and mathematics before they register for courses. The Compass exam screens students for
possible remediation and is given by the College at no charge to the student.

GED STUDENTS
     Freshmen who did not graduate from an accredited high school, but who have passed the
General Education Development Exam (GED) may be eligible for admission to Gainesville
College. Applicants who are considered traditional-aged freshmen (those whose high school
class would have graduated within the past five years) are required to submit official GED
score reports, and a high school transcript showing all work completed if the student ever
attended an accredited high school. GED recipients will be considered deficient in all
College Preparatory Curriculum areas not completed at an accredited high school. These
students are not eligible for admissions consideration until their class would have graduated
from high school or until they are 18 years old.
26 / Gainesville College


    GED recipients if they choose may submit satisfactory scores on appropriate SAT-II
subject tests as a means of satisfying CPC deficiencies or they may satisfy deficiencies as
outlined above.

HOME SCHOOLS/NON-ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS
     Applicants from home schools or graduates of non-accredited high schools may
validate the College Prep Curriculum in an alternative way. SAT I or ACT equivalent scores
and satisfactory documentation of equivalent competence in each of the CPC areas at the
college preparatory level may be used. A student whose SAT I Composite (critical reading
plus Mathematics) score is at or above the average SAT I score of the previous year’s fall
semester first-time freshman admitted to the Gainesville College and who has completed the
equivalent of each of the CPC areas as documented by a portfolio of work qualifies for
consideration for admission. For students with ACT scores, the ACT minimum test score
requirements are available at our web sit at www.gc.peachnet.edu/admissions/main/

ACCEL PROGRAM
(Formerly Joint Enrollment/Post Secondary Options Program)
     The ACCEL Program is designed for high school juniors and seniors enrolled in
accredited Georgia public or private high schools who wish to enter college and earn
college credit while they complete their junior and/or senior year of high school. Home
Schooled students who are participating in an approved USG accredited home school
program may also participate in the ACCEL Program. They must submit official
transcripts from the accredited home school program for evaluation along with
standardized test scores (SAT/ACT).
      Under ACCEL regulations, students may simultaneously receive high school
Carnegie unit credits and college credit hours. Beginning Winter/Spring term 2005,
ACCEL funding will apply only to the five CPC areas (English Language Arts,
Mathematics, Social Studies, Science, and Foreign Language). ACCEL applicants must
have prior approval from their parents or guardian, high school counselor or principal,
and must be enrolled in an accredited high school. Interested students should contact
their high school counselor.
     All ACCEL applicants should be on track for the College Preparatory Curriculum
diploma seal. Their high school grade point average (as calculated by the College on
academic subjects only) must be at least 3.0. ACCEL applicants are also required to
submit official college entrance examination scores. Minimum scores for ACCEL
admission are:
            - 480 Verbal and 460 Math on the SAT-I
                               or
            - 21 English and 19 Mathematics on the ACT; and
            - at least 970 combined SAT-I, or ACT composite score of at least 21
      The College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) requirements for admission to a University
System institution may be satisfied in English and/or Social Sciences during joint
enrollment. Students with SAT-I critical reading of at least 530 or ACT English score of at
least 24 who have not completed the final unit of high school English and/or Social Sciences
may be permitted to fulfill their high school requirements with the appropriate college
courses taken through the ACCEL Program.
                                                                                 Admissions / 27


     Students who wish to complete the fourth mathematics may do so at the college level if
they have at least a 530 math SAT-I or ACT mathematics score of at least 22. The CPC
requirements in natural science and foreign language must be completed at the high school.
Documentation required for ACCEL status includes:
      1.     Completed application for admission as an ACCEL student with the appropriate
             application fee. (ACCEL students are encouraged to apply online at
             www.gc.peachnet.edu/admissions/main/.
      2.     High school transcript with an academic grade point average of at least 3.0.
      3.     SAT or ACT scores as specified above.
      4.     Letter of permission from parents or guardian and high school counselor or
             principal
      5.     Completed Certificate of Immunization
     In addition to applying to Gainesville College, students who are participating in the
ACCEL program must also complete the ACCEL application through the Georgia Student
Finance Commission. Information on the program and its requirements and limitations can
be found at www.gsfc.org/ .

TRANSIENTS
(currently attending another college or university and wish to attend GC for
one semester, and then return to their home institution)
     Students enrolled in other colleges or universities may apply for temporary
admission and registration at Gainesville College as transient students. These students
expect to return to the colleges or universities in which they were previously enrolled to
complete degree requirements at those institutions. Transient students are not permitted
to enroll in Learning Support courses.
  •        Transient students must present a written statement from the Registrar or
           designated school official at their institution recommending admission as a
           transient student.

  •        Enrollment as a transient student is limited to one semester. Students who
           wish to apply for a second transient semester will be required to complete an
           application for readmission and furnish an updated transient permission letter
           from the designated school official of their home college.

  •        Transient students who decide to transfer to Gainesville College to pursue their
           educational goals must apply for readmission for the desired semester and comply
           with admission requirements for transfer students. Former Gainesville College
           transient students do not pay an application processing fee when they reapply for
           admission.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
     Gainesville College welcomes students from other countries. The presence of
international students fosters cultural exchange, which can be beneficial to the student body
and to the community at large. International students may enroll in any program of study
28 / Gainesville College


offered at Gainesville College. The College has no residence halls; therefore international
students must make their own arrangements for living accommodations and transportation.
    International students must pay non-resident fees unless such fees are waived. Fee
waivers are awarded once a year based on availability. The application deadline for out-
of-state tuition waivers for international students is June 15 of each year. Students may
apply for an out-of-state fee waiver after earning at least fifteen hours of credit at Gainesville
College. Applications for this waiver are available in the Office of Multi-Cultural Services.
Prior to being issued an I-20, international applicants must present documented evidence that
they have sufficient funds to meet their educational and living expenses for one academic
year.
    International applicants must submit the following credentials at least 3 months prior
to the desired semester of enrollment:
      1.    Completed International application for admission with the appropriate non-
            refundable, one time only application processing fee. (The application fee must
            be paid with U.S. currency, check or money order. International applicants
            must also complete and submit the paper International Application for
            Admission).      International applications are available for download at
            www.gc.peachnet.edu, or may be requested through the Admissions Office.
      2.    Sworn affidavit(s) of support from financial sponsor(s) if the student is not self-
            supporting. Each affidavit must include the maximum dollar amount that the
            sponsor will provide.
      3.    Letter from sponsor's (or student's) bank showing that funds are available for one
            year of support (at least $16,500 USD for tuition and fees, books, living expenses,
            insurance, and transportation). Bank statements are not sufficient. Funds must
            be reported in U.S. dollars or in U.S. dollar equivalents, and information reported
            must be no more than six months old.
      4.    Original or certified true copies of all secondary school and college records with a
            verified English translation. Records must include courses taken and grades
            earned. Students who have completed coursework at a foreign college or
            university must provide a course-by-course translation of foreign transcripts
            prepared by a U.S. based credential evaluation agency such as World Education
            Services, Inc. or Josef Silny & Associates, Inc. in order to have that coursework
            considered for credit at Gainesville College.
      5.    Official score of at least 480 (paper based test) or 157 (computer based test) on the
            Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) proficiency exam if English is
            not the native language. Photocopies of the TOEFL score will not be accepted.
      6.    Completed Certificate of Immunization.
    Applicants are informed of the admission decision after all academic credentials are
reviewed. An I-20 Form will be issued only after the student has been accepted into the
College.
    International students with student (F-1) visas are required to be full-time students (at
least 12 semester hours) for fall and spring semesters of the academic year. The College may
be required to notify the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE) Service
whenever a student's course load drops below full-time status.
                                                                                 Admissions / 29


    Students whose native language is not English and who do not submit satisfactory SAT-I
scores must take the Compass college placement exam in the areas required. Placement in
Learning Support or ESL courses may lengthen the student’s degree program.
    All international students are required to report to the International Admissions
Counselor within two weeks of their arrival and have their passports, I-20, and Arrival-
Departure Records photocopied and placed in their admission files. This procedure is
required by the USICE and facilitates the replacement of lost documents.

SPECIAL STUDENTS
    Students who have earned an academic associate degree or higher (not an associate in
applied science) and who wish to take courses at Gainesville College without pursuing a
Gainesville College degree, may be classified as special students. These students are
required to complete an application for admission and submit proof of degree and a
completed Certificate of Immunization. Should a special student subsequently wish to earn a
Gainesville College degree, he/she must submit another application for admission as a
transfer student and provide official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended.

AUDIT STUDENTS
     Persons wishing to attend regular college classes without credit may apply for admission
as auditors. These students are required to complete an application for admission and submit
proof of high school completion and a completed Certificate of Immunization. Regular
tuition and fees apply to these students. Auditors fully participate in their courses, except
that examinations are not required. No grades are issued and no credit is granted upon
completion of the courses, nor may students receive retroactive credit at any later time as
auditors for courses completed. To receive credit later, students must register again for the
same course(s) on a credit basis. Auditors are not allowed to change from an audit to a credit
status once classes have begun. To change from an audit to a credit status, students must
submit the appropriate documentation to the Admissions Office and take the Compass
placement tests, if required.

PERSONS 62 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER
    According to the provisions of Amendment 23 to the Georgia Constitution, the Board of
Regents of the University System of Georgia established the following rules with respect to
enrollment in colleges of the University System of persons aged 62 or older:
     1.   Applicants must be legal residents of Georgia, 62 years of age or older at the time
          of registration, and must present a birth certificate or other comparable written
          documentation of age to enable the Admissions Office to determine eligibility.
     2.   Students may enroll as regular students in courses offered for resident credit on a
          space available basis without payment of tuition. Students must pay associated
          course fees, supply fees, laboratory fees, auto registration fees, student activity
          fees, etc.
     3.   Applicants must meet all University System and institutional admission
          requirements, including high school record, official transcripts from all colleges
          previously attended, and completed Certificate of Immunization.
30 / Gainesville College


    Degree-seeking students must meet all institutional, University System, and state-
legislated degree requirements, including the Regents' Exam and instruction or exams in
American and Georgia history and the federal and state constitutions.


         READMISSION OF FORMER GC STUDENTS
FORMER STUDENTS
Effective Fall 2005, previously enrolled students who have been out of Gainesville
College for no more than two consecutive semesters (including summer) and who have
not enrolled in another college or university in the interim may return to GC without
having to re-apply. These students, if they choose, will be eligible to go through
advisement and pre-registration.
Students who must re-apply:
    1.   Any student who has not been registered at Gainesville College for three or more
         consecutive terms (including summer).
    2.   All transient students must re-apply each semester.
    3.   Students who have attended any other institution during their absence from
         Gainesville College. These students are classified as transfer students, even if
         they have attended GC before.

         •      please refer to our application for readmission to avoid paying an
                additional application fee.

         •      if you decide to complete and submit the online application you will be
                required to submit the $25 fee.

         •      must apply for readmission by the established deadline.

         •      who have attended another college or university in the interim must submit
                official transcripts of all colleges attended since last attending Gainesville
                College. A student who has previously paid the application fee will not be
                required to pay the fee again.
    Students, who for any reason have remained out of the College for three or more
semesters, including the Summer Semester, must apply for readmission by the established
semester application deadline. Students who have attended other colleges in the interim must
submit official transcripts of all colleges attended since they last attended Gainesville
College. Former students who leave the College prior to completing Learning Support
requirements will not be allowed to return to the College as transient students from another
college unless they have completed credit level coursework in the area of the existing
Learning Support requirements.
    Application Fee Waiver: Students with approved application fee waivers may NOT
apply online. Contact the Gainesville College of Admissions at 770-718-3641 for a paper
application, or you may download an application from our website at www.gc.peachnet.edu
.
                                                                                  Admissions / 31



               DEFINITION OF LEGAL RESIDENCE
          REGENTS' POLICIES GOVERNING THE CLASSIFICATION
                OF STUDENTS FOR TUITION PURPOSES

    The following policies have been adopted by the Board of Regents for the purpose of
determining the tuition status of students:
1. Citizens who move to the state of Georgia for the purposes of establishing Georgia as
   their permanent home can also be awarded (with an approved petition) the status of in-
   state for fee paying purposes. Students can be classified as residents for fee paying
   purposes based on: their own status and actions or the status and actions of their
   immediate family. Immediate family is defined as: spouse, parent, or children. If the
   student, or his or her spouse, parents, or children are bone fide residents, then the student
   is entitled to pay in-state fees regardless of age or the condition of the relationships.
2. (a)    If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student
          only upon demonstrating that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a
          period of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration.
    (b)   No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed
          to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any
          educational institution in this state, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he
          or she has in fact established legal residence in this state.
    (c)   A student who previously held residency status in the state of Georgia but moved
          from the state and then returned to the state in 12 or fewer months can, upon
          providing proof, be awarded in-state residency for tuition purposes.
3. If a person is under 18 years of age, he or she may register as an in-state student only
   upon demonstrating that his or her supporting parent or guardian has been a legal
   resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding the
   date of registration.
4. If a parent or legal guardian of a minor changes his or her legal residence to another
   state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the student may retain his or her
   classification as an in-state student as long as he or she remains continuously enrolled
   (defined as enrolled fall and spring semester each year) at Gainesville College,
   regardless of the status of his or her parent or legal guardian.
5. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed by a court as guardian of a
   nonresident minor, such minor will not be permitted to register as an in-state student
   providing the guardian can provide proof that he or she has been a resident of Georgia
   for the period of 12 months immediately preceding the date of the court appointment.
6. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students, provided, that an alien who is living in
   this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite or permanent
   residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state tuition as a citizen of
   the United States.
7. Waivers - An institution may waive out-of-state tuition for:
    (a)   international students, selected by the institutional president or his or her
          authorized representative, provided that the number of such waivers in effect does
          not exceed one percent of the number of equivalent full-time students enrolled at
32 / Gainesville College


            the institution in the fall immediately preceding the semester for which the out-of-
            state tuition is to be waived.
     (b)    full-time employees of the University System, their spouses, and their dependent
            children.
     (c)    medical and dental residents and medical and dental interns at the Medical
            College of Georgia.
     (d)    full-time teachers in the public schools of Georgia or in the programs of the State
            Board of Technical and Adult Education and their dependent children. Teachers
            employed full-time on military bases in Georgia shall also qualify for this waiver.
     (e)    career consular officers and their dependents who are citizens of the foreign nation
            which their consular office represents, and who are stationed and living in Georgia
            under orders of their respective governments. This waiver shall apply only to
            those consular officers whose nations operate on the principle of educational
            reciprocity with the United States.
     (f)    military personnel and their dependents stationed in Georgia and on active duty
            unless such military personnel are assigned as students to System institutions for
            educational purposes.
     (g)    selected graduate students at University-level institutions.
     (h)    students who are legal residents of out-of-state counties bordering on Georgia
            counties in which an institution of the University System is located and who is
            enrolled in said institution.
     (i)    dependent students who can document that a supporting parent or court-appointed
            guardian has accepted full-time, self-sustaining employment and established
            domicile in the State of Georgia for reasons other than gaining the benefit of
            favorable tuition rates are eligible for a Families Moving to Georgia Waiver for 12
            months. After 12 months, these students can petition for residency status
            according to established procedures.
     (j)    members of a uniformed military service of the United States, who within 12
            months of separation from such service are accepted and enroll at Gainesville
            College and demonstrate an intent to become a permanent resident of Georgia,
            may receive a waiver of out-of-state tuition for 12 months. After 12 months, these
            students can petition for residency status according to established procedures.
ADDITIONAL RESIDENT INFORMATION
     Individuals who enter Gainesville College as nonresident students but who wish later to
qualify as legal residents must submit a Petition for Georgia Residence Classification, which
can be obtained in the Admissions Office or online at www.gc.peachnet.edu. A student's
residence status is not changed automatically, and the burden of proof that the student
qualifies as a legal resident under the regulations of the Board of Regents of the
University System of Georgia rests with the student. Students are responsible for
registering under the proper residence classification. A student classified as nonresident who
believes he or she is entitled to be reclassified as a legal resident may petition the Director of
Admissions for a change in status. To avoid delay and inconvenience at registration, the
petition and all supporting documentation must be filed no later than 10 working days prior
to registration for the semester for which the student is petitioning for in-state residence
status.
Admissions / 33
                III
      FINANCIAL INFORMATION



FEES AND EXPENSES

REFUND POLICY

FEE SCHEDULE

STUDENT BUDGET WORKSHEET
Financial Information / 35
36 / Gainesville College



                           FEES AND EXPENSES
      Gainesville College fees are assessed according to the policies of the Board of Regents
of the University System of Georgia. Fees are subject to change at the end of any semester.
      Fees are in the form of tuition fees, nonresident tuition fees, activity fees, technology
fees, and other fees as applicable. Fees of all students are due and payable at the time of
registration or by the payment deadline specified on the schedule/fee bill. Payment may be
made with cash, check, MasterCard, Visa or Discover.
      Failure to fulfill financial obligations may result in denial of readmission, registration,
certification of attendance, transcripts, graduation, etc. Official transcripts will not be issued
and graduation will be denied for students whose accounts are delinquent.
      If a bank declines payment of a student's personal check and returns it to the College,
the student will be assessed a twenty-five dollar ($25) service charge.
     Please note that the fee amounts specified below reflect charges for Fall Semester 2004.
Fees and charges are subject to change in response to changes in University System of
Georgia and/or Gainesville College policies.

RESIDENT TUITION FEE
     For specific tuition amounts, go to www.gc.peachnet.edu/admin/registrar/fees.htm.
Georgia residents who are enrolled in less than 12 semester hours within a semester are
charged by the credit hour. There is no tuition fee charged for semester hours beyond twelve
in any one semester.

NON-RESIDENT TUITION FEE
    For specific tuition amounts, go to www.gc.peachnet.edu/admin/registrar/fees.htm.
Non-Georgia residents will be charged a non-resident tuition fee in addition to all other fees.
Legal residency requirements are stated in the Admissions chapter of the catalog.

ACTIVITY FEE
     An activity fee of twenty-two dollars ($22) per semester is assessed all students
registering for less than seven semester hours, and forty-two dollars ($42) per semester for
students registering for seven or more semester hours.

TECHNOLOGY FEE
     A technology fee of twenty dollars ($20) per semester is assessed for all students
registering for less than seven semester hours and thirty dollars ($30) per semester for
students registering for seven or more semester hours.
                                                             Financial Information / 37



OTHER FEES (as applicable)
    Application for Admission (Online)                           25.00
    Application for Admission (Paper Copy)                       35.00
    Auto Registration                                            10.00
    CLEP                                                         45.00
    Graduation                                                   25.00
    Independent Study                                            15.00
    International Student SEVIS                                 100.00
    International Student Health Insurance
    (Fall – 240.00; Spring – 336.00; Summer – 96.00)
    Late Registration (One Day)                                    10.00
    Late Registration (Two Days)                                   20.00
    NSF Check Charge                                               25.00
    Transcript (only for special handling)                         10.00

Course Related Fees*:
                                                                Campus
                                                       Gainesville    Oconee
PHED 1002       CPR/First Aid                            $ 9.00        $ 9.00
PHED 1108       Bait Casting                               5.00          5.00
PHED 1112       Yoga                                      10.00         10.00
PHED 1113       Beginning Karate                          50.00         50.00
PHED 1114       Ropes Course Challenge                    75.00         75.00
PHED 1115       Beginning Bowling                         75.00         75.00
PHED 1214       Beginning Golf                            60.00         60.00
PHED 1215       Advanced Golf                             60.00         60.00
PHED 1229       Beginning Tennis                           0.00         50.00
PHED 1230       Advanced Tennis                            0.00         50.00
PHED 1302       Rock Climbing / Rappelling                70.00         70.00
PHED 1304       Caving / Spelunking                       70.00         70.00
PHED 1400       Rowing                                    30.00         30.00
PHED 1401       Canoeing / Kayaking                       30.00         30.00
PHED 1403       Beginning Sailing / Basic Keelboat      400.00        400.00
PHED 1528       Lifeguard Training                         8.00          8.00
PHED 1701       Beginning Horseback Riding              200.00        200.00
PHED 1702       Intermediate Horseback Riding           200.00        200.00
PHED 1800       Snow Skiing                             220.00        220.00
Science Lab                                               24.00         24.00
Applied Art (Studio Art Courses)                          40.00
Applied Music                                           100.00 per semester hr
Health Professions Lab                                    34.00
Lifesaving Certification                                   8.00          8.00

        THESE FEES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
               * Course fees are not covered by the HOPE Program
38 / Gainesville College



TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES
      Textbooks and supplies are available in the College Bookstore. The cost of books and
supplies will vary with the courses selected by the individual student. An estimate of this
cost is from three hundred dollars ($300) to four hundred fifty dollars ($450) each semester.

                                  REFUND POLICY
     The only time students will receive a refund for course load reduction is during
the Schedule Adjustment (Drop/Add - Phase III) registration period at the beginning of
each semester.
NOTE: Students who drop one or more courses, thereby creating a course load
      reduction after the Schedule Adjustment period, are not eligible for any
      refund.
     Students who officially withdraw from the College may receive refunds on tuition, non-
resident tuition, and student activity fees, according to the following University System of
Georgia Board of Regents Refund Policy:
      The refund amount for students withdrawing from the institution shall be based on a
pro rata percentage determined by dividing the number of calendar days in the semester that
the student completed by the total calendar days in the semester. The total calendar days in
a semester includes weekends, but excludes scheduled breaks of five or more days and days
that a student was on an approved leave of absence. The unused portion shall be refunded
up to the point in time that the amount equals 60%.
     Students who withdraw from the institution when the calculated percentage of
completion is greater than 60% are not entitled to a refund of any portion of institutional
charges.
      A refund of all non-resident fees, tuition fees, and other mandatory fees shall be made
in the event of the death of a student at any time during the academic session.
      Refund checks will be mailed within approximately one (1) week after the official
withdrawal date if fees were paid with cash. If fee payment was by personal check, refunds
will be mailed within three (3) weeks. If paid by credit card, a credit will be issued to the
credit card account.

The following are not entitled to any refund of fees:

      1.     Students who withdraw after the first 60% of the semester has elapsed.
      2.     Students suspended for disciplinary reasons.
      3.     Students whose registration is canceled and who are withdrawn because of
             incomplete admission procedures (failure to take required tests, failure to furnish
             all admission documents, etc.).
      4.     Students whose registration is canceled because they are determined to be
             ineligible for admission after having been granted admission.
                                                                    Financial Information / 39



              STUDENT BUDGET WORKSHEET
A. HOW MUCH WILL IT COST?
     Estimate your yearly expenses while attending Gainesville College and enter the
amounts on the appropriate lines below. To assist you, typical ranges of student expenses
have been listed. Estimated expenses are based on a nine month academic year.


                                                                    YOUR ESTIMATE

1.   Tuition, Student Activity, Technology and Parking Fees
     for Full-Time enrollment (fees for Science laboratory, Art,
     and/or Music are not included)
     GEORGIA RESIDENT            $1632 ($816 per semester)
                            OR
     OUT-OF-STATE FEES           $6036 ($3018 per semester)              $____________


2.   Room and Board
     LIVE WITH PARENTS & COMMUTE FROM HOME
                          $3600-$4000 allowance
     OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
        Variable-range of $8000-$12,000                                  $____________


3.   Books and Supplies range
     depending on major       $700-$900                                  $____________


4.   Transportation range of      $2100-$2600                            $____________


5.   Personal Expenses for clothes, recreation,
     and miscellaneous          $1000-$1500 allowance                    $____________



     TOTAL ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES                                          $____________
40 / Gainesville College



B. HOW WILL YOU MEET YOUR EXPENSES?

     After discussing available resources with your family, list estimated amounts on the
lines below. Once your eligibility for the various financial aid programs has been
established, you may use this worksheet as an overall record of your financial situation for
the academic year. If your expenses exceed your resources, you should apply for financial
aid.
1.    Family
      a. Assistance from parents                              $__________
      b. Assistance from other relatives                      $__________

      TOTAL FAMILY ASSISTANCE                                                $__________

2.    Student
      a. Student's savings & bonds
          (minimum 35% of savings)                            $__________
      b. Money available from
          student's other assets                              $__________

3.    Student's Savings from Summer jobs                                    $__________

4.    Student's Employment
      during the school year                                  $__________

      TOTAL STUDENT CONTRIBUTION
                                                                            $__________

5.    Veterans Benefits
      Monthly amount $________ times 9 months =               $__________

6.    Financial Aid
      a. Federal Pell Grant                  (Variable)       $__________
      b. Federal Supplemental
          Educational Opportunity
          Grant                              ($300-$1000)     $__________
      c. Federal Work-Study                  ($500-$3000)     $__________
      d. Other Scholarships                  (Variable)       $__________
      e. Federal Stafford Loan               (Variable)       $__________
      f. HOPE Scholarship                    (Variable)       $__________

      TOTAL FINANCIAL AID AWARD                                              $__________


      GRAND TOTAL OF ALL RESOURCES (1 through 6)                             $__________
Financial Information / 41
                             IV
                        FINANCIAL AID


WHEN TO APPLY FOR AID

HOW TO APPLY FOR AID

FINANCIAL NEED

ENROLLMENT IN REGENTS’ TEST SKILLS COURSES

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

COLLEGE WITHDRAWAL OF FEDERAL STUDENT AID RECIPIENTS

FEDERAL GRANTS

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS

GAINESVILLE COLLEGE FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS

LOANS

EMPLOYMENT

OTHER PROGRAMS
     Tuition Remission & Reimbursement
     Veterans Administration Benefits
     Vocational Rehabilitation Educational Assistance

STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR
   FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS

                                 PLEASE NOTE
For financial aid, there are certain deadlines that must be met and specific forms that
must be filed to insure the student receives a response before enrolling. Prospective
students are urged to contact the Financial Aid Office for information about deadlines
and to verify they have the appropriate forms.
Financial Aid / 43
44 / Gainesville College




                                FINANCIAL AID
      Gainesville College offers a comprehensive program of financial aid that recognizes
the specific needs and talents of its students. Federal, state, and local agencies, private
agencies, and the Gainesville College Foundation fund the various financial aid programs.
Transient students attending Gainesville College should contact the financial aid office of
the institution that provided them with transient permission to determine financial aid
options. Students enrolled in certificate programs are not eligible for federal financial aid.
Students accepted as joint enrollment will receive financial assistance if they are participants
in the State of Georgia ACCEL Program. Other joint enrollment and special enrollment
students are not eligible for financial aid. Also, students who audit courses are not eligible
for financial aid.

                            WHEN TO APPLY FOR AID
      Financial aid is awarded for one school year (fall semester through summer semester).
Renewal of aid is not automatic, so students must apply for financial aid for each school
year. Students who have submitted all financial aid documents, have been accepted for
admission, and have transcripts of all prior schools on file with the College by the “Priority
Deadline” will be evaluated for all types of aid. After that time, some funds may no longer
be available. Students who apply after the “Priority Deadline” should be prepared to pay
their own tuition and fees. If eligible, these students will be reimbursed (a) after the
semester begins; and (b) once their application has been processed by the GC Financial Aid
Office.

  Academic                 Dates          Semesters        Priority
  Year                                                     Deadline

  2005-2006                August 2005-   Fall 2005        June 1, 2005
                           July 2006      Spring 2006      Nov. 1, 2005
                                          Summer           April 1, 2006
                                          2006

  2006-2007                August 2006-   Fall 2006        June 1, 2006
                           July 2007      Spring 2007      Nov. 1, 2007
                                          Summer           April 1, 2007
                                          2007


                             HOW TO APPLY FOR AID
     The HOPE Scholarship and Grant Application (HSGA) or the eHOPE online should
be completed by students who want to be considered only for the HOPE Scholarship or
HOPE Grant. All other students should complete the Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA).
     The FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA) is the most
common form used to apply for financial aid. The FAFSA should be filed each school year
(as noted above).
                                                                              Financial Aid / 45



                             FINANCIAL NEED
     Many types of aid require that a student’s financial need be calculated before financial
aid can be awarded. Information from the FAFSA is used in a federal formula to determine
an EXPECTED FAMILY CONTRIBUTION (EFC). Along with the COST OF
ATTENDANCE (tuition, and allowances for books, supplies, living, transportation, and
personal expenses), a student’s financial need is determined as follows:
                   FINANCIAL NEED = COST OF ATTENDANCE - EFC

              ENROLLMENT IN REGENTS’ TEST
                  PRACTICUM COURSES
     The semester hours for the Regents’ Test Practicum Course (RGTP 0199) is not
counted as part of the total number of hours used to determine Federal Aid eligibility. If a
student enrolls in this course, his or her Federal Aid may be subject to adjustment. The
semester hours for Regents Test Essay Preparation (RGTE 0199) and Regents Test Reading
Preparation (RGTR 0199) are counted as part of the total number of hours used to
determined Federal Aid eligibility.

         SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
      All types of aid except some Foundation Scholarships require that a student make
satisfactory academic progress (SAP) toward a degree or certificate. To be viewed as
making satisfactory academic progress a student must (a) have a minimum 2.0 college grade
point average (GPA), (b) successfully complete 67% of all college-level coursework, and (c)
finish the educational program before attempting 150% of the number of hours required for
the program. The complete description of SAP requirements is available under the heading
“Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Recipients.”

         COLLEGE WITHDRAWAL OF FEDERAL
             STUDENT AID RECIPIENTS
     Federal regulations require many recipients of the Federal Pell Grant, Federal
Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), and/or the Federal Stafford Loan
Program to repay a portion of the Federal funds they received if they initiate a withdrawal
from college before 60% of the semester has elapsed.
      To initiate withdrawal, the student must contact the Registrar’s Office. The repayment
amount is determined using a Federal formula and depends on the amount of Federal funds
the student received as well as the percentage of the semester the student completed prior to
withdrawal. (Students who discontinue attendance without officially withdrawing will
have their repayment amount determined based on attendance in 50% of the semester.)
      A student will have forty-five days from the date of withdrawal to repay the amount
owed. Failure to repay by the forty-five day deadline will result in the student being
ineligible for any future Federal, State, or Institutional student aid. Subsequent payments
would have to be made directly to the U.S. Department of Education. Failure to repay will
keep a student from receiving Federal Aid at other institutions as well.
46 / Gainesville College



                               FEDERAL GRANTS
      The Federal Pell Grant is awarded to students who qualify for this need-based program
after completing the FAFSA. Full-time and part-time students who meet the federally
mandated criteria can receive funding.
     Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is available to Pell
Grant recipients who show extreme need. Students who complete the FAFSA and furnish all
required information to the College’s Financial Aid Office by the priority processing
deadline are evaluated for the FSEOG.

                           STATE SCHOLARSHIPS
     GOVERNOR’S SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to high school seniors who are the
STAR Student or Valedictorian of an accredited Georgia high school or who have been
designated as a Georgia Scholar by the State Department of Education.
     HOPE GRANTS are awarded to eligible students classified as Georgia residents who
enroll in approved certificate programs. For additional information on the HOPE Grant,
contact the HOPE Grant Hotline by dialing 1-800-505-GSFC.
     HOPE SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to students who meet all Georgia residency
requirements and who meet the HOPE Scholarship grade point average requirements as
determined by their high school for entering freshmen OR as determined by Gainesville
College based on their collegiate grade point average after completing 30 semester hours of
coursework. For additional information on the HOPE Scholarship, contact the HOPE
Scholarship Hotline by dialing 1-800-505-GSFC.
     The Accel Program is for students classified as high school juniors and seniors at
accredited public or private high schools in the state of Georgia, and is operated in all school
terms except summer. The program allows students to pursue postsecondary study at
approved public and private colleges and technical colleges while receiving dual high school
and college credit for courses successfully completed. Credit hours paid by the Accel
Program for the student will count towards the limit of postsecondary hours paid for by the
HOPE Program.
      There are two steps to apply:
             1.    Apply for admission to Gainesville College through the Gainesville College
                   Admissions Office.
             2.    Apply for Accel online through the Georgia Student Finance Commission at
                   www.gsfc.org.
      For information on applying for HOPE at Gainesville College, refer to the GC
Financial Aid website www.gc.peachnet.edu/studev/finaid.

                       GAINESVILLE COLLEGE
                     FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS
     GC FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS assist the gifted student (actor, artist, debater,
musician, scholar, student leader, or writer), the needy student, and those who meet specific
scholarship criteria. Following is a chart of available Foundation Scholarships based on the
                                                                              Financial Aid / 47


overall categories of abilities/activities, academic major, financial need, county residency,
graduates of specific high schools, non-traditional students, links to specific
businesses/organizations, and other/miscellaneous:


                               ABILITIES/ACTIVITIES
 Criteria          Scholarship                         Other Criteria
 Artistic          Art                                 Criteria set by Art Dept.
 Choral            Choral & Cromartie-Hubbs-           Criteria set by Music Dept.
                   Boston
 Creative          Creative Writing/Chestatee          Criteria set by English Dept.
 Writing           Review
 Dramatic          Drama                               Criteria set by Drama Dept.
 Diversity         Diversity Center                    Criteria set by Diversity Center
 Journalism        Compass                             Criteria set by Journalism
                                                       Dept.
 Musical           Music & Band                        Criteria set by Music Dept.
 Public            GC Ambassadors                      Criteria set by Alumni Office
 Relations
 Student           Student Government                  Information available from
 Government        Association                         Student Activities

                                  ACADEMIC MAJOR
 Criteria          Scholarship                         Other Criteria
 Business          W. A. Bagwell                       Hall County resident
 Business          Tony Smith
 Business/         Harry Chapman                       Financial Need
 Finance
 Education/        Dean Myers                          Graduate of public school in
 Military                                              Hall County
 Education         Hall County Chapter of the          Gainesville/Hall Co. Grad, min.
                   GA Assn. of Retired                 2.5 GPA, full-time student
                   Educators
 Education         John L. Cromartie, Sr.              Hall County resident and visual
                   Lion’s Club                         disability

 Education         Alpha Kappa Alpha Theresa           Criteria set by Division of
                   Dove-Waters Book                    Social Sciences & Education
                   Scholarship
 Mathematics       David L. Singleton                  Criteria set by Math Dept.
48 / Gainesville College




  Nursing                  Nora Atkinson Fletcher       Student in Pre-Nursing who
                                                        demonstrates a passion for
                                                        nursing through past medical
                                                        experience
  Paralegal                Gainesville-NE Circuit Bar   Criteria set by Paralegal Dept.
                           Association
  Pharmacy                 Monica Hughes                Sophomore, 3.0 GPA, financial
                                                        need

  Each Major               Academic Scholarships        Criteria set by each Academic
                                                        Division/Department

                                          FINANCIAL NEED
  Criteria                 Scholarship                  Other Criteria
  Need                     Alumni                       Preference to children of GC
                                                        Alumni
  Need                     Alexander Russell

  Need                     Diane Carpenter Memorial     Non-traditional student; GA
                           Scholarship                  resident; US Citizen; receiving
                                                        no other aid.

  Need                     Bob Gano/GA Traffic          Must have a “C” college
                           Association                  academic average
  Need                     Bill Moore                   Hall County resident

  Need                     Frances J. Meadows           Non-traditional
  Need                     Joe Telford                  International or Minority
                                                        Student
  Need                     Mattie Moon                  GA resident. Preference given
                                                        to those pursuing careers in
                                                        education, social-work, church,
                                                        or military

                                         COUNTY RESIDENCY

  Criteria                 Scholarship                  Other Criteria
  Banks                    Banks County                 Financial Need
  Barrow                   Bob White                    Outstanding academic ability
                                                        or financial need
  Hall                     W. A. Bagwell                Business major; preference for
                                                        financial need
  Hall                     John L. Cromartie, Sr.       Education major with a visual
                           Lion’s Club                  disability
                                                                    Financial Aid / 49


Hall              Bill Moore                    Financial Need
Hall              Loyd Strickland               Preference to those with strong
                                                Christian commitment and/or
                                                former/current residents of
                                                Eagle Ranch

                  GRADUATES OF SPECIFIC HIGH SCHOOLS
Criteria           Scholarship                  Other Criteria
Gainesville        Carlisle-Pittard-Paris       Nominated by Gainesville High
                                                School
Gainesville/       Dean Myers                   Major in education or military
Hall County                                     career plans
Gainesville/       Hall County Chapter of the   Education major, full-time
Hall County        GA Assn of Retired           enrollment, min GPA of 2.5
                   Teachers
Gainesville/       Turbo Transport              Human services major (e.g.
Hall County                                     social work, education,
                                                criminal justice, religion)
East Hall          Robby C. Hewell              Student athlete or band
                                                member

East Hall          Nathan Barrett               Band member
West Hall/         Scott Bagwell                Financial Need; Secondary
Johnson                                         preference for choral
Selected High      Dean’s Scholarship           Student nominated by
Schools                                         respective high school

                        NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENT
Criteria            Scholarship                 Other Criteria
At least 23         Ann Purdy                   Cannot be receiving any other
years old                                       scholarship and out of high
                                                school for at least 5 years
Adult Learning      Gainesville or Dawson       Student nominated by
Center grad         Centers                     respective adult learning center
Alternative         Gainesville or Jackson      Student nominated by
school grad         County                      respective alternative school
Non-traditional     Rita Collins                Hall County resident showing
female student                                  financial need
Non-traditional     Jimmie Phillips Bryson      Significant financial need
student             Memorial
50 / Gainesville College




  Non-traditional          J. Garrick Hill           Cannot be receiving any other
  student                                            scholarship/grant
  Non-traditional          Bruce McArthy             Financial need
  student
  Non-traditional          Diane Carpenter           Receiving no other Financial
  Student                                            Aid

  Non-traditional          Alpha Kappa Alpha         Declared Education major,
  Student                  Theresa Dove-Waters       completion of 30 semester
                           Book Scholarship          hours, completion of
                                                     EDUC2000, preferred GPA 3.3

                 LINKS TO SPECIFIC BUSINESSES/ORGANIZATIONS
  Criteria                 Scholarship               Other Criteria
  Dependent of             Dependent’s               Dependent child of a
  GC employee                                        permanent Gainesville College
                                                     employee
  American                 American Protein          Preference given to dependents
  Protein                  Company                   of employees. Also awarded to
  Employee                                           Forsyth County residents
  Dependent
  JEMCO                    Jackson EMC
  subscribers
  SKF USA, Inc.            SKF and Don Nunn          Relatives of employees/retirees
                                                     of SKF USA, Inc.
  Tom Wilheit              Tom Wilheit               Preference given to employees
  Co. Employee                                       of the company
  Dependent
  Warren                   Warren Featherbone        Dependents of employees of the
  Featherbone                                        company
  Employee
  Dependent Co.

                           OTHER (MISCELLANEOUS) CRITERIA
  Criteria                 Scholarship               Other Criteria
  Average                  Bob Gano/GA Traffic       Awarded to “C” students with
  Students                 Assoc.                    financial need
  Visual                   John L. Cromartie, Sr.    Hall County resident majoring
  Disability               Lion’s Club               in education.

                                             LOANS
                                                                                 Financial Aid / 51


      The FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM offers long-term, comparatively low-
interest loans for students. Eligibility for the Stafford Loan Program is determined after a
student has been evaluated for scholarships and grants.

                                 EMPLOYMENT
     The FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM funds part-time employment in various
on- and off-campus work settings for students showing financial need.
      The INSTITUTIONAL WORK-AID PROGRAM, financed by the College, provides
on-campus jobs for students who may or may not show financial need. The availability of
jobs is dependent on the needs and resources of the institution.
    A listing of OFF-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES is available in the
Counseling and Career Services Office and from the Gainesville College website.

                            OTHER PROGRAMS
    TUITION REMISSION AND REIMBURSEMENT is available to full-time
employees of the University System of Georgia who have been employed for at least six
months. For further information, contact the employee’s budget unit supervisor.
     VETERANS ADMINISTRATION EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS are available to
students who are also eligible reservists, veterans, or dependents (spouses and children) of
veterans who were killed, disabled or listed as missing as a result of service in the U.S.
Armed Forces. For further information, students should contact the College Financial Aid
Office or the Veterans Administration (1-888-442-4551).
     VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE is
available to certain individuals with physical or mental limitations. To apply, students
should contact their local Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, a division of the Georgia
Department of Human Resources.

          STANDARDS OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS
            FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS
         The U. S. Department of Education mandates that institutions of higher education
establish minimum standards of “satisfactory academic progress” for students receiving
financial aid. Gainesville College applies these standards to all applicants for the Federal
Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, HOPE Scholarship, HOPE
Grant, Federal Work-Study, and the Federal Stafford Loan Program.
STANDARDS
         Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is determined by careful evaluation of
qualitative and quantitative criteria. Determination of satisfactory academic progress will be
made at least annually, normally at the time the student initially applies for aid for the school
year or when the initial award is made.
     A.    QUALITATIVE CRITERIA - To be eligible for financial aid, a student must
           have “the equivalent of a C average.” Any current or former student of
           Gainesville College must have a minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of
52 / Gainesville College


             2.0. Transfer students must have a minimum 2.0 transfer GPA to satisfy this
             requirement. Grades for repeated courses will be included.
      B.     QUANTITATIVE CRITERIA - Student financial aid recipients must show
             measurable progress toward earning a degree by successfully completing sixty-
             seven percent (67%) of all college-level course work they attempt at Gainesville
             College. This standard will be applied to current students, former students, and
             transfer students. Semester hours completed will be those courses in which a
             student has earned a grade of A, B, C, or D. Semester hours attempted will
             include all courses for which a student has received a grade of A, B, C, D, F, I, IP,
             P, S, U, W, WF, or NR. Hours and grades for repeated courses will be used in this
             determination.
      C.     MAXIMUM LENGTH OF STUDY AT GAINESVILLE COLLEGE - A
             student pursuing an Associate Degree may attempt a maximum of 96 semester
             hours of academic credit provided he or she satisfies the criteria of the preceding
             sections. All transfer credit hours accepted by Gainesville College will be counted
             in the total of 96 semester hours. After a student reaches the 96 semester hour
             limit, the student will no longer be considered making satisfactory academic
             progress. Hours for repeated courses will be included. For students in Certificate
             programs, a student can attempt no more than 150% of the required hours in
             required courses for the certificate.
      D.     LEARNING SUPPORT COURSES – A student who enrolls in Learning
             Support (LS) courses and maintains a 2.0 GPA and a 67% completion rate of all
             college-level course work is considered to be making SAP. If a student attempts
             30 semester hours of LS courses or earns a grade of U in one or more LS courses,
             that student is no longer making SAP. A student who has attempted 30 semester
             hours of LS courses will not be considered for additional Financial Aid until all
             LS courses are successfully completed and minimum SAP standards are met. No
             LS courses will be used in the determination of items A, B, or C (above).
             However, all college level courses taken during the student’s enrollment in LS
             courses will be used in the determination of items A, B, and C.
      E.     REESTABLISHING ELIGIBILITY - After termination of aid, a student will
             again be considered making SAP once attaining the minimum requirements in
             items A and B. When this occurs, the student should contact the Financial Aid
             Office so his or her SAP can be reviewed. Classes taken after losing eligibility
             will be at the student’s expense, using funds other than those from the financial
             aid programs listed above. A student who has exceeded the maximum length of
             study at Gainesville College (item C) cannot reestablish eligibility. A student
             who earns a grade of “U” in a LS class must satisfactorally complete the LS
             requirements before re-establishing eligibility.
      F.     APPEALS PROCESS - Failure by the student to attain the minimum
             requirements specified will, in most situations, indicate that he or she is not
             making SAP. A student who has lost his or her eligibility for financial aid may
             feel there were unusual circumstances that prevented him or her from meeting
             these standards (such as severe illness, injury of the student, or death of a family
             member). A student may appeal his or her lack of progress to the Student
             Financial Aid Office using the Financial Aid Appeals Form.
                                                                           Financial Aid / 53


     Approval of an appeal may be for one semester only, with the possibility of renewal.
Until meeting the minimum SAP requirements (items A and B), the student must meet the
following requirements during the probationary semester:
    1.   Earn grades of A, B, C, or D (or IP in Learning Support courses) for the semester
         in all courses attempted (no withdrawals or incomplete grades); and,
    2.   Overall GPA for the term must be at least 2.0.
Note: Grades for Learning Support courses will be considered during any probationary
semester.

     Denial of an appeal indicates that the student will not be considered eligible for
financial aid until meeting the criteria of items A and B.
54 / Gainesville College
                                     V
          STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
                  AND
        ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT
STUDENT DEVELOPMENT & ENROLLMENT
   MANAGEMENT OFFICE
ADMISSIONS
AREA HOUSING
COUNSELING & CAREER SERVICES
  Personal Counseling
  Career Development
  College Survival Workshops
  Job Listings (Job Board)
  Other Services
DISABILITY SERVICES
FINANCIAL AID OFFICE
MINORITY AFFAIRS & MULTI-CULTURAL PROGRAMS
REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
STUDENT ACTIVITIES & CAMPUS LIFE
  Office Services
  Student Role in Decision Making
  Student Government Association
  Campus Activity Board
  Student Orientation
  Non-Traditional Student Services
  Student Clubs & Organizations
  Student Conduct
  Awards and Honors
  Co-Curricular Transcripts
  Student Publications
  Student Identification Cards
  Student Activities Building
TESTING
OTHER STUDENT INFORMATION
  Free Speech Policy
  Traffic Regulations
  Hazardous Weather
  Religious Holidays
  Pets on Campus
SUPPORT FOR DISTANCE LEARNERS
FITNESS CENTER
56 / Gainesville College



              STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND
           ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE
      Gainesville College believes that a college education takes place both inside and
outside the classroom. The Division of Student Development and Enrollment Management
provides opportunities and challenges for students to develop skills and knowledge needed
for success in college and beyond. The Student Development and Enrollment Management
Office coordinates programs and services of an educational, social, and recreational nature
which occur outside the classroom. It also supports classroom activities by providing various
services to both students and faculty members. The Student Development and Enrollment
Management Office provides coordination for the units under its supervision. The Office is
located in the Student Center at the Gainesville Campus and the Administration Building at
the Oconee Campus.

                                   ADMISSIONS
          The Gainesville College Admissions Office processes applications and supporting
documentation based upon policies established by the faculty and administration of the
College. Application and document deadlines are always posted on the Gainesville College
website www.gc.peachnet.edu. A full description of the Admissions Office can be found in
Section II of this catalog.
                                AREA HOUSING
          The Student Development and Enrollment Management Office maintains a
housing list for students that provides local rental information as well as a listing of students
looking for roommates. This listing is provided as a service to students and all housing
arrangements are handled individually between the student and the landlord. The College
does not recommend students to prospective landlords, nor does the College officially
approve housing for students. This listing is located on the Gainesville College website
under Students/Student Services/Area Housing. Students looking for assistance with
housing in the Athens/Oconee area can check out helpful links from the Oconee Campus
website.

     COUNSELING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT
           Counseling and Career Development offers students a variety of services including
personal and career counseling, college survival workshops, transfer information, and job
listings. Counseling and Career Development is located in the Student Activities Building
on the Gainesville Campus and in the Administration Building on the Oconee Campus.

PERSONAL COUNSELING
      Short-term personal counseling is offered to students who are experiencing any of the
following: testing anxiety, depression, grief, indecision about personal or academic matters,
crises, self-exploration, interpersonal conflicts, sexuality issues, or addictive behaviors.
Also, some students come for advice because they are worried about other students, friends,
or family members. All personal counseling is provided in a supportive and confidential
atmosphere and is free of charge to Gainesville College students. If individuals prefer not to
see a college counselor or need to see someone for medication or long-term counseling,
referrals can be made to off-campus psychiatrists, therapists, and evaluation services.
                                                 Student Development and Enrollment Management / 57



CAREER DEVELOPMENT
     Counselors are available on both campuses to assist students with their decisions
regarding career choice and in developing plans to meet their goals. A computerized career
decision-making program, various personal/career assessment instruments, and one-on-one
advisement are available to aid students in selecting their career paths.
       Both campuses maintain up-to-date information on career trends, job outlook, salary
projections, information on state and national colleges/universities, transfer information, and
ways to improve job skills. In addition, workshops are held each semester to provide career
information to students and assist them in building job-seeking skills. An annual transfer
fair is held on both campuses to help students who wish to pursue a four-year degree to learn
more about colleges and universities in their region. Where possible, on both campuses,
counselors assist students in getting on-the-job experience in shadow programs. On the
Oconee campus, the counselor can assist students to locate non-credit internships. Students
may avail themselves of career related services on either campus.

COLLEGE SURVIVAL COUNSELING AND WORKSHOPS
      A schedule of workshops and other offerings sponsored by Counseling and Career
Development is available at the beginning of each semester and throughout the year. Topics
typically include study skills, time management, college transferring, communication skills,
interview skills, resume-writing skills. Students with test anxiety, math anxiety, and general
anxiety related to academic or personal factors are assisted by individual counseling and
workshops that take a holistic approach and include nutrition, sleep-deprivation, thought-
stopping and replacement techniques, and other factors. In addition, two unique features
include teaching relaxation through the use of biofeedback on the Oconee campus and
specific exercises to relax, concentrate, and harmonize the body’s energies (energy
medicine) on the Gainesville campus. Students can receive assistance on either campus.

JOB LISTINGS (Job Board)
     Counseling and Career Development maintain a web-based listing of off-campus area
employment opportunities for students seeking seasonal, full-time, or part-time positions.
The Job Board is located on the GC website under www.gc.peachnet.edu/asp/tools/jobboard/
The Job Board is updated daily. On the Oconee campus positions in the area are also posted
in the Job Opportunities Book and on the Employment Opportunities Board outside the
Career Development Office.

OTHER SERVICES
     Counseling and Career Development sponsors a Job/Recruiting Fair during fall and
spring semesters in the Student Center at the Gainesville Campus. Students seeking
employment now or after graduation will have the opportunity to network and meet Human
Resource Managers to discuss employment opportunities. On the Oconee campus,
individualized assistance is provided to help students locate and network with local
employers.
58 / Gainesville College



                           DISABILITY SERVICES
      Gainesville College is committed to providing educational opportunities for all students
and assisting them in making their college experience successful and positive. Disability
Services at Gainesville College provides program accessibility and reasonable
accommodations for students defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act and the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Disability Services, at
Gainesville College, insures access to all aspects of the educational experience by creating
an accessible academic, social, and physical environment for students with disabilities.
Students requesting special academic accommodations need to submit their documentation
to the Coordinator of Disability Services for the appropriate campus in a timely manner.
The Coordinators will conduct the review process to determine eligibility for
accommodations.

                           FINANCIAL AID OFFICE
      Gainesville College offers a comprehensive program of grants, scholarships, loans and
campus employment through its Financial Aid Office. The College uses these federal, state,
local and Gainesville College Foundation funded programs in an effort to best meet the
educational needs and personal circumstances of each student. A full description of the
Financial Aid program can be found in Section IV of this catalog.

        MINORITY AFFAIRS & MULTI-CULTURAL
                    PROGRAMS
      The Office for Minority Affairs and Multi-Cultural Programs (OMA) is located in the
Student Activities Building in the center of the Gainesville Campus. OMA's purpose is to
serve students of color through the development of programs which focus on addressing
their needs. Programs that are created out of OMA include, but are not limited to: the
Student Mentoring Program; the Campus to Community Program; Monthly Cultural Events;
seminars on topics such as Time Management, Study Skills, Self-Esteem, Financial
Planning, Outreach Programs; and many other events. Students may also receive
information on scholarships and various organizations with a cultural focus from the director
of OMA. This Office also provides similar programs at the Oconee Campus.
     ALL STUDENTS are encouraged to utilize the Office for Minority Affairs and Multi-
Cultural Programs because the focus is to REACH-TEACH-HOLD all students.

                           REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
          The Registrar’s Office maintains official academic records for each student in
accordance with federal and state regulations. The Registrar’s Office provides students’
enrollment verification letters for insurance or loan purposes and official copies of students’
academic transcripts. Additionally, the Registrar’s Office coordinates registration activities
and the yearly commencement exercises.
                                                Student Development and Enrollment Management / 59



           STUDENT ACTIVITIES/CAMPUS LIFE
               OFFICE OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES AT THE
                       GAINESVILLE CAMPUS

     The Office of Student Activities works to provide a variety of opportunities designed to
help students “Make Connections” to GC. The mission of the Office is to contribute to
student success in college and beyond by providing student services, coordinating a variety
of challenging programs (cultural, educational, recreational, and social), and promoting
leadership.
     The Office of Student Activities also administers the Student Activities Fee Budget
once it is allocated by the Student Activities Fee Budget Advisory Committee and approved
by the Vice President for Student Development and the President. Examples of areas
funded are: student clubs and organizations, dramatic productions, the intramural athletic
program, entertainment events, speakers, cultural programs, and special events.

OFFICE SERVICES
     The Office of Student Activities provides many services for the student population:
social, cultural, educational, and recreational programming; leadership and community
service opportunities; new student orientation; support for student clubs and organizations;
services and programs for non-traditional students; co-curricular transcript tracking and
information; Honors Day; the Game Room and Cyber Café; AJC campus readership
program; ID cards and parking permits; and the GC Student Handbook and Planner.

STUDENT ROLE IN DECISION MAKING
      Gainesville College operates as a community, and input is sought from all appropriate
constituencies in the decision-making process. The Student Government Association is the
representative body for all students. However, any student should feel free to offer
suggestions or feedback to any administrator or SGA representative as the need or desire
arises.
     Students, nominated by the Student Government Association President and appointed
by the Vice President for Student Development, are members of all College standing and
most ad hoc committees. The Student Activity Fee Budget Advisory Committee consists of
faculty members and students, with students having the majority in membership. All
authority at the institution ultimately rests with the College President.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
     The Student Government Association (SGA) is the voice of the student body at
Gainesville College. The President and Vice President are elected while other
representatives and officers are selected through an application process.
     The organization's mission is to further the welfare of the student body at Gainesville
College. It provides advice to the administration on matters of individual and group student
concern.
     In order to be considered for elective office in SGA, a student must have and maintain a
2.25 cumulative average and carry at least three (3) hours of classes. Other requirements are
60 / Gainesville College


listed in the Student Government Association Constitution which is available in the Student
Activities Office upon request.

CAMPUS ACTIVITIES BOARD (CAB)
      The Campus Activities Board plans and carries out programs such as musical groups,
comedy acts, magicians, recreational trips, cultural events, and other programs. Students
interested in planning and organizing these kinds of activities should contact the Director of
Student Activities.

STUDENT ORIENTATION
     The Student Orientation, Advisement, & Registration (SOAR) Program is designed to
connect new students and their families to life at Gainesville College. During this program,
new students learn about resources, policies, programs, and procedures that are important for
success. Additionally, students learn about academic requirements, meet with an advisor,
and register for classes.

NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
     Students whose graduating class completed high school at least five years ago are
identified as non-traditional. Support services for this important population are coordinated
through the Office of Student Activities, (770) 718-3622. Non-traditional students are
encouraged to join the activities of Second Wind, a club geared to providing support and
services for these students.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
     The Student Activities Building is the hub of student activities. It houses the cafeteria,
bookstore, meeting rooms for student organizations, a game room, Cyber Café, the Financial
Aid Office, the Office of Student Activities & the Student Government Association, the
Academic Advising Center and Disability Services Office, the Student Development &
Enrollment Management Office, and Counseling and Career Services. Meeting rooms can be
reserved through the Office of Student Activities.

STUDENT CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
      Student clubs and organizations serve an important role in the process of educating
students outside the classroom. Each student organization at the Gainesville Campus exists
in accordance with a constitution approved by the Director of Student Activities and under
the supervision of an advisor who must be a faculty or staff member. Advisors must follow
the policies and procedures set forth in the Student Club and Organization Handbook, which
may be obtained in the Office of Student Activities.

        STUDENT LIFE AT THE OCONEE CAMPUS
      The Office of Student Life, located in the Student Resource Center, coordinates all the
activities outside the classroom for students at the Oconee Campus. Professional staff
members assist students in planning and implementing a comprehensive program of events
that can be cultural, educational, social, or recreational. Most of these programs are funded
through student activity fees. The Office of Student Life also assists in the development and
training of clubs and organizations on the Oconee Campus according to the Student Club
and Organization Handbook. The student body at the Oconee Campus is represented by the
SGA in the role of decision-making. SGA is comprised of selected leaders from each
                                                 Student Development and Enrollment Management / 61


officially recognized club and organization on the Oconee Campus. Student activity fees are
allocated by a Student Activity Fee Budget Advisory Committee which consists of faculty
members and students at the Oconee Campus, with students having the majority in
membership. All authority at the institution ultimately rests with the College President.
      The Office of Student Life also offers special discount rates for student memberships at
the local fitness center in Watkinsville, Oconee First Fitness. For more information about
rates and services, please contact the Office of Student Life in the Student Resource
Building at the Oconee Campus.

STUDENT CONDUCT
     Every community must have standards of acceptable behavior. These standards for
Gainesville College are published in the "Student Conduct Code" which can be found in the
Student Handbook. It is also available as a separate publication in the Student Development
& Enrollment Management Office at either campus.

AWARDS AND HONORS
     Gainesville College hosts an "Honors Day" program at each campus spring semester
each year. At this program, students receive recognition for outstanding achievement in
various academic disciplines, as well as for outstanding service to various student
organizations. The students designated for Who's Who Among Students in American Junior
Colleges, the Clark-Theodore Outstanding Non-Traditional and Traditional Students, and the
Ann Mathews Purdy Outstanding Faculty are also recognized at this program.

CO-CURRICULAR TRANSCRIPTS
      The Gainesville College co-curricular transcript is an official document that records
verifiable student activities which occur outside the classroom. This valuable instrument can
be given to future employers or scholarship committees to provide a more complete view of
the student’s experiences and development while enrolled at Gainesville College. Co-
curricular transcripts can be requested by accessing the Gainesville College website or by
stopping by the Office of Student Activities at the Gainesville Campus or the Student Life
Office at the Oconee Campus.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
     Student publications at Gainesville College are designed to meet specific informational,
promotional, and aesthetic needs of the College community. All student publications are
edited by a student who is supervised by an appointed faculty advisor in accordance with the
Gainesville College Statutes. The direction comes from the Student Affairs Committee
which is a faculty/student committee appointed by the Committee on Committees in
accordance with College policies. As in all College actions, the policies of the University
System Board of Regents serve as the official guidelines.

     The College newspaper, The Compass, is sponsored by the Student Activities program,
the journalism program, and other departments on campus to provide a campus-wide
communications medium for students, staff, and campus organizations. Students working on
the newspaper staff gain valuable journalism experience and earn college credit in JOUR
2000 (Newspaper Practicum), a one semester hour course.
62 / Gainesville College


     Service awards in the form of scholarships are awarded each year to staff members with
significant responsibilities. Interested candidates should contact the Humanities and Fine
Arts Division or the Financial Aid Office for more information.
      Hoi Polloi (which translates from Greek as "the common man" or "the man in the
street") is Gainesville College's newest student publication. Hoi Polloi is published annually
by the English Club. The magazine is devoted to presenting the best in student non-fiction.
Essays on pop culture, social and political issues, literature, and history are considered for
publication. Work on the magazine begins in the fall semester, and the magazine appears
during spring semester.
     Chestatee Review is a creative arts magazine published by the Humanities and Fine
Arts Division to encourage the arts among students, faculty, and friends of the College.
Some of the works published are the creative products of art and writing classes; others are
contributions from friends of the creative arts. Poems, short fiction, essays, line and charcoal
drawings, photographs, musical compositions, and short plays will be accepted for
consideration during Fall Semester for publication each spring. Students should submit all
written work (in typed form) and all photography, music, and art to the appropriate faculty
sponsor. Chestatee Review is funded by Student Activities funds.

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDS
      Identification Cards are issued by the Office of Student Activities on the Gainesville
Campus and in the main office in the Administration Building at the Oconee Campus. The
card is valid for the entire time the student attends Gainesville College. A five dollar ($5.00)
fee will be charged to replace an I.D. Card. Student I.D.’s are needed to check out Library
and ACTT Center materials, use the Fitness Center, attend drama productions for free, and
to receive student discounts at selected area businesses. Students are required to show their
Student Identification Cards to any College Official upon request.

                                       TESTING
     The Gainesville College Testing Center is a member of the Consortium of the National
College Testing Association (NCTA) and the following nine testing programs are
administered through the Testing Center: ACT, CLEP, COMPASS, Independent Study
Exams, Learning Support Exit Tests, LSAT, Math Exemption Test, Regents’ Test, and
TOEFL.

ACT
     The Institutional ACT Test is administered to students who have not been able to take
advantage of the national SAT or ACT test schedules. Scores from this test are not valid for
competition in high school honors (i.e. “Star Student Award”) and are not guaranteed
acceptable by agencies other than the institution administering the test. Sub scores range
from 0 – 36 in the areas of English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning. A final
composite score is computed by averaging the four sub scores.

CLEP
      The College Level Examination Program is a national program of credit by
examination that allows students to obtain recognition for college-level achievement.
Interested individuals should review the Gainesville College CLEP website,
                                                Student Development and Enrollment Management / 63


www.gc.peachnet.edu/studev/counselingtesting/clep.htm, and then contact the Testing
Center to schedule a testing appointment.

COMPASS
      COMPASS is the computerized placement test given to those students whose SAT or
ACT scores and transcripts indicate a possible need for enrollment in Learning Support.
New students must take the Placement Tests if they are directed to do so in their acceptance
letter. Test registration is done on-line through the Gainesville College webpage:
www.gc.peachnet.edu. Placement testing must be completed before students may register
for courses.

INDEPENDENT STUDY EXAMS
     Independent Study Exams are administered as a community service. The majority of
these exams involve course work completed through the University of Georgia as well as the
e-Core program.

LEARNING SUPPORT EXIT TESTS
     Learning Support Exit Testing is conducted during the final exam schedule. Students
completing ENGL 0099, MATH 0099, READ 0099, ESLW 0075, and ESLR 0085 must
earn a minimum score on the computerized exit test to fulfill the requirements of completing
the course.

LSAT
     The Law School Admission Test is administered four times a year as a community
service.

MATH EXEMPTION TEST
     The Math Exemption Test is administered as a service to the Mathematics Department.
The purpose of this departmental exam is to allow students the opportunity to exempt
college algebra or college algebra and/or trigonometry.

REGENT’S TEST
     The Regents' Test is an examination to assess the competency level of students in
reading and writing. Passing the Regents’ Test is a requirement for graduation in all
Gainesville College degree programs.
     Gainesville College students may take the test when they have completed the freshman
English requirements (ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better) or thirty
(30) semester hours of credit. Students who have not taken the Regents’ Test by the time
they have earned forty-five (45) semester hours of credit MUST enroll in RGTE 0199 and
RGTR 0198, both three-hour Regents’ Test Skills courses, unless one or both parts of the
Test are satisfied by one of the following methods: SAT-I Verbal scores of at least 510,
ACT Reading scores of at least 23, or USG Regents’ Test Reading scores of at least 61
exempt the Reading Skills course. College Board Advanced Placement (AP) English
Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition scores of at least 3,
International Baccalaureate (IB) higher-level English scores of at least 4, SAT II English
Writing scores of at least 65 or Regents’ Test Essay scores of at least 2 exempt the Regents’
64 / Gainesville College


Writing Skills course. Students in the Regents’ Test Skills course(s) MUST successfully
complete the course and be approved to take the Test by the instructor and MUST take the
Test that semester.
      The Regents' Test is administered each semester. Students must register for the test
online through the Banner Web component of the Gainesville College home page before the
registration deadline. Those students who are repeating the Test must also register online.
Additional information on the Regents’ Test and the Regents’ Testing Program at
Gainesville College is in the “Regents’ Remediation Program” section in the Academic
Information chapter.

    However, students whose “mother-tongue” is not English, who are
transient students, or who have special accommodations through Disability
Services MUST register with the Director of Testing.
TOEFL
     The Test of English as a Foreign Language samples a prospective student’s ability to
comprehend both spoken and written English. An overall score is computed from the three
sub scores of listening comprehension, structure and written expression, and reading
comprehension. Students must meet or exceed the Gainesville College cutoff score to
qualify for admission to Gainesville College.


                  OTHER STUDENT INFORMATION
FREE SPEECH POLICY
      As an academic community, Gainesville College is an open marketplace of ideas. It is
also guided by appropriate state and federal laws and regulations such as the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act, the Georgia Open Meetings and Open Records Laws,
and the Constitutions of Georgia and the United States. The “free speech” rights of students,
faculty members, and staff members are guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States
of America. These rights are recognized by Gainesville College along with its responsibility
to provide an environment in which it can carry out its stated mission. The College reserves
its right and responsibility to restrict the time, place, and manner of speech and other
expression in order to carry out its stated mission. Students are referred to the Student
Conduct Code and other policies found in the Gainesville College Student Handbook and the
Gainesville College Catalog. Faculty and Staff members are referred to appropriate sections
of the Faculty Handbook and Staff Handbook respectively. Others are referred to the Public
“Free Speech” Permit Request available in the Student Development and Enrollment
Management Office on either campus.

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS
    Campus parking is by permit only for students, either full- or part-time. All students
who park on campus must register their cars with either the Public Safety Office located near
the Maintenance Building on the Gainesville Campus or in the main office of the
Administration Building on the Oconee Campus.
                                                   Student Development and Enrollment Management / 65



HAZARDOUS WEATHER
     To determine if the College is closed during inclement weather, tune to one of the
following stations:
Metro Atlanta                              WSB - TV, Fox 5 – TV, WXIA - TV
                                           WSB Radio Group - AM 750, B-98.5 FM,
                                           KISS 104.1 FM,
                                           95.5 The Beat, and 97.1 Jamz
                                           WGST-Radio 640 AM, 105.7 FM
                                           WSTR FM Star 94
Athens/Gainesville                         Southern Broadcasting – WLET 106.1 FM, 103.7
                                           FM, 102.1 FM, WGAU 1340 A, and WIFC 960 AM
Commerce                                   WJJC 1270 AM
Cornelia                                   WCON 99.3 FM and 1450 AM
Gainesville                                WDUN 550 AM, WGGA 1240 AM, and MAGIC
                                           102.9 FM

      Please do not call the Public Safety Office at these times as these calls then hamper
their ability to respond to emergencies which may arise. If the College is closed, a message
will be placed on the College Information Line at 770/718-3639 and on the Gainesville
College web page at www.gc.peachnet.edu. The College does not announce openings – only
closings.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS
      It is the policy of Gainesville College to respect the religious beliefs of the members of
the College community while not promoting the beliefs of any religion. As such, no student
shall be penalized for failure to participate in a given activity (class attendance, registration,
quiz, exam, etc.) that occurs on a documented religious holiday, when to do so would be a
violation of the creed of that particular faith. A student should be allowed to register for
classes or take a test or examination without penalty, at a time when that activity would not
violate the student’s religious creed. Such requests should be made, in advance, directly to
the person responsible for administering the activity. Assignment due dates should not be
affected by this policy unless the time to complete the assignment is less than three times the
length of the holiday in question (i.e., three days to complete an assignment when one of
those days is the holiday in question).
     Reasonable common sense, sound judgment, and the pursuit of mutual goodwill should
result in the positive resolution of scheduling conflicts. The regular campus appeals process
applies if a mutually satisfactory arrangement cannot be achieved.

PETS ON CAMPUS
     Safety considerations and liability concerns make it necessary to prohibit dogs and
other pets on campus. Service animals accompanying persons with disabilities are
permitted.

            SUPPORT FOR DISTANCE LEARNERS
    Distance learning includes on-line courses and classes taught at off-campus sites.
These students have access to academic advising, financial aid information, and some
66 / Gainesville College


Counseling & Career services through phone and e-mail. The College’s contract with the
Educational Testing Services does not permit the College to put the System of Interactive
Guidance and Information, Plus (SIGI Plus), on our website. The Student Activities Office
will make student identification cards for students at off-campus sites at announced times.
Counseling services are normally provided only on the Gainesville and Oconee Campuses,
though arrangements can be made for a counselor to visit with a student at an off-campus
site if a visit to the campus is not possible for a student. Student Activities and Intramural
Athletics programs are normally provided on the Gainesville and Oconee Campuses. As a
commuter institution, the College does not provide a direct health service since such services
are readily available in the community. Health education is provided through the required
Personal Health/Wellness Class (PHED 1020).

                              FITNESS CENTER
      The Gainesville College Fitness Center on the Gainesville Campus is operated through
the Division of Health, Wellness, and Physical Education. The Fitness Center and other
facilities in the Gymnasium are open to students during hours posted in the building.
Students must show a current student identification card for entrance. A towel is required in
the Fitness Center. Cardiovascular equipment, weight machines, and free weights are
available. Services include aerobic classes, fitness testing (by appointment), body fat
analysis, and blood pressure screening.
Student Development and Enrollment Management / 67
                    VI
          ACADEMIC INFORMATION

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
   Transfer Programs (AA and AS Degrees)
       Requirements for the Transfer Associate Degree
   Career Programs (AAS Degree)
       Requirements for the Career Associate Degree
   Certificate Programs
   Requirements for Certificate Programs
HONORS PROGRAM
GC ON THE GO!
GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION
   Policies and Procedures    Change of Schedule    Academic Standing
   Notification of FERPA      Student Course Load   Absences
   Academic Year              Arranged Courses      Course Withdrawal
   Unit of Credit             Auditing a Course     College Withdrawal
   Course Numberin            Hybrid Classes        Change in Program of study
   Classification of Students President’s List      Course Substitution
   Simultaneous Enrollment Dean’s List              Second Degree
   Credit by Examination      Merit List            Graduation
   Transfer Credit Appeals Grading System
   Registration               Change of Grade
ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
   ACTT Center
   John Harrison Hosch Library
LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMS
   Learning Support Remediation Program
   English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESL) Program
   Regents’ Testing Program
ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION
   College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) Requirements
   Summer Semester
CONTINUING EDUCATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE
COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS
   Regents’ Engineering Transfer Program (RTEP)
   Savannah River Environmental Science Field Station (SRESFS)
   Institute for Environmental and Spatial Analysis (ISEA)
UNIVERSITY CENTER PROGRAMS
Academic Information / 69
70 / Gainesville College



                            ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
     The Vice President for Academic Affairs has administrative responsibility for the
overall instructional program. Educational policy, academic programs, and courses are
developed by the faculty, presented to the Vice President for Academic Affairs for approval,
and forwarded to the Board of Regents by the President for final approval.
     Students are integrally involved in academic affairs as members of the Academic
Affairs Committee and other committees of the College.
     There are two basic directions in the Gainesville College curriculum-transfer and
career. Course requirements for each area of concentration in both transfer and career
programs are outlined in Section VII of this catalog.

TRANSFER PROGRAMS
      The transfer programs are organized around a basic curriculum consisting of: Essential
Skills (English and Mathematics); Institutional Options (Human Communications and
electives); Humanities and Fine Arts; Science, Mathematics, and Technology; Social
Sciences; and additional courses in the students' chosen area of concentration. Depending on
the program of study, the appropriate degree in either arts or sciences is awarded.
     The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degree programs are traditional
two-year college programs for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or
university upon graduation.

                             REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
                           TRANSFER ASSOCIATE DEGREE
GAINESVILLE COLLEGE
      1.    Complete one of the programs of study offered by the College;
      2.    Enroll in and pass a minimum of two Physical Education courses, one of which
            must be Health/Wellness (PHED 1020);
      3.    Enroll in and pass Introduction to Human Communications (COMM 1100);
      4.    Earn a minimum of 20 semester hours at Gainesville College;
      5.    Achieve a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0;
      6.    Earn grades of C or higher in ENGL 1101 or ENGL 1101H and ENGL 1102 or
            ENGL 1102H;

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
      7.    Achieve good academic standing;
      8.    Demonstrate competence in the areas included in the Regents' Testing Program
            by making satisfactory scores on the examination;

STATE OF GEORGIA
      9.    Pass one course in Survey of U.S. History (HIST 2111, 2111H, or 2112,
            2112H) or Survey of World Civilization II (HIST 1112), which incorporates
                                                                     Academic Information / 71


         U.S. and Georgia History, or pass an exemption examination on United States
         and Georgia History; and,
    10. Pass one course in American Government (POLS 1101, 1101H), which
        incorporates the essentials of the Georgia and United States Constitutions, or
        pass an exemption examination on the United States and Georgia Constitutions.
     NOTE: Students transferring any of the above designated courses from non-
           University System of Georgia schools must petition the Chair of the Division
           of Social Sciences & Education for a proficiency examination to meet State
           of Georgia requirements.

CAREER PROGRAMS
      Career programs are designed to provide students with job-market skills. While the
curricula also contain the courses necessary for a more broadly based Liberal Arts
Education, these programs are primarily for the student who does not plan to transfer
to a senior college or university to pursue the baccalaureate degree.
    Gainesville College offers the Associate of Applied Science degree in certain approved
cooperative programs with area technical colleges.
     The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded in all career programs.
Students may select an area of concentration from one of the two types of career-related
programs leading to the Applied Science degree:


    1.   COLLEGE PROGRAMS
         Career programs offered by Gainesville College
    2.   TECHNICAL PROGRAMS
         Career programs offered cooperatively by Gainesville College and area Technical
         Colleges

                  REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
                 CAREER ASSOCIATE DEGREE
GAINESVILLE COLLEGE
    1.   Complete one of the programs offered by the College or through the College in
         cooperation with the Technical College;
    2.   Enroll in and pass a minimum of two Physical Education courses, one of which
         must be Health/Wellness (PHED 1020);
    3.   Enroll in and pass Introduction to Human Communications (COMM 1100);
    4.   Earn a minimum of 20 semester hours at Gainesville College;
    5.   Achieve a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0;
    6.   Earn a grade of C or higher in ENGL 1101 or ENGL 1101H and ENGL 1102
         or ENGL 1102H;
72 / Gainesville College



UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
      7.    Achieve good academic standing;
      8.    Demonstrate competence in the areas included in the Regents' Testing Program
            by making satisfactory scores on the examination;

STATE OF GEORGIA
      9.    Pass one course in Survey of U.S. History (HIST 2111, 2111H or 2112,
            2112H) or Survey of World Civilization II (HIST 1112), which incorporates
            U.S. and Georgia History, or pass an exemption examination on United States
            and Georgia History; and,
      10. Pass one course in American Government (POLS 1101, 1101H), which
          incorporates the essentials of the Georgia and United States Constitutions, or
          pass an exemption examination on the United States and Georgia Constitutions.
      NOTE: Students transferring any of the above designated courses from non-
            University System of Georgia schools must petition the Chair of the Division
            of Social Sciences & Education for a proficiency examination to meet State
            of Georgia requirements.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
      Certificate Programs are designed to meet either the needs of an employment area or
the requirements of an academic area of interest. Certificate Programs teach the skills
necessary for immediate employment, while the academic area programs are add-on
concentrations for students who have completed a degree or are enrolled in a degree
program. Specific course requirements for Certificate Programs can be found in Chapter VII
entitled Academic Programs. Students interested in a particular program should contact the
sponsoring division.

REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
     Students must complete certificate-specific requirements and achieve a minimum grade
point average (GPA) of 2.0 in certificate coursework. Students enrolled in Certificate
Programs are not required to complete the Regents’ Test.
    STUDENTS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT CHANGES IN DEGREE
REQUIREMENTS ARE MADE PERIODICALLY. CLOSE COMMUNICATION
WITH THEIR ACADEMIC ADVISORS AND THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE WILL
INSURE CURRENT INFORMATION.

                           HONORS PROGRAM
      The Gainesville College Honors Program offers a unique opportunity for talented and
motivated students to take enriched versions of academic courses. Classes are small (15-17
students) and seminar-oriented with an emphasis on discussion, critical thinking, and
independent study. The central aims of the program are to better engage the abilities of
gifted students, prepare them for more challenging upper-level courses at the university
level, and provide more individualized mentoring by faculty. The program offers other
advantages such as additional scholarship opportunities.
                                                                         Academic Information / 73


      Minimum requirements for entry into the program are an 1100+ combined SAT and a
3.2 GPA. Honors courses are designated on the schedule and on the student’s transcripts by
an “H” suffix at the end of the course number; e.g., POLS 1101H. Students who complete
the program will be recognized as “Honors Scholar” on their transcripts. Please note:
participation in the program does not add or change any requirements for graduation. For
inquiries, please see the Director of the Honors Program.

                                GC ON THE GO!
      Gainesville College sponsors a number of trips and experiential classroom activities
that allow students the opportunity to explore various environments and experiences outside
of the classroom. The GC ON THE GO! program includes international travel that will offer
course credit, as well as other educational trips. For more information on the GC ON THE
GO! program, contact the program’s Coordinator.

          GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
     The Office of the Registrar is responsible for the activation and administration of the
policies and procedures developed by the Academic Affairs Committee, the faculty, and the
administration in accordance with Board of Regents Policy. While the student may never
come into contact with all of the policies and procedures, it is advisable to be aware of them.
Students should contact the Registrar’s Office (located in the Administration Building on the
Gainesville Campus) if they have questions concerning registration, program and transcript
evaluation, the recording of grades, graduation, and/or academic procedures.

NOTIFICATION OF STUDENT RIGHTS UNDER FERPA
      The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain
rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:
     1.   The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days
          of the day the College receives a request for access. Students should submit to
          the registrar, dean, division chair, or other appropriate official, written requests
          that identify the records(s) they wish to inspect. The College officials will
          make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place
          where the records may be inspected.
     2.   The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the
          student believes is inaccurate. Students may ask the College to amend a record
          that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the College official
          responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want
          changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the College decides not to amend
          the record as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the
          decision and advise the student of his or her rights to a hearing regarding the
          request for amendment.
74 / Gainesville College


      3.    The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information
            contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA
            authorizes disclosure without consent.
     Gainesville College will disclose information from a student’s education records only
with the written consent of the student, except:

   • to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person
      employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff
      position; a person or company with whom the College has contracted; a person serving
      on the Board of Regents; or a student serving on an official committee or assisting
      another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate
      educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill
      his or her professional responsibility.

   • in connection with a student’s application for, and receipt of, financial aid.
   • to comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena.
   • to parents of dependent students as defined by the Internal Revenue Code, Section 15.
   • if the information to be disclosed is designated by the College as Directory
      Information: student’s name, address, telephone number, email address, major,
      participation in activities, enrollment status (full- or part-time), degrees, and awards
      received, unless the student has submitted a written request to the Registrar’s Office not
      to release his or her directory information.

   • The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged
      failures by Gainesville College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name
      and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office,
      U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-
      4605

ACADEMIC YEAR
      The academic year is divided into two semesters (fall and spring) of approximately
fifteen weeks and a shorter summer semester. Summer semester includes a three week May
session and the traditional summer sessions. Students may enter Gainesville College at the
beginning of any semester.

UNIT OF CREDIT
     The Unit of Credit is the semester hour. A semester hour represents one-hundred fifty
minutes of class time per week. Thus, a class having three fifty-minute lecture periods a
week will generally award three semester hours of credit. Similarly, a seventy-five minute
lecture period meeting two times a week will also award three semester hours of credit.
Generally, two laboratory or activity contact hours per week are the equivalent of one
lecture hour.

COURSE NUMBERING
     Freshman and sophomore level courses are numbered 1000-2999 respectively. Courses
are identified by a four-letter prefix and a four-digit number. Learning Support courses
(ENGL 0099, MATH 0097, MATH 0099, READ 0099), English for Speakers of Other
                                                                          Academic Information / 75


Languages (ESLR 0083, 0084, 0085 and ESLW 0073, 0074, 0075) courses, and Regents’
Skills courses (RGTE 0199, RGTP 0199, RGTR 0198) carry institutional credit only.
These courses do not grant credit toward any degree and are not transferable to another
college or university and do not affect the GPA.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
    A student will be classified as a Freshman or a Sophomore according to the number of
semester credit hours earned. Students are classified as freshmen if they have less than 30
semester hour of academic credit. Sophomore status is reached upon acquiring 30 or more
semester credit hours, exclusive of institutional credit.

SIMULTANEOUS ENROLLMENT IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS
      With the permission of the Registrar, a student in good academic standing may be
enrolled in classes at another institution (transient status) while enrolled in a degree, career,
or certificate program at Gainesville College. Students should contact the Registrar’s Office
for details. An official transcript must be sent by the transient student to the Gainesville
College Registrar’s Office in order for work completed on another campus to be considered
for transfer credit. Gainesville College Learning Support students are not allowed transient
permission to enroll in any courses at other institutions.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
      The College awards credit for the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests
and the Advanced Placement Program (AP) tests administered by the College Entrance
Examination Board. Students should contact the Testing Center for details about acceptable
Subject Tests and cutoff scores. A student may also exempt specific courses by departmental
testing and/or placement examinations.
     Credit may also be awarded for certain Business Education, Business Administration,
and Economics courses by passing specific sections of the Certified Professional Secretary
Examination, the Professional Legal Secretary Examination, and the Certified Legal
Assistant Examination. Interested students should contact the Business Division for
additional information.

TRANSFER CREDIT APPEALS PROCESS
      The Core Curriculum of the University System of Georgia was established to facilitate
the transferability of credits among all colleges of the University System.
Students who experience transfer-of-credit problems should:
     1.   Contact the Director of Admissions or Registrar of the institution to which they
          have transferred (Receiving Institution) to determine the nature of the problem.
           If the problem is not resolved,
     2.   Contact the Campus Ombudsperson of the institution from which they have
          transferred (Sending Institution) to determine the nature of the problem. If the
          Campus Ombudsperson of the Sending Institution believes a problem of
          transfer of Core Curriculum credit does exist, he/she will contact the Director
          of Admissions or Registrar of the Receiving Institution in an attempt to resolve
          the problem. If the problem is not resolved,
76 / Gainesville College


      3.    The Campus Ombudsperson of the Sending Institution will notify the President
            of the Sending Institution, or a designee, that a problem exists. The President
            will attempt to resolve the problem with the Receiving Institution. If the
            problem is not resolved,
      4.    The President of the Sending Institution will notify the Chancellor of the nature
            of the problem. If appropriate, the Chancellor may refer the matter to the
            appropriate Regents’ Administrative Committee. Decisions regarding the
            fulfillment of transferability requirements remain the sole prerogative of the
            University System of Georgia.

REGISTRATION
    Registration at Gainesville College occurs in three phases: Pre-Registration (Phase I),
Registration and Schedule Adjustment (Phase II), and Late Registration and Schedule
Adjustment (Phase III).
     Phase I Pre-Registration for the upcoming term occurs after the midpoint of the term in
which students are currently enrolled. Students must pay all tuition and fees by the
specified deadline in order to retain the pre-registration schedule. Currently enrolled
students and early enrolling new students are eligible for Phase I. Students are strongly
encouraged to participate in Phase I in order to increase the likelihood of obtaining their
preferred schedule.
     Phase II Registration and Schedule Adjustment usually occur the day before the first
day of classes for each term. At this time students with a pre-registration schedule may also
adjust their schedules. All tuition and fees must be paid at the time of registration for
Phase II.
      Phase III Late Registration and Schedule Adjustment begin the first day of each term
and continue for three to four days (depending on the dates of the term). At this time
students who have not previously registered may do so. However, there is a late registration
charge of $10 per day (not to exceed $20). Students may make schedule adjustments (drop
or add classes) to their schedules during this phase. All tuition and fees must be paid at
the time of registration.
     Students should consult the semester schedule of courses each semester for specific
dates, times, locations, and details of each phase of registration. Registration dates and
deadlines are available each semester at www.gc.peachnet.edu.

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE
     During the dates specified in the semester schedule of classes, the student may make
changes in his/her schedule. To do so, the student may access the registration system with
his/her PIN (Personal Identification Number) and make changes. If not eligible to self-
register and make schedule changes, the student must consult his/her Academic Advisor to
make schedule adjustments. Students are reminded that they assume responsibility for
course selection when making schedule changes and adjustments. Questions regarding the
appropriateness of courses being considered should be addressed with his/her Academic
Advisor.
     A student may withdraw from a course during the semester. The deadline for
withdrawing from a course without academic penalty is midpoint of the term. If the student
                                                                       Academic Information / 77


withdraws from a course before the published midpoint, a "W" will be assigned. If the
student withdraws from a course after the deadline, an automatic "WF" will be assigned.
      Failure to follow the official procedures for course changes may also result in a
failing grade for the course. Students should also note that there is no refund for
course drops occurring after Phase III registration ends.
STUDENT COURSE LOAD
      Students taking twelve hours of academic work per semester (normally three to four
courses, depending on the credit hours of the courses taken) are considered to be taking a
full load. This does not include physical education courses, which are also a requirement.
Students who wish to schedule more than eighteen academic hours in any one semester
must have the written approval of the Vice President of Academic Affairs or Executive Dean
on the Oconee Campus prior to registration.
     Gainesville College addresses the need for flexibility in scheduling in a number of
ways including extensive course offerings in the evening hours. In the interest of realistic
academic advisement it should be noted that it is usually inadvisable to expect to be able to
complete a full two-year program at the College (sixty academic hours and the physical
education requirements) within four semesters all within the confines of the evening
program.
      Additionally it is inadvisable to attempt to maintain a full employment schedule and
expect to complete the necessary requirements within the span of four semesters. Twelve
(12) semester hours of credit are considered a full load for financial aid, insurance, and
other purposes.
ARRANGED CLASSES
     Arranged classes and/or independent study courses require the joint approval of the
Division Chair and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. For further information contact
the Chair of the appropriate Division.

AUDITING A COURSE
     The student admitted as a regular student who desires to audit a course while taking one
or more additional courses for credit must declare his intention to do so at the time of
registration. One must fill out the Audit Form which may be obtained in the
Registrar’s Office at the Gainesville College Campus, and Room 101 of the
Administration Building at the Oconee Campus. The fees are the same for courses
audited as for those taken for credit. The student should understand that all course
requirements are to be met with the exception of taking the final examination. No credit is
earned, no grade is given at the end of the semester in which a course is audited, AND no
credit will be given at any later time. If at some future date the student wishes to receive
credit for the course(s) audited, he/she must re-enroll in the course(s) as a regular credit
student. It is the stated policy of the Board of Regents of the University System of
Georgia that a student may not change his status from audit to credit or vice versa
after coursework has begun.
     A student placed in a Learning Support course(s) or having a CPC deficiency may not
audit that course(s). Students who voluntarily enroll in Learning Support courses are limited
78 / Gainesville College


to two attempts each in ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 and three attempts in total in any
combination of MATH 0097 and MATH 0099. They are not subject to any exit
requirements, and they are not eligible to receive federal financial aid for such courses.
 In addition, a student who places in MATH 0099 may not audit MATH 0097. If the student
chooses to volunteer to take MATH 0097, it will count as one of the three semesters allowed
in Learning Support Math.

HYBRID CLASSES
     In a hybrid class students meet with the instructor in a classroom setting for a reduced
amount of time and complete all other course work in an online classroom environment.
Students must participate both in the live classroom portion and in the online classroom
environment. Hybrid courses are open to students who are in good academic standing, and
who are not currently enrolled in Learning Support courses. Students who plan to take a
hybrid course should be comfortable with computers and have internet access at home.

PRESIDENT'S LIST
     To earn a place on the President’s List, a student must attain a 4.0 grade point average
with a minimum of fifteen (15) semester hours of academic work in one semester.

DEAN'S LIST
     To earn a place on the Dean's List, a student must attain a 3.5 or higher grade point
average with a minimum of fifteen (15) semester credit hours of academic work in one
semester.

MERIT LIST
     To earn a place on the Merit List, a student must attain a 3.5 or higher grade point
average with a minimum of nine (9) and less than fifteen (15) semester credit hours of
academic work in one semester.

GRADING SYSTEM
      It is the responsibility of the Registrar to compute students’ grades and maintain student
files. At the end of each semester, a grade report showing courses taken, hours
carried/attempted, grades earned, hours earned, and quality points awarded is made available
online to each student. If the student earns a place on the President’s List, Dean's List or
Merit List, or has been placed on Academic Probation or Suspension, an appropriate notation
appears on the grade report. The student should be aware of all the grades entered in his/her
records and agree with their validity. If the student becomes aware of a mistake, he/she
should report it immediately to the Registrar.


     Letter Grade                                                                                          Numeric Range
         A................................................................................................... 90 - 100
         B ................................................................................................... 80 - 89
         C ................................................................................................... 70 - 79
         D................................................................................................... 60 - 69
         F.................................................................................................... 00 - 59

     Letter Grade                                                                             Quality Points Per
                                                                                                Semester Hour
                                                                                                        Academic Information / 79


          A.............................................................................................................. 4.0
          B .............................................................................................................. 3.0
          C .............................................................................................................. 2.0
          D.............................................................................................................. 1.0
          F............................................................................................................... 0.0
          I      (Incomplete) .................................................................................... 0.0
          IP (In Progress) .................................................................................... 0.0
          S (Satisfactory) ................................................................................... 0.0
          U (Unsatisfactory Progress)................................................................. 0.0
          W (Withdrew) ...................................................................................... 0.0
          WF (Withdrew Failing) .......................................................................... 0.0
          V (Audit) ............................................................................................. 0.0
          K (Credit by Examination) .................................................................. 0.0
          NR (Professor failed to report grade) ..................................................... 0.0
          P (Passing - institutional credit only).................................................. 0.0

"I" -- A grade of Incomplete is assigned when a student has not, for excusable reasons,
completed the requirements of a course. This grade may be assigned only with the consent
of the Division Chair or Instructional Coordinator on the Oconee Campus. An Incomplete
grade must be made up within the next semester, excluding Summer, or the symbol "I" will
be changed to the grade "F".

"IP" -- A grade of In Progress is assigned when a student enrolled in a Learning Support
course, in spite of conscientious work and definite progress during the semester, fails to
reach the competency required to complete the course. The student enrolls in the course
again the next semester, and receives a grade and credit for the course when competency is
attained.

"V" -- This symbol indicates that the student audited the course. No credit is earned and the
student may not change from Audit to credit status or vice versa.

"K" -- This symbol indicates that the student was given credit for the course via a credit by
examination program (CLEP, AP, etc.) or through institutional/departmental proficiency
examination.

“S” -- For Regents’ Writing Skills, Regents’ Reading Skills and Regents Test Practicum
          Courses

     1.      A student passed both or either portion of the Regents’ Test.
     2.      A student passed to take the Test.

"U" -- A grade of "U" is assigned under conditions listed below:
     For Learning Support Reading, English and Math Courses
     1. A student has been enrolled in Learning Support READ 0099 and/or Learning
          Support ENGL 0099 and/or MATH 0097 and has not exited within the two
          semester limit.
     2. A student has been enrolled in Learning Support MATH 0097 and MATH 0099
          for three semesters and has not exited within the three semester limit.
     3. A student failed to make adequate progress toward exiting in any semester.
80 / Gainesville College




      For Learning Support ESL Courses
      1. A student failed to exit the ESL level within the three semester limit.
      2. A student failed to make adequate progress toward exiting in any semester.

      For Regents’ Writing Skills, Regents’ Reading Skills and Regents Test Practicum
      Courses
      1. A student failed both or either portion of the Regents’ Test.
      2. A student failed to take the Test.

"W", "WF", AND "NR" -- A student who officially withdraws from a course before the
course mid-point (the penalty date) will be assigned a "W" (withdrew) grade. A student who
drops/withdraws from a course after the mid-point will be assigned a "WF" (withdrew
failing) grade. The "W" grade is not considered in computing grade point averages. The
"WF" grade is computed as an "F" grade. "NR" is a symbol on the grade report to indicate
that no grade was submitted by the professor at the time the grade reports were processed.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE CALCULATION
     The Grade Point Average is computed only on work attempted at Gainesville College.
The formula for computing the GPA for a student is as follows:

                                         (TotalQualityPoints)
                               GPA =
                                        (TotalHoursAttempted)
Example: A student took a 3 hour mathematics course and made an 'A', a 3 hour science
course and made a 'C', a 4 hour Spanish course and made a ‘B’, a 3 hour history course and
made a “B’, and a 1 hour physical education course making an 'A'. The GPA for that
semester would be calculated in the following manner:
Quality Points =           3 Hours x 4 Quality Points +
                           3 Hours x 2 Quality Points +
                           4 Hours x 3 Quality Points +
                           3 Hours x 3 Quality Points +
                           1 Hours x 4 Quality Points = 43 Quality Points

Total Hours Attempted = 14
                                                  43
                                        GPA =        =3.07
                                                  14
The grades of I, IP, K, S, U, V, W, and NR are not used in computing the Grade Point
Average (GPA).

CHANGE OF GRADE
     A change of grade may be approved by the appropriate Division Chair or the
appropriate Instructional Coordinator on the Oconee Campus following the written
request/approval of the instructor.

ACADEMIC STANDING
Good Standing
                                                                                    Academic Information / 81


     Degree-seeking students are in good standing (making progress toward the required 2.0
grade point average requirement for graduation) if their cumulative Gainesville College
grade point average falls within the minimum acceptable range for the number of hours
attempted plus transfer hours.
  Semester Hours Attempted                                                    Minimum Cumulative GPA
     Plus Transfer Hours                                                     (Gainesville College Credit Only)
              0 - 20 ............................................................................... 1.5
            21 - 30 ............................................................................... 1.6
            31 - 45 ............................................................................... 1.8
            46 - 60 ............................................................................... 1.9
                 61 + .............................................................................. 2.0
Probation
      Students will be placed on academic probation when they have attempted the number
of credit hours shown in the left column in the above table and have not earned at least the
cumulative grade point average shown in the corresponding right column. Student’s placed
on probation will not be allowed to register for the following semester until he/she meets
with an Academic Advisor. The student’s ability to self-register will not be reinstated until
the student attains good academic standing.
Continued Probation
     Students who earn a 2.0 GPA during any semester in which they are on probation, but
do not raise their cumulative average sufficiently to be removed from probation, will be
continued on academic probation.
Suspension
Students on academic probation will be suspended for one semester unless:
      (a) they remove themselves from probation by achieving the appropriate
          GPA given in the above table, or
      (b) they achieve a 2.0 GPA for the current semester.
   When a student is re-enrolled following suspension he/she must achieve the specified
GPA as indicated in the table.
     A student on academic suspension may request readmission through an appeal to the
Admissions Committee which, on hearing the student appeal, recommends action to the Vice
President for Academic Affairs.
     Students enrolled in Learning Support courses should note policies regarding
requirements for continued enrollment as stated below:
Learning Support Suspension
     Enrollment in Learning Support courses is not reflected in the Semester Hours
Attempted, nor are grades earned in such courses reflected in the student's Grade Point
Average; however, performance in Learning Support courses is a factor in determining
the student's academic standing. Students who fail to make satisfactory progress in any
Learning Support course may be suspended at the end of their first or any subsequent
semester of enrollment. Attempts in Learning Support courses are also counted towards
number of hours attempted for the HOPE Scholarship. In addition, to be eligible for
financial aid, students must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward a
82 / Gainesville College


degree. Students who attempt more than 30 semester hours of Learning Support classes are
viewed as not making SAP.
      Students who fail to exit Learning Support ENGL 0099 and/or Reading READ 0099
and/or MATH 0097 after two semesters will be suspended for three years. Students who fail
to pass Learning Support MATH 0099 after three semesters or who fail to pass MATH 0097
and MATH 0099 with MATH 0099 being the last course attempted will be suspended for
three years. Students who fail to exit ESL after three attempts at any level will be suspended
for three years. The suspension will be enforced regardless of their performance in other
courses.
Learning Support Appeal
     Students who are suspended from ENGL 0099, READ 0099, MATH 0099, ESLW
0075 or ESLR 0085, all exit level courses, may appeal for one additional semester. Students
must submit a written request for an appeal to the Learning Support Chair by the published
midpoint of the semester following the suspension. Prior to meeting with the student, the
Appeal panel, including the Learning Support Chair, the Learning Support Liaison for the
area in which the student is suspended, and the appropriate Division Chairs, evaluates
information provided by the student and the instructor who gave the suspension. A
successful appeal allows the student to apply for readmission as soon as the following
semester. If granted the additional semester, the student may enroll in only that Learning
Support course.
     Students who are suspended from non-exit level courses may not appeal. Students who
are suspended from two Learning Support/ESL areas may not appeal.

ABSENCES
     Attendance at all scheduled classes is expected. The individual instructor's "Absence
Policy" is specified on the course syllabus. Questions regarding an instructor’s
attendance/absence policy should be directed to the instructor.

COURSE WITHDRAWAL
     Students who wish to withdraw from a course without academic penalty (to receive a
W) must do so prior to the midpoint of the session. Course withdrawals after the midpoint
date result in a grade of "WF" unless otherwise approved by the Vice President for
Academic Affairs.
     To withdraw, the student may complete the Course Withdrawal form available on the
student’s Banner Web, or he/she must obtain a Course Withdrawal form from the Registrar’s
Office. The student then submits the completed form to the Registrar’s Office.
     There is NO REFUND for a COURSE WITHDRAWAL – withdrawing from
part, but not all of one's schedule of classes.
TOTAL WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE
     Students who register for courses and subsequently desire to withdraw totally from the
College before the semester midpoint must contact the Registrar’s Office on the Gainesville
College Campus or in Room 101 in the Administration Building on the Oconee Campus.
The request to be withdrawn may be made in person, by fax, by mail, or online on the
student’s Banner Web. Requests submitted by fax or mail should include the student's full
name, address, social security number, and the reason for withdrawal. In addition, the
                                                                         Academic Information / 83


request must be signed by the student and dated. Students who officially withdraw within the
first half of the term may be eligible for a refund of a portion of the tuition and student
activity fees, the amount to be determined by the Registrar based on University System of
Georgia policy. Students who discontinue attendance without officially withdrawing will
receive failing grades and will be ineligible for any refund.

CHANGE IN PROGRAM OF STUDY
     Upon initial enrollment, the student is asked to declare the Program of Study he/she
plans to pursue at Gainesville College. The student may change his/her Program of Study
by submitting a Request for Change in Program of Study form to the Academic Advising
Center.

PROGRAM GRADUATION MODIFICATIONS
      Each student is responsible for following the requirements of his/her selected program
of study as specified in the catalog and in accordance with the regulations of the College.
For this reason, every student is strongly encouraged to maintain close contact with his/her
Academic Advisor in order to meet course requirements for the program of study.
Variations in program requirements are considered only upon petition and approval of the
Academic Advisor, the Chair of the Academic Division responsible for the program of
study, the Chair of the Academic Division responsible for the required course, and the Vice
President for Academic Affairs. Variations from course requirements are approved only
under exceptional circumstances and only in cases where courses of the same academic
value and type can be substituted. The petition for a course substitution is obtained in the
Registrars’ Office.

SECOND DEGREE
      If a student already has earned one degree from Gainesville College and would like to
earn a second, the Program of Study for the second degree must be approved by the advisor
for the new program and the Division Chair in which the program is offered.
     All requirements for the second degree must be met, including a minimum of
eighteen (18) additional Area F hours as outlined in the catalog with elective courses
selected in conjunction with and approved by the Academic Advisor and the Division Chair.

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
      Written application and payment ($25) for graduation must be made in the Office of the
Registrar before pre-registration for the student's final semester of enrollment. At the time of
application, the student will participate in the review of his/her records, pay the graduation
fee, and receive additional information regarding further procedures. No portion of the
graduation fee is refundable.
GRADUATION CEREMONY
     Graduation exercises are held once each year at the end of spring semester. At this time
the degrees are conferred by the President of the College and the graduates receive their
diplomas. Students completing degrees in summer, fall, and spring semester are invited and
encouraged to participate in the ceremony, held each spring.
Honors at Graduation
84 / Gainesville College


     As a part of the graduation ceremony, recognition is given to the Honor Graduate(s)
who have the highest grade point average in the categories of Associate of Arts and/or
Associate of Science with forty-five (45) semester hours earned at Gainesville College, and
Associate of Applied Science with thirty (30) semester hours earned at Gainesville College.
All graduates who are members of Phi Theta Kappa are given stoles to wear during the
graduation ceremony, distinguishing their achievement.


                   ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
JOHN HARRISON HOSCH LIBRARY
      The Hosch Library provides professional staff to assist students in locating information
resources and in the effective use of these resources. Assistance is provided in using
GALILEO, the award-winning collection of databases provided by the University System of
Georgia, and in using GIL, the online catalog. GIL provides access to over 80,000 books,
videos, and other items housed at the Hosch Library and the Oconee Library/ACTT, as well
as to resources in other University System of Georgia Libraries. Inside the Library are
various types of student areas – individual study carrels, tables, study rooms for group work,
a large multi-purpose room, and a smaller classroom/meeting room. Students are offered a
large number of computers on the first floor for their use. Major emphasis is placed on
supporting the curriculum by providing basic works in all subject areas and by subscribing to
periodicals, newspapers, indexes, bibliographies, microfilm, and similar tools of scholarship.
Library instruction is available to individuals and to classes. A joint agreement with Student
Activities provides popular books for recreational reading. The cordial atmosphere of the
Library makes it a popular center for study and relaxation.

THE ACADEMIC COMPUTING, TUTORING, AND TESTING (ACTT)
CENTER AT THE GAINESVILLE CAMPUS
      The Academic Computing, Tutoring, and Testing (ACTT) Center at the Gainesville
Campus comprises the central part of the Academic III Building. It provides access to the
use of the largest concentration of computers on the Gainesville Campus, provides tutorial
assistance and Regents’ Test Skills Courses, and administers make-up tests. All these
services are available evenings as well as regular week day hours.
      ACTT Center computers are available for any student, faculty, or staff to use any time
the Center is open. All of the computers in the ACTT Center are connected to the campus
network, which provides easy access to several hundred software applications and to the
Internet.
     Professional and peer tutors provide assistance in Math, English, Foreign Languages,
ESL, and a variety of other subjects. Student employees of the Information Technology
Department provide computing assistance. There are TV/VCRs and cassette players
available to support class work, as well as study materials (old tests, answer books, study
guides, etc.), which faculty make available to their students on a reserve basis.

LIBRARY/ACTT CENTER AT THE OCONEE CAMPUS
     The Library/ACTT Center on the Oconee Campus combines the best features of the
separate Hosch Library and ACTT Center on the Gainesville Campus. The Library/ACTT
houses a collection of over 10,000 books, videos, and other academic materials and provides
                                                                       Academic Information / 85


professional staff to assist students in locating the information resources they need. Oconee
students also have easy access to library resources on the Gainesville Campus. A large
group of computers provides access to GALILEO, the widely-acclaimed collection of online
databases, to GIL, the catalog, to an extensive array of software applications on the campus
network, and to the Internet. Professional and peer tutors provide assistance in math,
English, foreign languages, and a variety of other subjects. Student employees of the
Information Technology Department provide computing assistance. The Library/ACTT also
provides Regents’ Test remediation, administers make-up tests, and has TV/VCRs available
to support class work, as well as study materials which faculty make available to students on
a reserve basis.

              LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMS
    Learning Support at Gainesville College provides assistance to students who have
needs, which may be met by various Learning Support Programs.

LEARNING SUPPORT REMEDIATION PROGRAM
      The Learning Support program at Gainesville College provides the opportunity for
students to improve their basic academic skills in the areas of English, Mathematics, and
Reading, before enrolling in related college-level courses. In addition to formal classroom
instruction, the Learning Support program incorporates the use of the multi-media ACTT
Center, the College counseling staff, and other college resources to enhance the academic
and personal development of students.
      Students whose previous academic record, admissions test scores, and placement test
scores indicate the need for additional preparation in English, Mathematics, and/or Reading
are required to take the appropriate Learning Support courses. If only one or two Learning
Support courses are required, students may enroll concurrently in college-level courses for
which they have satisfied the prerequisites; HOWEVER, if they withdraw from any
Learning Support course, they will not be allowed to remain in any regular college
credit courses. If they remain enrolled in at least one Learning Support class, they will
be allowed to remain in GCOR 1101. Learning Support students are not permitted to
enroll in May session classes with the exception of GCOR 1101. The maximum college
credit, which can be earned before completion of ALL Learning Support requirements, is
twenty (20) semester hours. Learning Support courses carry only institutional credit, which
is NOT applicable to the requirements for graduation.
      Students who are required to take one or more Learning Support courses must enroll
each semester in the required Learning Support course(s) before enrolling in any credit
course until the requirement has been satisfied. Students who are unable to complete a given
Learning Support course in one semester may be allowed additional time to complete the
course, provided the student is making satisfactory progress. The maximum time which may
be allowed for the completion of Learning Support READ 0099, ENGL 0099, and MATH
0097 is two semesters. The maximum time allowed for the completion of Learning Support
Mathematics is three semesters.
      If transfer students took but did not complete Learning Support/Developmental Studies
courses at other University System institutions in Georgia, the time spent in those courses
will count toward their maximum semester allotment when they enroll in Learning Support
courses at Gainesville College. Transfer students who, at the previous University System
86 / Gainesville College


institution(s), have completed the maximum number of semesters allowed in Learning
Support as defined by Gainesville College may not be admitted to Gainesville College until
the three (3) year suspension has elapsed.
     Students who fail to complete any Learning Support course within the time allowed or
who do not make satisfactory progress will receive a grade of U in the course and be placed
on Learning Support Suspension for three years. They may return after that suspension and
begin anew with a placement test and all attempts set to zero (0). See section entitled
Learning Support Appeal.
     Students who must take three or more Learning Support and/or College Preparatory
Curriculum Deficiency courses are required to take GCOR 1101, a college orientation and
study skills course, during their first semester of enrollment.

ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
(ESL) PROGRAM
      Gainesville College offers courses designed to prepare students whose native language
is not American English for success in college credit courses. Placement in ESL is
determined by TOEFL score, COMPASS placement testing, or professor’s recommendation.
 In addition, students who score high enough on COMPASS placement tests to enroll in
collegiate-level courses may also choose to take some ESL courses in order to enhance their
academic performance. With the exception of ESLO 1101, ESL courses carry
institutional credit, but do not count toward graduation.
      The College offers one course in college orientation and classroom communication, one
course in pronunciation, two in academic vocabulary, three in writing/grammar taught on
different skill levels, and three in academic reading taught on different skill levels. A
student’s skill level placement within the ESL program is determined by his/her scores on a
battery of English language tests, plus a writing sample. Students have three attempts to exit
each level. Students exit from the intermediate and high intermediate level classes by
earning passing grades in these courses. Students exit advanced reading classes by
achieving passing grades in the class(s) and by attaining a passing score on the COMPASS
reading test. Students exit the advanced writing/grammar classes by meeting the following
successive requirements: achieving a passing score in the course, passing the Exit Essay
scored by members of the English faculty, and attaining a passing score on the COMPASS
English test. Permission to attempt each of these steps depends on successfully completing
these requirements in this order.
     Students who fail to complete a course in the time allowed will receive a grade of U
and be placed on Learning Support Suspension for three years. Students may return after
serving their suspension and begin anew with a placement test and all attempts set to zero
(0). See section entitled Learning Support Appeal. Students who are enrolled in Learning
Support ESL must take and pass ESLO 1101 (Classroom Communication and College
Orientation) and ESLC 0061 (Pronunciation), exempt the ESLC 0061 course through oral
examination, and ESLV 0051 and ESLV 0052 (Academic Vocabulary for ESL Students).

REGENTS' TESTING PROGRAM
     All students who attend Gainesville College except special status non-degree seeking
students, those who seek a certificate, and those who have already earned a baccalaureate
degree must take and pass the Regents’ Test. Students who have not taken the Regents' Test
by the time they have earned 45 or more semester hours of college credit must enroll in
                                                                        Academic Information / 87


RGTE 0199 and RGTR 0198, both three-hour Regents' Test Skills courses unless one or
both parts of the Test are satisfied by one of the following methods: SAT-I Verbal scores of
at least 510, ACT Reading scores of at least 23, or USG Regents’ Test Reading scores of at
least 61 exempt the Reading Skills course. College Board Advanced Placement (AP)
English Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition scores of at least
3, International Baccalaureate (IB) higher-level English scores of at least 4, SAT II English
Writing scores of at least 65 or Regents’ Test Essay scores of at least 2 exempt the Regents’
Writing Skills course. Students in the Regents’ Test Skills course(s) MUST successfully
complete the course and be approved to take the Test by the instructor and MUST take the
test that semester.
      Students who fail the entire Test or any component of it must, during their next
semester of enrollment, register for the appropriate skills course or courses as required by
the institution each semester of attendance until they have passed all components of the Test.
Applicants who are required to take skills courses and/or to retake any component of the
Test will not be eligible to take the Test unless approved by the instructor of the skills
course(s).

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT
     Upon enrollment in Gainesville College, each student is assigned an Academic
Advisor. The faculty member selected to serve as his/her advisor is determined by the
student's academic placement and Program of Study. The advisor assists the student in
planning and achieving his/her educational objectives. Each student is urged to establish
early, and maintain throughout the period of enrollment at the College, a close and
continuous working relationship with his/her Academic Advisor.
     The Academic Advisor provides valuable advice and assistance in planning an
appropriate Program of Study. Each semester the student should meet with his/her advisor to
discuss academic progress and to decide the subsequent semester's class schedule. However,
academic advising is a service provided to students. Ultimate responsibility for course
selection lies with the student. Students are advised to consider Gainesville College
graduation requirements and core requirements of transfer institutions when
scheduling courses.
     Students who are required to take three or more Learning Support and/or College
Preparatory Curriculum courses will be assigned to the Learning Support area for
advisement. Students will remain with an advisor in this area until they complete all pre-
college course requirements. As well, they must take GCOR 1101 during their first semester
of enrollment.
    Questions concerning the assignment of the advisor or procedures for the Academic
Advisement Program should be directed to the Academic Advising Center. Students are
encouraged to consult their Academic Advisor, faculty members, or professional staff
members in the Counseling and Career Services for additional assistance.

DISABILITY SERVICES
      Gainesville College, in keeping with its commitment to serve all citizens in its service
area, welcomes otherwise qualified students with disabilities and attempts to accommodate
those students in every reasonable way. Support services available include the following:
academic support labs with free tutoring, note takers, interpreters for users of American Sign
88 / Gainesville College


Language, and career and personal counseling. Students who need special arrangements
must apply to Gainesville College and notify the Coordinator of Disability Services on the
appropriate campus at least one semester prior to the term of their initial enrollment.
Accommodations for students with diagnosed disabilities will be made on a case-by-case
basis.

         ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION
FULFILLMENT OF COLLEGE PREPARATORY
CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
    Students having College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) deficiencies in English or
Mathematics may satisfy these deficiencies by placement test (COMPASS) exemption or by
completing the Learning Support area(s) required as a result of COMPASS scores.
     Students with CPC deficiencies in Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, or Foreign
Language may satisfy these deficiencies by completing (with a grade of "C" or better) the
following courses:
Social Science
  ECON 1100           Survey of Economic Principles, or
  HIST 1111           Survey of World Civilization I, or
  HIST 1112           Survey of World Civilization II, or
  HIST 1121           Survey of Western Civilization I, or
  HIST 1122           Survey of Western Civilization II

Science
  SSCI 1100           Science Study Skills

Foreign Language
  FREN 1000 Introductory French               or   FREN      1001   Elementary French I, or
  GRMN 1000 Introductory German               or   GRMN      1001   Elementary German I, or
  JAPN 1000 Introductory Japanese             or   JAPN      1001   Elementary Japanese I, or
  RUSS 1000 Introductory Russian              or   RUSS      1001   Elementary Russian I, or
  SPAN 1000 Introductory Spanish              or   SPAN      1001   Elementary Spanish I

     Students with CPC deficiencies who earn 20 or more semester hours of college-level
credit and who have not satisfied College Preparatory Curriculum deficiencies in science,
social science, or foreign language may not register for other courses (except required
Learning Support courses) unless they also register for the deficiency course or courses.

SUMMER SEMESTER
      The College offers a full range of classes each summer. In keeping with the desire for
scheduling flexibility there are short session offerings as well as the more traditional full
session courses. The College also offers limited course offerings in response to student
interest and demand in a three-week May session, which is a part of the Summer term.
Learning Support students may not enroll in May session courses except for GCOR 1101.
For more specific information about the programs and courses available during the various
parts of summer semester, contact the Registrar’s Office.
Academic Information / 89
90 / Gainesville College



                    CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
                         PUBLIC SERVICE
      Continuing Education and Public Service programs, in keeping with one of the basic
missions of the College, provide a necessary link between the College and the communities
of Northeast Georgia. Programs of Continuing Education are developed in response to
special educational demands and requests of citizens, professional and business groups,
governmental agencies, and civic groups. The major role of Continuing Education is to
develop and implement short courses, workshops, seminars, and institutes for (1) personal
interest and enrichment and (2) career and professional development.
     Personal enrichment programs are developed with special focus upon educational needs
and desires as they may relate to arts and crafts, musical training, physical education, health
concerns, and other areas of interest. Individuals from the community, civic groups, and
other organizations are encouraged to make the Continuing Education and Public Service
Office aware of any special areas of interest for which personal enrichment programs might
be developed. Classes, offered during both day and night at a variety of locations, are
selected to serve people of all ages with different interests from a wide region of Northeast
Georgia. Typical short courses and workshops in this area include Swimming,
Communicative Spanish, and Driver's Education.
     Career and Professional Programs are developed to meet the Continuing Education
needs of personnel in banking, education, real estate, insurance, social services, general
business, law and other occupational areas. Typical workshops, seminars, and short courses
include Leadership Strategies, Customer Service, Real Estate Salesperson’s Preparation,
Conflict Management, Basic and Intermediate Word Processing and Spreadsheets, and Web
Page Design and Publishing. More comprehensive programs are tailored to meet on-going,
in-depth needs of personnel and organizations. For example, the Headstart Child
Development Associate (CDA), and the Supervisory/Management Certificate programs
involve detailed and sequential short courses designed for career and professional
improvement.
      A variety of locations throughout Northeast Georgia are utilized for Continuing
Education programs. A special focus of delivery provides training on location within the
facilities of area businesses, social service agencies and medical facilities. Any group
wishing help with training and development for employees should contact the Office of
Continuing Education for further information.
     The public services offered by the College are designed to extend the use of college
resources and facilities to the community. Special training programs, organizational
meetings, recreational programs, and other educationally related meetings may be permitted
on a space available basis.
Registration Information for Continuing Education Programs
     Registration for Continuing Education programs may be completed at the Office of
Continuing Education/Public Service in person, by mail, fax, or telephone. Special
registration procedures are generally set up for off-campus programs.
      1.    Credit: There are generally no educational prerequisites for enrolling in
            Continuing Education courses. Continuing Education Units (C.E.U.'s),
            indicating successful completion, may be awarded for approved short courses,
            seminars and workshops. One C.E.U. is defined as "ten contact hours of
                                                                         Academic Information / 91


          participation in organized Continuing Education under responsible
          sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction".
          Certain Continuing Education courses offered under a co-sponsored
          arrangement with another educational institution may carry undergraduate or
          graduate academic credit by that institution.
     2.   For additional information or to request details on a specific program,
          interested persons should contact the Office of Continuing Education/Public
          Service at (770) 718-3605 or visit the web site at www.gc.peachnet.edu and
          click on “Continuing Education.”

                    COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS
      In keeping with the philosophy of The Board of Regents in bringing the resources of
the University System to Northeast Georgia, and in support of the Chancellor's regional
initiatives, Gainesville College and other area institutions of higher education and technical
colleges collaborate to provide varied educational opportunities for the citizens of Northeast
Georgia.
     Currently, Gainesville College maintains close working relationships with North
Georgia College and State University, Lanier Technical College, and North Georgia
Technical College. North Georgia College and State University teaches classes on the
Gainesville Campus through the University Center which lead to baccalaureate degrees,
graduate programs, and the ASN degree.
      Additionally, Gainesville College partners with several area high schools to provide
instruction in the high schools for students jointly enrolled in high school and at Gainesville
College.
     Students interested in courses offered by North Georgia College and State University
on the Gainesville College Campus are advised to contact the Gainesville College University
Center. See webpage and contact information or see page 183.

REGENTS' ENGINEERING TRANSFER PROGRAM (RETP)
      As a regional leader in math, science, and technology, Gainesville College is proud to
be a Regents Engineering Transfer Program institution. In 1986 the Board of Regents
approved the establishment of an Engineering Transfer Program (RETP). Qualified students
seeking a bachelor of engineering degree may begin their college studies at designated
institutions of the University System of Georgia through the Regents Engineering Transfer
Program. Upon successful completion of the pre-engineering curriculum, students may
transfer to the Georgia Institute of Technology to complete the degree requirements. It is
expected that students in this program, like other Georgia Tech graduates, will normally
require four to five and one-half years to complete the degree requirements, depending on
their pre-college preparation, involvement in extracurricular activities, and the specific
engineering major.
      By enrolling in the RETP, students may attend college close to home, which can
decrease the cost of their education and ease the adjustment to college life. Generally,
classes at the RETP institutions are small, which permits more individual attention and
interaction with professors.
92 / Gainesville College


      At the same time, RETP students enjoy many of the advantages of Tech students: they
have equal access to engineering majors at Tech, they can participate in the Co-op program,
and they are invited to the Tech campus each spring for campus tours, information sessions,
and meetings with advisors in their engineering major. At that meeting, the students who
will be transferring to Tech the coming fall semester can pre-register for their classes.
     To be eligible for RETP, a student must be a resident of Georgia. The admission
requirements are:
      1.    A combined SAT score of at least 1090 (including a minimum 560 math and
            440 verbal); and,
      2.    A high school GPA of at least 3.0, OR have been admitted to an engineering
            program at Georgia Tech
     Students who do not meet the initial admission criteria may qualify for the RETP after
the end of their freshman year by completing the first Chemistry course, the first Physics
course and Calculus I and II with grades of 3.0 (B) or higher and by attaining a cumulative
GPA of 3.0 or higher.
     Finally, students who complete the courses included in the first two years of the desired
Tech engineering program with an overall GPA of 2.7 or higher in those courses plus a 2.7
Math GPA and a 2.7 Science GPA may be admitted to RETP at the discretion of the Georgia
Tech RETP Coordinator. Please refer to pages 116-120 for specific Engineering courses
offered at Gainesville College and specific Engineering major course requirements.

SAVANNAH RIVER ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE FIELD STATION
(SRESFS)
     Gainesville College is a member of the Savannah River Environmental Science Field
Station (SRESFS). The goals of the SRESFS are:


      1.    To provide hands-on field oriented experiences for students from regional,
            Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and Minority Institutions
            (MI) undergraduate programs that utilize mathematics and science principles
            to solve complex real life problems in agriculture, environmental science,
            natural resource management, and engineering by using the expertise available
            at the HBCU's, MI's, government agencies, private sector, and the natural and
            technological resources available at the Savannah River site.
      2.    To increase recruitment and retention of minority students and women in
            science, engineering, natural resource management, and environmental career
            professions.
      3.    To increase science literacy and public education on complex environmental
            issues.
     There are two educational tracks that students may pursue: Environmental Science or
Marine Science. All courses in both tracks are offered in the summer. Each course is one
month long and students can enroll in up to three courses each summer. Credit for these
courses is awarded by South Carolina State University. Several of these courses will
transfer into the Gainesville College Environmental Science Certificate Program.
                                                                        Academic Information / 93


     Gainesville College students enrolling in courses at SRESFS must contact the Division
of Natural Sciences for information and application materials. Students accepted for
coursework at SRESFS will receive tuition, lodging, and a stipend.
     These courses are open to all Gainesville College students.


INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND SPATIAL ANALYSIS
(IESA)
     In 2001 Gainesville College was approved as the home site for the Institute for
Environmental and Spatial Analysis, IESA. The Institute is a collaborative effort between
The Science, Engineering and Technology Division of Gainesville College, The School of
Natural and Health Sciences of North Georgia College & State University and the
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering of The University of Georgia. The
main focus of the Institute is the development of an in-depth scientific understanding of
water quality, watershed integrity, and land use impacts within the Chattahoochee River
Basin and other basins in northeast Georgia. This is accomplished through collaborative
grant activity and research efforts.
      The IESA also provides educational opportunities to the public at large by increasing
public awareness of water and environmental issues that impact daily living. A major focus
of IESA is to involve students from under-represented groups in Institute activities in order
to attract more of these students to studies in the sciences. As the partners in the IESA seek
to expand educational programs of study, the Institute anticipates collaborative course
development within the environmental and spatial analysis areas, in particular in water
quality analysis, watershed assessment, source water assessment, spatial data analysis, and
hydrologic modeling.
94 / Gainesville College



                 UNIVERSITY CENTER PROGRAMS
     North Georgia College and State University (NGCSU) currently uses Gainesville
College facilities to provide instruction leading to the completion of selected bachelor
degrees. NGCSU also offers selected upper level courses for students to work toward
advanced degrees. Additional information regarding University Center programs on the
Gainesville College campus may be obtained from the University Center located in the
Dunlap Mathis Building on the Gainesville Campus.
A list of the programs offered by NGCSU is presented below.

INSTITUTION                PROGRAM OF STUDY               CURRENT STATUS AT GC

NGCSU                      Computer Information Systems   BS Degree
                           Accounting                     BBA Degree & Graduate Courses
                           Marketing                      BBA Degree
                           Finance                        BBA Degree
                           Management                     BBA Degree
                           Nursing                        ASN Degree
                           Education                      Teacher Certification
                                                          BS Degree in Early Childhood
                                                              Education
                                                          EdS in Teacher Leadership
                           Public Administration          MPA Degree
                    VII
             ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

COLLEGE TRANSFER CURRICULUM
        Core Curriculum
        Associate of Arts (AA) Degree Programs
        Associate of Science (AS) Degree Programs


CAREER CURRICULUM
        Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree Programs
              Gainesville College
              Lanier Technical College and North Georgia Technical College
        Certificate Programs


UNIVERSITY CENTER PROGRAMS




                               PLEASE NOTE

Students first entering Gainesville College spring quarter 1998 and later must
meet semester degree requirements.

Students first entering Gainesville College prior to spring quarter 1998 have
the choice of meeting quarter or semester degree requirements.

Students first entering Gainesville College summer quarter 1993 and later are
required to take COMM 1100 (Introduction to Human Communications), or,
its quarter course equivalent, SPC 108 (Fundamentals of Speech
Communication).
96 / Gainesville College
                                                                         Academic Programs / 97



                 COLLEGE TRANSFER PROGRAMS
     In keeping with the polices established by the Board of Regents of the University
System of Georgia, Gainesville College has designed a semester core curriculum which
meets the academic needs of students wishing to transfer to a four-year baccalaureate degree
granting institution upon completion of the Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree.
Specifics of the core curriculum (Areas A-E) and areas of concentration (Area F) are
contained on the following pages.
Associate of Arts Degree Programs
Anthropology                                       Music
Art                                                Philosophy
Business Administration                            Political Science
Communication                                      Psychology
English                                            Religion
Foreign Languages                                  Social Work
History                                            Sociology
Journalism                                         Theatre
Media Studies                                      General Studies
Associate of Science Degree Programs
Agriculture – General and Poultry Science
Biological Sciences
Chemistry
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Early Childhood Education (Grades K-5)
Early Childhood Education (Ages 0-5)
Engineering - Agricultural Engineering, Biological Engineering, Engineering
Engineering Technology - Civil Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering
   Technology, Engineering Technology, Industrial Engineering Technology, Mechanical
   Engineering Technology
Environmental Health
Exercise Science
Forestry Resources
Geology
Mathematics
Middle Grades Education
Physical Geography
Physics
Pre-Professional and Allied Health - Pre-Nursing, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-
     Pharmacy, Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Physician’s Assisting, Pre-Veterinary, Pre-Sports
     Medicine
Secondary Education - Agricultural Education, Art Education, Biology Education, Business
     Education, Chemistry Education, Earth Science Education, English Education, Health
     and Physical Education, Language Arts Education, Marketing Education, Mathematics
     Education, Music Education, Physics Education, Social Sciences Education,
     Technology Education
Sport Management
General Studies
98 / Gainesville College



                       SEMESTER CORE CURRICULUM
                               AREAS A-E
Core courses listed may have pre-requisites or enrollment restrictions. Students should check the course
descriptions for information on pre-requisite and enrollment requirements before registering for any
course.

Area A      Essential Skills -- 9 hours                                                     Hours

ENGL       1101 or 1101H      English Composition I                                             3
ENGL       1102 or 1102H      English Composition II                                            3
(Earn a grade of C or higher in ENGL 1101/H and ENGL 1102/H)

Select one from the following courses:
MATH        1001               Quantitative Skills and Reasoning                                3
MATH        1111               College Algebra                                                  3
MATH        1113               Precalculus                                                      3
MATH        1450               Calculus I                                                       4

If the total hours in Area A exceed nine, the excess may be counted in Area F, if applicable.

Math and science majors are required to take MATH 1113 or a higher level course. Majors included
are Math, Computer Science, Engineering Technology, Secondary Math Education, Geology, Physical
Geography, Physics, Chemistry, Biology. Engineering majors are required to take MATH 1450 or a
higher level course.

Area B      Institutional Options -- 4 to 5 hours                                            Hours

COMM        1100               Introduction to Human Communications                             3

Select one from the following elective courses:
CGLO        1502               Contemporary Global Issues                                       2
CINE        1502               Film and Culture                                                 2
CISM        1502               Introduction to Information Technology

                                                                                                2
COMM        1502               Intercultural Communication                                      2
CSCI        1502               Introduction to Computer Technology                              2
DVRS        1502               Studies in Diversity Issues                                      2
ECOL        1000               Field Ecology

                                                                                                2
ENST      2030             Human Ecology                                                        3
ECON      1502             Consumer Economics                                                   2
ESCI      1105             Environmental Issues                                                 2
EURO      1100             Introduction to European Union                                       3
HIST      2114             American History Through Film                                        2
INED      2901, 2902, 2903 International Perspectives - Special Topics                          1-3
INST      1502             Leadership Development                                               2
MFLA      1501             Foreign Language Readings                                            1
MFLA      1502             Foreign Language for Professionals                                   2
RSCH      1502             Research Strategies and Technology                                   2
SCTS      1502             Orientation to Science and Technology in Society                     2
SSCE      1501             Survey of Science Ethics                                             1
STAT      1501             Chance                                                               1
SVLN      1502             Service Learning                                                     2
Any 1002 or 1002H Level Foreign Language course                                                 1-4

Area C      Humanities/Fine Arts -- 6 hours                                                  Hours

Select one from the following courses:
ENGL        2111 or 2111H      World Literature I                                               3
                                                                               Academic Programs / 99


ENGL     2112 or 2112H     World Literature II                                               3
ENGL     2121              English Literature I                                              3
ENGL     2122              English Literature II                                             3
ENGL     2131              American Literature I                                             3
ENGL     2132              American Literature II                                            3
ENGL     2300              Introduction to Film                                              3
ENGL     2301              Film History                                                      3
ENGL     2302              Literature and Film                                               3
Any 2000 Level Foreign Language course                                                       3

Select one from the following courses:
ARHS        2510               Introduction to Art History I                                 3
ARHS        2520               Introduction to Art History II                                3
ARSX        1100               Art Appreciation                                              3
MUSC        1100               Music Appreciation                                            3
THEA        1100               Theatre Appreciation                                          3

Area D     Science, Mathematics, and Technology -- 10 to 11 hours

Review Area F requirements for the specific major before choosing Area D courses.

Area D courses are broken down into two categories: one for science majors and one for non-science
majors. This breakdown does not preclude a non-science major from selecting a sequence from the
science majors list.

Additional Note Regarding Science CPC Deficiency: Students with a Science CPC deficiency are
required to take SSCI 1100 to satisfy the CPC deficiency. A grade of C or higher in SSCI 1100 is
required. SSCI 1100 credit cannot be used to fulfill graduation requirements.

Science Majors                                                                            Hours

Majors included are Math, Computer Science, Engineering, Engineering Technology, Secondary Math
Education, Geology, Physical Geography, Physics, Chemistry, Biology

Select one of the following science sequences (both lecture and lab must be taken).

BIOL       1107 - 1108         Principles of Biology I & II                                  4,4
BIOL       2210 - 2220         Botany I & II                                                 4,4
CHEM       1211 - 1212         Principles of Chemistry I & II                                4,4
GEOG       1111 - 1112         Physical Geography & Weather and Climate
                                                                                             4,4
GEOL       1250 - 1260         Physical Geology & Historical Geology                         4,4
PHYS       1111 - 1112         Introductory Physics I & II                                   4,4
PHYS       2211 - 2212         General Physics I & II                                        4,4

Non-Science Majors

Select one of the following science sequences or combinations (both lecture and lab must be taken).

BIOL       1101- BIOL 1102         Biology - A Human Perspective & Intro to Ecology      4,4
BIOL       1101 - ESCI 1101        Biology - A Human Perspective & Environmental Science 4,4
BIOL       1101 - GEOG 1111        Biology - A Human Perspective & Physical Geography 4,4
BIOL       1101 – GEOG 1112        Biology – A Human Perspective & Weather & Climate     4,4
BIOL       1101 - CHEM 1151        Biology - A Human Perspective & Survey of Chemistry I 4,4
BIOL       1101 - PHYS 1001        Biology - A Human Perspective & Survey of Physics     4,4
BIOL       1101 - GEOL 1250        Biology - A Human Perspective & Physical Geology      4,4
BIOL       1101 - GEOL 1260        Biology - A Human Perspective & Historical Geology    4,4
BIOL       1102 – CHEM 1151        Introduction to Ecology – Survey of Chemistry I       4,4
BIOL       1102 – GEOG 1111        Introduction to Ecology – Physical Geography          4,4
BIOL       1102 – GEOG 1112        Introduction to Ecology – Weather and Climate         4,4
BIOL       1102 – GEOG 1250        Introduction to Ecology – Physical Geology            4,4
100 / Gainesville College


BIOL        1102 – GEOG 1260       Introduction to Ecology – Historical Geology          4,4
BIOL        1102 – PHYS 1001       Introduction to Ecology – Survey of Physics           4,4
BIOL        2210 – BIOL 2220       Botany I & II                                         4,4
CHEM        1151 – CHEM 1152       Survey of Elementary Chemistry I & II                 4,4
CHEM        1151 - GEOL 1250       Survey of Chemistry I & Physical Geology              4,4
CHEM        1151 - GEOL 1260       Survey of Chemistry I & Historical Geology            4,4
CHEM        1151 - PHYS 1001       Survey of Chemistry I & Survey of Physics             4,4
ESCI        1101 - BIOL 1102       Environmental Science & Introduction to Ecology       4,4
ESCI        1101 – CHEM 1151       Environmental Science & Survey of Chemistry I         4,4
ESCI        1101 - GEOG 1111       Environmental Science & Physical Geography            4,4
ESCI        1101 - GEOG 1112       Environmental Science & Weather and Climate           4,4
GEOG        1111 - GEOL 1260       Physical Geography & Historical Geology               4,4
GEOL        1250 - GEOG 1112       Physical Geology & Weather and Climate                4,4
GEOL        1250 – GEOL 1260                                              Physical Geology    &
                                                                                         Histori
                                                                                         cal
                                                                                         Geolo
                                                                                         gy

                                                                                             4,4
GEOL       1250 - ESCI 1101        Physical Geology & Environmental Science                  4,4
ISCI       1101 – ISCI 1102        Integrated Science I & II                                 4,4
Select one additional course from courses specified above or one course from the following courses

CSCI        1100                   Intro to Computing and Computer Programming                    3
ESCI        1101                   Environmental Science & Lab                                    4
GISC        2011                   Geographic Information Science                                 3
MATH        1113                   Precalculus                                                    3
MATH        1450                   Calculus I                                                     4
MATH        2040                   Survey of Calculus                                             3
MATH        2460                   Calculus II                                                    4
MATH        2510                   Discrete Math                                                  3
STAT        2400 or 2400H          Statistics                                                     3

If the total hours in Area D exceed eleven, the excess may be counted in Area F, if applicable.


Area E      Social Sciences -- 12 hours                                                    Hours

POLS        1101 or 1101H          American Government or Honors American Government 3

Select one from the following courses:
HIST        2111 or 2111H          Survey of U.S. History I                                       3
HIST        2112 or 2112H          Survey of U.S. History II                                      3
HIST        1112 or 1112H          Survey of World Civilization II                                3

Select one from the following courses:
ANTH        1102                   Introduction to Anthropology                                   3
PSYC        1101                   General Psychology                                             3
SOCI        1101                   Introduction to Sociology                                      3

Select one course from the courses specified above or one from the following courses:
ECON       1100                    Survey of Economic Principles                                  3
ECON       2105 or 2105H           Macro Economics                                                3
ECON       2106 or 2106H           Micro Economics                                                3
GEOG       1101                    World Human Geography                                          3
HIST       1111                    Survey of World Civilization I                                 3
HIST       1121                    Western Civilization I                                         3
HIST       1122                    Western Civilization II                                        3
POLS       2201                    Introduction to State and Local Governments                    3
POLS       2401                    Introduction to Global Studies                                 3
SOCI       1160                    Introduction to Social Problems                                3
                                                Academic Programs / 101




Physical Education Requirement:
Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
102 / Gainesville College



                      ASSOCIATE OF ARTS PROGRAMS

                               ANTHROPOLOGY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Course (3 hours)
ANTH        1102             Introduction to Anthropology                          3
Major Elective Courses (6 hours)
ANTH        2010             Introduction to Biological Anthropology               3
ANTH        2020             Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                 3
ANTH        2030             Introduction to Archaeology                           3
Elective Courses (9 hours)
BIOL        2120 and lab         Human Anatomy and Physiology I                 4
BIOL        2130 and lab         Human Anatomy and Physiology II                4
CISM        2201                 Computer Information Systems                   3
ENGL        2111                 World Literature I                             3
ENGL        2112                 World Literature II                            3
GEOG        1101                 World Human Geography                          3
HIST        1111                 Survey of World Civilization I                 3
HIST        1112                 Survey of World Civilization II                3
MLAN        2010                 Introductions to Linguistics                   3
PHIL        2010                 Great Questions of Philosophy                  3
PHIL        2040                 Introduction to Ethical Theory                 3
POLS        2301                 Introduction to Comparative Government Systems 3
POLS        2401                 Introduction to Global Studies                 3
PSYC        1101                 General Psychology                             3
PSYC        2150                 Introduction to Social Psychology              3
RELG        2101                 Introduction to World Religions                3
RELG        2105                 Eastern Religions                              3
SOCI        1101                 Introduction to Sociology                      3
SOCI        1160                 Introduction to Social Problems                3
STAT        2400                 Statistics                                     3
Note: Students specialize in one of the four areas of Anthropology and are advised to
utilize core requirements to support their area as follows:
 Biological Anthropology students take BIOL 1107-1108 with labs in Area D.
 Linguistic Anthropology students complete a foreign language through the 2000 level.
    1002 and one 2000 level foreign language course may be used to meet a
    requirement in Area B and C respectively.
 Archaeology students take GEOL 1250-1260 with labs in Area D.
 Cultural Anthropology students take ESCI 1101 – BIOL 1102 in Area D and complete a
    foreign language through the 2000 level. 1002 and one 2000 level foreign language
    course may be used to meet a requirement in Area B and C respectively.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 103



                                           ART
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (12 hours)

ARST 1010                    Two-Dimensional Design                               3
ARST 1020                    Basic Drawing                                        3
ARST 1030                    Three-Dimensional Design                             3
ARHS 2510 or 2520            Introduction to Art History I or II                  3


Elective Courses (6 hours)

ARST     2010                Color Theory                                         3
ARST     2020                Drawing II                                           3
ARST     2050                Computer Graphics                                    3
ARST     2300                Basic Painting I                                     3
ARST     2310                Painting II                                          3
ARST     2400                Basic Sculpture I                                    3
ARST     2410                Sculpture II                                         3
ARST     2500                Handbuilding                                         3
ARST     2510                Wheelthrowing                                        3
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
104 / Gainesville College



                            BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (15 hours)

ACCT        2101              Principles of Accounting I                3
ACCT        2102              Principles of Accounting II               3
ECON        2105 or 2105H     Macro Economics                           3
ECON        2106 or 2106H     Micro Economics                           3
CISM        2201              Computer Information Systems              3

Electives (3 hours)

BUSA 2106                     The Environment of Business               3
COMM 2108                     Business Communications                   3
BUSA 1105                     Introduction to Business                  3


Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
Note: Dual credit is not awarded for both CISM 1502 and CISM 2201.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 105


                               COMMUNICATION
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours

Required Courses - (9 hours)

COMM 1500                  Interpersonal Communication                            3
STAT 2400                  Introduction to Statistics                             3
CSCI 1100                  Introduction to Computing                              3

Select one from the following (3 hours)
COMM 1800                  Cultural Diversity in Communication                    3
COMM 2100                  Advanced Public Communication                          3
COMM 2300                  Business and Professional Communication                3
COMM 2510                  Small Group Communication                              3

Major Elective Courses (Select one from the following) (3 hours)

PHIL 2020                  Symbolic and Critical Thinking                         3
PHIL 2040                  Introduction into Ethical Theory                       3
ECON 2105                  Macro Economics                                        3
ECON 2106                  Micro Economics                                        3
MLAN 2010                  Introduction to Linguistics                            3

Elective Courses (Select one from the following) (3 hours)
FREN     2001 or 2001H     Intermediate French I                                  3
FREN     2002 or 2002H     Intermediate French II                                 3
FREN     2121              Intermediate Conversation                              3
FREN     2122              Critical Reading and Composition                       3
FREN     2903              Selected Topics                                        3
                 or

GRMN     2001 or 2001H Intermediate German I                                      3
GRMN     2002 or 2002H Intermediate German II                                     3
                  or

JAPN     2001 or 2001H Intermediate Japanese I                                    3
JAPN     2002 or 2002H Intermediate Japanese II                                   3
                  or

LATN 2001 or 2001H         Intermediate Latin I                                   3
LATN 2002 or 2002H         Intermediate Latin II                                  3
                 or

MLAN     2010              Introduction to Linguistics or                         3
MLAN     2903 or 2904      Special Topics in Linguistics                          3-4
                  or
106 / Gainesville College


SPAN        2001 or 2001H    Intermediate Spanish I                        3
SPAN        2002 or 2002H    Intermediate Spanish II                       3
SPAN        2121             Intermediate Conversation                     3
SPAN        2122             Critical Reading and Composition              3
SPAN        2125             Intensive Grammar and Written Communication
                                Skills                                     3
SPAN 2500                    Spanish Sound and Script                      3
SPAN 2903                    Selected Topics                               3
                        or

RUSS        2001 or 2001H Intermediate Russian I                           3
RUSS        2002 or 2002H Intermediate Russian II                          3
                                                                  Academic Programs / 107



                                     ENGLISH

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F (18 hours)

Required Courses - Foreign language sequence (9 semester hours)
Choose one three course sequence

FREN        1002 or 1002H   Elementary French II                                 4
FREN        2001 or 2001H   Intermediate French I                                3
FREN        2002 or 2002H   Intermediate French II                               3
FREN        2121            Intermediate Conversation                            3
FREN        2122            Critical Reading and Composition                     3

SPAN        1002 or 1002H   Elementary Spanish II                                4
SPAN        2001 or 2001H   Intermediate Spanish I                               3
SPAN        2002 or 2002H   Intermediate Spanish II                              3
SPAN        2121            Intermediate Conversation                            3
SPAN        2122            Critical Reading and Composition                     3
SPAN        2125            Intensive Grammer & Written Communication Skills     3
SPAN        2500            Spanish Sound & Script                               3

GRMN        1002            Elementary German                                    4
GRMN        2001            Intermediate German I                                3
GRMN        2002            Intermediate German II                               3

JAPN        1002            Elementary Japanese II                               4
JAPN        2001            Intermediate Japanese I                              3
JAPN        2002            Intermediate Japanese II                             3

RUSS        1002            Elementary Russian II                                4
RUSS        2001            Intermediate Russian I                               3
RUSS        2002            Intermediate Russian II                              3


Elective Courses (9 hours)
Choose from those not used in Area C

ENGL        2111 or 2111H   World Literature I                                   3
ENGL        2112 or 2112H   World Literature II                                  3
ENGL        2121            English Literature I                                 3
ENGL        2122            English Literature II                                3
ENGL        2131            American Literature I                                3
ENGL        2132            American Literature II                               3
ENGL        2180            Creative Writing                                     3
ENGL        2300            Introduction to Film                                 3
ENGL        2301            Film History                                         3
ENGL        2302            Literature and Film                                  3
MLAN        2010 or 2010H   Introduction to Linguistics                          3
PHIL        2010            Great Questions of Philosophy                        3
RELG        2101            Introduction to World Religions                      3
       or
RELG        2103            Religions in America                                 3
108 / Gainesville College




Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 109


                         FOREIGN LANGUAGES
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses - Foreign language sequence (6 hours)
Choose one two course sequence
FREN     2001 or 2001H       Intermediate French I                                3
FREN     2002 or 2002H       Intermediate French II                               3
FREN     2121                Intermediate Conversation                            3
FREN     2122                Critical Reading and Composition                     3
SPAN     2001 or 2001H       Intermediate Spanish I                               3
SPAN     2002 or 2002H       Intermediate Spanish II                              3
SPAN     2121                Intermediate Conversation                            3
SPAN     2122                Critical Reading and Composition                     3
SPAN     2125                Intensive Grammer & Written Communication Skills     3
SPAN     2500                Spanish Sound & Script                               3

Elective Courses (9 hours)
Choose any three courses

FREN     1001                Elementary French I                                  4
FREN     1002 or 1002H       Elementary French II                                 4
FREN     2001 or 2001H       Intermediate French I                                3
FREN     2002 or 2002H       Intermediate French II                               3
FREN     2121                Intermediate Conversation                            3
FREN     2122                Critical Reading and Composition                     3
                 or
SPAN     1001                Elementary Spanish I                               4
SPAN     1002 or 1002H       Elementary Spanish II                              4
SPAN     1006                Accelerated Beginning Spanish               (6, 2) 8
SPAN     2001 or 2001H       Intermediate Spanish I                             3
SPAN     2002 or 2002H       Intermediate Spanish II                            3
SPAN     2121                Intermediate Conversation                          3
SPAN     2122                Critical Reading and Composition                   3
SPAN     2125                Intensive Grammer & Written Communication Skills 3
SPAN     2500                Spanish Sound & Script                             3
                  or
GRMN     1001                Elementary German                                    4
GRMN     1002                Elementary German                                    4
GRMN     2001                Intermediate German I                                3
GRMN     2002                Intermediate German II                               3
                  or
JAPN     1001                Elementary Japanese I                                4
JAPN     1002                Elementary Japanese II                               4
JAPN     2001                Intermediate Japanese I                              3
JAPN     2002                Intermediate Japanese II                             3
                   or
RUSS     1001                Elementary Russian I                                 4
RUSS     1002                Elementary Russian II                                4
RUSS     2001                Intermediate Russian I                               3
RUSS     2002                Intermediate Russian II                              3
                   or
MLAN     2010 or 2010H       Introduction to Linguistics or                       3
110 / Gainesville College


MLAN        2903             Special Topics in Linguistics               3
Elective Courses (3 hours)
Choose one course
ARHS        2510             Introduction to Art History I               3
ARHS        2520             Introduction to Art History II              3
HIST        1111             Survey of World Civilization I              3
HIST        1112 or 1112H    Survey of World Civilization II             3
ENGL        2111 or 2111H    World Literature I                          3
ENGL        2112 or 2112H    World Literature II                         3
PHIL        2010             Great Questions of Philosophy               3
PHIL        2020             Symbolic Logic and Critical Thinking        3
PHIL        2030             Introduction to Western Political Thought   3
PHIL        2040             Introduction to Ethical Theory              3
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                 Academic Programs / 111


                                    HISTORY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Course - Foreign language sequence (6 semester hours)
Choose one two course sequence
FREN     1001              Elementary French I                                  4
FREN     1002 or 1002H     Elementary French II                                 4
FREN     2001 or 2001H     Intermediate French I                                3
FREN     2002 or 2002H     Intermediate French II                               3
FREN     2121              Intermediate Conversation                            3
FREN     2122              Critical Reading and Composition                     3
SPAN     1001              Elementary Spanish I                               4
SPAN     1002 or 1002H     Elementary Spanish II                              4
SPAN     1006              Accelerated Beginning Spanish              (6 , 2) 8
SPAN     2001 or 2001H     Intermediate Spanish I                             3
SPAN     2002 or 2002H     Intermediate Spanish II                            3
SPAN     2121              Intermediate Conversation                          3
SPAN     2122              Critical Reading and Composition                   3
SPAN     2125              Intensive Grammer & Written Communication Skills 3
SPAN     2500              Spanish Sound & Script                             3
GRMN     1001              Elementary German I                                  4
GRMN     1002              Elementary German II                                 4
GRMN     2001              Intermediate German I                                3
GRMN     2002              Intermediate German II                               3
JAPN     1001              Elementary Japanese I                                4
JAPN     1002              Elementary Japanese II                               4
JAPN     2001              Intermediate Japanese I                              3
JAPN     2002              Intermediate Japanese II                             3
RUSS     1001              Elementary Russian I                                 4
RUSS     1002              Elementary Russian II                                4
RUSS     2001              Intermediate Russian I                               3
RUSS     2002              Intermediate Russian II                              3
Required Courses Select two (6 hours)
HIST     1111              Survey of World Civilization I                       3
HIST     1112 or 1112H     Survey of World Civilization II                      3
HIST     1121              Survey of Western Civilization I                     3
HIST     1122              Survey of Western Civilization II                    3
HIST     2111 or 2111H     Survey of U.S. History I                             3
HIST     2112 or 2112H     Survey of U.S. History II                            3
Elective Courses Select two (6 hours)
ANTH     1102              Introduction to Anthropology                         3
ANTH     2020              Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                3
ANTH     2030              Introduction to Archaeology                          3
CSCI     1100              Introduction to Computing & Computer Programming     3
ECON     1100              Survey of Economic Principles                        3
ECON     2105 or 2105H     Macro Economics                                      3
ECON     2106 or 2106H     Micro Economics                                      3
GEOG     1101              World Human Geography                                3
PHIL     2010              Great Questions of Philosophy                        3
112 / Gainesville College


POLS        2201            Introduction to State and Local Government       3
POLS        2301            Introduction to Comparative Government Systems   3
POLS        2401            Introduction to Global Studies                   3
PSYC        1101            General Psychology                               3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                     3
PSYC        2150            Introduction to Social Psychology                3
PSYC        2530            Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                3
RELG        2101            Introduction to World Religions                  3
SOCI        1101            Introduction to Sociology                        3
SOCI        1160            Introduction to Social Problems                  3
SOCI        2293            Introduction to Marriage and Family              3
STAT        2400 or 2400H   Statistics                                       3
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 113


                               JOURNALISM
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (6 hours)
JOUR     1000             Introduction to Mass Communication                      3
JOUR     1010             News Writing and Reporting                              3
Elective Courses (12 hours)
ARST     1010             Two-Dimensional Design                                  3
ARST     2050             Computer Graphics I                                     3
ARST     2051             Computer Graphics II                                    3
COMM     2300             Business & Professional Communications                  3
ECON     2105 or 2105H Macro Economics                                            3
ECON     2106 or 2106H Micro Economics                                            3
ENGL     2010             Technical Writing                                       3
ENGL     2180             Creative Writing                                        3
ENGL     2300             Introduction to Film                                    3
ENGL     2301             Film History                                            3
ENGL     2302             Literature & Film                                       3
ENGL     2801             Magazine Production I                                   1
ENGL     2802             Magazine Production II                                  1
FREN     1002 or 1002H Elementary French II                                       4
FREN     2001 or 2001H Intermediate French I                                      3
FREN     2002 or 2002H Intermediate French II                                     3
JOUR     2000             Newspaper Practicum (maximum 3 hours)                   1
JOUR     2100             News Photography, Graphics, & Design                    3
JOUR     2902, 2903       Special Topics in Journalism                            2-3
SPAN     1002 or 1002H    Elementary Spanish II                                   4
SPAN     2001 or 2001H    Intermediate Spanish I                                  3
SPAN     2002 or 2002H    Intermediate Spanish II                                 3
SPAN     2125             Intensive Grammer & Written Communication Skills        3
STAT     2400 or 2400H Statistics                                                 3
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
114 / Gainesville College


                                MEDIA STUDIES
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
MDST 1100                   Introduction to Media Studies*                   3
COMM 2050                   Media, Culture, and Society**                    3
JOUR 1010                   News Writing and Reporting                       3

Major Elective Courses (3-6 hours)
ARST        1010            Two-Dimensional Design                           3
ENGL        2180            Creative Writing                                 3
ENGL        2300            Introduction to Film                             3
Elective Courses (3-6 hours)
ARST        2050            Computer Graphics I                               3
ARST        2051            Computer Graphics II                              3
COMM        2300            Business & Professional Communications           3
ENGL        2301            Film History                                     3
ENGL        2302            Literature and Film                              3
ENGL        2801            Magazine Production I (maximum 3 hours)           3
ENGL        2802            Magazine Production II (maximum 3 hours)          3
FREN        2001            Intermediate French I                            3
FREN        2002            Intermediate French II                           3
JOUR        2000            Newspaper Practicum (Maximum 3 hours)             3
JOUR        2100            News Photography, Graphics and Design             3
JOUR        2902/4          Special Topics in Journalism                    2-3
MFLA        1501            Readings/Writings in Foreign Language             1
SPAN        1021            Heritage Language Spanish I                      3
SPAN        2001            Intermediate Spanish I                           3
SPAN        2002            Intermediate Spanish II                          3
SPAN        2022            Heritage Language Spanish II                     3
SPAN        2125            Intensive Grammar & Written Communication Skills 3
* Formerly JOUR 1000              ** New Course
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                           Academic Programs / 115


                                        MUSIC
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (10 hours)
MUSC     1110                Fundamentals of Music I                      2
MUSC     1010                Aural Skills I                               1
MUSC     1120                Fundamentals of Music II                     2
MUSC     1020                Aural Skills II                              1
MUSC     1410                Class Piano I                                1
MUSC     1420                Class Piano II                               1
MUSC     2410                Class Piano III                              1
MUSC     2420                Class Piano IV                               1

Elective Courses (4 hours)
MUSC     1610                Applied Music Instrumental                   1
MUSC     2610                Applied Music Instrumental                   1
MUSC     1620                Applied Music Instrumental                   2
MUSC     2620                Applied Music Instrumental                   1
MUSC     1710                Applied Music Piano                          1
MUSC     2710                Applied Music Piano                          1
MUSC     1720                Applied Music Piano                          2
MUSC     2720                Applied Music Piano                          2
MUSC     1810                Applied Music Voice                          1
MUSC     2810                Applied Music Voice                          1
MUSC     1820                Applied Music Voice                          2
MUSC     2820                Applied Music Voice                          2
Elective Courses (4 hours - Courses are repeatable)
MUSC     2020                GC Chorale                                   1
MUSC     2040                GC Jazz Band                                 1
MUSC     2050                Ensemble                                     1
MUSC     2310                Brass Choir                                  1
MUSC     2320                Woodwind Choir                               1
MUSC     2330                Percussion Ensemble                          1
MUSC     2340                String Ensemble                              1
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
116 / Gainesville College


                                   PHILOSOPHY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (6 hours)
PHIL        2010             Great Questions of Philosophy                       3
PHIL        2020             Symbolic Logic and Critical Thinking                3
Elective Course (3 hours)
PHIL        2030             Introduction to Western Political Thought           3
PHIL        2040             Introduction to Ethical Theory                      3
Elective Courses (9 hours)
Choose from Humanities or Social Sciences course offerings in consultation with academic
advisor.
Note: No more than 9 hours of Philosophy (PHIL) classes may be taken in Area F

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 117


                            POLITICAL SCIENCE
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (6 hours)
POLS        2201            Introduction to State and Local Government            3
POLS        2301            Introduction to Comparative Government Systems        3
POLS        2401            Introduction to Global Studies                        3
Elective Courses (12 hours)
ANTH        1102            Introduction to Anthropology                          3
ANTH        2020            Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                 3
CSCI        1100            Introduction to Computing & Computer Programming      3
ECON        1100            Survey of Economic Principles                         3
ECON        2105 or 2105H   Macro Economics                                       3
ECON        2106 or 2106H   Micro Economics                                       3
GEOG        1101            World Human Geography                                 3
HIST        1111            Survey of World Civilization I                        3
HIST        1112 or 1112H   Survey of World Civilization II                       3
HIST        1121            Survey of Western Civilization I                      3
HIST        1122            Survey of Western Civilization II                     3
PHIL        2010            Great Questions of Philosophy                         3
       or
PHIL        2020            Symbolic Logic and Critical Thinking                  3
PSYC        1101            General Psychology                                    3
PSYC        2150            Introduction to Social Psychology                     3
PSYC        2530            Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                     3
SOCI        1101            Introduction to Sociology                             3
SOCI        1160            Introduction to Social Problems                       3
SOCI        2293            Introduction to Marriage and Family                   3
STAT        2400 or 2400H   Statistics                                            3
Note: Any Foreign Language sequence at the intermediate level or higher may be
used as elective courses

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
118 / Gainesville College


                                  PSYCHOLOGY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Course (3 hours)
PSYC        1101             General Psychology                                  3
Major Elective Course (6 hours)
PSYC        2103             Human Growth and Development                        3
PSYC        2150             Introduction to Social Psychology                   3
PSYC        2530             Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                   3
Elective Courses (9 hours)
ANTH        1102             Introduction to Anthropology                        3
ANTH        2010             Introduction to Biological Anthropology             3
ANTH        2020             Introduction to Cultural Anthropology               3
BIOL        1101             Biology - A Human Perspective with Lab              4
BIOL        1107             Principles of Biology I with Lab                    4
BIOL        1102             Introduction to Ecology with Lab                    4
BIOL        1108             Principles of Biology II with Lab                   4
BIOL        2120             Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                   4
BIOL        2130             Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab                  4
CHEM        1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                  4
CHEM        1212             Principles of Chemistry II &Lab                     4
CSCI        1100             Introduction to Computing & Computer Programming    3
HIST        1111             Survey of World Civilization I                      3
HIST        1112 or 1112H    Survey of World Civilization II                     3
PHIL        2010             Great Questions of Philosophy                       3
PHIL        2020             Symbolic Logic and Critical Thinking                3
PHIL        2030             Introduction to Western Political Thought           3
PHIL        2040             Introduction to Ethical Theory                      3
POLS        2301             Introduction to Comparative Government Systems      3
POLS        2401             Introduction to Global Studies                      3
SOCI        1101             Introduction to Sociology                           3
SOCI        1160             Introduction to Social Problems                     3
SOCI        2293             Introduction to Marriage and Family                 3
SOWK        2000             Introduction to Social Work                         3
STAT        2400 or 2400H    Statistics                                          3
Note: No more than 9 hours of Psychology (PSYC) classes may be taken in Area F

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                      Academic Programs / 119


                                    RELIGION
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (9-10 hours)
PHIL     2010            Great Questions of Philosophy                               3
RELG 2020                Introduction to Religious Thought                           3
Foreign Language (1001 or higher as appropriate for student)                         3-4
Elective Course (3 hours)
RELG      2101              Introduction to World Religions                          3
RELG      2105              Eastern Religions                                        3
Elective Course (3 hours)
RELG      2103              Religions in America                                     3
RELG      2030              Introduction to the Old & New Testament                  3
Elective Course (2-3 hours)
Choose from Humanities, Fine Arts, or Social Sciences course offerings in consultation with
academic advisor.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
120 / Gainesville College


                                SOCIAL WORK
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Course (3 hours)
SOWK        2000            Introduction to Social Work                          3
Elective Courses (15 hours)
ANTH        1102                Introduction to Anthropology                     3
ANTH        2020                Introduction to Cultural Anthropology            3
BIOL        1101                Biology – A Human Perspective with Lab           4
BIOL        1102                Introduction to Ecology with Lab                 4
BIOL        1107                Principles of Biology I with Lab                 4
BIOL        1108                Principles of Biology II with Lab                4
CISM        2201                Computer Information Systems                     3
                                   or
CSCI        1100                Introduction to Computing &
                                   Computer Programming                          3
CRJU        1100                Introduction to Criminal Justice                 3
ECON        2105 or 2105H       Macro Economics                                  3
ECON        2106 or 2106H       Micro Economics                                  3
PSYC        1101                General Psychology                               3
PSYC        2103                Human Growth and Development                     3
PSYC        2150                Introduction to Social Psychology                3
PSYC        2530                Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                3
SOCI        1101                Introduction to Sociology                        3
SOCI        1160                Introduction to Social Problems                  3
SOCI        2293                Introduction to Marriage and Family              3
STAT        2400                Statistics                                       3
Note: Any Foreign Language sequence at the intermediate level or higher may be
used as elective courses
Students who intend to pursue a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree from an
accredited program should take Biology either in Area D or Area F.


Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 121


                                   SOCIOLOGY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Course (3 hours)
SOCI     1101                Introduction to Sociology                            3
Major Elective Courses (6 hours)
SOCI     1160                Introduction to Social Problems                      3
SOCI     2293                Introduction to Marriage and Family                  3
SOWK     2000                Introduction to Social Work                          3
Elective Courses (9 hours)
Note: From the options below, only one course may be selected from any single
academic area (e.g., foreign language, history, political science, psychology)
ANTH     1102                    Introduction to Anthropology                   3
ANTH     2020                    Introduction to Cultural Anthropology          3
CISM     2201                    Computer Information Systems                   3
ECON     2105 or 2105H           Macro Economics                                3
ECON     2106 or 2106H           Micro Economics                                3
GEOG     1101                    World Human Geography                          3
HIST     1111                    Survey of World Civilization I                 3
HIST     1112 or 1112H           Survey of World Civilization II                3
HIST     1121                    Survey of Western Civilization I               3
HIST     1122                    Survey of Western Civilization II              3
HIST     2111 or 2111H           Survey of U.S. History I                       3
HIST     2112 or 2112H           Survey of U.S. History II                      3
MLAN     2010 or 2010H           Introductions to Linguistics                   3
PHIL     2010                    Great Questions of Philosophy                  3
PHIL     2020                    Symbolic Logic and Critical Thinking           3
PHIL     2030                    Introduction to Western Political Thought      3
PHIL     2040                    Introduction to Ethical Theory                 3
POLS     2201                    Introduction to State and Local Government     3
POLS     2301                    Introduction to Comparative Government Systems 3
POLS     2401                    Introduction to Global Studies                 3
PSYC     1101                    General Psychology                             3
PSYC     2103                    Human Growth and Development                   3
PSYC     2150                    Introduction to Social Psychology              3
PSYC     2530                    Introduction to Abnormal Behavior              3
STAT     2400 or 2400H           Statistics                                     3
Note: Any Foreign Language sequence at the intermediate level or higher may be
used as elective courses.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
122 / Gainesville College


                                      THEATRE
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 Hours
Required courses (6 hours)
THEA        1021             Acting I                                           3
THEA        1500             Stagecraft                                         3
Theatre Elective Courses (6-12 hours)
THEA        1070             Oral Interpretation                                3
THEA        2022             Acting II                                          3
THEA        2150             Introduction to Design                             3
THEA        2300             Voice and Movement                                 3
Production Elective Courses (0-4 hours)
THEA        1010             Theatre Practicum                                  2
Fine Arts Elective Courses (0-6 hours)
ARST        1020             Drawing I                                          3
ARSX        1100             Art Appreciation                                   3
ARHS        2510             Art History I                                      3
ARHS        2520             Art History II                                     3
THEA        1100             Theatre Appreciation                               3
MUSC        1100             Music Appreciation                                 3
MUSC        1810             Applied Music Voice                                1
MUSC        1820             Applied Music Voice                                2
Foreign Language Elective Courses (0-6 hours in same language)
FREN        1002 or 1002H    Elementary French II                               4
FREN        2001 or 2001H    Intermediate French I                              3
FREN        2002 or 2002H    Intermediate French II                             3
SPAN        1002 or 1002H    Elementary Spanish II                              4
SPAN        2001 or 2001H    Intermediate Spanish I                             3
SPAN        2002 or 2002H    Intermediate Spanish II                            3
SPAN        2125             Intensive Grammar & Written Communication Skills   3
SPAN        2500             Spanish Sound & Script                             3

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                       Academic Programs / 123


                             ASSOCIATE OF ARTS
                              GENERAL STUDIES

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours (See Academic Advisor for course selection)
This program allows more flexibility in Area F course selections than do most Core
Curriculum Transfer Programs. It may be the program of choice for students who:
 (1)     have not decided upon a major, or
 (2)     plan to major in an area in which the College does not offer a program
         of study, but which requires emphasis in the Humanities and/or Social
         Sciences, or
 (3)     do not wish to specialize in any particular area at the lower division level.

REQUIREMENTS:

 I.      Humanities, Social Sciences and/or Business Electives                12 hours
         (Must be selected from courses approved for Area F in any
         Associate of Arts program of study)

II.      General Electives                                                     6 hours
         (Must be selected from courses approved for Area F in any
         Associate of Arts or Associate of Science program of study)
124 / Gainesville College


                  ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS
                            AGRICULTURE - GENERAL

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (8 hours) Select one sequence

BIOL        1107              Principles of Biology I with Lab                   4
BIOL        1108              Principles of Biology II with Lab                  4
CHEM        1211              Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                 4
CHEM        1212              Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                4

Note: CHEM 1211/1211L & CHEM 1212/1212L or BIOL 1107/1107L & BIOL
1108/1108L should be taken in AREA D.


Elective Courses (10 hours) Select with advice of Academic Advisor

CHEM        2211              Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab

                                                                                 4
CHEM        2212              Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab               4
CSCI        1100              Introduction to Computing & Computer Programming   3
GISC        2011              Geographic Information Science with Lab            3
MATH        1450              Calculus I                                         4
MATH        2460              Calculus II                                        4
PHYS        1111              Introductory Physics I with Lab                    4
PHYS        1112              Introductory Physics II with Lab                   4
STAT        2400 or 2400H     Statistics                                         3


Note: Other electives may be selected in consultation with Academic Advisor.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                    Academic Programs / 125


                AGRICULTURE - POULTRY SCIENCE
                       (SCIENCE TRACK)

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (12 hours)
BIOL     1107             Principles of Biology I with Lab                         4
BIOL     1108             Principles of Biology II with Lab                        4
CHEM     1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                       4
CHEM     1212             Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                      4
POUL     2020             Introductory Poultry Science with Lab                    3

Note: CHEM 1211/1211L & CHEM 1212/1212L or BIOL 1107/1107L & BIOL
1108/1108L should be taken in AREA D.


Elective Courses (6 hours) Select with advice of Academic Advisor

CHEM     2211             Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab

                                                                                   4
CHEM     2212             Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab                     4
CSCI     1100             Introduction to Computing & Computer Programming         3
MATH     1450             Calculus I                                               4
MATH     2460             Calculus II                                              4
PHYS     1111             Introductory Physics I with Lab                          4
PHYS     1112             Introductory Physics II with Lab                         4
POUL     2953             Poultry Science Internship                               3
STAT     2400 or 2400H    Statistics                                               3

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
126 / Gainesville College


                   AGRICULTURE - POULTRY SCIENCE
                         (BUSINESS TRACK)

                            Consult Academic Advisor for course selection.

                                BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses - if not taken in Area D (8 hours)

BIOL        1107                  Principles of Biology I with Lab             4
BIOL        1108                  Principles of Biology II with Lab            4
CHEM        1211                  Principles of Chemistry I with Lab           4
CHEM        1212                  Principles of Chemistry II with Lab          4

Note: BIOL 1107/1107L, BIOL 1108/1108L, CHEM 1211/1211L or MATH 1450
should be taken in AREA D.

Additional Coursework (2-18 hours)

Lower division science courses for majors chosen from biology, organic chemistry,
general physics, and geology; mathematics not taken as part of areas A or D; computer
science; foreign language

BIOL        2210                  Botany I with Lab                            4
BIOL        2220                  Botany II with Lab                           4
CHEM        1212                  Principles of Chemistry II with Lab          4
CHEM        2211                  Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab

                                                                               4
CHEM        2212                  Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab         4
GEOL        1260                  Historically Geology with Lab                4
MATH        1450                  Calculus I                                   4
MATH        2460                  Calculus II                                  4
MATH        2470                  Calculus III                                 4
CSCI        1301                  Computer Science I                           4
GISC        2011                  Geographic Information Systems with Lab      3
PHYS        1111                  Introductory Physics I with Lab              4
PHYS        1112                  Introductory Physics II with Lab             4

Note: Other electives may be selected in consultation with Academic Advisor.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                  Academic Programs / 127


                                  CHEMISTRY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses - If not taken in Area D (8 hours)

CHEM     1211              Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                    4
CHEM     1212              Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                   4
MATH     1450              Calculus I                                            4

Note: CHEM 1211/1211L, CHEM 1212/1212L, & MATH 1450 should be taken in
Area D.


Elective Courses (10 hours)

CHEM     2211              Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab

                                                                                 4
CHEM     2212              Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab                  4
MATH     2460              Calculus II                                           4
MATH     2470              Calculus III                                          4
BIOL     1107              Principles of Biology I with Lab                      4
BIOL     1108              Principles of Biology II with Lab                     4
PHYS     1111              Introductory Physics I with Lab                       4
PHYS     1112              Introductory Physics II with Lab                      4
PHYS     2211              General Physics I with Lab                            4
PHYS     2212              General Physics II with Lab                           4

Note: Other electives may be selected in consultation with Academic Advisor.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
128 / Gainesville College


                             COMPUTER SCIENCE
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (15 hours)
MATH        1450             Calculus I                                             1
                             (Note: MATH 1450 is a four credit hour course; three
                              credit hours for the course are applied in Area D)
CSCI        1301             Computer Science I                                     4
CSCI        1302             Computer Science II                                    3
MATH        2460             Calculus II                                            4
MATH        2510             Discrete Math                                          3

Elective Courses (3 hours)

MATH        2470          Calculus III                                              4
MATH        2700          Object-Oriented Programing                                3
STAT        2400 or 2400H Statistics                                                3


Note: Student should take MATH 1113 in Area A and MATH 1450 in Area D.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                  Academic Programs / 129


                              CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (6 hours)
CRJU     1100             Introduction to Criminal Justice                       3
SOCI     1160             Introduction to Social Problems                        3

Elective Courses (12 hours)

ANTH     1102             Introduction to Anthropology                           3
ANTH     2010             Introduction to Biological Anthropology                3
ANTH     2020             Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                  3
CISM     2201             Computer Information Systems                           3
CRJU     2002             Introduction to Law Enforcement                        3
ECON     2105 or 2105H    Macro Economics                                        3
GEOG     1101             World Human Geography                                  3
HIST     2112 or 2112H    Survey of U.S. History II                              3
POLS     2201             Introduction to State and Local Government             3
POLS     2301             Introduction to Comparative Government Systems         3
POLS     2401             Introduction to Global Studies                         3
PSYC     1101             General Psychology                                     3
PSYC     2150             Introduction to Social Psychology                      3
PSYC     2530             Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                      3
SOCI     1101             Introduction to Sociology                              3
SOCI     2293             Introduction to Marriage and Family                    3
SOWK     2000             Introduction to Social Work                            3
STAT     2400 or 2400H    Statistics                                             3

Note: Any Foreign Language sequence at the intermediate level or higher may be used
as elective courses.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
130 / Gainesville College


           EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (AGES 0-5)

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours

Required Courses (18 hours)

ECDV        1101            Introduction to Child Development           3
ECDV        2010            Methods & Materials in Child Development    3
ECDV        2020            Curriculum Development                      3
ECDV        2040            Family System & Parent Involvement          3
ECDV        2110            Program Administration                      3
ECDV        2120            Internship                                  3


Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                      Academic Programs / 131



     EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (GRADES K - 5)

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

EDUC      2000             Foundations of Education                                   3
PSYC      2103             Human Growth and Development                               3
SPED      2100             Exceptional Children                                       3

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC     1101             General Psychology                                          3
         (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E.)

Elective Courses (6-9 hours)

Courses to be chosen in conjunction with Academic Advisor based on anticipated senior
college choice.

Choose one Mathematics or Statistics course                                           3

          MATH 1001 and MATH 1111 may not both be
          taken to meet graduation requirements.

          (Students completing an Associate Degree at Gainesville College
          may meet this requirement in Area D, allowing for another
          elective course in Area F. Select in consultation with Academic Advisor.)

Recommendation: Spanish proficiency at the 1002 or 1002H level and an additional
science course.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.

Special Notes: Minimum requirements for admission into an undergraduate educator
preparation program at all University System of Georgia institutions:

     1.   Students must earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on all attempted hours
          in the System core curriculum in areas A-F, as required for teacher preparation.
     2.   Students must have a passing score on the Regents’ Test.
     3.   Students must have a passing score on PRAXIS I.

Receiving institutions may establish higher admission requirements.
132 / Gainesville College



               EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (K – 5)
                 (AS Degree Program with Lanier Technical College)
Area A - 9 hours

ENGL        1101 or 1101H      English Composition I                                         3
                               (taken in lieu of or in addition to ENG 101 at LTC)
ENGL        1102 or 1102H      English Composition II                                        3
MATH        1001               Quantitative Skills and Reasoning                             3
   or
MATH        1111               College Algebra                                               3
                               (taken in lieu of or in addition to MAT 101 at LTC)
Area B - 5 hours

Required Course (5 hours)
COMM 1100                     Introduction to Human Communications                           3
Other course chosen in consultation with academic advisor from among those                   2
 designated for this area

Area C - 6 hours

Courses chosen in consultation with academic advisor from among those designated for this area.

Area D - 11 hours

Courses chosen in consultation with academic advisor from among those designated for this area.

Area E - 12 hours

POLS       1101 or 1101H American Government                                                  3
Other courses chosen from among those designated for this area in consultation with academic advisor.

Area F - 18 hours

EDUC     2000               Foundations of Education                                          3
   (taken in lieu of Diploma requirement of ECE 101 and ECE 121 or 122; or, taken in
   addition to Diploma requirement of ECE 101; and, in the latter case, the Diploma
   requirement of ECE 121 or 122, if appropriate, may be used to meet part of the
   requirements of EDUC 2000 or the EDUC 2000 field experience requirement may be
   used to meet the Diploma requirement of either ECE 121 or 122)

SPED      2100               Exceptional Children                                            3
    (Students successfully completing the Diploma program ECE 201 may petition for
    credit through examination)

PSYC      2103                 Human Growth and Development                                   3
    (taken in lieu of or in addition to Diploma requirement of ECE 103)

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC      1101                General Psychology                                             3
          (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E.)

Elective Courses (6-9 hours)

Courses to be chosen in conjunction with Academic Advisor based on anticipated senior college
choice.

Choose one Mathematics or Statistics course                                                   3

            MATH 1001 and MATH 1111 may not both be
            taken to meet graduation requirements.
                                                                              Academic Programs / 133


           (Students completing an Associate Degree at Gainesville College
           may meet this requirement in Area D, allowing for another
           elective course in Area F. Select in consultation with Academic Advisor.)

Recommendation: Spanish proficiency at the 1002 or 1002H level and an additional science course.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.

Special Notes: Minimum requirements for admission into an undergraduate educator preparation
program at all University System of Georgia institutions:

     1.    Students must earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on all attempted hours in the
           System core curriculum in areas A-F, as required for teacher preparation.
     2.    Students must have a passing score on the Regents’ Test.
     3.    Students must have a passing score on PRAXIS I.

Receiving institutions may establish higher admission requirements.
134 / Gainesville College



ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 Hours

Gainesville College, a Regents’ Engineering Transfer Program Institution, gives students
several alternatives to articulate to upper division institutions. Formal engineering transfer
agreements have been developed with the Georgia Institute of Technology, The University
of Georgia, Southern Polytechnic State University, and Mercer University. Gainesville
College offers the student several options in engineering and engineering technology
including: the Associate of Science Degree in Engineering, the Associate of Science Degree
in Engineering Technology, the Associate of Science Degree in Agricultural Engineering,
the Associate of Science Degree in Biological Engineering , the Associate of Science Degree
in Civil Engineering Technology, the Associate of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering
Technology, the Associate of Science Degree in Industrial Engineering Technology, and the
Associate of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.

                            ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
(1)                         AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (8 hours)
ENGR        1101            Introduction to Engineering                                3
ENGR        2201            Statics                                                    3
MATH        1450            Calculus I (hour from Area A)                              1
MATH        2460            Calculus II (hour from Area D)                             1
Note: Physics 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken in Area D. If not, they will be
required in Area F.
Elective Courses (10 hours)
BIOL        1107            Principles of Biology I with Lab                           4
CHEM        1211            Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                         4
CHEM        1212            Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                        4
CSCI        1301            Computer Science I                                         4
CSCI        1371            Computing for Engineers                                    3
ENGL        2010            Technical Writing                                          3
ENGR        2101            Engineering Graphics                                       3
ENGR        2202            Dynamics                                                   3
ENGR        2203            Strength of Materials                                      3
ENGR        2301            Electrical Engineering I                                   3
MATH        2470            Calculus III                                               4
MATH        2640            Differential Equations                                     3
MATH        2650            Linear Algebra                                             3
                                                                  Academic Programs / 135


(2)                       BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (8 hours)
ENGR     1101             Introduction to Engineering                            3
ENGR     2201             Statics                                                3
MATH     1450             Calculus I (hour from Area A)                          1
MATH     2460             Calculus II (hour from Area D)                         1

Note: Physics 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken in Area D. If not, they will be
required in Area F.
Elective Courses (10 hours)
BIOL     1107             Principles of Biology I with Lab                       4
BIOL     1108             Principles of Biology II with Lab                      4
CHEM     1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                     4
CHEM     1212             Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                    4
CHEM     2211             Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab                    4
CHEM     2212             Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab                   4
CSCI     1301             Computer Science I                                     4
CSCI     1371             Computing for Engineers                                3
ENGL     2010             Technical Writing                                      3
ENGR     2101             Engineering Graphics                                   3
ENGR     2202             Dynamics                                               3
ENGR     2203             Strength of Materials                                  3
ENGR     2301             Electrical Engineering I                               3
MATH     2470             Calculus III                                           4
MATH     2640             Differential Equations                                 3
MATH     2650             Linear Algebra                                         3


(3)                       ENGINEERING

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (8 hours)
ENGR     1101             Introduction to Engineering                            3
ENGR     2201             Statics                                                3
MATH     1450             Calculus I (hour from Area A)                          1
MATH     2460             Calculus II (hour from Area D)                         1
Note: Physics 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken in Area D. If not, they will be
required in Area F.
Elective Courses (10 hours)
CHEM     1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                     4
CHEM     1212             Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                    4
CSCI     1301             Computer Science I                                     4
ENGL     2010             Technical Writing                                      3
ENGR     2101             Engineering Graphics                                   3
ENGR     2202             Dynamics                                               3
ENGR     2203             Strength of Materials                                  3
ENGR     2301             Electrical Engineering I                               3
MATH     2470             Calculus III                                           4
MATH     2640             Differential Equations                                 3
MATH     2650             Linear Algebra                                         3
136 / Gainesville College



               ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS
(A)                          CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (15 hours)
CHEM        1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab            4
ENGR        1101             Introduction to Engineering                   3
ENGR        2201             Statics                                       3
MATH        1450             Calculus I (hour from Area D)                 1
MATH        2460             Calculus II                                   4
Note: Physics 1111/1111L & 1112/1112L or 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken
in Area D. If not, they will be required in Area F.
Elective Courses (3 hours)
CSCI        1301             Computer Science I                            4
CSCI        1371             Computing for Engineers                       3
ENGL        2010             Technical Writing                             3
ENGR        2101             Engineering Graphics                          3
ENGR        2202             Dynamics                                      3
ENGR        2203             Strength of Materials                         3
(B)                          ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (12 hours)
CHEM        1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab            4
ENGR        1101             Introduction to Engineering                   3
MATH        1450             Calculus I (hour from Area D)                 1
MATH        2460             Calculus II                                   4
Note: Physics 1111/1111L & 1112/1112L or 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken
in Area D. If not, they will be required in Area F.
Elective Courses (6 hours)
CSCI        1301             Computer Science I                            4
CSCI        1371             Computing for Engineers                       3
ENGL        2010             Technical Writing                             3
ENGR        2101             Engineering Graphics                          3
ENGR        2301             Electrical Engineering I                      4
MATH        2640             Differential Equations                        3
(C)                          ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (11 hours)

CHEM        1211             Principles of Chemistry I with Lab            4
ENGR        1101             Introduction to Engineering                   3
ENGR        2201             Statics                                       3
MATH        1450             Calculus I (hour from Area D)                 1

Note: PHYS 1111/1111L & 1112/1112L or PHYS 2211/2211L & PHYS 2212/2212L
                                                                      Academic Programs / 137


should be taken in AREA D. If not, they will be required in Area F.

Elective Courses (7 hours)

ACCT     2101                Principles of Accounting I                              3
CSCI     1301                Computer Science I                                      4
CSCI     1371                Computing for Engineers                                 3
ENGL     2010                Technical Writing                                       3
ENGR     2101                Engineering Graphics                                    3
ENGR     2202                Dynamics                                                3
ENGR     2203                Strength of Materials                                   3
ENGR     2301                Electrical Engineering I with Lab                       4
MATH     2460                Calculus II                                             4
MATH     2640                Differential Equations                                  3
STAT     2400 or 2400H       Statistics                                              3

(D)                 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (11 hours)
CHEM     1211                Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                      4
ENGR     1101                Introduction to Engineering                             3
ENGR     2201                Statics                                                 3
MATH     1450                Calculus I (hour from Area D)                           1
Note: Physics 1111/1111L & 1112/1112L or 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken
in Area D. If not, they will be required in Area F.
Elective Courses (7 hours)
ACCT     2101                Principles of Accounting I                              3
CSCI     1301                Computer Science I                                      4
CSCI     1371                Computing for Engineers                                 3
ENGL     2010                Technical Writing                                       3
ENGR     2101                Engineering Graphics                                    3
ENGR     2202                Dynamics                                                3
ENGR     2203                Strength of Materials                                   3
ENGR     2301                Electrical Engineering I with Lab                       4
MATH     2460                Calculus II                                             4
STAT     2400 or 2400H       Statistics                                              3
(E)                 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (15 hours)
CHEM     1211                Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                      4
ENGR     1101                Introduction to Engineering                             3
ENGR     2201                Statics                                                 3
MATH     1450                Calculus I (hour from Area D)                           1
MATH     2460                Calculus II                                             4
Note: Physics 1111/1111L & 1112/1112L or 2211/2211L & 2212/2212L should be taken
in Area D. If not, they will be required in Area F.
138 / Gainesville College


Elective Courses (3 hours)
CSCI        1301             Computer Science I                  4
CSCI        1371             Computing for Engineers             3
ENGL        2010             Technical Writing                   3
ENGR        2101             Engineering Graphics                3
ENGR        2202             Dynamics                            3
ENGR        2203             Strength of Materials               3
ENGR        2301             Electrical Engineering I with Lab   4
MATH        2460             Calculus II                         4
MATH        2640             Differential Equations              3
                                                           Academic Programs / 139



                      ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum


Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (8-16 hours)

CHEM     1211       Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                    4
CHEM     1212       Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                   4
CHEM     2211       Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab                   4
CHEM     2212       Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab                  4

Note: Either CHEM 1211/1211L and CHEM 1212/1212L or BIOL 1107/1107L and
BIOL 1108/1108L and STAT 2400 should be taken in Area D. MATH 1113 should be
taken in Area A.

Elective Courses (2-10 hours)

BIOL     1107       Principles of Biology I with Lab                      4
PHYS     1111       Introductory Physics I with Lab                       4
PHYS     1112       Introductory Physics II with Lab                      4

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
140 / Gainesville College



                              EXERCISE SCIENCE
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Students should carefully choose, in consultation with the Academic Advisor, courses
for Area D that meet the transfer institution’s Area D requirements

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (13 hours)

BIOL        2120             Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab             4
BIOL        2130             Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab            4
PHED        2000             Personal Training with Lab                          3
PHED        2034             Strength Training and Conditioning                  2


Elective Courses (5 hours)

Select, in consultation with academic advisor, from Exercise Science Area F approved
courses.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required. It
is strongly recommended that students take a fitness-related course each semester and
complete a CPR/First Aid course.
                                                                 Academic Programs / 141



                         FORESTRY RESOURCES

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses

BIOL 1107                  Principles of Biology I with Lab                     4
BIOL 1108                  Principles of Biology II with Lab                    4
CHEM 1211                  Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                   4
CHEM 1212                  Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                  4
MATH 1450                  Calculus I                                           4
STAT 2400 or 2400H         Statistics                                           3


Note: CHEM 1211/1211L & CHEM 1212/1212L or BIOL 1107/1107L & BIOL
1108/1108L and MATH 1450 should be taken in AREA D.

Elective Courses    Select with advice of Academic Advisor

CHEM     2211              Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab                  4
GISC     2011              Geographic Information Science with Lab              3
MATH     2460              Calculus II                                          4
MATH     2470              Calculus III                                         4
PHYS     1111              Introductory Physics I with Lab                      4

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
142 / Gainesville College


                                    GEOLOGY
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses
GEOL        1250            Physical Geology with Lab                      4
GEOL        1260            Historical Geology with Lab                    4
CHEM        1211            Principles of Chemistry I with Lab             4
CHEM        1212            Principles of Chemistry II                     4
MATH        1450            Calculus I                                     4

Note: Either GEOL 1250/1250L & GEOL 1260/1260L or CHEM 1211/1211L &
CHEM 1212/1212L & MATH 1450 should be taken in AREA D.

Elective Courses (10 hours)

BIOL     1107              Principles of Biology I with Lab                4
BIOL     1108              Principles of Biology II with Lab               4
GISC     2011              Geographic Information Science with Lab         3
MATH 2460                  Calculus II                                     4
PHYS 1111                  Introductory Physics I with Lab                 4
PHYS 1112                  Introductory Physics II with Lab                4
STAT     2400 or 2400H Statistics                                          3
.
Note: Other electives may be selected with approval of Academic Advisor.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                    Academic Programs / 143



                                 MATHEMATICS

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

MATH     1450                Calculus I                                           1
                             (Note: MATH 1450 is a four credit hour course; three
                              credit hours for the course are applied in Area D)
MATH     2460                Calculus II                                          4
MATH     2470                Calculus III                                         4

Elective Courses (9 hours)

MATH     2510                Discrete Math                                         3
MATH     2650                Linear Algebra                                        3
MATH     2640                Differential Equations                                3
CSCI     1100                Introduction to Computing & Computer Programming      3
CSCI     1301                Computer Science I                                    4
PHYS     2211                General Physics I with Lab                            4
PHYS     2212                General Physics II with Lab                           4

Note: Student should take MATH 1113 in Area A and MATH 1450 in Area D.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
144 / Gainesville College


                            MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
EDUC        2000               Foundations of Education                           3
PSYC        2103               Human Growth and Development                       3
SPED        2100               Exceptional Children                               3
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC     1101             General Psychology                                    3
         (If PSYC 1101 does not meet a chosen concentration requirement, it must be
         selected in Area E.)

Elective Courses (9 hours)
Choose any three courses (9 hours) in consultation with Academic Advisor to support
the two content concentrations chosen for certification. Courses may not be chosen for
one concentration only. Concentrations include reading/English (Language Arts),
mathematics, science and social studies.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
Special Notes: Minimum requirements for admission into an undergraduate educator
preparation program at all University System of Georgia institutions:
1. Students must earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on all attempted hours in the
   System core curriculum in areas A-F, as required for teacher preparation.
2. Students must have a passing score on the Regents’ Test.
3. Students must have a passing score on PRAXIS I.

Receiving institutions may establish higher admission requirements.
                                                                  Academic Programs / 145


                        PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
Areas A-E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (11 hours; If not taken in Area D)
GEOG     1111                 Physical Geography with Lab                        4
GEOG     1112                 Weather and Climate with Lab                       4
GISC     2011                 Geographic Information Science with Lab            3

Elective Courses (10 hours)
ANTH     1102                 Introduction to Anthropology                       3
ECOL     1000                 Field Ecology                                      2
GEOG     1101                 World Human Geography                              3
GEOG     2901, 2902, 2903     Special Topics in Geography                        1-3
GEOL     1260                 Historical Geology with Lab                        4
GISC     2012                 Spatial Analysis in GIS with Lab                   3
GISC     2201                 Fundamentals of Cartography & Earth Measure.       3
GISC     2202                 Data Acquisition and Conversion in GIS             3
GISC     2203                 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing                     3
STAT     2400 or 2400H        Statistics                                         3
Note: GISC courses may be applied toward the optional Certificate in Geographic
Information Science.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
146 / Gainesville College



                                            PHYSICS
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses

PHYS        2211            General Physics I with Lab                             4
PHYS        2212            General Physics II with Lab                            4
MATH        1450            Calculus I                                             1
                            (Note: MATH 1450 is a four credit hour course; three
                            credit hours for the course are applied in Area D)
MATH        2460            Calculus II                                            4

Note: PHYS 2211/2211L, PHYS 2212/2212L, and MATH 1450 should be
taken in Area D.

Elective Courses

CHEM        1211            Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                     4
CHEM        1212            Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                    4
MATH        2470            Calculus III                                           4
MATH        2640            Differential Equations                                 3
MATH        2650            Linear Algebra                                         3
Note: Other electives may be selected in consultation with Academic Advisor.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                 Academic Programs / 147



                        SPORT MANAGEMENT
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (6 hours)

CISM 2201           Computer Information Systems                                3
SPMG 2100           Introduction to Sport Management                            3
Elective Courses (12 hours)
Select, in consultation with Academic Advisor, from Sport Management Area F approved
courses.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
148 / Gainesville College


            PRE-PROFESSIONAL AND ALLIED HEALTH
      Although the College does not offer a degree program in any of the Health Professions,
students pursuing a medical career who plan to continue their studies at a four-year
institution may complete the majority of their freshman and sophomore course requirements
at Gainesville College. These students should work closely with their Academic Advisor
from the Division of Natural Sciences and Technology in the selection of courses with the
requirements of the transfer institution in mind.
      Almost all first and second year course requirements are available in the following
major areas: dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, medical records, medical technology,
occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician’s assisting, veterinary medicine,
optometry, chiropractic medicine, podiatry, nursing and sports medicine. Students who
successfully complete a prescribed program of study approved by the advisor may qualify
for the Associate of Science Degree in General Studies.
      Because of high interest in specific health careers, i.e., nursing, physical therapy,
pharmacy, veterinary medicine, seats in these programs are often difficult to obtain within
what the student would consider a reasonable academic timetable for his/her academic
situation. There are a myriad of health related career options. It is recommended that the
student, with his/her advisor, explore some of the health career options that are
commensurate with the student’s initial health career interest.
      The core requirements for three high demand allied health programs, i.e., dental
hygiene, pre-nursing, and pre-pharmacy are contained in this catalog. For core requirements
for other allied health fields, please consult an academic advisor and the anticipated transfer
institution.
                                                                        Academic Programs / 149


                          PRE-MEDICAL STUDIES
      At most baccalaureate degree granting transfer institutions, “pre-medicine” and similar
“pre-professional” designations (pre-chiropractic medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-optometry,
pre-osteopathic medicine, etc.) are not majors; they are programs of study. Any student
attending Gainesville College who plans to attend medical school or one of the other
professional schools should plan to select a major in a regular degree program at the transfer
institution according to his/her aptitudes, experiences and interests.
     The Pre-Medical Studies Program at Gainesville College, which leads to an Associate
of Science Degree in General Studies, provides the student with flexibility in course
selection and encourages the student to seek breadth of education through interdisciplinary
study. It is the student’s responsibility to identify those courses that are required by the
transfer institution, those courses that are needed to prepare the student for
standardized admission tests and those courses that are required for admission to the
professional school of interest. A program of study should be developed by the student in
consultation with the academic advisor.

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Requirements:

III. Mathematics and Science Electives                                       12 hours
        (Must be selected from Mathematics and/or Science courses approved for
        Area F in any Associate of Science program of study)

Recommended Courses - if not taken in Area D

BIOL      1107        Principles of Biology I with Lab                             4
BIOL      1108        Principles of Biology II with Lab                            4
CHEM      1211        Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                           4
CHEM      1212        Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                          4

Note: BIOL 1107/1107L, BIOL 1108/1108L, CHEM 1211/1211L or CHEM 1212/1212L
should be taken in Area D, if appropriate.

Recommended Courses - if not taken in Area A or Area D

MATH 1113             Precalculus                                                  3
    or
MATH 1450             Calculus                                           4
Note: MATH 1113 or MATH 1450 should be taken in Area A or Area D, if appropriate.
Elective Courses - includes courses above
BIOL      2120      Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                        4
BIOL      2130      Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab                       4
BIOL      2500      Microbiology for Allied Health Professionals with Lab          4
CHEM      2211      Modern Organic Chemistry I with Lab                            4
CHEM      2212      Modern Organic Chemistry II with Lab                           4
CISM      2201      Computer Information Systems                                   3
150 / Gainesville College


CSCI        1100            Introduction to Computing and Computer Programming   3
GISC        2011            Geographic Information Science with Lab              3
MATH        2460            Calculus II                                          4
MATH        2470            Calculus III                                         4
PHYS        1111            Introductory Physics I with Lab                      4
PHYS        1112            Introductory Physics II with Lab                     4
STAT        2400            Statistics                                           3

II. General Electives - includes courses above                                   6 hours
       (Must be selected from courses approved for Area F in any Associate
       of Science or Associate of Arts program of study)
ANTH        1102            Introduction to Anthropology                         3
ARST        2400            Sculpture I                                          3
PHED        1002            CPR/First Aid                                        1
PHIL        2010            Great Questions of Philosophy                        3
PHIL        2040            Introduction to Ethical Theory                       3
PSYC        1101            General Psychology                                   3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                         3
PSYC        2150            Introduction to Social Psychology                    3
PSYC        2530            Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                    3
RELG        2020            Introduction to Religious Thought                    3
SOCI        1101            Introduction to Sociology                            3
SOCI        1160            Introduction to Social Problems                      3
SOWK        2000            Introduction to Social Work                          3
SPAN        1002            Elementary Spanish II                                4
SPAN        2001            Intermediate Spanish I                               3

Note: Some of these electives should be taken in other Areas of the Core Curriculum, if
appropriate. Other electives not listed above may be selected in consultation with
Academic Advisor.
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                        Academic Programs / 151



                                  PRE-NURSING
     Although Gainesville College does not offer a degree program in nursing, students
pursuing a nursing career who plan to continue their studies at a school of nursing for either
an Associate of Science-Nursing (ASN) degree or the Bachelor of Science-Nursing (BSN)
degree may complete the majority of their freshman and sophomore core courses at
Gainesville College.
     Each degree (ASN/BSN) varies in the number of courses required and each school of
nursing has slightly different course requirements. Therefore, students need to select a
prospective nursing degree program (ASN/BSN) and a transfer institution early in their
academic program. Students must plan their coursework at Gainesville College to comply
with the requirements of their specific transfer institution’s nursing program.
     Following the course guide below will fulfill core requirements for most BS nursing
programs and satisfy the requirements for an Associate of Science (AS) degree in General
Studies from Gainesville College.

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses

BIOL      2120        Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                      4
BIOL      2130        Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab                     4
BIOL      2500        Microbiology for Allied Health Professions w/Lab             4
PSYC      2103        Human Growth and Development                                 3
                      (PSYC 1101 should be taken in Area E)

Directed Elective Course

As required by specific BSN transfer program, and in consultation with Advisor

Physical Education Requirement: Two PHED courses (3 hours) are required.
Required Course
PHED 1020 Personal Health/Wellness                                                 2

Recommended Course
PHED 1002       CPR/First Aid                                                      1
152 / Gainesville College



                               PRE-PHARMACY

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Area F - 18 hours

Required Courses (If not taken in Area D)

CHEM        1211            Principles of Chemistry I with Lab
CHEM        1212            Principles of Chemistry II with Lab                4
MATH        1450            Calculus I                                         4


Note: CHEM 1211/1211L , CHEM 1212/1212L and MATH 1450 should be
taken in Area D.


Elective Courses

CHEM        2211 - 2212     Modern Organic Chemistry I & II with Lab           4,4
BIOL        1107 - 1108     Principles of Biology I & II with Lab              4,4
STAT        2400 or 2400H   Statistics                                         3
PHYS        1111            Introductory Physics I with Lab                    4

Note: Other electives may be selected in consultation with Academic Advisor.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                       Academic Programs / 153


                        SECONDARY EDUCATION
Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.

Special Notes: Minimum requirements for admission into an undergraduate educator
preparation program at all University System of Georgia institutions:
1. Students must earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on all attempted hours in the
   System core curriculum in areas A-F, as required for teacher preparation.
2. Students must have a passing score on the Regents’ Test.
3. Students must have a passing score on PRAXIS I.
4. Receiving institutions may establish higher admission requirements.

                           AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

EDUC      2000      Foundations of Education                                          3
PSYC      2103      Human Growth and Development                                      3
SPED      2100      Exceptional Children                                              3

Major Electives (6-9 hours)
PSYC      1101       General Psychology                                               3
                    (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Select from Agriculture Area F approved courses.
                                  ART EDUCATION
Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (15 hours)

EDUC      2000      Foundations of Education                                          3
PSYC      2103      Human Growth and Development                                      3
SPED      2100      Exceptional Children                                              3
ARST      1010      Basic Design I                                                    3
ARST      1020      Basic Drawing I                                                   3

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC      1101       General Psychology                                               3
                    (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (0-3 hours)

ARHS      2510      Introduction to Art History I                                     3
ARHS      2520      Introduction to Art History II                                    3
ARST      2300      Basic Painting I                                                  3
ARST      2400      Basic Sculpture I                                                 3
ARST      1030      Design II                                                         3
ARST      2020      Drawing II                                                        3
154 / Gainesville College




                                       BIOLOGY EDUCATION

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

EDUC        2000            Foundations of Education                                 3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                             3
SPED        2100            Exceptional Children                                     3

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC        1101             General Psychology                                      3
                            (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (6-9 hours)
Select from Biology Area F approved courses.

                                       BUSINESS EDUCATION

Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
EDUC        2000            Foundations of Education                                 3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                             3
SPED        2100            Exceptional Children                                     3
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC        1101             General Psychology                                      3
                            (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (6-9 hours)
Select from Business Administration Area F approved courses.

                                     CHEMISTRY EDUCATION

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

EDUC        2000            Foundations of Education                                 3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                             3
SPED        2100            Exceptional Children                                     3

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC        1101             General Psychology                                      3
                            (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (6-9 hours)

Select from Chemistry Area F approved courses.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 155


                           EARTH SCIENCE EDUCATION

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

EDUC      2000      Foundations of Education                                      3
PSYC      2103      Human Growth and Development                                  3
SPED      2100      Exceptional Children                                          3

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC      1101      General Psychology                                            3
          (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)

Electives (6-9 hours)

Select from Geology Area F approved courses.

                               ENGLISH EDUCATION
Area F - 18 hours

Required Courses (9 hours)

EDUC      2000       Foundations of Education                                     3
PSYC      2103       Human Growth and Development                                 3
SPED      2100       Exceptional Children                                         3

Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC     1101             General Psychology                                          3
         (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)

Electives - Foreign language sequence (9 semester hours)
Choose one three course sequence
FREN      1002 or 1002H       Elementary French II
                                                                                  4
FREN      2001 or 2001H       Intermediate French I
                                                                                  3
FREN      2002 or 2002H       Intermediate French II                              3
FREN      2121                Intermediate Conversation                           3
FREN      2122                Critical Reading and Comp                           3
SPAN      1002 or 1002H       Elementary Spanish II                               4
SPAN      2001 or 2001H       Intermediate Spanish I                              3
SPAN      2002 or 2002H       Intermediate Spanish II                             3
SPAN      2121                Intermediate Conversation                           3
SPAN      2122                Critical Reading and Comp                           3
SPAN      2125                Intensive Grammar & Communications Skills           3
SPAN      2500                Spanish Sound & Script                              3
GRMN      1002                Elementary German II                                4
GRMN      2001                Intermediate German I                               3
GRMN      2002                Intermediate German II                              3
JAPN      1002                Elementary Japanese II                              4
JAPN      2001                Intermediate Japanese I                             3
JAPN      2002                Intermediate Japanese II                            3
156 / Gainesville College


RUSS        1002                      Elementary Russian II                                4
RUSS        2001                      Intermediate Russian I                               3
RUSS        2002                      Intermediate Russian II                              3

                             HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Area F - 18 Hours

Required Courses (13 hours)

BIOL        2120            Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                        4
EDUC        2000            Foundations of Education                                       3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                                   3
SPED        2100            Exceptional Children                                           3

Major Elective (5 hours)
Select, in consultation with academic advisor, from Health and Physical Education Area
F approved courses.
Note: It is strongly recommended that students take a Physical Education course each
semester and complete a CPR/First Aid course.

                                     MARKETING EDUCATION
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
EDUC        2000             Foundations of Education                                      3
PSYC        2103             Human Growth and Development                                  3
SPED        2100             Exceptional Children                                          3
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC        1101             General Psychology                                            3
                             (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (6-9 hours)
Select in consultation with Academic Advisor.
                                   MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (14 hours)
EDUC        2000             Foundations of Education                                      3
SPED        2100             Exceptional Children                                          3
PSYC        2103             Human Growth and Development                                  3
MATH        1450             Calculus I                                                    1
                             (Note: MATH 1450 is a four credit hour course; three credit
                             hours for the course are applied in Area D)
MATH        2460             Calculus II                                                   4
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC        1101             General Psychology                                            3
                            (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Academic Programs / 157
158 / Gainesville College


Electives (1-4 hours)
MATH        2470            Calculus III                                       4
MATH        2640            Differential Equations                             3
MATH        2650            Linear Algebra                                     3
CSCI        1100            Introduction to Computing & Computer Prog.         3
Note: Student should take MATH 1113 in Area A and MATH 1450 in
Area D.

                                       MUSIC EDUCATION
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (14-15 hours)
EDUC        2000            Foundations of Education                           3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                       3
SPED        2100            Exceptional Children                               3
MUSC        1200            Music History and Literature                       3
MUSC        1110            Music Theory I                                     2
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC        1101            General Psychology                                 3
Electives (3 hours)
MUSC        1100             Music Appreciation                                3
MUSC        1120             Music Theory II                                   2
MUSC        1010/1020        Aural Skills I, II                             (1, 1)
MUSC        1610/1620        Applied Music                                  (1, 1)
MUSC        1620/2620        Applied Music                                  (2, 2)
MUSC        1710/2710        Applied Music                                  (1, 1)
MUSC        1720/2720        Applied Music                                  (2, 2)
MUSC        1810/2810        Applied Music                                  (1, 1)
MUSC        1820/2820        Applied Music                                  (2, 2)
                            See Academic Advisor for degree requirements.
                                      PHYSICS EDUCATION
Area F - 18 Hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
EDUC        2000            Foundations of Education                           3
PSYC        2103            Human Growth and Development                       3
SPED        2100            Exceptional Children                               3
Major Electives (6-9 hours)
PSYC      1101        General Psychology                                       3
(must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Select from Physics Area F approved courses and PHYS 1111 and 1112.
PHYS        1111            Introductory Physics I with Lab                    4
PHYS        1112            Introductory Physics II with Lab                   4
                                                                       Academic Programs / 159


                           SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
EDUC      2000          Foundations of Education                                      3
PSYC      2103          Human Growth and Development                                  3
SPED      2100          Exceptional Children                                          3
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC      1101       General Psychology                                               3
                    (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (6-9 hours)
Select in consultation with Academic Advisor.
                             TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
Area F - 18 hours
Required Courses (9 hours)
EDUC      2000          Foundations of Education                                      3
PSYC      2103          Human Growth and Development                                  3
SPED      2100          Exceptional Children                                          3
Major Elective (3 hours)
PSYC      1101       General Psychology                                               3
                    (Must be taken in this area if not selected in Area E)
Electives (6-9 hours)
Select in consultation with Academic Advisor.
160 / Gainesville College



                            ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE
                              GENERAL STUDIES

Areas A - E: Refer to Core Curriculum


Area F - 18 hours (See Academic Advisor for course selection)

This program allows more flexibility in Area F course selections than do most Core
Curriculum Transfer Programs. It may be the program of choice for students who:

      (1) have not decided upon a major, or
      (2) plan to major in an area in which the College does not offer a program of
          study but which requires emphasis in the Sciences and/or Mathematics, or
      (3) do not wish to specialize in any particular area at the lower division level.


REQUIREMENTS:

I.       Mathematics and/or Science Electives         12 hours

         (Must be selected from Mathematics and/or Science courses
         approved for Area F in any Associate of Science program of study)


II.      General Electives                            6 hours

         (Must be selected from courses approved for Area F in any
          Associate of Science or Associate of Arts program of study)
                                                                        Academic Programs / 161



                            CAREER PROGRAMS
    Gainesville College offers a number of Associate of Applied Science career preparation
programs for students who do not plan to transfer to a senior college or university to pursue
a baccalaureate degree, but who wish to pursue a two-year program of study which will
provide career skills in combination with a Liberal Arts based education. The College also
offers several one-year, non-transferable Certificate career preparation programs which
provide career skills for entry into the workplace.

                    Associate of Applied Science Degree Programs
                                  Gainesville College
Paralegal Studies

                   Associate of Applied Science Degree Programs
                                in Cooperation with
            Lanier Technical College & North Georgia Technical College

Accounting (LTC-O, NGTC)
Air Conditioning Technology (LTC-O)
Applied Business Technology (NGTC)
Applied Manufacturing Technology (LTC-O, LTC-F, NGTC)
Automated Manufacturing Technology (LTC-F)
Building & Facilities Maintenance (NGTC)
Business & Office Technology (LTC-O, LTC-F, NGTC)
Commercial Photography (NGTC)
Computer Information Systems (LTC-O, LTC-F, NGTC)
Cosmetology (LTC-O)
Culinary Arts (NGTC)
Dental Hygiene (LTC-O)
Drafting (LTC-O)
Early Childhood Care & Education (LTC-O)
Electrical Construction & Maintenance (NGTC)
Electronics Fundamentals (NGTC)
Electronics Technology (LTC-O, LTC-F, NGTC)
Environmental Horticulture (NGTC)
Fire Science Technology (LTC-O)
Hotel/Restaurant/Travel Management (NGTC)
Industrial Systems Technology (LTC-O, LTC-F, NGTC)
Machine Tool Technology/Advanced Machine Tool Technology (LTC-O)
Management & Supervisory Development (LTC-F)
Marketing Management (LTC-O, LTC-F)
Medical Assisting (LTC-O, NGTC)
Medical Laboratory Technology (LTC-O, NGTC)
Paramedic Technology (LTC-O, NGTC)
Practical Nursing (LTC-O, LTC-F, NGTC)
Printing & Graphics Technology (LTO-F)
Turf & Golf Course Management (NGTC)
Welding and Joining Technology (NGTC)

LTC-O     Lanier Technical College - Oakwood Campus
LTC-F     Lanier Technical College - Forsyth County/Cumming Campus
NGTC      North Georgia Technical College
162 / Gainesville College



                            PARALEGAL STUDIES
Required Courses (22 hours)
ACCT 2101                Principles of Accounting I                     3
BUSA 2106                The Environment of Business                    3
ENGL 1101 or 1101H Composition I                                        3
ENGL 1102 or 1102H Composition II                                       3
HUM or FA                Any Area C Humanities or Fine Arts Course      3
NAT SCI                  Any Laboratory Science Course                  4
POLS     1101 or 1101H American Government                              3
Select 3 hours from the following courses:
COMM 1100                   Introduction to Human Communications        3
COMM 2108                   Business Communications                     3
Select 3 hours from the following courses:
ECON 1100                   Survey of Economic Principles               3
ECON 2105 or 2105H Macro Economics                                      3
ECON 2106 or 2106H Micro Economics                                      3
Select 3 hours from the following courses:
PSYC      1101              General Psychology                          3
SOCI      1101              Introduction to Sociology                   3
Select 3 hours from the following courses:
HIST      1112 or 1112H Survey of World Civilization II                 3
HIST      2111 or 2111H Survey of U.S. History I                        3
HIST      2112 or 2112H Survey of U.S. History II                       3
Select 3 hours from the following courses:
BUSA 1120                   Business Mathematics                        3
MATH 1001                   Quantitative Skills & Reasoning             3
MATH 1111                   College Algebra                             3
Required Paralegal Courses (17 hours)
PARA 1100                Introduction to Paralegalism & Ethics          3
PARA 2101                Civil Procedure                                2
PARA 2102                Criminal Litigation                            2
PARA 2103                Civil Litigation II                            2
PARA 2104                Legal Research and Writing                     3
PARA 2105                Wills, Probate and Estate Administration       2
PARA 2106                Computers for the Legal Profession             3
Elective Paralegal Courses (select 7 hours):
PARA 2201                 Real Estate and Title Examination             2
PARA 2202                 Real Estate Closings                          1
PARA 2203                 Family Law                                    2
PARA 2204                 Business Organizations/Contracts              2
PARA 2206                 Internship                                    1
PARA 2207                 Bankruptcy                                    2
Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                     Academic Programs / 163



              LANIER TECHNICAL COLLEGE
                          &
           NORTH GEORGIA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

    COOPERATIVE DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
      The required general education component of the AAS degree at Gainesville College
consists of not less than 20 semester credit hours exclusive of Physical Education hours.
Some programs may require more than 20 semester credit hours at Gainesville College.
Other requirements include completion of one of the above programs at the chosen
Technical College and satisfactory performance on the Regents' Test. Coursework from the
Technical College will be transferred upon completion of the Technical College component.
There must be a total of at least 60 semester credit hours, excluding Physical Education,
for the AAS degree. Elective credit hours to complete the 60 semester hour requirement
may be taken at either institution. General education courses for the Gainesville College
minimum component of the program are:
Course                        Course Title                         Hours Credit
ENGL 1101 or 1101H            Composition I                             3
Humanities or Fine Arts                                                 3-4
   or Behavioral Science*
COMM 1100                     Intro. To Human Communications             3
BUSA 1120 or                  Business Mathematics or                    3
MATH 1001, 1111, or 1113      Quantitative Skills and Reasoning,
                               College Algebra or Precalculus            3
Natural Science with Lab*                                                3-4
POLS 1101 or 1101H         American Government                           3
HIST 2111 or 2111H or 2112 Survey of U.S. History I or II or             3
or 2112H or 1112 or 1112H Survey of World Civilization II

Total                                                                    21-23

*   To be selected from Area D (Science, Mathematics and Technology) and Area C
    (Humanities) or Area E (Social Sciences) of the Gainesville College Transfer Core
    Curriculum.

                                    PLEASE NOTE
The General Education course requirements specified above are minimal course
requirements for cooperative degree programs; some programs may have more extensive
collegiate requirements. Students should consult their Academic Advisor for specific
degree requirements.

Other program requirements are as follows:

Physical Education: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.

Georgia History/Constitution: Must satisfy requirements either through coursework:
HIST 1112 or 1112H or 2111 or 2111H or 2112 or 2112H and POLS 1101 or 1101H, or
through testing if appropriate.

Residency Requirement: A minimum of 20 semester hours of college level credit must be
earned at Gainesville College.
164 / Gainesville College




      ADMISSION AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
.   The student must satisfy admissions requirements at both institutions. Each institution
    will evaluate each applicant and accept or reject the applicant based on its established
    admission policies.

.   Any CPC deficiencies will be waived for students who transfer a completed program for
    their vocational/technical area of specialization from the Technical College to
    Gainesville College.

.   Students will have three options for pursuit of the cooperative degree:
         Take the Gainesville College component first, or
         Take the Technical College component first, or
         Take both institutional components simultaneously.

.   Student financial aid will be administered by the institution from which the student is
    taking courses. If the student elects to take courses from both institutions simultaneously,
    the student will choose which institution administers the financial aid.

.   Transcripts of completed credits will be exchanged by both institutions upon receiving a
    written request from the student.

.   The student must submit an application for graduation to the Gainesville College
    Registrar’s Office.

.   All diploma requirements must be satisfied at the Technical College before an Associate
    of Applied Science degree will be awarded.
                                                                        Academic Programs / 165



                                DENTAL HYGIENE
                   Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College

Completion of the Lanier Technical College clinical requirements and the Gainesville
College general education requirements (as specified below) leads to the Associate of
Applied Science degree.

Consideration for acceptance into the clinical portion of the Dental Hygiene program at
Lanier Technical College requires the applicant to:

1.    be admitted to Gainesville College as a regular student and to have completed all
      CPC and/or Learning Support requirements.

2.    complete at least one of the following science combinations:

     a. BIOL 1101             Biology - A Human Perspective                            4
                              or
          BIOL 1107           Principles of Biology I with Lab                         4
                              and
          BIOL 2120           Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                  4
                              or
          BIOL 2500           Microbiology for Allied Health Professions               4


     b. CHEM 1151             Survey Of Chemistry I with Lab                           4
                              and
          BIOL    2120        Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                  4
                              or
          BIOL 2500           Microbiology for Allied Health Professions               4


     c. BIOL 2120             Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab                  4
                              and
          BIOL 2130           Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab                 4

3. provide the following to the Gainesville College Registrar’s Office by March 15th of
   each year upon completion of 2 (a, b, or c) above:

     d.   Personal letter relating reasons for choosing Dental Hygiene as a career
     e.   Three Letters of Reference
     f.   Dental Experience Validation form
     g.   Request for Interview form

4. interview with the Dental Hygiene Selection Committee. Candidates selected will be
   allowed admission to the Lanier Technical College clinical portion of the program.

Lanier Technical College Requirements

Complete the Dental Hygiene program requirement as specified in the Lanier Technical
College catalog.

Please note that all Dental Hygiene courses are taught on the Oakwood Campus of Lanier
Technical College.
166 / Gainesville College




Gainesville College Course Requirements (42 hours)

Required Courses (36 hours)

ENGL               1101 or 1101H   Composition I                                  3
ENGL               1102 or 1102H   Composition II                                 3
COMM               1100            Human Communications                           3
PSYC               1101            General Psychology                             3
SOCI               1101            Introduction to Sociology                      3
MATH               1001            Quantitative Skills and Reasoning              3
BIOL               2120            Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab        4
BIOL               2130            Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab       4
BIOL               2500            Microbiology for Allied Health Profession      4
CHEM               1151            Survey of Chemistry I with Lab                 4
CHEM               1115            Bio/Nutritional Chemistry for Dental Hygiene   2
Elective Courses (6 hours)

POLS               1101 or 1101H American Government                              3
HIST               2111 or 2111H Survey of U.S. History I                         3
         or
HIST               2112 or 2112H Survey of U.S. History II                        3
         or
HIST               1112 or 1112H Survey of World Civilization II                  3


Physical Education: Two courses - PHED 1020 and PHED 1002 are required.
                                                                   Academic Programs / 167



                                  DRAFTING
                Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College
Gainesville College Course Requirements (22-25 hours)

ENGL        1101 or 1101H        Composition I                                    3

Humanities or Fine Arts or Behavioral Science                                     3-4
COMM       1100                  Introduction to Human Communications             3
MATH       1111 or 1113          College Algebra or Precalculus                   3

Natural Science with Lab                                                          4
POLS        1101 or 1101H        American Government                              3
HIST        2111 or 2112         Survey of U.S. History I or II                   3
        or 2111H or 2112H

Other requirements include completion of the appropriate program of study at Lanier
Technical College and satisfactory performance on the Regents’ Test.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
168 / Gainesville College



                            ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
                  Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College
                                        or
               Gainesville College & North Georgia Technical College

Gainesville College Course Requirements (22-25 hours)

ENGL           1101 or 1101H      Composition I                                 3

Humanities or Fine Arts or Behavioral Science                                   3-4
COMM       1100                  Introduction to Human Communications           3
MATH       1111 or 1113          College Algebra or Precalculus                 3

Natural Science with Lab                                                        4
POLS        1101 or 1101H         American Government                           3
HIST        2111 or 2112          Survey of U.S. History I or II                3
      or 2111H or 2112H

Other requirements include completion of the appropriate program of study at Lanier
Technical College and satisfactory performance on the Regents’ Test.

Physical Education Requirement: Two courses including PHED 1020 are required.
                                                                 Academic Programs / 169



                    PARAMEDIC TECHNOLOGY
                Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College
Completion of the Lanier Technical College clinical requirements and the Gainesville
College core requirements will lead to an Associate of Applied Science degree.

Gainesville College Course Requirements (28 Hours)*

ENGL       1101 or 1101H     Composition I                                      3
MATH       1001 or 1111      Quantitative Skills and Reasoning
                                 or College Algebra                             3
COMM       1100              Human Communications                               3
CISM       1502              Introduction to Information Technology             2
 or other Area B Elective

HIST       1112 or 1112H     Survey of World Civilization II                    3
POLS       1101 or 1101H     American Government                                3
PSYC       1101              General Psychology                                 3
BIOL       2120/2120L        Human Anatomy and Physiology I & Lab               4
BIOL       2130/2130L        Human Anatomy and Physiology II & Lab              4


* Physical Education: Two courses - PHED 1020 and one other PHED course are
required and the student must pass the Regent’s Testing Program in Reading and
Composition.
170 / Gainesville College



                            PRACTICAL NURSING
                  Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College
                                        or
               Gainesville College & North Georgia Technical College
Completion of the Lanier Technical College or North Georgia Technical College program
specific course requirements and the Gainesville College general education requirements
specified below with asterisks (*) will prepare the student to sit for the State Board Exam in
Georgia for licensing as a practical nurse (LPN). Completion of the remaining Gainesville
College general education requirements will lead to the Associate of Applied Science
degree. Upon completion of this degree program the student will have met the twenty-four
hour general education requirement necessary for admittance into North Georgia College
and State University’s Career Mobility LPN to RN Program.

Gainesville College Course Requirements (28 hours)

ENGL           1101 or 1101H* Composition I                                            3
MATH           1001 or 1111*  Quantitative Skills and Reasoning
                                   or College Algebra                                  3
COMM           1100           Human Communications                                     3
CISM           1502           Introduction to Information Technology                   2

or other Area B Elective

HIST           1112 or 1112H    Survey of World Civilization II                        3
POLS           1101 or 1101H    American Government                                    3
PSYC           1101*            General Psychology                                     3
BIOL           2120/2120L*      Human Anatomy and Physiology I                         4
BIOL           2130/2130L*      Human Anatomy and Physiology II                        4


Physical Education: Two courses - PHED 1020 and PHED 1002 are required.
                                                                    Academic Programs / 171



                           MEDICAL ASSISTING
               Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College
                                     or
            Gainesville College & North Georgia Technical College
Completion of the Lanier Technical College or North Georgia Technical College clinical
requirements and the Gainesville College general education requirements specified below
will lead to the Associate of Applied Science degree. Upon completion of this degree
program, the student will have completed most of the general education core requirements
necessary for admittance into a Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) degree program.
However, additional coursework in Areas A-F may be required before entering a BAS or
other allied health program.

Gainesville College Course Requirements (28 hours)

ENGL        1101 or 1101H     Composition I                                        3
MATH        1001 or 1111      Quantitative Skills and Reasoning
                                  or College Algebra                               3
COMM        1100              Human Communications                                 3
CSCI or      CISM 1502        Introduction to Information Technology               2
HIST        1112 or 1112H     Survey of World Civilization II                      3
POLS        1101 or 1101H     American Government                                  3
PSYC        1101              General Psychology                                   3
BIOL        2120/2120L        Human Anatomy and Physiology I                       4
BIOL        2130/2130L        Human Anatomy and Physiology II                      4


Physical Education: Two courses - PHED 1020 and PHED 1002 are required.
172 / Gainesville College



               MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
                  Gainesville College & Lanier Technical College
                                        or
               Gainesville College & North Georgia Technical College
Completion of the MLT program requirements at Lanier Technical College or North Georgia
Technical College and the Gainesville College general education requirements (listed below)
leads to the Associate in Applied Science degree.

The Medical Laboratory requirements are listed individually in each of the Technical
College’s catalogs. Students must apply, qualify, and be accepted at each individual
institution. Students may complete either component of the programs separately (any order)
or enroll in both the technical and general education courses simultaneously. However, prior
completion of the general education courses at Gainesville College, i.e., Math, English, and
Psychology, may reduce the general education requirements at LTC and NGTC.

Gainesville College Course Requirements (26 hours)

ENGL           1101 or 1101H    Composition I                                        3
COMM           1100             Human Communications                                 3
BIOL           1107/1107L       Principles of Biology I                              4
CHEM           1211/1211L       Principles of Chemistry I                            4
MATH           1111             College Algebra                                      3
PSYC           1101             General Psychology                                   3
POLS           1101 or 1101H    American Government                                  3
HIST           2111 or 2112     Survey of U.S. History I or II                       3
            or 2111H or 2112H


Note: BIOL 2120/2120L (Anatomy & Physiology) may be substituted for BIOL 1107/1107L.

Physical Education: Two courses - PHED 1020 and PHED 1002 are required.
                                            Academic Programs / 173



                     CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Child Development (Birth to Five)
Early Childhood Care and Education
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Studies
European Union Studies
Geographic Information Science
Paralegal Studies
Personal Training
174 / Gainesville College



                   CHILD DEVELOPMENT (Birth to Five)
                            CERTIFICATE
     Designed for Child Care Teachers to meet the immediate educational credentialing
requirement of their employment, this ten semester credit hour program can be completed
within 180 days and lead directly into an Associate Degree Program.
Required Courses (10 hours)

ECDV        1101            Introduction to Child Development                    3
ECDV        2010            Methods and Materials                                3
ECDV        2040            Family Systems                                       3
ECDV        2901            Special Topics                                       1

      Students requiring learning support classes are required to take one learning support
class each semester beginning with READ 0099, if required. Upon completion of the ECDV
classes, a student will have met the educational requirements of their employment. Upon
completion of learning support requirements, if any, the student would be officially granted
the Certificate. Upon receiving the Certificate a student becomes eligible to pursue the
Associate Degree in Early Childhood Educaiton (Ages 0-5).
                                                                           Academic Programs / 175



                      ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
                            CERTIFICATE
             (Emphasis in Watershed Characterization and Management)

     Watershed characterization and management is a relatively new, holistic approach that
is currently being used nationally to address water quality and quantity issues. The
watershed approach is a coordinated framework for environmental management that focuses
public and private sector efforts to address the highest priority problems within
hydrologically-defined geographic areas (watersheds), taking into consideration both
ground and surface water flow. The aim of the watershed approach is to work with the
regional community to prevent pollution and achieve and sustain environmental
improvements.
      The Geographic Information System (GIS) is central to the watershed approach and is
the tool that is employed to assimilate, analyze, and present the various data that is collected.
Since this data is collected by professionals from a variety of disciplines, e.g., engineers,
geologists, hydrologists, biologists, chemists, political and social scientists, it is imperative
that the well-trained GIS technician have a fundamental understanding of the role that each
of these disciplines have in the overall watershed process.
     Students that complete the Environmental Science Certificate will be able to conduct
watershed investigations on small watersheds and assist as a team member in watershed
characterization on larger, more complex systems.
      Those that complete both the Environmental Science and the GIS certificate programs
will be able to play a pivotal role in the entry, analysis, and presentation of the data collected
by the multi-discipline watershed characterization and management team.

Required Courses (19 hours)

ESCI      2001       Land Use and Conservation with Lab                     4
ESCI      2002       Fundamentals of Soil Science with Lab                  3
ESCI      2010       Wetlands and Aquatic Ecology with Lab                  4
ESCI      2020       Environmental Chemistry with Lab                       4
ESCI      2030       Hydrology with Lab                                     4

     All of the courses in the Environmental Science Certificate Program are offered on the
Gainesville College Gainesville Campus as a component of the Institute for Environmental
and Spatial Analysis (see page 84). However, some of the courses above as well as
additional Environmental Science courses may be taken at the Savannah River
Environmental Science Field Station (see page 83).
176 / Gainesville College



                              ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
                                   CERTIFICATE
     Environmental study has been a growing field for several decades, particularly since
the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the 1970’s. With the
increasing need for continued examination of environmental practice, it is necessary to
understand the interplay between the environment and the human dimension. The
Certificate provides an interdisciplinary understanding of the environment as it examines the
man-environment relationship from the historical, philosophical, political, and soci-
psychological perspectives.
     Taken in conjunction with a major area of study, students who complete the Certificate
will have a broad understanding of environmental issues that prepares them for further
advanced environmental study and/or provides them with a base of understanding to work in
the area of environmental policy analysis and/or community development.

Required Courses (18 hours)

ENST        2030            Human Ecology                               3
ENST        2070            Practicum in Environmental Studies          3

Elective Courses (12 hours)

ENST        2035            Introduction to Environmental Policy        3
ENST        2040            Environmental Communication                 3
ENST        2045            Environment &Community Organization         3
ENST        2050            Ethics and the Environment                  3
ENST        2055            Environment and Society                     3
ENST        2060            History and the Environment                 3
ENST        2065            Social Influence & the Environment          3
ECON        2258            Applied Micro Economics                     3
                                                                     Academic Programs / 177



                      EUROPEAN UNION STUDIES
                           CERTIFICATE
     Gainesville College participates with other University System of Georgia institutions
and with select European institutions in offering the European Union Studies Certificate.
The Certificate was created to enable students from a wide range of degree programs to
better prepare themselves for employment opportunities in the global marketplace.
     The Certificate must be taken in tandem with a formal degree program and students
from all academic majors are eligible if they possess a minimum 2.75 cumulative GPA.
Students may apply upon successful completion of all three of the following:

          A course in World or Western Civilization or Global Studies (see below);

          the introductory course in European Union Studies (EURO 1100 - Introduction to
          the European Union) with a minimum grade of “C”; and,

          30 semester hours of academic credit.

Certificate requirements consist of the following:

          World Civilization or Western Civilization or Global Studies (HIST 1111, 1112,
          1112H, 1121, 1122 or POLS 2401);

          Introduction to the European Union (EURO 1100) with a minimum grade of “C”;

          four interdisciplinary courses from an approved menu (to be taken at a senior
          college);

          Capstone Seminar (to be taken at a senior college);

          Practicum Experience (to be taken at a senior college); and,

          3.0 GPA in Certificate courses.

     Coursework for the Certificate may be commenced at Gainesville College and
completed at a senior Georgia college. For further information contact the Division of
Social Sciences.
178 / Gainesville College



                GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
                         CERTIFICATE
      Location matters. That's why Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is such a rapidly
growing field. If you've heard of it, you probably know that it is a powerful computer
mapping system. But GIS is much more, involving the complex analysis and modeling of
information based on its geographic location. In this sense, GIS is a powerful and often
necessary tool in a wide range of disciplines. Businesses need to know where customers are
located and where to build new offices, government agencies need to know where natural
resources are located and how to effectively manage them, environmentalists need to locate
and manage sensitive wildlife habitats, and sociologists need to track the distribution and
demographics of our population. In a rapidly changing world, decision-makers in many
fields depend on GIS specialists to collect, manage, and analyze geographic data. These are
just a few of the applications of Geographic Information Systems. For many disciplines,
knowledge of GIS and related technologies serves to produce a more versatile and
marketable individual.
     The Certificate in Geographic Information Science is designed to complement students
who are pursuing or who already possess an Associates Degree or higher. Students will be
prepared for entry level positions as GIS technicians and/or transfer into competitive
four-year degree programs. Contact the Division of Natural Science, Engineering, and
Technology for information on job placement and transferability.

Required Courses (15 hours)

GISC               2011*    Introduction to Geographic Information        3
                                Science with Lab
GISC               2012     Spatial Analysis in GIS with Lab              3
GISC               2201     Fundamentals of Cartography and Earth         3
                                Measurement
GISC               2202     Data Acquisition and Conversion in GIS        3
GISC               2203     Fundamentals of Remote Sensing                3

* Students with prior GIS experience may exempt this course upon successful completion of
a competency exam.

Select 3 hours from the following courses:

GISC               2903     Special Topics in GIS                         3
GISC               2963     Service Learning in GIS                       3
GISC               2983     Internship in GIS                             3

Note: Certain GISC courses may be applied toward Area F graduation requirements in
Geology and Physical Geography. For more information contact the Division of Natural
Sciences and Technology.

To earn a GIS Certificate, students must:
    • maintain a 3.0 GPA in all required GIS Certificate courses;
    • successfully complete an exit exam; and,
    • apply for graduation one semester prior to completion of the Certificate
          requirements.
                                                                     Academic Programs / 179



                           PARALEGAL STUDIES
                              CERTIFICATE

    This certificate is available only to students who have earned at least an Associate’s
Degree (AA or AS) or a bachelor’s degree (BA or BS) from an accredited institution.

Required Courses (17 hours)
PARA           1100            Introduction to Paralegalism and Ethics              3
PARA           2101            Civil Procedure                                      2
PARA           2102            Criminal Litigation                                  2
PARA           2103            Civil Litigation II                                  2
PARA           2104            Legal Research and Writing                           3
PARA           2105            Wills, Probate & Estate Administration               2
PARA           2106            Computers for the Legal Profession                   3
Elective Paralegal Courses (Select 7 hours)
PARA           2201        Real Estate and Title Examination                        2
PARA           2202        Real Estate Closings                                     1
PARA           2203        Family Law                                               2
PARA           2204        Business Organizations/Contracts                         2
PARA           2206        Internship                                               1
PARA           2207        Bankruptcy                                               2
Required General Education Courses (5 hours)
BUSA           2106        The Environment of Business                              3
CISM           1502        Introduction to Information Technology                   2

Note:
    • This certificate is approved by the American Bar Association.
    • Students qualifying are classified as “special” students, and as such, are not
        evaluated for learning support and are not required to take the Regents’ Test.
    • All paralegal classes are taught at night on the Gainesville College Gainesville
        Campus.
    • PARA 1100 Introduction to Paralegalism and Ethics – is a prerequisite course for all
        the remaining paralegal courses.
180 / Gainesville College


                              PERSONAL TRAINING
                                 CERTIFICATE

Required Courses (32 hours)
ENGL               1101 or 1101H   Composition I                                     3
COMM               1100            Introduction to Human Communication               3
POLS               1101 or 1101H   American Government                               3
BIOL*              2120            Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab           4
PHED*              2000            Personal Training with Lab                        3
PHED*              1020            Personal Health and Wellness                      2
PHED*              2034            Strength Training and Conditioning                2
PHED*              1002            CPR/First Aid                                     1
Select one of the following courses (3 hours)
MATH               1001            Quantitative Skills and Reasoning                 3
MATH               1111            College Algebra with Applications                 3
MATH               1113            Precalculus                                       3
Select one of the following courses (4 hours)
CHEM               1151            Survey of Chemistry I with Lab                    4
CHEM               1211            Principles of Chemistry I with Lab                4
BIOL               1101            Biology - A Human Perspective with Lab            4
BIOL               1107            Principles of Biology I with Lab                  4
Select one of the following courses (3 hours)
HIST               1112 or 1112H Survey of World Civilization II                     3
HIST               2111 or 2111H Survey of U.S. History I                            3
HIST               2112 or 2112H Survey of U.S. History II                           3
Select one of the following courses (1 hour)*
PHED               1000            Personal Fitness                                  1
PHED               1106            Aerobics                                          1
PHED               1109            Water Aerobics                                    1
PHED               1110            Fitness Walking                                   1
PHED               1111            Jogging                                           1
PHED               1300            Mountain Biking                                   1
PHED               1500            Fitness Swimming                                  1

* Note: In order to receive a Certificate in Personal Training, students must complete these
required courses with minimum grade of C in each course.
                                                                      Academic Programs / 181



                 UNIVERSITY CENTER PROGRAMS
     Currently, North Georgia College and State University (NGCSU) offers courses on the
Gainesville College campus leading to the completion of the Associate of Science in Nursing
and selected Bachelor Degrees. NGCSU also offers selected upper level courses for students
to work toward advanced degrees. Students taking classes through the University Center,
whether full- or part-time, will have access to all facilities and services offered by
Gainesville College, as well as, North Georgia College and State University.

Additional information regarding the University Center programs may be obtained from the
Gainesville College website: http://www.gc.peachnet.edu/admin/gcuc/ or at the University
Center located in the Dunlap Mathis Building on the Gainesville campus.


NGCSU PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Nursing                                   Associate of Science
Nursing                                   LPN to RN Career Mobility Program

Early Childhood Education                 Bachelor of Science
Computer Information Systems              Bachelor of Science

Accounting                                Bachelor of Business Administration
Finance                                   Bachelor of Business Administration
Marketing                                 Bachelor of Business Administration
Management                                Bachelor of Business Administration

In addition to the undergraduate degrees, the NGCSU School of Education offers
certificates, endorsements, and graduate level core courses on the Gainesville College
campus.
               VIII
      COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

ACCOUNTING (ACCT)
AIR FORCE ROTC (AIRS)
ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
ART (ARHS, ARST, ARSX)
BIOLOGY (BIOL)
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSA)
CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
CHILD DEVELOPMENT (ECDV)
CINEMA (CINE)
COMMUNICATIONS (COMM)
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CISM)
COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSCI)
CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES (CGLO)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CRJU)
DIVERSITY ISSUES (DVRS)
ECOLOGY (ECOL)
ECONOMICS (ECON)
EDUCATION (EDUC)
ENGINEERING (ENGR)
ENGLISH (ENGL)
ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
   (ESLC, ESLO, ESLR, ESLV, ESLW, ESOL)
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ESCI)
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (ENST)
EUROPEAN UNION STUDIES (EURO)
FRENCH (FREN)
GAINESVILLE COLLEGE FRESHMAN ORIENTATION (GCOR)
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE (GISC)
GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)
GEOLOGY (GEOL)
GERMAN (GRMN)
HISTORY (HIST)
HONORS (HONR)
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (ITEC)
INTEGRATED SCIENCE (ISCI)
INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES (INED)
                                            Courses of Instruction / 183


JAPANESE (JAPN)
JOURNALISM (JOUR)
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (INST)
LEARNING SUPPORT COURSES (listed with ENGL, MATH, READ)
LINGUISTICS (MLAN)
MANAGEMENT (MGNT)
MATHEMATICS (MATH)
MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE (MFLA)
MUSIC (MUSC)
PARALEGAL STUDIES (PARA)
PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHED)
PHYSICS (PHYS)
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
POULTRY SCIENCE (POUL)
PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
READING (READ)
REGENTS’ TEST PREPARATION (RGTE, RGTP, RGTR)
RELIGION (RELG)
RESEARCH STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY (RSCH)
RUSSIAN (RUSS)
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (SCTS)
SCIENCE STUDY SKILLS (SSCI)
SERVICE LEARNING (SVLN)
SOCIAL WORK (SOWK)
SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
SPANISH (SPAN)
SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED)
SPORT MANAGEMENT (SPMG)
STATISTICS (STAT)
SURVEY OF SCIENCE ETHICS (SSCE)
TEAM BUILDING (TBLD)
THEATRE (THEA)
184 / Gainesville College


                                   COURSE ABBREVIATIONS
                                  (Alphabetical by Abbreviation)

ACCT..................................................................................................Accounting
AIRS ......................................................................................... Air Force ROTC
ANTH ............................................................................................ Anthropology
ARHS, ARST, ARSX . ................................................................................... Art
BIOL ........................................................................................................ Biology
BUSA............................................................................Business Administration
CGLO................................................................... Contemporary Global Issues
CHEM ................................................................................................. Chemistry
CINE ........................................................................................................Cinema
CISM ............................................................... Computer Information Systems
COMM ..................................................................................... Communications
CRJU......................................................................................... Criminal Justice
CSCI ....................................................................................... Computer Science
DVRS.......................................................................................... Diversity Issues
ECDV ................................................................................... Child Development
ECOL .......................................................................................................Ecology
ECON ..................................................................................................Economics
EDUC ...................................................................................................Education
ENGL ....................................................................................................... English
ENGR ............................................................................................... Engineering
ENST .............................................................................. Environmental Studies
ESCI ............................................................................... Environmental Science
ESLC, ESLO, ESLR, ESLV, ESLW, ESOL,..............English for Speakers of
                                                                                               Other Languages
EURO ...........................................................................European Union Studies
FREN.........................................................................................................French
GCOR............................................................... Gainesville College Orientation
GEOG................................................................................................. Geography
GEOL ...................................................................................................... Geology
GISC............................................................... Geographic Information Science
GRMN.....................................................................................................German
HIST ......................................................................................................... History
HONR....................................................................................................... Honors
INED .........................................................................International Perspectives
INST ............................................................................Leadership Development
ISCI ........................................................................................Integrated Science
ITEC.............................................................................Information Technology
JAPN ......................................................................................................Japanese
JOUR..................................................................................................Journalism
MATH ............................................................................................. Mathematics
MFLA..................................................................... Modern Foreign Languages
MGNT .............................................................................................Management
                                                                                         Courses of Instruction / 185


MLAN ................................................................................................ Linguistics
MUSC..........................................................................................................Music
PARA .......................................................................................Paralegal Studies
PHED ....................................................................................Physical Education
PHIL................................................................................................... Philosophy
PHYS........................................................................................................ Physics
POLS ..........................................................................................Political Science
POUL ..........................................................................................Poultry Science
PSYC .................................................................................................. Psychology
READ ......................................................................................................Reading
RELG ......................................................................................................Religion
RGTE, RGTP, RGTR..............................................Regents’ Test Preparation
RSCH .......................................................Research Strategies and Technology
RUSS ........................................................................................................Russian
SCTS .............................................................................Science and Technology
SOCI...................................................................................................... Sociology
SOWK .............................................................................................. Social Work
SPAN ........................................................................................................Spanish
SPED .......................................................................................Special Education
SPMG ................................................................................... Sport Management
SSCE ............................................................................Survey of Science Ethics
SSCI..................................................................................... Science Study Skills
STAT ......................................................................................................Statistics
SVLN........................................................................................ Service Learning
TBLD............................................................................................Team Building
THEA .......................................................................................................Theatre
186 / Gainesville College



ACCOUNTNG (ACCT)
ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I                                                3 hours
An introduction to the fundamentals, practices and procedures of accounting, including the
construction and interpretation of financial statements. Emphasis is placed on the corporate
form of business organization. Prerequisite: READ 0099 and MATH 0099.
ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II                                              3 hours
A study of utilization of accounting information in business management, including cost
accounting fundamentals, specialized internal reports, budgeting and decision making for the
corporate forms of business. Prerequisite: ACCT 2101 with a grade of C or higher.


AIR FORCE ROTC (AIRS)
AIRS 1001 Foundations of the United States Air Force I                                1 hour
Oasis Title: FOUNDATIONS OF USAF I
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air
Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include Air Force heritage, career
fields in the Air Force, and military benefits. Offered fall semester every year.
AIRS 1001L Leadership Laboratory I (General Military Course)                        1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB I GMC                                      (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
to complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. Lab is a student-planned,
organized, and executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment
commander and commandant of cadets. Offered fall semester every year.
AIRS 1002 Foundations of the United States Air Force II                            1 hour
Oasis Title: FOUNDATIONS OF USAF II
Continuation survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force
and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include Air Force heritage,
career fields in the Air Force, and military benefits. Offered spring semester every year.
Preprequisite: AIRS 1001 or permission of department.
AIRS 1002L Leadership Laboratory II (General Military Course)                       1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB II GMC                                     (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
to complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. Lab is a student-planned,
organized, and executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment
commander and commandant of cadets. Offered spring semester every year. Prerequisite:
AIRS 1001L or permission of department.
AIRS 2001 Air Power History I                                                      1 hour
Oasis Title: AIR POWER HISTORY I
Second-year survey course covering a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to
the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are
provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities and missions and to
determine the evolution of what has become today’s United States Air Force air/space
power.     Examination of several fundamental truths associated with war from
doctrinal/historical perspectives, incorporation of operational examples of Air Force core
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 187


values, and development of writing/briefing style to meet Air Force communication skills
requirements. Offered fall semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 1002 or permission of
department.
AIRS 2001L Leadership Laboratory I (General Military Course)                        1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB I GMC                                      (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
to complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. Lab is a student-planned,
organized, and executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment
commander and commandant of cadets. Offered fall semester every year. Prerequisite:
AIRS 1002L or permission of department.
AIRS 2002 Air Power History II                                                    1 hour
Oasis Title: AIR POWER HISTORY II
Beginning with the Vietnam War, historical examples are provided to extrapolate the
development of Air Force capabilities/missions to determine the evolution of what has
become today’s United States Air Force air/space power. Examination of fundamental truths
associated with war, from doctrinal/historical perspectives; incorporation of operational
examples of Air Force core values; and development of writing/briefing styles to meet Air
Force communication skills requirements. Offered spring semester every year. Prerequisite:
AIRS 2001 or permission of department.
AIRS 2002L Leadership Laboratory II (General Military Course)                       1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB II GMC                                     (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
to complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. Lab is a student-planned,
organized, and executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment
commander and commandant of cadets. Offered spring semester every year. Prerequisite:
AIRS 2001L or permission of department.
AIRS 3001 Air Force Leadership Studies I                                             2 hours
Oasis Title: AF LDRSHP STUDIES I
Emphasizes the individual as a manager in an Air Force environment. Individual
motivation/behavioral process, leadership, communication, and group dynamics provide a
foundation for the development of the junior officer’s professional skills as an Air Force
officer. Basic managerial processes involving decision making, utilization of analytic aids in
planning, organizing, and controlling in a changing environment. Offered fall semester
every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 2002 or permission of department.
AIRS 3001L Leadership Laboratory I (Professional Officer Course)                    1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB I POC                                      (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. It is a student-planned, organized, and
executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment commander and
commandant of cadets. Offered fall semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 2002L or
permission of department.
188 / Gainesville College


AIRS 3002 Air Force Leadership Studies II                                       2 hours
Oasis Title: AF LDRSHP STUDIES II
Managerial and leadership problems found in industry and government. Actual Air Force
cases are used to enhance the learning and communication process. Organizational and
personal values, management of forces in change, managerial strategy and tactics.
Application of learned theories to potential problems the new officer may encounter.
Offered spring semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 3001 or permission of department.
AIRS 3002L Leadership Laboratory II (Professional Officer Course)                   1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB II POC                                     (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. It is a student-planned, organized, and
executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment commander and
commandant of cadets. Offered spring semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 3001L or
permission of department.
AIRS 4001 National Security Affairs I                                                    2 hours
Oasis Title: NATL SEC AFFAIRS I
Examination of the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics,
and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession,
officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and
current issues affecting military professionalism. Continued emphasis is given to refining
communication skills. Offered fall semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 3002 or
permission of department.
AIRS 4001L Leadership Laboratory I (Professional Officer Course)                    1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB I POC                                      (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. It is a student-planned, organized, and
executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment commander and
commandant of cadets. Offered fall semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 3002L or
permission of department.
AIRS 4001 National Security Affairs II                                                  2 hours
Oasis Title: NATL SEC AFFAIRS II
Continues focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control
of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military
professionalism. Continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Offered
spring semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 4001 or permission of department.
AIRS 4001L Leadership Laboratory II (Professional Officer Course)                   1 hour
Oasis Title: LEADER LAB II POC                                     (2 hours lab per week)
Leadership lab is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities
designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and
complement the Air Force ROTC academic program. It is a student-planned, organized, and
executed practicum conducted under the supervision of the detachment commander and
commandant of cadets. Offered spring semester every year. Prerequisite: AIRS 4001L or
permission of department.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 189


ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology                                           3 hours
Anthropology is the holistic study of what it means to be human. Four subfields are
surveyed: biological anthropology (the study of human evolution, diversity and
environmental adaptation), archaeology (the study of prehistory, human migrations,
emergence of agriculture and complex societies), linguistic anthropology (comparative
studies of human languages and linguistic behavior, and animal communication systems),
and sociocultural anthropology (the study of cultures in both complex and small-scale
societies; human cognition and behavior in cross-cultural contexts). Prerequisite: READ
0099.
ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology                                 3 hours
   (Human Origins and Evolution)
An introduction to the theories, methods, and basic issues in biological anthropology,
emphasizing human origins, evolutionary change, and primatology. Comparisons between
traditional archaeological methods and recent molecular techniques of analysis, biological
diversity of human populations and their environmental adaptations, and applications of
human genetics are investigated. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                                       3 hours
   (Ethnology)
An introduction to the theories, methods, and basic issues in cultural anthropology, stressing
comparison and interpretation of case studies (ethnographies) from contemporary small and
large-scale societies. Ethnographies are investigated as teaching tools, organizing principles,
documentation of ways of life for specific groups of people and as problem-solving devices
for better understanding global perspectives. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
ANTH 2030 Introduction to Archaeology                                              3 hours
An introduction to the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archaeology.
Archaeological interpretations of human societies using material remains are explored.
Topics include the history of archaeology; developing a research design; field methods;
laboratory analyses; chronology; excavation and analytical techniques. Prerequisite: READ
0099.
ANTH 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Anthropology
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand. Among such topics are Archaeology of Georgia, Aztecs and Maya, East Asian
Cultures, and Medical Anthropology. Prerequisite: READ 0099.


ART (ARSX, ARST, ARHS)
All three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact hours
per week
ARSX 1100 Art Appreciation                                                        3 hours
A study of the visual arts as an expression of human creativity. Comparison of paintings,
sculpture and architecture from past and present acquaints students with aesthetic, social,
psychological and critical dimensions of art. Occasional experiments with selected media.
Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.
190 / Gainesville College


ARST 1010 Two-Dimensional Design                                                    3 hours
An investigation of principles of visual organization and composition in two-dimensional
design through the problem solving process. Emphasis is placed on development of a visual
vocabulary of line, shape, value and form as the basic elements of art. All three (3) credit
hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact hours per week
ARST 1020 Basic Drawing I                                                             3 hours
An introduction to visual concepts used to develop a two-dimensional composition. The
visual environment is explored through interaction of perceptual and graphic experiences.
These experiences stress figure-ground relationship, picture plane, form, planes, contour, and
gesture. A variety of materials is used. All three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet
for six (6) contact hours per week.
ARST 1030 Three-Dimensional Design                                                 3 hours
An investigation of the principles of visual organization and composition in three-
dimensional design. Emphasis is placed on tactile experiences. The student develops an
understanding of space, mass, weight, line, shape and value through three-dimensional
materials. All three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact hours per
week.
ARST 2010 Color Theory                                                            3 hours
Specific consideration of problems of light and color theory as related to two-dimensional
design and composition. All three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6)
contact hours per week.
ARST 2020 Drawing II                                                                3 hours
Emphasis placed on the development of the student’s ability to see and interpret a variety of
forms through drawing the human figure as a means to create a pictorial composition.
Prerequisites: ARST 1010 and ARST 1020, or permission of instructor. All three (3) credit
hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact hours per week.

ARST 2050 Computer Graphics I                                                       3 hours
An introduction to creative utilization of the computer for a wide range of graphics tasks,
focusing on the design and manipulation of the computer image in terms of both the pictorial
image and the printed word image. Students will have “hands-on” experience with various
programs such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Quark. Assignments are intended to develop
technical ability as well as enhancing aesthetic awareness. All three (3) credit hour studio
courses will meet for six (6) contact hours per week.
ARST 2051 Computer Graphics II                                                       3 hours
An advanced introduction to creative utilization of the computer for a wide range of graphics
tasks focusing on the design and manipulation of the computer image in terms of both the
pictorial image and the printed word image. Students will have “hands-on” experience with
various programs such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Quark. Assignments are intended to
develop technical ability as well as enhancing aesthetic awareness. Prerequisite: ARST 2050
or permission of instructor. All three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6)
contact hours per week.
ARST 2300 Basic Painting I                                                       3 hours
The fundamentals of painting are explored through the characteristics of the medium.
Emphasis is placed on color and perception as a basis to achieve a pictorial composition.
The student will explore his/her perceptions and their translation to a two-dimensional
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 191


surface in terms of color, light, and picture plane. All three (3) credit hour studio courses
will meet for six (6) contact hours per week.

ARST 2310 Painting II                                                              3 hours
Specific consideration of problems of light and color as they relate to spatial factors
encountered in painting. Prerequisite: ARST 2300 or permission of instructor. All three (3)
credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact hours per week.
ARST 2400 Sculpture I                                                             3 hours
Fundamentals of the basic methods of sculpture and their aesthetic implication in terms of
form and content. All three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact
hours per week.
ARST 2410 Sculpture II                                                              3 hours
Continued study of the techniques, processes, and materials in sculpture and their aesthetic
implications in terms of form and content. Prerequisites: ARST 1030 and ARST 2400. All
three (3) credit hour studio courses will meet for six (6) contact hours per week.
ARST 2500 Handbuilding                                                             3 hours
An introduction to the materials and processes involved in constructing, glazing and firing
earthenware clay. Studio based projects will incorporate hand building techniques and skills
required for making pottery on the potters wheel. All three (3) credit hour studio courses
will meet for six (6) contact hours per week.
ARST 2510 Wheelthrowing                                                            3 hours
The second level ceramics course develops the basic concepts taught in ARST 2500. The
course introduces wheel thrown forms, kiln firing, and the development of glaze formulation
and its application by individual student. The history of ceramics and its contemporary
issues will be addressed.
ARHS 2510 Introduction to Art History I                                           3 hours
A survey of mankind’s creative endeavors from cave paintings to cathedral, including
ancient Mediterranean cultures and eventual focus on emerging forms of Christian West.
Follows a chronological narrative from cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Crete and Greece to
the threshold of Christian art in Latin and Byzantine forms. Observes final flowering of
Medieval piety in evolution of Gothic imagination. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL
1101 with a grade of C or higher.

ARHS 2520 Introduction to Art History II                                               3 hours
A survey of the history of western European art from the Renaissance to WWII, focusing on
painting, sculpture and architecture since the 15th century. Characteristics of style as well as
influences of major cultural themes are traced through Renaissance, Baroque, Neo-Classical,
and Romantic Periods, culminating in the diversity of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 1101 with a grade of C or higher.
ARST 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Art                                            2-3 hours
Special interest courses, which may not be transferable, are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are advanced studio projects or research on
problems of art history. Prerequisite: Consent of supervising instructor.
192 / Gainesville College


ARST 2952, 2953 Art Internship                                                    2-3 hours
These courses, which may not be transferable, are offered in response to student interest and
demand. Internships allow students who have achieved a level of competency in art to work
within the community, applying their skills. Prerequisite: Consent of supervising instructor.


BIOLOGY (BIOL)
All lecture and lab courses have a separate number and grade; therefore,
if the lab is required with the lecture, they must be taken concurrently. The
only exception is if one component (lecture or lab) is passed and the other
failed, only the failed portion need be repeated.
BIOL 1101 Biology - A Human Perspective                                          3 hours
A course for non-science students, it focuses on organisms, particularly humans. Topics
include cells, metabolism/dynamic equilibrium, continuity of life (DNA to population
genetics), animal form and function (comparative evolution of selected body systems) and
environmental interactions. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Corequisite: BIOL 1101L.
BIOL 1101L Biology - A Human Perspective Lab                                         1 hour
Activities designed to supplement BIOL 1101 lecture. These include use of scientific
methods of investigation, data analysis and critical thinking to understand the relevance of
biology in the contemporary world. Corequisite: BIOL 1101.
BIOL 1102 Introduction to Ecology                                                    3 hours
A course for non-science students that focuses on the environment, evolution and biological
diversity. It introduces students to a variety of organisms, particularly plants and animals;
attention is given to their evolutionary and ecological interactions with each other and
humanity. Emphasis is placed on natural and stressed (polluted) ecosystems. Prerequisite:
READ 0099. Corequisite: BIOL 1102L.
BIOL 1102L Introduction to Ecology Lab                                               1 hour
Activities designed to supplement BIOL 1102 lecture. These include use of scientific
methods of investigation, data analysis and critical thinking. Field studies and analysis of
selected ecosystems are involved. Corequisite: BIOL 1102.
BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology I                                                      3 hours
A course that is intended for science majors and is essential for any student who will take
senior level courses in biology. It includes biological chemistry, cell structure and function,
bioenergetics, inheritance, genetics, gene expression, regulation and technology, population
genetics and evolution. Prerequisites: a strong background in chemistry, preferably college-
level, taken prior to or concurrently with this course; evidence of a strong high school
chemistry may be acceptable with permission of Biology Coordinator; READ 0099.
Corequisite: BIOL 1107L.
BIOL 1107L Principles of Biology I Lab                                                1 hour
Activities designed to develop the powers of observation, skills in biological techniques,
experimentation, data analysis, and critical thinking that are necessary for advanced biology
courses. Corequisite: BIOL 1107.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 193


BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology II                                                3 hours
A continuation of Principles of Biology I that includes diversity, growth, physiology and
ecology of microbes, plants and animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 or permission of Biology
Coordinator. Corequisite: BIOL 1108L.
BIOL 1108L Principles of Biology II Lab                                               1 hour
Activities designed to develop the powers of observation, skills in biological techniques,
experimentation, data analysis, and critical thinking that are necessary for advanced biology
courses. Corequisite: BIOL 1108.
BIOL 2120 Human Anatomy and Physiology I                                           3 hour
An in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body, from the cell and tissue
level through these organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, endocrine, urinary,
and reproductive systems. It is strongly recommended that the student have taken AP
biology in high school or BIOL 1101 or CHEM 1151 before taking this course. Prerequisite:
READ 0099. Corequisite: BIOL 2120L.
BIOL 2120L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab                                     1 hour
Activities include in-depth study of cell and tissues, the skeletal, muscular, endocrine,
urinary, and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Corequisite: BIOL 2120.

BIOL 2130 Human Anatomy and Physiology II                                         3 hours
A continuation of Human Anatomy and Physiology I. It includes those organ systems not
studied in BIOL 2120. Systems included for study are: nervous and special senses,
cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, and digestive systems. Prerequisite: BIOL
2120 or permission of Biology Coordinator. Corequisite: BIOL 2130L.
BIOL 2130L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab                                1 hour
Activities include detailed study of the nervous and special senses, cardiovascular,
lymphatic, immune, respiratory, and digestive systems. Computer exercises and animal
dissections are utilized. Corequisite: BIOL 2130.
BIOL 2210 Botany I                                                                    3 hours
A general survey of the fundamentals of plant life including cell structure and function, plant
morphology and anatomy, growth, reproduction, and physiology. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
Corequisite: BIOL 2210L.
BIOL 2210L Botany I Lab                                                            1 hour
Activities designed to supplement the lecture material of BIOL 1210. Outside field studies
will be required. Corequisite: BIOL 2210.
BIOL 2220 Botany II                                                             3 hours
A study of diversity, evolution, ecology, and systematics the vascular plants primarily.
Local flora will be emphasized. The influence of plants on humans will be highlighted.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2210. Corequisite: BIOL 2220L or permission of Biology Coordinator.
BIOL 2220L Botany II Lab                                                           1 hour
Activities designed to supplement the lecture material of BIOL 2220. Outside field studies
will be required. Corequisite: BIOL 2220.
194 / Gainesville College


BIOL 2500 Microbiology for Allied Health Professions 3 hours

A basic course that emphasizes microbial control, epidemiology, pathogenicity, virulence
and a survey of selected human communicable diseases. Prerequisite: (select one) BIOL
1101, BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2120. Corequisite: BIOL 2500L.
BIOL 2500L Microbiology for Allied Health Professions Lab                           1 hour
Live bacteria are used in the laboratory for developing the skills and techniques needed to
study and perform diagnostic tests on microorganisms. Corequisite: BIOL 2500.
BIOL 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Biology                                    1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Course proceeds by arrangement with instructor. A written proposal
for the study filed with the supervising instructor is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 and
BIOL 1108 or permission of Biology Coordinator.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSA)
BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business                                                3 hours
A study of various business organization patterns with emphasis on management functions
and responsibility of divisions. Locations, layouts, lines of promotion and authority, and
problems of organization expansion are covered. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
BUSA 1120 Business Mathematics                                                      3 hours
A study of the application of mathematics to the field of business, including interest,
discount, taxes, insurance, interpretation of graphs, and descriptive statistics. Calculator
skills are developed. For career students primarily. Prerequisite: MATH 0099.
BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business                                              3 hours
A broad survey course of several different areas of law which is designed to provide the
student with a basic understanding of law. These legal concepts relate to and impact the
business environment. Students will learn about the legal regulation of business, ethics,
alternative methods of dispute resolution, a global perspective of business and law, as well
as the social and political influences on the business environment. Prerequisite: READ
0099.

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
Chemistry courses at Gainesville College have a corresponding laboratory component.
Each chemistry course and its related laboratory component must be taken
concurrently. The lecture and laboratory are scheduled, evaluated, and listed
individually. The only exception is when one portion of the course (lecture or
laboratory) has been successfully completed and the other failed. In this case, only the
failed portion must be repeated. Careful attention should be given to avoiding schedule
conflicts.

CHEM 1115 Bio/Nutritional Chemistry for Dental Hygiene                              2 hours
A course designed to provide a general survey of biochemical and nutritional topics for
students in the Dental Hygiene program. Topics are included to provide a basic introduction
and preparation for specific dental hygiene courses. It is a non-laboratory course and
generally should not be considered as transferable to other programs or majors. Prerequisite:
CHEM 1151 or equivalent.
                                                                     Courses of Instruction / 195


CHEM 1151 Survey of Chemistry I                                                   3 hours
The first course of a two-semester sequence covering the elementary principles of general,
organic, and biochemistry. This course is designed to meet the core requirements - Area D
or F - of a variety of students including allied health majors. Topics covered normally
include elements and compounds, chemical equations and reactions, nomenclature, atomic
and molecular structure, the periodic table, solutions, and the physical states of matter.
Prerequisite: READ 0099 and MATH 1001 or equivalent, or concurrent enrollment in
MATH 1001 with permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 1151L.
CHEM 1151L Survey of Chemistry I Lab                                      1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 1151. Corequisite:
CHEM 1151.
CHEM 1152 Survey of Chemistry II                                                   3 hours
The second course of a two-semester sequence covering the elementary principles of
general, organic, and biochemistry. Topics to be covered normally include: acids, bases,
buffers, functional group organic chemistry, nomenclature, isomers, carbohydrates, proteins,
lipids, and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or equivalent, and a grade of C or better
in CHEM 1151 or equivalent. Corequisite CHEM 1152L.
CHEM 1152L Survey of Chemistry II Lab                                     1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 1152. Corequisite:
CHEM 1152.
CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I                                              3 hours
The first course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and
applications of modern chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include the
composition of matter, stoichoimetry, periodic relations, nomemclature, states of matter,
acid-base concepts, kinetics, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, and equilibrium.
Prerequisite: READ 0099 and MATH 1111 or equivalent, concurrent enrollment in MATH
1111 with permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 1211L. Students who have not had
high school chemistry are encouraged to take CHEM 1151 before CHEM 1211.
CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry I Lab                                  1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 1211. Corequisite:
CHEM 1211.
CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II                                              3 hours
The second course of a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and
applications of modern chemistry for science majors. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher
in CHEM 1211 and MATH 1111 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 1212L.
CHEM 1212L Principles of Chemistry II Lab                                 1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 1212. Corequisite:
CHEM 1212.
CHEM 2150 Survey of Organic Chemistry                                               3 hours
A one-semester course presenting a general survey of organic chemistry including the basic
functional groups and their reactions and a descriptive introduction to the major classes of
biochemical compounds. The course is designed for students needing a general introduction
to organic and biochemistry. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CHEM 1151 or 1211.
Corequisite: CHEM 2150L.
196 / Gainesville College


CHEM 2150L Survey of Organic Chemistry Lab                                1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 2150. Corequisite:
CHEM 2150.
CHEM 2211 Modern Organic Chemistry I                                                3 hours
The first course of a two-semester sequence covering nomenclature, molecular structure,
reactions and reaction mechanisms of hydrocarbons, their derivatives, and alcohols.
Stereochemical and spectroscopic concepts are introduced. This course is designed for
biology, chemistry, and pre-professional health related majors. Prerequisite: A grade of C or
higher in CHEM 1212. Corequisite: CHEM 2211L.
CHEM 2211L Modern Organic Chemistry I Lab                                      1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 2211 using both micro
and macro scale techniques. Corequisite: CHEM 2211.
CHEM 2212 Modern Organic Chemistry II                                          3 hours
The second course of a two-semester sequence continuing to emphasize properties,
reactions, mechanisms, and spectroscopic concepts of the basic organic and biochemical
functional groups. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in CHEM 2211. Corequisite:
CHEM 2212L.
CHEM 2212L Modern Organic Chemistry II Lab                                1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 2212. Corequisite:
CHEM 2212.
CHEM 2743 Analytical Chemistry                                                        3 hours
Study of the fundamental principles of quantitative/qualitative analytical chemistry including
basic statistics, equilibrium reactions and calculations, and instrumental methods such as
spectroscopy and chromatography. An intensive laboratory experience which applies these
principles to gravimetric, volumetric, colorimetric and chromatographic determinations.
Three lectures each week. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHEM 1212 or permissions
of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 2743L.
CHEM 2743L Analytical Chemistry Lab                                             1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of CHEM 2743. One lab per week
Corequisite: CHEM 2743.
CHEM 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Chemistry                              1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Topics are agreed upon by the student and instructor and a written
proposal as well as a final report are required. Prerequisites: CHEM 1212.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (ECDV)
ECDV 1101 Introduction to Child Development                                           3 hours
An introduction to the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of the young
child, birth to five years of age. Provides for competency development in observing,
recording and interpreting the stages in the young child’s physical and intellectual as well as
related social and emotional development, and for the development of positive guidance
techniques. Topics include: developmental characteristics, observation and recording theory
and practice, guidance techniques, transitioning the child, and developmentally appropriate
practice in early childhood settings. Corequisite: READ 0099.
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 197


ECDV 2010 Methods and Materials in Child Development                              3 hours
An introduction to the curriculum areas and the educational administration of child
development centers. Planning the classroom setting, instructional materials and methods,
and staff-parent-community relations are covered. Topics include: creativity in art, music
and movement, pre-writing and readiness activities, math and science concepts.
Prerequisite: ECDV 1101 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: READ 0099.
ECDV 2020 Curriculum Development                                                 3 hours
Develops knowledge and skills that enable the student to establish a quality learning
environment appropriate for young children. Topics include: instructional media,
curriculum approaches, curriculum materials, and community services. Prerequisite: ECDV
1101 or permission of instructor.
ECDV 2040 Family System and Parent Involvement                                       3 hours
Examines ways in which the childcare teacher can plan and implement a comprehensive
parent involvement program. Addresses parent education and support, school-family
activities, and teacher-parent communication and partnerships. Topics include: child
assessment and documentation, application of guidance techniques, linguistics and social
diversity issues, anti-bias issues, parent interaction and interpersonal skills. Prerequisite:
ECDV 1101 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: READ 0099.
ECDV 2110 Program Administration                                                     3 hours
Provides training in planning, implementation, and maintenance of an effective early
childhood organization. Topics include: organization, mission, philosophy, goals, and
history of a program; types of programs; laws, rules, regulations and accreditation; needs
assessment; administrative roles and governing boards; marketing, public and community
relations, grouping, and enrollment and retention; working with parents; and professionalism
and work ethics. Prerequisites: ECDV 1101 or permission of instructor.
ECDV 2120 Internship                                                              3 hours
Child Care Center observation. Course provides the opportunity to gain experience in a
work setting where planning, implementation, observation, and evaluation activities are the
focus. Topics include: problem solving, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of
developmentally appropriate practices, professional development, and resource file
development. Prerequisites: ECDV 1101 or permission of instructor.
ECDV 2901 Special Topics in Child Development                                      1 hour
Special interest course which may not be transferable is offered to meet student need and
demand. Among such topics are family involvement, child guidance, mentally appropriate
practices and current issues. Corequisite: READ 0099.


CINEMA (CINE)
CINE 1100 Film Appreciation (renamed ENGL 2300 Introduction to Film) 3 hours

CINE 1502 Film and Culture                                                        2 hours
An Area B course, CINE 1502 examines the relationship between film and culture. Students
will build a vocabulary to discuss film content and theme. Both American and International
films will be discussed. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
198 / Gainesville College


COMMUNICATION (COMM)
COMM 1100 Introduction to Human Communication                                      3 hours
A critical thinking based course designed to introduce students to various communication
contexts. Special emphasis is placed on adapting communication style and content to diverse
cultural audiences. The course includes practice in public address and small group
communication. This class fulfills the oral communication requirement. Prerequisites:
READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
COMM 1500 Interpersonal Communication                                            3 hours
A communication course designed to give the student a better understanding of dyadic
communication. Emphasis is on how we communicate interpersonally and how we might
choose to change our communication in the areas of listening, disclosure, and conflict.
COMM 1502 Intercultural Communication                                               2 hours
This course introduces the student to the study of communication, culture, and intercultural
communication. Students will become aware of the ability of culture to shape and modify
personal views or reality through differing perceptions of world view, family experiences,
history, and verbal and nonverbal message systems. How diverse cultures communicate in
business, educational, and health settings will be addressed. Application of intercultural
communication theory and principles will be practiced throughout the course. Note: COMM
1502 may not be substituted for COMM 1100, Introduction to Human Communication, the 3
credit hour Area B course requirement of all Gainesville College students. Prerequisites:
READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
COMM 1800 Cultural Diversity in Communication                                     3 hours
Patterns of public and interpersonal communication among and between cultures and groups,
including North American minority cultures, will be explored. Strategies for understanding
group identity, difficulties in inter-group communication, and communication skills for
improving quality of interactions will be given emphasis. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and
ENGL 0099.

COMM 2050 Media, Culture, and Society                                             3 hours
A review of the ways in which mass mediation has transformed individuals, politics, and
society. This course will assess current debate over the role of the media in society, and
emphasize the arguments and strategies of argument used in debating this topic.
Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.

COMM 2100 Advanced Public Communication                                            3 hours
This course will extend the students’ knowledge of public communication by giving them
advanced practice. Emphasis will be placed on developing and demonstrating advanced
presentational skills in various public communication contexts, such as community
presentations, press conferences, media interviews and persuasive speaking to hostile
audiences. In addition to developing platform speaking skills, emphasis is placed on critical
evaluation and the situational/historical/cultural determinants of effective discourse.
Prerequisites: COMM 1100, READ 0099, and ENGL 0099.

COMM 2108 Business Communication                                               3 hours
A management-oriented course emphasizing theories and channels on communication,
semantic problems, and other barriers to effective communication with emphasis on both
oral and written communications. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 1101 with a grade
of C or higher. This course is taught by Business Division faculty.
COMM 2300 Business and Professional Communication                                   3 hours
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 199


A basic course that focuses on practical and theoretical elements of communicating in
today’s culturally diverse business setting. Students will learn communication processes and
basic concepts of interpersonal, group, and organizational communication. Assignments
include interviews, reports, individual or group presentations. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and
ENGL 0099.
COMM 2510 Introduction to Small Group Communication                                    3 hours
Offers the student principles, practice, and theory in leading and participating in small group
communication. Emphasizes student involvement in groups. Examines and applies factors,
which affect the quality of communication processes, interpersonal and task behaviors,
leadership and participation, ethical considerations, group norms and cohesiveness, decision
making and conflict resolution, and group evaluation options. Prerequisites: READ 0099
and ENGL 0099.


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CISM)
CISM 1502 Introduction to Information Technology                                    2 hours
An Area B course to introduce students to useful computer applications and current
technological and ethical issues. As information technology advances, new applications and
concerns will emerge and particular topics in this course may change. Students completing
this course will be able to make basic informed decisions on current information technology
issues and will be familiar with some of the basic tools of information technology.
Prerequisite: MATH 0099, READ 0099, and ENGL 0099. Students cannot receive credit for
CISM 1502 and CISM 2201.
CISM 2201 Computer Information Systems                                             3 hours
An introductory course including a study of basic computer concepts, management
information systems, data and file processing, systems analysis, the hardware and software
available for meeting information systems needs, computer privacy and security, and the
various types of information systems. Students will gain extensive hands-on microcomputer
experience applying spreadsheet, database management, and word processing software to
solve information problems. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and MATH 0099.


COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSCI)
CSCI 1100 Introduction to Computing and Computer Programming                      3 hours
A course designed for non-computer science majors. Students will be introduced to the
concepts of computing and computer programming. Students will also learn problem
solving techniques and the basics of computer programming using a modern programming
language. Students will also get hands-on experience using modern operating systems, word
processors, spreadsheets, the Internet, and the World Wide Web. Prerequisite: MATH 1001
or MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 or higher level with a grade of C or higher, or SAT Math
Score of 550 or higher, or ACT Math score of 23 or higher.
CSCI 1301 Computer Science I                                                  4 hours
Foundations of computing with an emphasis on the design, construction, and analysis of
algorithms. Laboratory-based introduction to computers and selected software tools.
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 with a grade of C or higher.
200 / Gainesville College


CSCI 1302 Computer Science II                                                    3 hours
Techniques and practices for implementing algorithms in a modern language. Laboratory
exercises and projects focus on professional software practices. Prerequisite: CSCI 1301
with a grade of C or higher.
CSCI 1371 Computing for Engineers                                            3 hours
Foundations of computing with an emphasis on design and implementation of algorithms
that complement and support engineering problem solving. Primarily for engineering
students in the Regents Engineering Transfer Program. Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or
MATH 1113 or higher.
CSCI 1502 Introduction to Computer Technology                                      2 hours
An Area B course to introduce students to current topics in computing, including computer
architecture and history, algorithms and programming languages, data organization, artificial
intelligence, and the theory and future of computing. Prerequisite: MATH 0099, READ
0099, and ENGL 0099.
CSCI 2700 Object Oriented Programming                                             3 hours
A course introducing the concepts of object oriented programming as a means of problem
solving. Topics include classes, objects, modeling techniques, inheritance, abstract data
types (information hiding), polymorphism, modularity, messages, and reusability. Choice of
language: A fully capable object oriented language such as C++ or JAVA. Prerequisite:
CSCI 1301 or CSCI 1302 (1302 recommended) with a C or higher.
CSCI 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Computer Science                          1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Course proceeds by arrangement with the instructor. A written
proposal for the study filed with the supervising instructor is required. Prerequisite: CSCI
1301 and CSCI 1302 with a grade of C or higher.


CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES (CGLO)
CGLO 1502 Contemporary Global Issues                                                 2 hours
This course is designed to illuminate the scientific, historical, political and psychological
perspectives in understanding contemporary global issues. Particular emphasis is placed on
the analysis of such current global phenomena as population, disease/poverty and prejudice.
 This course fulfills the requirements for Area B in the Core Curriculum.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CRJU)
CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice                                          3 hours
An overview of the criminal justice system, its history, philosophical background,
constitutional limitations, and the processes for achieving its goals. Also included are the
contemporary trends in the system on the local and national levels. Prerequisite: READ
0099.
CRJU 2002 Introduction to Law Enforcement                                           3 hours
A study of the organizational structure and functioning of the contemporary law enforcement
agency, its problems, and possible solutions. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 201


CRJU 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Criminal Justice                        1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand and interest. Among topics are criminal law, corrections, criminology, and juvenile
justice. Prerequisite: READ 0099.


DIVERSITY ISSUES (DVRS)
DVRS 1502 Studies in Diversity Issues                                               2 hours
A focus on issues involving diversity and multiculturalism from a variety of perspectives
and academic disciplines. The course features a specific issue each semester, and the issues
differ depending on faculty teaching the course. Particular emphasis is on the U.S.
experience but may include issues of a global nature as they impact the U.S. or allow a
cross-national comparative study of a particular area. Prerequisite: READ 0099.


ECOLOGY (ECOL)
ECOL 1000 Field Ecology                                                                 2 hours
Ecology 1000 is a two-semester hour credit course that is designed to meet requirements in
Area B for all students. The course incorporates a series of intensive field trips and lab
activities in various locations to introduce the students to the principles of ecology. Students
are required to travel to the designated locations and spend a week or more in the field and
lab activities. Prerequisite: READ 0099, an introductory college level course in biology,
chemistry, or geology, and permission of instructor.


ECONOMICS (ECON)
ECON 1100 Survey of Economic Principles                                              3 hours
The study of the basis of economic systems and markets; factors which determine economic
behavior, national income, economic growth, pricing and output decisions. Primarily for
career students. A grade of C or higher in this course satisfies the CPC requirement in social
science. This course may be used as a social science elective in area E. Prerequisite or
Corequisite: READ 0099 and MATH 0099.
ECON 1502 Consumer Economics                                                      2 hours
An introduction to personal financial management. This course is designed to provide the
student with the tools necessary to make effective financial decisions and includes
budgeting, retirement planning, making savings and investment decisions, purchasing
insurance and real estate, tax planning and consumer protection. This course may be used in
Area B. Prerequisite: MATH 0099. Corequisite: READ 0099.
ECON 2105 Macro Economics                                                         3 hours
This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will
enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.
Includes the foundation of economic analysis, understanding the concepts of demand and
supply and price determination, money and credit systems, determining the level of
aggregate macroeconomic activity, the impact of globalization on macroeconomic activity,
and identification of underlying social goals. Prerequisites: MATH 0099 and READ 0099.
202 / Gainesville College


ECON 2106 Micro Economics                                                         3 hours
This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will
enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy.
Includes analysis of supply and demand and pricing; understanding consumer and producer
behavior, application of microeconomic analysis in decision-making, and the impact of
globalization on microeconomics. Prerequisites: MATH 0099 and READ 0099.
ECON 2258 Economics of Agriculture                                              3 hours
Elementary principles of economics as applied to decision making in production and
distribution, prices, interest and credit, demand and supply, and comparative advantage.
Prerequisites: MATH 0099 and READ 0099.


EDUCATION (EDUC)
EDUC 2000 Foundations of Education                                                     3 hours
An overview of the foundations of American education and the teaching profession. Content
includes the role of the professional educator including ethical, legal, and effective practice.
The social, historical, and philosophical perspectives and methods of inquiry used in the
analysis of education issues and current technology as related to effective teaching are also
included. A field experience in public schools is required. Prerequisite: READ 0099 and
ENGL 1101; Minimum 2.5 overall GPA and sophomore standing.
EDUC 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Education                              1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand and interest. Among such topics are curriculum development, family, school and
community, school management and internship. Prerequisite: READ 0099.


ENGINEERING (ENGR)
ENGR 1101 Introduction to Engineering                                                3 hours
This course will provide an introduction to the ethical, historical, philosophical, political,
and socioeconomic aspects of engineering. The student will also be introduced to
engineering careers, personal computer operating systems, spreadsheets, statistics, technical
communications, networking, engineering design, and problem solving. Prerequisites:
READ 0099, ENGL 0099. Corequisite: MATH 1113 or permission of instructor.
ENGR 2101 Engineering Graphics                                                    3 hours
The elements of graphic communication and engineering design, including free hand
sketching, lettering, orthographic projection, auxiliary views, pictorial views, sections,
dimensioning, descriptive geometry. An introduction to design using Computer-Aided
Design (CAD) tools including file management, creating CAD files, user interface,
coordinate geometry vectors, simple geometric objects, geometric constructions, surface
modeling, basic concepts of three-dimensional geometry. Prerequisites: MATH 1450 or
permission of instructor.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 203


ENGR 2201 Engineering Statics                                                       3 hours
The study of forces and moments on structures, frames, and machine parts. The equilibrium
of force systems in two and three dimensions, centroids, moments of inertia, and friction are
studied. Prerequisites: PHYS 2211 and MATH 2460 or concurrent enrollment, or
permission of instructor.
ENGR 2202 Engineering Dynamics                                                   3 hours
The study of the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Including the
dynamics of particles, work and kinetic energy, impulse and momentum, rigid body motions,
moving coordinate systems and relative motion, basic mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite:
A grade of C or higher in ENGR 2201.
ENGR 2203 Strength of Materials                                                         3 hours
The study of the mechanics of deformable bodies in compression, tension, bending, and
torsion. Including axial stress and strain, thermal stress and strain, statically indeterminant
systems, torsional stress and strain, power transmission in shafts, bending stresses in beams,
beam deflections, combined stresses, elastic buckling in columns, and introductory finite
element analysis. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in ENGR 2201.
ENGR 2301 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering I                                   3 hours
An introduction to the basic concepts of DC and AC circuit theory and analysis. Topics
include voltage, power, energy, circuit elements, Kirchoff’s laws, series and parallel
combinations of elements, node and mesh analysis, Thevnin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem,
first and second order circuits, forcing functions, RLC circuits, sinusoidal and steady state
analysis, power analysis, two-port networks, Laplace transformations, and SPICE.
Prerequisites: PHYS 1112 or PHYS 2212, and MATH 2460.


ENGLISH (ENGL)
A grade of C or higher is required in ENGL 0099, 1101 or 1101H, and 1102 or 1102H

ENGL 0099 Learning Support English                                             4 hours
A course which emphasizes development of college-level competency in written
communication and provides a review of basic English grammar and mechanics for students
who need additional preparation in English prior to taking ENGL 1101. Placement test
scores and writing sample determine if this course is required.
ENGL 1101 Composition I                                                             3 hours
A course which emphasizes the development of written communications for college and
career, and also stresses critical thinking and reading. Computer resources, where available,
will be used in composition and research. Prerequisites: Satisfactory placement or
completion of ENGL 0099 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite: READ 0099 if
required.
ENGL 1102 Composition II                                                               3 hours
A course which emphasizes the development of written analysis and interpretation of
literature, critical thinking skills, and advanced research methods. Prerequisite: Satisfactory
placement or completion of ENGL 1101 with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2010 Technical Writing                                                         3 hours
Introduction to organization, style, and mechanics of technical and professional writing.
Includes practice in writing such typical documents as technical descriptions, instructions,
204 / Gainesville College


proposals, and recommendation reports. Emphasis placed on planning, organizing, and
writing reports; designing visual aids; and editing. Among other assignments, at least one
complete technical report is required. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H
with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2111 World Literature I                                                      3 hours
A survey of World Literature from the earliest literary writing to the middle of the
Seventeenth Century which involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary
works within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Completion of
ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2112 World Literature II                                                     3 hours
A survey of World Literature from the middle of the Seventeenth Century to the present
which involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their
historical, social, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H
with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2121 English Literature I                                                       3 hours
A survey of English Literature from the Angle-Saxon period to the end of the Eighteenth
Century which involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within
their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or
1102H with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2122 English Literature II                                                   3 hours
A survey of English Literature from the end of the Eighteenth Century to the present which
involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their
historical, social, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H
with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2131 American Literature I                                                       3 hours
A survey of American Literature from the Colonial period to the Civil War which involves
reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their historical, social,
and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C
or higher.
ENGL 2132 American Literature II                                                   3 hours
A survey of American Literature from the Civil War to the present which involves reading,
analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their historical, social, and
cultural contexts. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C or
higher.

ENGL 2170 Fantastic Literature                                                         3 hours
A survey of the literature of Fantasy and Science Fiction, including its history, general
characteristics, and special qualities. Study includes short stories, novels, and theoretical or
critical works. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C or
higher.
ENGL 2180 Creative Writing                                                               3 hours
Creative Writing is a course designed to aid students in writing their first short stories and/or
poems. Class time will be spent discussing the form and the theory of fiction and poetry as
well as in workshop sessions in which the students and the instructor will critique student
work. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C or higher and
permission of instructor.
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 205


ENGL 2300 Introduction to Film                                                   3 hours
This course examines film genre. Students will study the schools of film criticism (the
realists, the grammarians, the mythographers, etc.) and the techniques and conventions of
various kinds of film types including documentary, mystery, western, science fiction,
historical drama, women’s film, comedy, and the horror film. Students will examine films
as cultural artifacts that can make important social and philosophical statements. Note:
Duplicate credit is not allowed for ENGL 2300 and CINE 1100. Prerequisite: Completion
of READ 0099 and ENGL 0099 with a grade of C or higher.
ENGL 2301 Film History                                                            3 hours
This course examines the development of cinema as an art form. Students will study
selected films representing different genres, movements, and technological developments in
world cinema. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C or
higher.
ENGL 2302 Literature and Film                                                         3 hours
Students will examine the relationship between film and literature, with specific focus on the
aesthetic impact of narrative, drama, and poetry on film and the significance in film of
romanticism, realism, and expressionism as literary modes as well as the nature and history
of the adaptations of literary works to film. Students will gain hands-on experience with the
challenges of creating and adaptation of a literary text through the course project. The
course carries three hours of credit in Areas C and F. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a
grade of C or higher; ENGL 2301or CINE 1502 is highly recommended.
ENGL 2801 Magazine Production I                                                  1 hour
This course offers instruction in editing, layout, and design. As a practicum, it offers
students the opportunity to work on the production of the annual non-fiction prose
publication, Hoi Polloi.
ENGL 2802 Magazine Production II                                                   1 hour
This course offers students instruction in writing, editing, and designing a creative arts
magazine. As a practicum, it allows students the opportunity to work on the production of
the annual creative arts magazine, The Chestatee Review.
ENGL 2901, 2902, 2903
Special Topics in Literature and Composition                                      1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are: Children's Literature, Ethnic Literature,
Fantasy-Science Fiction Literature, Mythology and Literature, Film as Communication, The
Occult in Literature, Creative Writing, and other topics suggested by students. Prerequisite:
Completion of ENGL 1102 or 1102H with a grade of C or higher.

ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
(ESLC, ESLR, ESLV, ESLW, ESOL, ESLO)
ESLO 1101 Classroom Communication & College Orientation                             2 hours
This course is designed to help non-native speakers succeed in the American college setting
by improving their pronunciation of English and by developing the skills necessary for the
classroom. Students will develop all language skills with a focus on English phonology, oral
presentations, small group work, debate, and professor-student communication. Students will
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also become familiar with the opportunities and resources available to them in the college
community.
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ESLW 1100 Writing Across the Curriculum                                              2 hours
A writing-across-the-curriculum humanities elective for non-native English speakers which
focuses on the text differences and writing assignment demands of representative college
disciplines. Students will study the organization and grammar of appropriate student
responses to questions and assignments in the social sciences, business, laboratory sciences,
and technological fields; review typical writing assignments; and practice completing
representative writing tasks using suitable discourse patterns, vocabulary, and grammar.
Prerequisites: satisfactory placement or completion of ESLW 0075 and ESLR 0085, or
ENGL 1101. Corequisite: Area D, E, or F courses requiring papers, critiques, case studies,
reports, and other extended writing assignments.
These courses award institutional credit only, and credit is awarded the semester in
which the student attains the required proficiency.
ESLC 0061 Classroom Communication I                                               2 hours
This course is designed to help non-native speakers succeed in the American college setting
by improving their pronunciation of English and by developing the skills necessary for the
classroom. Students will develop all language skills with a focus on English phonology,
listening and note-taking skills, following directions, using standard reference materials,
vocabulary, and lecture and discussion structure and content.
ESLR 0083 Reading and Rhetoric I                                                    4 hours
An intermediate course in English for speakers of other languages designed to improve their
academic reading and writing abilities and to enhance their academic vocabulary.
Classroom situations involve students in practicing their skills in American spoken English.
Prerequisite: ESL placement or permission of instructor. Corequisites: ESLC 0061 and/or
ESLO 1101, and ESLV 0051 and ESLV 0052 unless the oral communication and/or
academic vocabulary components have already been satisfied.
ESLR 0084 Reading and Rhetoric II                                                4 hours
An upper intermediate course in English for speakers of other languages designed to
improve their academic reading and writing abilities and to enhance their academic
vocabulary. Classroom situations involve students in practicing their skills in American
spoken English. Prerequisite: ESL placement or permission of instructor. Corequisites:
ESLC 0061 and/or ESLO 1101, unless the oral communication component has already been
satisfied.
ESLR 0085 Reading and Rhetoric III                                                 4 hours
An advanced course in English for speakers of other languages designed to improve their
academic reading and writing abilities. Classroom situations involve students in practicing
their skills in American spoken English. Prerequisites: ESL placement or permission of
instructor. Corequisite: ESLC 0061 and/or ESLO 1101, unless the oral communication has
already been satisfied; ECON 1100/1502, ENGL 1101, HIST 1112, MATH 1001, MATH
1111, PARA 1100, AND POLS 1101.
ESLV 0051 Academic Vocabulary for ESL I                                           3 hours
To introduce English as a Second Language students to the 800 English words of the
University Word List (UWL), the lexicon most widely used in academic settings across the
disciplines. Accuracy and fluency with these high-frequency root words, along with
command of a 2,000 word basic English vocabulary, will enable students to understand 95%
of the words necessary for academic reading and writing on the post-secondary level.
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Students will utilize their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, along with
technological learning tools such as audio and video lessons, internet resources, and word
processing. Corequisite: ESLR 0084 and/or ESLR 0085.
ESLV 0052 Academic Vocabulary for ESL II                                           3 hours
To introduce English as a Second Language students to the 800 English words of the
University Word List (UWL), the lexicon most widely used in academic settings across the
disciplines. Accuracy and fluency with these high-frequency root words, along with
command of a 2,000 word basic English vocabulary, will enable students to understand 95%
of the words necessary for academic reading and writing on the post-secondary level.
Students will utilize their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, along with
technological learning tools such as audio and video lessons, internet resources, and word
processing. Corequisite: ESLR 0084 and/or ESLR 0085.
ESLW 0073 Grammar I                                                               4 hours
An intermediate course in English for speakers of other languages designed to improve their
writing skills. Particular attention is given to grammar problems common to non-native
speakers. Prerequisite: ESL placement or permission of instructor. Corequisites: ESLC
0061 and/or ESLO 1101, and ESLV 0051 and ESLV 0052 unless the oral communication
and/or academic vocabulary components have already been satisfied.
ESLW 0074 Grammar II                                                              4 hours
An upper intermediate course in English for speakers of other languages designed to
improve their writing skills. Particular attention is given to grammar problems common to
non-native speakers. Prerequisite: ESL placement or permission of instructor. Corequisites:
 ESLC 0061 and/or ESLO 1101, and ESLV 0051 and ESLV 0052 unless the oral
communication and/or academic vocabulary components have already been satisfied.
ESLW 0075 Grammar III                                                                 4 hours
An advanced course in English for speakers of other languages designed to improve writing
skills. Particular attention is given to grammatical problems common to non-native speakers
and to developing students’ abilities to edit their own work. Prerequisites: ESL placement or
permission of instructor. Corequisites: ESLC 0061 and/or ESLO 1101, and ESLV 0051 and
ESLV 0052 unless the oral communication and/or academic vocabulary components have
already been satisfied.
ESOL 0065, 0066, 0067 Special Topics in ESOL                                      1-3 hours
A non-transferable ESL special interest course. Possible topics include English morphology,
English consonant phonology, and English syntax. Prerequisites: ESL placement or
permission of instructor.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ESCI)
ESCI 1101 Environmental Science                                                   3 hours
A general introduction to the basic principles and concepts of environmental science. This
course is an integration of the concepts of biology, the physical sciences, and the social
sciences and emphasizes the relationship of humans with their environment. Prerequisite:
READ 0099. Corequisite: ESCI 1101L.
ESCI 1101L Environmental Science Lab                                        1 hour
An exploration of the scientific method and of laboratory and field experiences in
environmental science. Corequisite: ESCI 1101.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 209


ESCI 1105 Environmental Issues                                                      2 hours
Environmental Issues is an interdisciplinary course that explores the many facets of current
environmental issues. Using a variety of sources, students will examine these issues from
both historical and scientific perspectives. Concepts will be presented in the context of the
natural laws and ecological processes which govern the outcome of human-environmental
interactions. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
ESCI 2001 Land Use and Conservation                                                    3 hours
A presentation of methods for the management of runoff, erosion and associated water
quality issues derived by the ecological assessment of agricultural, forestry, rural, and urban
land use patterns. Techniques of mapping and classification of attributes by field survey and
Geographic Information Systems are included. Prerequisite: GIS 2011/2011L or permission
of instructor.
ESCI 2001L Land Use and Conservation Lab                                         1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of ESCI 2001. Corequisite: ESCI
2001.
ESCI 2002 Fundamentals of Soil Science                                               2 hours
This course covers the fundamentals of soil formation and morphology, physical, biological
and chemical properties, soil-water interactions, wetlands and hydric soils, soil landscapes,
field methods and protocols of soil sampling. Fundamentals of soils essential to
environmental science careers will be discussed Prerequisite: GEOL 1250/1250L or GEOG
1111/1111L or permission of instructor.
ESCI 2002L Fundamentals of Soil Science Lab                                      1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of ESCI 2002. Corequisite: ESCI
2002.
ESCI 2010 Wetlands and Aquatic Ecology                                               3 hours
Emphasis will be placed on the ecological principles associated with aquatic ecosystem
structure and function, including vegetation, hydrology, water chemistry, soils, fauna,
elemental cycling, and management strategies of freshwater ecosystems. Field experiences
will include habitat analysis and sampling, limnological sampling, wetland delineation, and
plant and animal identification. This course will utilize traditional classroom meetings and
numerous field exercises. Geographic Information Systems will be used to analyze some
data. Prerequisites: BIOL 1107/1107 & BIOL 1108/1108L or BIOL 2210/2210L & BIOL
2220/2220L & GISC 2011/2011L or permission of instructor.
ESCI 2010L Wetlands and Aquatic Ecology Lab                                      1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of ESCI 2010. Corequisite: ESCI
2010.
ESCI 2020 Environmental Chemistry                                                   3 hours
Studies related to principles associated with Environmental Chemistry and field techniques,
including chemical properties and processes that affect transport, degradation and retention
of organic and metal pollutants in soil, water and air. Emphasis is placed upon field
sampling and monitoring, sample handling, storage, instrumentation, data analysis, GLP and
quality control. Prerequisites: CHEM 1211/1211L & 1212/1212L or permission of
instructor.
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ESCI 2020L Environmental Chemistry Lab                                           1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of ESCI 2020. Corequisite: ESCI
2020.
ESCI 2030 Hydrology                                                                3 hours
A multi disciplinary examination of the fundamentals of hydrology essential for
environmental and spatial analysis. Topics of hydrologic processes and water balances in the
landscape, saturated and unsaturated flow in soils, drainage, basic aquifer mechanics,
environmental monitoring techniques, stream flow and storm flow dynamics in response to
rainfall and watershed characteristics. Prerequisites: GEOL 1250/1250L or GEOG
1111/1111L; CHEM 1211/1211L, & PHYS 1111/1111L or permission of instructor.
ESCI 2030L Hydrology Lab                                                         1 hour
Laboratory exercises supplementing the lecture material of ESCI 2030. Corequisite: ESCI
2030.


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (ENST)
ENST 2030 HUMAN ECOLOGY                                                         3 hours
A seminar course that addresses the social, political, and cultural aspects of human
ecological problems. As an introduction to the field of Human Ecology, it examines both
past and current human activities and their influence on our species and the physical
environment, and explores the place of cultural elements in creating and solving
environmental problems. Course meets the Area B institutional options requirement.
Prerequisite: READ 0099; ENGL 0099.
ENST 2035 Introduction to Environmental Policy                                       3 hours
A seminar style course which presents a general survey of environmental policy in both the
international and domestic spheres, with particular emphasis placed on the U.S. state and
federal levels. Focusing on air, water, and land, it examines the impact of regulatory action,
monitoring standards, public participation, enforcement options, the need for regulation, and
how regulations are adopted through policy initiative in both the international and domestic
arenas. Prerequisite: POLS 1101; ENST 2030.
ENST 2040 Environmental Communication                                               3 hours
A study of communication styles, strategies, and campaigns of participants in environmental
policy debates (government, industry, environmentalists, scientists, the media, private
citizens and anti-environmentalists). Students consider the various types of communication,
the ways in which they shape and are shaped by different approaches to the environment and
their interaction in a number of case studies. Students also reflect on their own
environmental positions and arguments. Prerequisite: ENST 2030.
ENST 2045 Environment and Community Organization                                   3 hours
A study of the impact on communities of problems such as pollution, resource depletion,
hazardous waste disposal and other environmental problems and the struggles and responses
of community organizations. The course also examines scientific and social controversy,
conflict and litigation among various industry, government and public groups, and mitigative
and regulatory efforts by various governmental and non-governmental community
organizations. Prerequisite: ENST 2030.
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 211


ENST 2050 Ethics and the Environment                                                3 hours
A seminar course which familiarizes students with the concepts and theories in the field of
environmental ethics. The course brings these theories and concepts to bear on current
issues in environmental legislative agendas and policy-making; discusses how nature is
perceived and valued; and examines the theories of natural law, natural rights, animal rights,
life-centered and ecosystem-centered ethics, environmental policies and their effects on
future generations and human stewardship. Prerequisite: ENST 2030.
ENST 2055 Environment and Society                                                   3 hours
The main objective of the course is to help students develop a critical understanding of the
reciprocal relationship between humans and the natural environment. In exploring the ways
in which humans influence the environment and the ways the environment sets the
parameters of human society, the course applies a sociological framework to evaluate the
interactions between social factors (class, race, gender, religion) and environmental factors
(air and water quality, biodiversity, deforestation, ozone depletion) and discussions of
current issues, including the U.S. environmental movement, ecotourism, waste management,
energy policies, and “NIMBYism.” Prerequisite: ENST 2030.
ENST 2060 History and the Environment                                               3 hours
This course explores the evolving historical relationship between humans and the global
environment from pre-historical times to the present. The focus of the course is on political,
economic, and cultural themes at different historical epochs, and includes the examination of
such issues as the rise and fall of civilizations, colonialism, industrialization, and the
changing perception and understanding of the environment around the world at different
times. Prerequisite: ENST 2030.
ENST 2065 Social Influence and the Environment                                     3 hours
Like all of our attitudes and beliefs, our ideas about environmental issues are heavily
influenced by other people, and they are always subject to change. This course examines the
ways in which other people influence our thoughts, attitudes, and ultimately our behavior in
regard to the environment. The following topics are examined: research methods,
conformity, compliance, obedience, social facilitation, social loafing, attitude formation,
attitude change, persuasion, bargaining, and group decision-making processes. Prerquisite:
ENST 2030.
ENST 2070 Practicum in Environmental Studies                                         3 hours
A directed studies course which primarily involves practical application in some area of
work related to the environment. The instructor supervising the directed study will be
associated with the area of application in which the student chooses to do his/her practicum,
such as public policy, community relations, business, etc. The student is also introduced to
possible positions available in his/her particular area of interest. Prerequisite: Completion
of 15 semester hours of Certificate course work.


EUROPEAN UNION STUDIES (EURO)
EURO 1100 Introduction to European Union                                              3 hours
This course is an introduction to European integration and the European Union (EU). The
diversity of opinion over Europe’s future is a focus of the course. The course prepares
students for 1) more advanced coursework in international political economy, international
politics, and comparative policies; 2) participation in intercollegiate simulations of the EU;
212 / Gainesville College


and, 3) international careers (including business). The course must be completed by students
who apply to participate in the EU Certificate Program sponsored by the University System
of Georgia. Course meets the Area B institutional options requirement. Prerequisite: READ
0099.
EURO 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in European Union Studies                 1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand. Among such topics are: Doing Business in the EU and US, EU Science and
Technology Policy, Law and Legal Systems of the EU, EU Environmental Policy, and
European Monetary Union. Prerequisite: READ 0099.

FRENCH (FREN)
A native speaker may not register for certain French classes. A native speaker is
defined as a person who graduated from a secondary school in which the language of
instruction was French.

FREN 1000 Introductory French                                                         3 hours
An introductory language course that presents the fundamentals in all skill areas and assists
students to develop basic skills necessary for understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
the target language. This course is specifically designed for students with very little or no
previous experience in the target language or who indicate a deficiency in foreign languages.
The class prepares students to enter a foreign language class at the 1001 level. A grade of C
will fulfill the CPC deficiency. Lab required.
FREN 1001 Elementary French I                                                     3,1 hours
The first of two elementary language courses designed to develop skills in speaking,
listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as familiarize students with aspects of
the target culture. The course delivery combines three hours of in-class lecture with one-
hour alternative instructional delivery through lab assignments, online course work, and
service learning where applicable. A grade of ‘C’ will fulfill the CPC deficiency.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, FREN 1000 or its equivalent, or permission of instructor.
FREN 1002 Elementary French II                                                    3,1 hours
Continuation of FREN 1001 and skills development in speaking, listening, comprehension,
reading and writing, and familiarity with aspects of the target culture. The course delivery
combines three hours of in-class lecture with one hour alternative instructional delivery
through lab assignments, online course work, and service learning where applicable.
Prerequisite: FREN 1001, or its equivalent, or permission of instructor.
FREN 2001 Intermediate French I                                                     3 hours
The first of two intermediate language courses designed to consolidate and further students'
knowledge of the fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, conversation, reading and
writing. Classes will be conducted in French except for occasions when questions in English
are accepted. Students will participate in a variety of activities designed to develop their
conversational skills and their writing skills while further developing their knowledge of
French culture and civilization. Language lab assignments are frequent. Students who have
completed a third year of high school French with a grade of B or higher are eligible to take
this course. Students may also take a placement test to gain access to FREN 2001.
Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or high school equivalent as defined above.
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 213


FREN 2002 Intermediate French II                                                     3 hours
The second of two intermediate language courses presenting the fundamentals of grammar,
pronunciation, conversation, reading and writing. Classes will be conducted in French
except for occasions when questions in English are accepted. Students will participate in a
variety of activities designed to develop their conversational skills and their writing skills
while further developing their knowledge of French culture and civilization. Students will
complete a comprehensive review of grammar, primarily through written assignments and
lab work with class time reserved for conversational activities. Prerequisite: FREN 2001.
FREN 2121 Intermediate Conversation                                              3 hours
This course emphasizes oral proficiency, using guided conversations, realistic scenarios,
vocabulary building, and free discussion to prepare students for authentic communication
situations. The course will be conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2001.
FREN 2122 Critical Reading and Composition                                         3 hours
This course is designed to increase proficiency in French skills through study of authentic
materials: dialogues, readings, and writing exercises. Emphasis will be placed on
independent study. Prerequisite: FREN 2002.
FREN 2801, 2802, 2803 French Practicum                                           1-3 hours
French Practicum is a course designed to provide students with the opportunity to use their
language skills in everyday situations. Each student will choose, organize and complete one
French project. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
FREN 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in French                                 1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are: Introduction to the Twentieth-Century French
Novel, French Pronunciation, Modern French Culture and other topics suggested by
students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


GAINESVILLE COLLEGE FRESHMAN ORIENTATION (GCOR)
GCOR 1101 Gainesville College Freshman Orientation                                 2 hours
The course is designed to help students cope with the demands of college; strengthen study,
interaction, and stress management skills; develop a better understanding and awareness of
their personal, educational, and career goals. Recommended for all new students and
required for those who must take three or more Learning Support and/or CPC courses.


GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE (GISC)
GISC 2011 Geographic Information Science                                            2 hours
An introduction to the principles and applications of Geographic Information Systems.
Examines the accuracy and applications of geographic information including spatial
analysis, data management, data visualization, and data retrieval. Emphasis is placed on the
interdisciplinary nature of GIS and its relevance to society. The course involves hands-on
computer exercises. Little or no computer experience is needed. Prerequisites: READ 0099,
ENGL 0099, and MATH 0097. Corequisite: GISC 2011L.
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GISC 2011L Geographic Information Science Lab                                     1 hour
One lab period consisting of two hours per week. This course is the laboratory component
for GISC 2011. Corequisite: GISC 2011.
GISC 2012 Spatial Analysis in Geographic Information Science                    2 hours
This course is an introduction to more complex spatial operations in GIS. Emphasis is
placed on geographic data analysis, including data sampling, manipulation, presentation,
interpretation, and statistical description. Prerequisites: GISC 2011 and MATH 1111.
GISC 2012L Spatial Analysis in Geographic Information Science Lab                     1 hour
One lab period consisting of two hours per week. Activities are designed to supplement
lecture materials in GISC 2012. Computer exercises are used to integrate statistical methods
with Geographic Information Systems. Corequisite: GISC 2012.
GISC 2201 Fundamentals of Cartography and Earth Measurement                      3 hours
An introduction to the fundamentals of cartography and earth mapping. Topics covered
include coordinate systems, map projections, map interpretation, thematic map design, and
cartographic theory. Prerequisites: READ 0099, MATH 0099, and GISC 2011.
GISC 2202 Data Acquisition and Conversion in GIS                                  3 hours
An introduction to data collection techniques for use in a Geographic Information System.
Topics include field data collection, correction and visualization using a compass, range
finder, survey transit, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and desktop GIS. Evaluation,
acquisition, manipulation, and implementation of existing data sources are presented.
Prerequisite: GISC 2011.
GISC 2203 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing                                           3 hours
Fundamental properties of the electromagnetic spectrum and remote sensing devices.
Emphasis is placed on the use of remotely sensed data to evaluate land use and land change
for urban and environmental GIS applications. Prerequisite: MATH 1111; Corequisite:
GISC 2011.
GISC 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in GIS                                      1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. This is an applied course that addresses special topics in Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) technology. The course concentrates on a specific GIS project
relevant to the student’s major. Issues covered include project planning, management, and
evaluation. Course proceeds by arrangement with instructor. A written proposal for the
study filed with the supervising instructor is required. Prerequisites: GISC 2011.
GISC 2961, 2962, 2963 GIS Service Learning                                      1-3 hours
An applied course that addresses special topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
technology. The course consists of real-world project design and implementation through
service-learning partnerships with local government and industry. Students are required to
work as a team with other students and with members of the community. Prerequisite:
GISC 2011.
GISC 2983 Internship in Geographic Information Science                          3 hours
A work-study program where students work part-time to full-time with a community partner.
A committee representing both partners will evaluate student’s performance. Prerequisite:
GISC 2011.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 215


GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)
GEOG 1101 World Human Geography                                                  3 hours
A survey of world human geography with emphasis on cultures, resources, populations, and
land utilization of countries and regions of the world. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
GEOG 1111 Introduction to Physical Geography                                         3 hours
An introduction to spatial patterns and underlying processes of the physical environment and
biosphere, including climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, and water resources. Prerequisite:
READ 0099. Corequisite: GEOG 1111L.
GEOG 1111L Introduction to Physical Geography Lab                                  1 hour
One lab period consisting of two hours per week. Activities designed to supplement lecture
materials in GEOG 1111. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Prerequisite or Corequisite: GEOG
1111.
GEOG 1112 Introduction to Weather and Climate                                        3 hours
Atmospheric composition and structure, clouds, precipitation, and atmospheric motion and
winds. Organized weather systems, including air masses, fronts, and severe weather.
Discussion of global climates includes circulation, wind systems, climate classification, and
climate change. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Corequisite: GEOG 1112L.
GEOG 1112L Introduction to Weather and Climate Lab                              1 hour
One lab period consisting of two hours per week. Activities are designed to supplement
lecture materials in GEOG 1112. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Corequisite: GEOG 1112.
GEOG 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Geography                              1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are Political Geography, World Population, and
Land Utilization.

GEOLOGY (GEOL)
All lecture and lab courses have a separate number and grade; therefore, if the lab is
required with the lecture, they must be taken concurrently. The only exception is if
one component (lecture or lab) is passed and the other failed, only the failed portion
need be repeated.
GEOL 1250 Physical Geology                                                          3 hours
An introductory study of the materials composing the earth; the composition and distribution
of these materials; and the geologic processes involved in the formation, alteration, and
deformation of these materials. Topics covered include: minerals, rocks, igneous and
metamorphic processes, weathering, erosion, sedimentation, evolution of landform, and
tectonics. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Corequisite: GEOL 1250L.
GEOL 1250L Physical Geology Lab                                                   1 hour
Laboratory exercises include studies of minerals and rocks, geologic & topographic maps,
and photographs are used to study geologic process. Corequisite: GEOL 1250.
GEOL 1260 Historical Geology                                                            3 hours
A study of the origin of the solar system, the planets, and the earth. Topics covered include
sedimentary rocks and fossils, the origin of life, evolution, and the distribution of plants and
animals through time. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Corequisite: GEOL 1260L.
216 / Gainesville College


GEOL 1260L Historical Geology Lab                                                  1 hour
Laboratory exercises include the study of sedimentary rocks & fossils, geologic maps and
their applications in the interpretation of earth history. Corequisite: GEOL 1260.
GEOL 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Geology                                 1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. This is a project based course in which students do investigations in
special topics in Geology. Course proceeds by arrangement with instructor. A written
proposal for the study filed with the supervising instructor is required. Prerequisite or
Corequisite: GEOL 1250 or GEOL 1260.


GERMAN (GRMN)
A native speaker may not register for certain German classes. A native speaker is
defined as a person who graduated from a secondary school in which the language of
instruction was German.
GRMN 1000 Introductory German                                                         3 hours
An introductory language course that presents the fundamentals in all skill areas and assists
students to develop basic skills necessary for understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
the target language. This course is specifically designed for students with very little or no
previous experience in the target language or who indicate a deficiency in foreign languages.
The class prepares students to enter a foreign language class at the 1001 level. A grade of C
will fulfill the CPC deficiency. Lab required.
GRMN 1001 Elementary German I                                                      3,1 hours
The first of two elementary language courses designed to develop skills in speaking,
listening comprehension, reading, and writing as well as familiarize students with aspects of
the target culture. The course delivery combines three hours of in-class lecture with one
hour alternative instructional delivery through lab assignments, online course work, and
service learning where applicable. A grade of ‘C’ will fulfill the CPC deficiency.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, GRMN 1000 or its equivalent, or permission by the instructor.
GRMN 1002 Elementary German II                                                    3,1 hours
Continuation of GRMN 1001 and skills development in speaking, listening, comprehension,
reading and writing, and familiarity with aspects of the target culture. The course delivery
combines three hours of in-class lecture with one hour alternative instructional delivery
through lab assignments, online course work, and service learning where applicable.
Prerequisite: GRMN 1001, or its equivalent, or permission of instructor.
GRMN 2001 Intermediate German 1                                                 3 hours
Designed to increase proficiency in German skills through study of authentic materials:
dialogues, readings, writing exercises, and dictation/pronunciation drills. Prerequisite:
GRMN 1002 or two years of high school German and permission of instructor.
GRMN 2002 Intermediate German II                                                  3 hours
Focuses on conversation and reading comprehension using real world and culturally-oriented
readings to expand students' knowledge of the German-speaking world. Prerequisite:
GRMN 2001.
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HISTORY (HIST)
HIST 1111 Survey of World Civilization I                                             3 hours
History of the world from ancient times to 1600. Emphasis is placed on the social, cultural,
political, and economic interactions between nations around the world, particularly the Third
World, up through the early modern era. A grade of C or higher in this course satisfies the
CPC requirement in social science. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
HIST 1112 Survey of World Civilization II                                          3 hours
History of the world from 1600 to present. Emphasis is placed on the social, cultural,
political, and economic interactions between major centers of world civilizations from the
early modern era to the present. A grade of C or higher in this course satisfies the CPC
requirement in social science. Prerequisite or Corequisite: READ 0099.
HIST 1121 Survey of Western Civilization I                                         3 hours
History of the Western World from ancient times to 1600. Emphasis is placed on the social,
cultural, political, and economic development of Western society and its institutions from
ancient civilizations up to the early modern era. A grade of C or higher in this course
satisfies the CPC requirement in social science. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
HIST 1122 Survey of Western Civilization II                                            3 hours
History of the Western World from 1600 to present. Emphasis is placed on the social,
cultural, political, and economic development of Western society and its institutions from
the early modern era to the present, stressing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A grade
of C or higher in this course satisfies the CPC requirement in social science. Prerequisite:
READ 0099.
HIST 2111 Survey of U.S. History I                                                   3 hours
History of the United States to 1877. From exploration and colonization through
Reconstruction, emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, political, and economic evolution
of the United States. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
HIST 2112 Survey of U.S. History II                                                   3 hours
History of the United States from 1877 to the present. From Post-Reconstruction to the
global era, emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, political, and domestic upheaval of the
U.S. and its diplomatic emergence as a world power. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
HIST 2114 American History through Film                                   2 hours
An Area B course that examines topics in American history through the use of film.
Prerequisites: READ 0099, ENGL 0099, and HIST 2111 or HIST 2112.
HIST 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in History                                1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are: Cold War, Vietnam, Asia, minority history.
Prerequisite: READ 0099.
218 / Gainesville College


HONORS (HONR)
HONR 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Honors                                 1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are: Genesis, Medieval Women Writers, and other
topics suggested by students. The topics may be in any discipline or may be
interdisciplinary. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one Honors course.


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (ITEC)
ITEC 1101 Introduction to Information Systems                                    3 hours
An introductory course for students in the information technology program. Topics include
foundations in hardware, software, data, telecommunications, and systems analysis.
Students are introduced to systems development, decision support systems, electronic
commerce, database design, and networking. Aspects of appropriate business ethics are
discussed. Corequisites: MATH 1001 and ENGL 1101.
ITEC 1211 Foundations of Database Design                                        3 hours
A foundation course in terminology, concepts, and applications of database processing
including file organization and data structures. Course emphasizes database design using
various modeling techniques including Entity-Relationship and Semantic-Object models;
database implementation using the relational model, normalization, and SQL; database
application design including control mechanisms, forms, reports, and menus. Students will
design, create, and process a database to demonstrate competence in the course content.
Prerequisite: CISM 2201. Corequisite: ITEC 1101.
ITEC 1311 Foundations of Programming                                           3 hours
An introductory programming course for students in the information technology program.
Programming concepts are taught using Visual Basic, Java, or another high-level
programming language. Topics include control structures, user interface concepts, data
types and arrays, error handling, event-driven programming, and database access.
Corequisite: ITEC1101.
ITEC 1411 Introduction to Webmaster                                                3 hours
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of web site design. It is geared
toward hands-on practical knowledge of creating and maintaining a simple internet web site.
An overview of web site design and implementation strategies will be covered. HTML
control and file structures, language syntax, and data formats and conversions will also be
covered in depth. Corequisite: ITEC 1101
ITEC 1511 Foundations of Networking                                              3 hours
An introduction to terminology and applications of communications and networking,
essential elements of computer and business information systems. Students gain familiarity
with communication hardware, software, media, and LAN and WAN systems through
hands-on experience. Corequisite: ITEC 1101.
ITEC 2212 Intermediate Database Design                                               3 hours
This course continues the study of relational databases adding these topics: relational
algebra, set-theoretic operations, and relational operations. The course contains a complete
description of the SQL select syntax, sub-selects, SQL unions and divisions. The database
description features of SQL are covered and handling of null values is discussed. The
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discussion of multi-user databases is expanded. Student teams create a database using SQL.
Prerequisites: ITEC 1101 and ITEC 1211 with a grade of C or higher.
ITEC 2312 Intermediate Programming                                              3 hours
A second programming course for students in the information technology program. Topics
include object-oriented analysis and programming, remote data access, and user-interface
design. Students will learn to use the Windows API, libraries and components.
Prerequisites: ITEC1101 and ITEC 1311 with a grade of C or higher.
ITEC 2412 Intermediate Webmaster                                                    3 hours
This course is an intermediate course in web page production. Interconnectivity of software
and web sites will be covered. Topics include the application of multimedia video and
animation in the creation of interactive web sites, and integrating and connecting of
databases to web sites. E-commerce and security on the internet and other advanced issues
will be covered. Prerequisites: ITEC 1101 and ITEC 1411 with a grade of C or higher.
ITEC 2512 Intermediate Networking                                                  3 hours
An intermediate course in terminology, concepts, and applications of data communications
technology, including network topologies, network devices, standards, and protocol analysis.
Hands-on experience in the use of data communications hardware, software, facilities, and
media. Prerequisites: ITEC 1101 and ITEC 1511 with a grade of C or higher.
ITEC 2811 Capstone Project                                                           3 hours
The capstone project for students in the certificate program in Information Technology is
designed to provide opportunities to focus and apply information technology skills. Hours
may vary, but students are expected to spend from 90 to 150 hours working with a business
or other organization on an approved project. Student will develop a proposal for a project
during the term prior to registering for the class. Prerequisites: ITEC 1101, two ITEC skills
courses, and permission of the instructor.


INTEGRATED SCIENCE (ISCI)
ISCI 1101 Integrated Science I                                                      3 hours
The course introduces the paradigm of science and the scientific method and integrates
physical and biological sciences in the study of current science topics. Corequisite: READ
0099 and ISCI 1101L.
ISCI 1101L Integrated Science I Lab                                                  1 hour
The laboratory component of Integrated Science I. In this course students collect qualitative
and quantitative data using a variety of measuring devices and use this data to test
hypotheses and draw conclusions. Corequisite: READ 0099 and ISCI 1101.
ISCI 1102 Integrated Science II                                                      3 hours
Integrated Science II focuses on patterns and cycles in our physical and biological universe
and the place of humans in these cycles, from our origins to our current roles. Prerequisites:
ISCI 1101 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: ISCI 1102L.
ISCI 1102L Integrated Science II Lab                                                 1 hour
Integrated Science II laboratory is the laboratory component to Integrated Science II.
Students explore patterns and cycles in our physical and biological universe in a laboratory
setting. Corequisite: ISCI 1102.
220 / Gainesville College




INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES (INED)
INED 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in International Perspectives                1-3 hours
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the culture of the target
country or countries to be visited as part of a study abroad program, an understanding and
appreciation of the importance of the specific sites visited, and practical advice for the
inexperienced traveler.

JAPANESE (JAPN)
JAPN 1000 Introductory Japanese                                                       3 hours
An introductory language course that presents the fundamentals in all skill areas and assists
students to develop basic skills necessary for understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
the target language. This course is specifically designed for students with very little or no
previous experience in the target language or who indicate a deficiency in foreign languages.
The class prepares students to enter a foreign language class at the 1001 level. A grade of C
will fulfill the CPC deficiency. Lab required.
JAPN 1001 Elementary Japanese I                                                     3,1 hours
The first of two elementary language courses designed to develop skills in speaking,
listening comprehension, reading, and writing, as well as familiarize students with aspects of
the target culture. The course delivery combines three hours of in-class lecture with one
hour alternative instructional delivery through lab assignments, online course work, and
service learning where applicable. A grade of “C” will fulfill the CPC deficiency.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, JAPN 1000, or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
JAPN 1002 Elementary Japanese II                                                  3,1 hours
Continuation of JAPN 1001 and skills development in speaking, listening, comprehension,
reading and writing, and familiarity with aspects of the target culture. The course delivery
combines three hours of in-class lecture with one hour alternative instructional delivery
through lab assignments, online course work, and service learning where applicable.
Prerequisite: JAPN 1001, or its equivalent, or permission of instructor.
JAPN 2001 Intermediate Japanese I                                                      3 hours
Designed to increase proficiency in Japanese skills through study of authentic materials:
dialogues, readings, writing exercises, and dictation/pronunciation drills. Prerequisite: JAPN
1002 or two years of high school Japanese and permission of instructor.
JAPN 2002 Intermediate Japanese II                                                3 hours
Focuses on conversation and reading comprehension using real world and culturally-oriented
readings to expand students' knowledge of the Japanese-speaking world. Prerequisite: JAPN
2001.


JOURNALISM (JOUR)
JOUR 1010 News Writing and Reporting                                            3 hours
Techniques of basic news reporting and writing, with practical assignments in the media.
Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
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JOUR 2000 Newspaper Practicum                                            1 hour
Open to all students wishing to work on campus newspaper. Assignments may cover
reporting, writing, photography and sales.
JOUR 2100 Graphic Arts: Layout and Design                                      1 hour
A special interest course designed for students who are interested in photojournalism.
Emphasis is placed upon learning to use a 35mm camera and the complete darkroom
procedures from processing film to enlarging, cropping, and screening photographs for
publication in the school newspaper.
JOUR 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Journalism                                   2-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are news writing, editorial writing, non-print
media, school publications, advertising, reviewing and critiquing, and contemporary
America newspapers.


LATIN (LATN)
LATN 1001 Elementary Latin I                                                   3,1 hours
Introduction to Latin and its influence on the Romance Languages and English. Emphasis is
placed on vocabulary, grammar and syntax through reading, writing, and translation from
cultural and literary texts. The course will focus on vocabulary acquisition and the
development of sight translation skills and reading competency. Laboratory work required.
A grade of “C” will satisfy the CPC deficiency. Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ
0099.

LATN 1002 Elementary Latin II                                                     3,1 hours
A continuation of LATN 1001 with emphasis on vocabulary, grammar and syntax through
reading, writing, and translation from cultural and literary texts. The course will focus on
vocabulary acquisition and the development of sight translation skills and reading
competency. Laboratory work required. Prerequisite: Completion of LATN 1001 or its
equivalent with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

LATN 2001 Intermediate Latin I                                                       3 hours
A study of Latin culture and language as revealed through the work of Cicero and other
Latin writers of the classical period. Latin prose and poetry readings from Pliny and Ovid to
Cicero are supplemented with review of grammar and syntax. Exposure to more complex
syntax and translation forms. Emphasis on Latin literary styles and their influence on
English and Romance languages. Prerequisite: LATN 1002 or its equivalent.

LATN 2002 Intermediate Latin II                                              3 hours
A study of classical Latin culture and language as revealed through poetry and prose.
Emphasis on major figures such as Catullus, Horace, Vergil, Livy, and Petronius.
Prerequisite: LATN 2001 or its equivalent.


LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (INST)
INST 1502 Leadership Development                                                    2 hours
This Area B course has as its central focus the development of leadership skills. The course
is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of leadership and group
dynamics theory and to assist the student in developing a personal philosophy of leadership,
222 / Gainesville College


an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and an awareness of his
or her own style of leadership. The course integrates readings from the humanities, classic
works of literature and contemporary multi cultural writings, and experiential learning
exercises with readings and discussions of traditional leadership theories. Prerequisite:
READ 0099.


LEARNING SUPPORT (ENGL 0099; MATH 0097, 0099; READ 0099)
These courses award institutional credit only, and credit is awarded the semester in
which the student attains the required proficiency.


ENGL 0099 English                                                              4 hours
A course which emphasizes development of college-level competency in written
communication and provides a review of basic English grammar and mechanics for students
who need additional preparation in English prior to taking ENGL 1101. Placement test
scores and writing sample determine if this course is required.
MATH 0097 Introductory Algebra                                                      4 hours
A course for students needing supplemental preparation in basic mathematics and beginning
algebra. The course is required for students whose placement test scores indicate a need for
the course. Topics include signed numbers, algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities,
basic graphing, polynomials, rational expressions, and problem solving. Students must pass
this course with a grade of C or higher before enrolling in MATH 0099.
MATH 0099 Intermediate Algebra                                                       4 hours
A course for students needing supplemental preparation in intermediate algebra skills. The
course is required for students whose placement test scores indicate a need for the course, or
any student who placed in and completed MATH 0097 with a grade of C or higher. Topics
include linear equations, graphing, systems of equations, inequalities, polynomials,
factoring, functions, rational expressions, radicals, quadratic equations and functions,
complex numbers, and problem solving.
READ 0099 Reading                                                                4 hours
This course offers preparation for reading in the content areas with special emphasis on
vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and critical thinking. The following classes
are co-requisites and may be taken while enrolled in READ 0099: ENGL 1101, ECON 1100,
ECON 1502, HIST 1112, MATH 1001, MATH 1111, PARA 1100, and POLS 1101.


LINGUISTICS (MLAN)
MLAN 2010 Introduction to Linguistics                                                3 hours
An introductory study of descriptive, comparative and historical linguistics. The origins and
structure of language are examined and a brief analysis is made of the various language
families. The importance and function of language are stressed. Prerequisites: READ 0099
and ENGL 0099.
MLAN 2801, 2802, 2803 Linguistics Practicum                                    1-3 hours
Linguistics Practicum is a course designed to provide students with the opportunity to use
their language skills in everyday situations. Each student will choose, organize and
complete one linguistics project. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
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MLAN 2901, 2902, 2903, 2904 Special Topics in Linguistics                      1-4 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are transformational-generative grammar, short
comparison of useful grammars, grammatical foundations for teaching languages,
comparative syntax, and language universals. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


MANAGEMENT (MGNT)
MGNT 1111, 1112, 2111, 2112 Management Practicum                                  1 hour
One 50 minute class per week for the student who wishes to enhance the value of education
in Marketing, Merchandising and Management which will contribute to occupational
competence and help to develop progressive leadership skills. Students are required to
affiliate with the local chapter of Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE).
MGNT 2280, 2281, 2282, 2283 Supervised Work Experience                            1-3 hours
An introduction to the principles and practices of supervision which provides the student
with the opportunity to incorporate related work experience into the academic program.
This course includes supervised work experience (minimum of 15 hours per week) in
selected businesses and group discussions of the problems facing supervisors and entry-level
management personnel. The instructor will work closely with the work supervisor and
student during the course to develop practices and solutions specific to the student’s needs.


MATHEMATICS (MATH)
MATH 0097 Introductory Algebra                                                      4 hours
A course for students needing supplemental preparation in basic mathematics and beginning
algebra. The course is required for students whose placement test scores indicate a need for
the course. Topics include signed numbers, algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities,
basic graphing, polynomials, rational expressions, and problem solving. Students must pass
this course with a grade of C or higher before enrolling in MATH 0099.
MATH 0099 Intermediate Algebra                                                       4 hours
A course for students needing supplemental preparation in intermediate algebra skills. The
course is required for students whose placement test scores indicate a need for the course, or
any student who placed in and completed MATH 0097 with a grade of C or higher. Topics
include linear equations, graphing, systems of equations, inequalities, polynomials,
factoring, functions, rational expressions, radicals, quadratic equations and functions,
complex numbers, and problem solving.
MATH 1001 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning                                         3 hours
This course is an alternative in Area A of the Core Curriculum and is not intended to supply
sufficient algebraic background for students who intend to take Precalculus or the Calculus
sequences for Mathematics and Science majors. This course places quantitative skills and
reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. It
emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations,
understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which
conclusions can be reasonably determined. Corequisite: READ 0099. Prerequisite: Regular
placement or successful completion of MATH 0099. Note: Credit toward meeting
graduation requirements will not be granted for both MATH 1001 and MATH 1111.
224 / Gainesville College


MATH 1111 College Algebra                                                           3 hours
An algebra course designed primarily for science, mathematics, and business majors. This
course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate
technology. Topics include a detailed study of piece-wise defined, polynomial, rational,
logarithmic and exponential functions, their graphs and applications. Prerequisite: Regular
placement or successful completion of MATH 0099. Corequisite: READ 0099. Note:
Credit toward meeting graduation requirements will not be granted for both MATH 1001
and MATH 1111.
MATH 1113 Precalculus                                                                 3 hours
A course providing an intensive study on transcendental functions and their applications,
which are fundamental to the study of Calculus, Physics, and related technical subjects.
Emphasis is placed on trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric
identities and equations, right and oblique triangles, and the trigonometric form of complex
numbers. Additional topics include algebraic calculus expressions, system of equations,
conic sections, and a review of exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisites: READ
0099; SAT Math score of 550 or higher, or ACT Math score of 23 or higher, or MATH
1111 with a grade of C or higher, or advanced placement.
MATH 1450 Calculus I                                                             4 hours
A course providing an introduction to differential and integral calculus. Topics include
limits; continuity; derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic
functions; integrals of algebraic and basic trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic
functions; derivative applications; the Mean Value Theorem; elementary differential
equations; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and numerical integration. Corequisite:
READ 0099. Prerequisite: One year of high school trigonometry and a SAT math score of
600 or higher, or an ACT Math score of 25 or higher, or MATH 1113 with a grade of C or
higher, or advanced placement.
MATH 2040 Survey of Calculus                                                         3 hours
A course intended for majors in which the usual calculus sequence is not required. It will
develop familiarity with such concepts as limits; the derivative, definite integral, and
indefinite integral of algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and applications of
derivative and integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 1111 with a grade of C or higher or advanced
placement.
MATH 2460 Calculus II                                                                 4 hours
A second course involving the differential and integral calculus. Topics include integration,
computation of area, differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, applications
of integration, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite
series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 1450.
MATH 2470 Calculus III                                                           4 hours
A course in multivariate calculus and vector analysis. Topics include two-dimensional and
three-dimensional vectors, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple
integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2460.
MATH 2510 Discrete Math                                                         3 hours
A course introducing the fundamentals of discrete mathematics. Topics include set theory
and set equations, prepositional logic, Boolean algebra, graphs and networks, induction
proof and recursion, combinatorial methods and number bases. Emphasis will be placed on
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applications in other disciplines, particularly the areas of science and engineering.
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 with a grade of C or higher.
MATH 2640 Differential Equations                                                     3 hours
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations. The topics
included in this course are first and second order differential equations, higher order linear
equations, mathematical models and numerical methods, Laplace Transforms, and
applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2460.
MATH 2650 Linear Algebra                                                          3 hours
A course introducing the study of linear algebra. Topics include linear systems, matrices,
vector spaces, determinants, linear transformations and inner products, eigenvalues and
eigenvectors, and orthogonality. Corequisite: MATH 2460.
MATH 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Mathematics                            1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand.


MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES (MFLA)
MFLA 1102 How to Learn a Foreign Language                                             2 hours
In this optional course, students will become familiar with the nature and structure of foreign
language courses and review English grammar skills essential to foreign language learning.
Then these skills will be applied to whatever foreign language course the student is taking.
This course should be helpful to non-traditional students and those with a CPC deficiency in
foreign languages.
MFLA 1501 Foreign Language Readings                                              1 hour
In this Area B course the student prepares a dossier of Spanish or French articles from
various publications, particularly on-line journals and newspapers that pertain to and
illustrate a chosen topic of relevance to the social science or speech class.
MFLA 1502 Foreign Language for Professionals                                          2 hours
In this Area B course the student will study the oral and written foreign language appropriate
to the needs of a particular profession. Appropriate use will be made of applicable software
and the Internet. This course will include lab work. Prerequisite: the 1002 level of the
language.


MUSIC (MUSC)
MUSC 1010 Aural Skills I                                                             1 hour
A pre-test may be required. This course deals with the development of sight singing and
ear-training skills using diatonic scales, intervals, and harmony. It is designed for music
majors and meets for two contact hours.
MUSC 1020 Aural Skills II                                                          1 hour
This is the second level in the development of sight singing and ear-training skills using
diatonic scales, intervals, and harmony. It is designed for music majors. Prerequisite:
MUSC 1010. Meets for two contact hours.
226 / Gainesville College


MUSC 1100 Music Appreciation                                                        3 hours
Survey of music in Western civilizations, including; basic listening skills, developments in
the musical arts correlated to the history of man, and fundamental terminology/notation of
music. Individual listening is required. Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.
MUSC 1110 Theory: Fundamentals of Music I                                      2 hours
Pre-test may be required. Development of skills in notation, meter, rhythm, scales, key
signatures, chords, and part writing.
MUSC 1120 Theory: Fundamentals of Music II                                   2 hours
A continuation of MUSC 1110 introducing diatonic harmony, voicing, cadences, melodic
organization, and rhythm. Prerequisite: MUSC 1110.
MUSC 1200 Music History and Literature                                            3 hours
This is a survey of primarily Western World art music from B.C. to the present. It is
designed for music majors to satisfy an entry level of study in music literature.
MUSC 1410, 1420, 2410, 2420 Class Piano                                              1 hour
Two 50-minute classes per week. For the music education major whose applied
concentration is not piano. Fundamental keyboard skills including scales, elementary chord
progressions, sight reading, transposition, harmonization, and prepared pieces. Open to non-
music majors if space permits. Pre-test may be required.
MUSC 1610, 2610 Applied Music Instrumental                                      1 hour
One 25-minute lesson per week. Open to music education majors. Non-majors by
permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 1620, 2620 Applied Music Instrumental                             2 hours
One 50-minute lesson per week. Open to applied music majors only. Prerequisites:
Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 1710, 2710 Applied Music Piano                                             1 hour
One 25-minute lesson per week. Open to music education majors. Non-majors by
permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 1720, 2720 Applied Music Piano                                              2 hours
One 50-minute lesson per week. Open to applied music majors only. Prerequisites: Audition
and permission of instructor.
MUSC 1810, 2810 Applied Music Voice                                             1 hour
One 25-minute voice lesson per week. Open to music education majors. Non-majors by
permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 1820, 2820 Applied Music Voice                                           2 hour
One 50-minute voice lesson per week. Open to applied music majors only. Prerequisites:
Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 2010 Aural Skills III                                                         1 hour
This is the third level in the development of sight singing and ear-training skills. It is
designed for music majors and includes two contact hours. Prerequisite: MUSC 2010.
MUSC 2020 Gainesville College Chorale                                              1 hour
Student chorus that performs choral literature of the centuries throughout the semesters.
Meets for three contact hours. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
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MUSC 2030 Aural Skills IV                                                          1 hour
This is the fourth level in the development of sight singing and ear-training skills. It is
designed for music majors. Meets for two contact hours. Prerequisite: MUSC 2010.
MUSC 2040 Jazz Band                                                                 1 hour
This performance organization plays all forms of jazz literature and includes three contact
hours. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 2050 Ensemble: Jazz Combo                                                    1 hour
This performance organization plays all forms of jazz literature and includes 1.5 contact
hours. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 2060 Ensemble: Symphonic Band                                                   1 hour
This performance organization consists of all instruments except percussion and performs
concert literature and includes 1.5 contact hours. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of
instructor.
MUSC 2070 Ensemble: Guitar                                                            1 hour
This class is designed to provide study/performance opportunities for intermediate and
advanced level guitar students in ensemble literature. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
MUSC 2080 Class Voice                                                              1 hour
One 50-minute class per week for non-music majors. Fundamental vocal skills, including
breath management, tone production, song interpretation, vocal physiology and health. Will
involve in-class participation, performing songs and vocal exercises.
MUSC 2110 Advanced Theory III                                          2 hours
A continuation of MUSC 1120 with the addition of chromatic harmonic techniques.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1120.
MUSC 2120 Advanced Theory IV                                                   2 hours
A continuation of MUSC 2110 with the addition of twentieth century harmonic techniques.
Prerequisite: MUSC 2110.
MUSC 2310 Brass Choir                                                              1 hour
This performance organization plays all forms of brass literature and includes 1.5 contact
hours. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 2320 Woodwind Choir                                                      1 hour
This performance organization plays all forms of woodwind literature and includes 1.5
contact hours. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor.
MUSC 2330 Percussion Ensemble                                                   1 hour
This course is designed to provide study/performance opportunities for intermediate and
advanced level percussion students in ensemble literature. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
MUSC 2340 String Ensemble                                                             1 hour
This course is designed to provide study/performance opportunities for intermediate and
advanced level string students in ensemble literature. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
228 / Gainesville College


PARALEGAL STUDIES (PARA)
PARA 1100 Introduction to Paralegalism and Ethics                                      3 hours
The course introduces the new student to the legal system and the responsibilities of
paralegals. Topics include the development of paralegals as a profession; the unauthorized
practice of law; ethical considerations; interviewing techniques; library instruction on how to
conduct legal research; and dynamics of client relationships. This course is offered each
Spring Semester and is the required first course in paralegal courses. Corequisite: READ
0099.
PARA 2101 Civil Procedure                                                         2 hours
A detailed knowledge of the law of pleading and practice in the State of Georgia, study of
jurisdiction, discovery, trial, judgment and appeal. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2102 Criminal Litigation                                                         2 hours
The organization of a criminal case for trial beginning with the preparation of the pleadings
to verdict. Emphasis will be upon preparation of a trial notebook. Skills will be developed
in analyzing facts to determine trial strategy, interviewing, obtaining statements from
witnesses, preparation of trial exhibits and use of discovery. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2103 Civil Litigation                                                           2 hours
The organization of a civil case for trial beginning with the preparation of the pleadings to
verdict. Emphasis will be upon preparation of a trial notebook. Skills will be developed in
analyzing facts to determine trial strategy, interviewing, obtaining statements from
witnesses, preparation of trial exhibits and use of discovery. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2104 Legal Research                                                          3 hours
An explanation of the use of legal books and other publications which form the backbone of
legal research. Normally, visits to a law library and a county records room will be made.
This course is offered every Fall Semester. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2105 Wills, Probate and Estate Administration                                  2 hours
A detailed knowledge of the law of descent and distribution; the execution of wills; the law
of executors and administrators; and the procedures in probate courts. Prerequisite: PARA
1100.
PARA 2106 Computers for the Legal Profession                                        3 hours
A study of the use of computers in the law office. The student will acquire the skill needed
to use a personal computer and word processing, spreadsheet, and data manager software to
solve applications commonly found in the law office. The student will also become familiar
with the capability of other law office oriented software such as that used for litigation
support, loan closings, legal research, and computerized timekeeping. Prerequisite: CISM
1502 or CISM 2201 or permission of instructor.
PARA 2201 Real Estate Title Examination                                               2 hours
Basic principles of real estate, deeds, courthouse records, tax and judgment examinations,
and title abstracting. Actual title examination projects will be conducted at the Hall County
Records Room, Gainesville, Georgia, under instructor supervision. Prerequisite: PARA
1100.
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 229


PARA 2202 Real Estate Closings                                                        1 hour
The basic legal procedures and regulations for real estate closings, preparation of standard
closing documents, including HUDI, deeds, and mortgages. Students will be familiarized
with state and local regulations. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2203 Family Law                                                                2 hours
An introduction to basic domestic law. This course will include techniques of interviewing;
overview of the laws of divorce; alimony; child custody and property division; and
preparations and trying of divorce cases. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2204 Business Organizations/Contracts                                            2 hours
A general view of legal principles of partnerships and corporations, together with classroom
discussions by a paralegal on his/her role in a corporate law practice. Course also covers the
principles and elements of contract law along with typical forms. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.
PARA 2206 Internship                                                                   1 hour
This course is for paralegal majors who are in their second year of taking paralegal courses.
It is only offered in Summer Semester. Through professionally supervised work at law
firms, government agencies, courts, corporate offices or legal services, skills learned by the
student in the classroom will be applied to working situations. The one credit hour of field
placement involves a minimum of forty hours of on-site paralegal work and at least two
classroom sessions. Placement cannot be guaranteed. Prerequisite: PARA 1100 and PARA
2104.
PARA 2207 Bankruptcy                                                           2 hours
The study of rules and procedures in the Bankruptcy Court, including the preparation of
schedules and filing for various types of bankruptcy. Prerequisite: PARA 1100.


PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)
PHIL 1502 The Intellectual Foundation of Modern Science                             2 hours
An examination of the nature of the scientific process, tracing the development of the
scientific world view from medieval times to the present, the nature of both science and
social science and the implications of scientific progress for the human condition.

PHIL 2010 Great Questions of Philosophy                                               3 hours
An introduction to the study of philosophy through a consideration of the major problems
attendant upon the discussion of the nature of free will and determinism; God and religious
belief; morality, responsibility and human happiness; human personality and the nature of
persons; political theories; and human knowledge and science. It is not the purpose of this
course to provide definitive answers to the questions discussed, but rather to expose one to
the various proposed solutions, to discuss the cogency of various proposals, and to allow one
to decide, in the light of the evidence offered, which proposal or proposals seem most
rationally persuasive. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
PHIL 2020 Symbolic Logic and Critical Thinking                                     3 hours
An introduction to the principles and standards for thinking and communicating clearly and
effectively. The course provides the tools to discern good and bad reasoning and to be able
to test an argument to see whether it is correct or not. Prerequisite: PHIL 2010.
230 / Gainesville College


PHIL 2030 Introduction to Western Political Thought                              3 hours
A first study of the major themes dealing with political theory and the construction of
“government”. A critical examination of the major views of and approaches to political
behavior from the time of Plato through philosophers such as Karl Marx. Included is the
examination of the political theory of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, John
Locke, Jean-Jacque Rousseau, and Karl Marx among others. Prerequisite: PHIL 2010.
PHIL 2040 Introduction to Ethical Theory                                           3 hours
An introduction to the major topics of ethics and morality from both eastern and western
traditions, involving a critical examination of the centuries’ old questions of ethical and
moral behavior. Included are examinations of the appropriate writings of philosophers such
as Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Hobbes, Kant, Jeremy Bentham, J.S. Mill,
Confucious, Lao Tzu, and others. Prerequisite: PHIL 2010.
PHIL 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Philosophy                             1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand. Topics may include but are not limited to ancient and modern philosophy,
phenomenology and metaphysics. Prerequisite: PHIL 2010 or permission of instructor.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHED)
PHED 1000 Personal Fitness                                                          1 hour
This course helps the student establish and maintain an individual fitness program utilizing
the components of flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular endurance,
and body composition. Segments may include strength training, walking/jogging, aerobics,
swimming, and water aerobics.
PHED 1002 CPR/First Aid                                                         1 hour
Provides instruction in methods of handling respiratory and circulatory emergencies and
many other situations which require emergency first aid. Students who successfully
complete requirements may obtain certification. Course related fee applies (see Fees &
Expenses)
PHED 1020 Personal Health/Wellness                                                   2 hours
Discussion of current issues in health/wellness and how a fit and well lifestyle can enhance
the quality of life. Self-assessments are performed to determine self-health status. There is
a laboratory component to this class requiring physical activity.
PHED 1106 Aerobics                                                               1 hour
This course focuses on improving the student’s cardiovascular level through a variety of
low, high, and step aerobics exercises. Students also develop an understanding of the
different components comprising physical fitness.
PHED 1107 Basketball                                                      1 hour
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques and knowledge appropriate for the
successful participation in five player basketball.
PHED 1108 Bait Casting                                                               1 hour
An introduction to basic fly casting and spin casting techniques as applied to fresh water
fishing. Other key elements of instruction include: equipment selection and care, fishing
regulations, where to fish, fish dressing techniques, and boating safety. Course related fee
applies (see Fees & Expenses)
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 231


PHED 1109 Water Aerobics                                                               1 hour
Emphasizes safe and enjoyable activities, through water exercises, which increase fitness
levels. Principle components of fitness, including healthy nutrition practices, are examined.
PHED 1110 Fitness Walking                                                           1 hour
Provides knowledge of techniques of fitness walking. It aids beginners and experienced
walkers in developing more efficient walking patterns in order to participate in a lifelong
fitness walking program.
PHED 1111 Jogging                                                                    1 hour
A beginning jogging course providing guidelines for safe and effective jogging and the basic
principles of training related to the development of cardio-respiratory endurance. Note:
Student must be able to jog/run/walk one-mile in less than 12 minutes.
PHED 1112 Yoga                                                                         1 hour
An introduction to the fundamentals of Yoga through the practice of exercises, breathing,
and relaxation techniques. This course is designed to teach the various styles and techniques
involved in Yoga. Corse related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1113 Beginning Karate                                                          1 hour
This course introduces the student to the fundamental skills of karate. It is designed to
develop physical skills of karate as well as develop self esteem, self discipline, and self
confidence. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1114 Ropes Course Challenge                                                     1 hour
This course familiarizes the student with concepts of adventure based programming which
utilizes activities such as cooperative games, group initiative and problem solving, trust
activities, and ropes course elements which aid individuals and groups in learning about
decision making, leadership, and how to be a team player. The student is introduced to skills
required to manage ropes course activities as well as safety. Course related fee applies (see
Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1115 Beginning Bowling                                                          1 hour
This course is designed to give students a better understanding of the sport of bowling and
develop fundamental bowling skills. Students acquire reasonable effectiveness in bowling
while learning to appreciate bowling as a lifetime recreational activity. Course related fee
applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1117 Tumbling                                                                     1 hour
The course addresses three main areas: strength, flexibility, and balance. Skills taught range
from very basic rolls, to advanced skills such as round offs and somersaults.
PHED 1123 Soccer                                                                       1 hour
This course provides the fundamentals of the game of soccer as applied to a beginning
soccer player/student. Basic skills such as different types of kicks, dribbling, passing, rules
of the game and positions played in soccer are covered.
PHED 1134 Weight Training                                                              1 hour
A beginning weight training course providing guidelines for proper execution of a variety of
exercises and the basic principles of training related to the development of muscular strength
and endurance.
232 / Gainesville College


PHED 1200 Self-Defense                                                               1 hour
This course provides knowledge of self-defense tactics and promotes good judgment for
safety of the individual in various situations which include home and travel. Topics include
strikes, escapes, and other defense tactics.
PHED 1205 Badminton                                                              1 hour
Badminton is an activity course designed to acquaint the student with the sport and to
encourage continued use of the activity for the future lifestyle of the student.
PHED 1214 Beginning Golf                                                          1 hour
A beginning golf course teaching the fundamentals of golf such as swing, stance, grip, the
rules, and etiquette of golf. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1215 Advanced Golf                                                            1 hour
A course that continues with the basic fundamentals and also covers the more advanced
aspects of the game. Students are required to play two rounds (minimum) of golf during the
term. Students should have a thorough knowledge of the game and the ability to execute the
basic fundamentals. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1229 Beginning Tennis                                                          1 hour
This course introduces the student to the basic tennis fundamentals of forehand and
backhand ground strokes and serving, as well as learning scoring and simple game strategies.
Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1230 Advanced Tennis                                                          1 hour
This course continues with basic fundamentals and also covers more advanced aspects of the
game, such as the volley, lob, overhead smash, and singles and doubles game strategies.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval. Student should have a thorough knowledge of the game
and the ability to execute the basic fundamentals. Course related fee applies (see Fees &
Expenses)
PHED 1300 Mountain Biking                                                           1 hour
A beginning mountain biking course that provides guidelines for safe biking, such as proper
equipment needed, how to maneuver on different terrain, basic maintenance of a mountain
bike and how mountain biking can enhance physical fitness.
PHED 1302 Rock Climbing/Rappelling                                                  1 hour
An introductory course designed to teach the student the fundamental skills involved in rock
climbing/rappelling. No prior experience is necessary. Topics include: equipment,
terminology, safety, logistics of packing for a trip, route finding and rescue scenarios.
Course related fee applies (see Fees and Expenses).

PHED 1304 Caving/Spelunking                                                             1 hour
The primary purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basic knowledge and
skills necessary to perform safe caving/spelunking activities. Caving is for those more
adventurous spirits and those simply wanting a taste of adventure in the outdoors. The
course provides opportunities for individuals to push themselves physically and emotionally.
 Hard skills including route finding/tagging, cave rescue and safety, and soft skills including
debriefing and challenge of choice are foci in the course. The course is an excellent
introduction into the exciting fields of outdoor and experiential education. Course related
fee applies (see Fees and Expenses).
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 233


PHED 1332 Volleyball                                                           1 hour
Volleyball is a recreational activity course in which proper skills and techniques are
emphasized.
PHED 1400 Rowing                                                                      1 hour
An introductory rowing course designed to teach the student the fundamental skills involved
in rowing. Topics include: equipment terminology, boat safety, fundamentals of the rowing
stroke, sweep rowing, sculling, boat handling, coxing, and erging. Course related fee applies
(see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1401 Canoeing/Kayaking                                                     1 hour
An introductory course designed to teach the student the fundamental skills involved in
rowing. Topics include: open Canadian canoeing, sea kayaking, whitewater, kayak polo,
and flatwater paddling. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1403 Beginning Sailing, Basic Keelboat                                            1 hour
An introductory course in sailing. Students learn to sail a boat of about 20 feet in length in
light to moderate winds and sea conditions in familiar waters without supervision. The
course is approved by the National Association of Boating Law Administration and the U.S.
Coast Guard as a recognized safe boating course. As such it meets all requirements for
mandatory education and licensing in the U.S., and provides certification from the American
Sailing Association. Course related fee applies (see Fees and Expenses).
PHED 1500 Fitness Swimming                                                       1 hour
Students learn how to perform various swim workouts and improve proficiency in stroke
techniques as a means of promoting physical fitness. Students are exposed to the various
programs available through United States Masters Swimming.
PHED 1526 Beginner Swimming                                                   1 hour
Designed to teach elementary safety skills in or about the water and to promote skills
necessary to enjoy basic swimming strokes.
PHED 1527 Intermediate Swimming                                                        1 hour
Covers stroke mechanics of Front Crawl, Back Crawl, Elementary Backstroke, Breaststroke,
and Sidestroke. Rescue and safety techniques, survival skills, and water entries are included.
PHED 1528 Lifeguard Training                                                        2 hours
This course provides lifeguard candidates with the skill and knowledge necessary to keep the
patrons of aquatic facilities safe in and around the water. Students who successfully
complete requirements may obtain certification. Course related fee applies (see Fees &
Expenses)
PHED 1529 Water Safety Instructor                                                      1 hour
This course can certify students as Water Safety Instructors. Focus is on stroke proficiencies
and different teaching situations. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. Students should be able
to demonstrate proficiency in different swimming skills.
PHED 1551 Sports and Games                                                              1 hour
This course provides the student with an opportunity to learn assorted lifetime activities such
as volleyball, bowling, walking/jogging, swimming, aerobics, and others. The student also
develops an understanding of the principles underlying total fitness.
234 / Gainesville College


PHED 1552 Sports and Games                                                      1 hour
This course provides the student with further opportunities to learn and enjoy lifetime
activities and a thorough knowledge of the physical fitness principles.
PHED 1613 Dance                                                                         1 hour
A survey of different dances from different countries and periods of time.
PHED 1701 Beginning Horseback Riding                                                 1 hour
An introductory course designed to teach a student the fundamental skills involved as a
beginner rider. Beginners start in Western saddle and evolve into an English saddle. Topics
include: tack terminology, horse anatomy, basic horse care, common horse ailments and
diseases, as well as horsemanship safety. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1702 Intermediate Horseback Riding                                             1 hour
This course is designed for the student who has a basic knowledge of horsemanship and
riding. Theory of training techniques and their application are introduced. Topics include:
basic veterinary care, anatomy of the hoof, types of rein and leg aids and how the horse
responds to each. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 1800 Snow Skiing                                                                  1 hour
This course is designed for students to develop a knowledge of snow skiing which will
enable them to enjoy a lifetime sport. Topics include: proper safety and etiquette on the
slopes, exercises specific for skiing, basic principles of dressing properly, proper use of ski
equipment, and learning how to load and unload from various types of ski lifts. Some basic
instruction will be given at the College, but on slope skiing at a designated off-campus site is
required. Course related fee applies (see Fees & Expenses)
PHED 2000 Personal Training                                                          2 hours
Students master the basic exercise science facts, concepts, principles, and skills of
developing and implementing individual physical fitness programs within their specialized
setting. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines for exercise testing
and prescription for the apparently healthy adult are emphasized. This course is for students
taking the Personal Training Certificate and Exercise Science major, and cannot be used to
partially fulfill the college physical education requirement. Corequisite: PHED 2000L.
PHED 2000L Personal Training Lab                                                       1 hour
Activities designed to supplement PHED 2000 lecture and apply the American College of
Sports Medicine (ACSM) principles of exercise testing and prescription for the apparently
healthy adult are emphasized. This includes skills in resting blood pressure and resting heart
rate assessments, body fat assessment techniques, flexibility, cardio-respiratory and strength
assessment techniques and conditioning methods. This course is for students taking the
Personal Training Certificate and Exercise Science major, and cannot be used to partially
fulfill the college physical education requirement. Corequisite: PHED 2000.
PHED 2010 Introduction to Physical Education                                       3 hours
A survey of the physical education profession emphasizing teaching and non-teaching
careers. Students are exposed to different philosophies of physical education, scientific
principles, programs and related fields, and professional considerations. This course is for
Physical Education majors and cannot be used to partially fulfill the College Physical
Education requirement. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 235


PHED 2034 Strength Training and Conditioning                                          2 hours
An introduction to the principles of developing and implementing strength and conditioning
programs for healthy individuals, teaching them to prepare individualized and specialized
weight training programs. Topics include: basic exercise science training principles, testing
and evaluation of strength, power, speed, reaction time, flexibility, agility, and a survey of
basic kinesiology. The guidelines and competencies required for the National Strength and
Conditioning Association’s (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)
certification are emphasized. Prerequisite: PHED 1134 or permission of instructor.

PHED 2911, 2912, 2913 Special Topics in Physical Education                       1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand and interest. Classes might include special topics such as fencing, wilderness
survival skills, creative dance, or other topics suggested by students and professors.


PHYSICS (PHYS)
All lecture and lab courses have a separate number and grade; therefore, if the lab
is required with the lecture, they must be taken concurrently. The only exception is
if one component (lecture or lab) is passed and the other failed, only the failed
portion need be repeated.

PHYS 1001 Survey of Physics                                                     3 hours
This is an algebra based survey of the fundamental ideas of mechanics, heat, electricity,
light, and sound. Not open to students with credit in PHYS 1111/1111L or PHYS
2211/2211L. Prerequisite: MATH 1111. Corequisite: PHYS 1101L.

PHYS 1001L Survey of Physics Lab                                                1 hour
This is the laboratory component of PHYS 1001 and involves laboratory investigations of
phenomena in mechanics, heat, electricity, light, and sound. Corequisite: PHYS 1001
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I                                                3 hours
This is an algebra/trigonometry based introduction to the fundamental laws of mechanics.
Prerequisite: MATH 1113. Corequisite: PHYS 1111L.
PHYS 1111L Introductory Physics I Lab                                   1 hour
This course is a laboratory investigation of the fundamental laws of mechanics.
Corequisite: PHYS 1111.
PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II                                                    3 hours
This is an algebra/trigonometry based introduction to the fundamental laws of electricity and
magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1111. Corequisite: PHYS
1112L.
PHYS 1112L Introductory Physics II Lab                                        1 hour
This course is a laboratory investigation of the fundamental laws of electricity and
magnetism, optics and modern physics. Corequisite: PHYS 1112.
PHYS 2211 General Physics I                                                     3 hours
This is a calculus based introduction to the fundamental laws of mechanics. Prerequisite:
MATH 1450. Corequisite: PHYS 2211L.
236 / Gainesville College


PHYS 2211L General Physics I Lab                                                    1 hour
This course is a laboratory investigation of the fundamental laws of mechanics. Corequisite:
PHYS 2211.
PHYS 2212 General Physics II                                                    3 hours
This is a calculus based introduction to the fundamental laws of electricity, magnetism,
optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2460 and PHYS 2211.
Corequisite: PHYS 2212L.
PHYS 2212L General Physics II Lab                                                    1 hour
This course is a laboratory investigation of the fundamental laws of electricity, magnetism,
optics, and modern physics. Corequisite: PHYS 2212.
PHYS 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Physics                                1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. This is a project based course in which students do investigations in
special topics in physics. Course proceeds by arrangement with instructor. A written
proposal for the study filed with the supervising instructor is required. Prerequisite or
Corequisite: PHYS 1111, 1112, 2211 or 2212.


POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
POLS 1101 American Government                                                   3 hours
An introductory course that provides an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the
nation, government institutions, and political processes. Not open to students who have
credit for POLS 1101H. Prerequisite or Corequisite: READ 0099.
POLS 2201 Introduction to State and Local Government                                3 hours
An introductory examination of the institutions, processes, and policy making of state and
local governments. An in-depth study of the state of Georgia and its local governments is
included. Satisfies Georgia Constitution legislative requirement. Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or
POLS 1101H or permission of instructor.
POLS 2301 Introduction to Comparative Government Systems                         3 hours
A course designed to acquaint students with key concepts and methods necessary for
evaluating and comparing a variety of political systems. Prerequisite: POLS 1101or POLS
1101H or permission of instructor.
POLS 2401 Introduction to Global Studies                                           3 hours
The course introduces students to the concepts, practices, and issues in contemporary
international relations (global or world politics). Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or POLS 1101H
or permission of instructor.
POLS 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Political Science                      1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand. Among such topics are the Presidency, Congress, Supreme Court, and American
Foreign Policy. Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or POLS 1101H or permission of instructor.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 237


POULTRY SCIENCE (POUL)
POUL 2020 Introductory Poultry Science                                              2 hours
A course designed to cover the biology of the domestic fowl with emphasis on its
application to poultry production. Prerequisite: BIOL 1101 (for Agribusiness track) or BIOL
1107 (for Science track). Corequisite: POUL 2020L.
POUL 2020L Introductory Poultry Science Lab                                               1 hour
The laboratory component for Poultry Science 2020. Corequisite: POUL 2020.
POUL 2953 Poultry Science Internship                                                3 hours
This course is structured to allow the student a hands-on experience in the major sectors of
poultry production/processing. The student will work a 40-hour week for one semester in
various sectors of the cooperating poultry firm’s production/processing operation under the
guidance of the firm’s personnel manager and the supervision of the firm’s line manager.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or POUL advisor.


PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
PSYC 1101 General Psychology                                                     3 hours
An introduction to the application of scientific methods to problems of human behavior. A
variety of topics and theories in psychology is included. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
PSYC 2103 Human Growth and Development                                            3 hours
A survey course of life span human development explored from a variety of psychological
perspectives. Meets the needs of students in nursing, education, sociology, and behavioral
science programs. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 with a grade of C or higher.
PSYC 2150 Introduction to Social Psychology                                            3 hours
An introductory course that explores theories of human behavior and cognition in social
settings. This research based course covers a wide variety of topics germane to the field of
social psychology including: research methods, the self-concept, person perception,
prejudice, attitudes and attitude change, gender issues, romantic attraction, aggression, social
influence, pro- and anti-social behavior, health/environmental psychology, and group
dynamics. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 with a grade of C or higher.
PSYC 2530 Introduction to Abnormal Behavior                                        3 hours
An introductory course that provides an overview of literature and research findings that
shape our understanding of psychological disorders and their treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC
1101 with a grade of C or higher.

PSYC 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Psychology                             1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand. Among such topics are: Human Sexuality, Controversial Issues in Psychology,
Classical Psychological Experiments, the Psychology of Women, the Psychology of the Self,
and Gerontology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 with a grade of C or higher.
238 / Gainesville College


READING (READ)
READ 0099 Reading                                                                4 hours
This course offers preparation for reading in the content areas with special emphasis on
vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and critical thinking. The following classes
may be taken while enrolled in READ 0099: ENGL 1101, ECON 1100, ECON 1502, HIST
1112, MATH 1001, MATH 1111, PARA 1100, and POLS 1101.


REGENTS’ TEST PROGRAM (RGTE, RGTP, RGTR)
These courses award institutional credit only, and credit is awarded the semester in
which the student attains the required proficiency.

RGTE 0199 Regents’ Test Essay Skills                                                 3 hours
The Regents’ Writing Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG
institutions possess certain minimum skills in writing. Students learn to evaluate their own
writing strengths and weaknesses and work on improving their writing skills so that they are
able to write an essay meeting the Regents’ criteria. The course is taught by arrangement on
an individual basis.
RGTP 0199 Regents’ Test Practicum                                                  1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with a review of reading and composition skills
needed to pass the Regents’ Test. It is designed for students who have accumulated 45 or
more hours without having taken the test. The course is taught by arrangement on an
individual basis.
RGTR 0198 Regents’ Test Reading Skills                                           3 hours
The Regents’ Reading Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG
institutions possess certain minimum skills in reading comprehension. Students work on
improving their comprehension of material drawn from a variety of subject areas (social
science, natural science, and humanities) with various modes of discourse (exposition,
narration, and argumentation). Critical thinking and the following four major aspects of
reading are emphasized: vocabulary in context, inferential and literal comprehension, and
analysis. The course is taught by arrangement on an individual basis.


RELIGION (RELG)
RELG 2020 Introduction to Religious Thought                                               3 hours
A thematic introduction to the academic study of religion. Through examples drawn from a
wide range of religious traditions, issues central to the field of religious studies in particular,
and to humanity in general, are explored to include: How can we understand our own place
and role in the cosmos? Are there really any moral absolutes? Why is there evil? Is there
life after death? Readings are drawn largely from primary texts, some dating back to 2000
B.C.E., representing a wide range of traditions including Jewish, Christian, Muslim,
Buddhist, Hindu, Native American, African American, Ancient Babylonian, and Ancient
Egyptian. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
RELG 2030 Introduction to the Old and New Testament                              3 hours
An introduction to the texts included in the Jewish Bible (the Tanakh), the Christian Old
Testament and the New Testament. No assumption is made that students have any prior
familiarity with these texts. The course discusses how the Bible is understood and
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 239


incorporated as authoritative teaching within the Jewish and Christian communities as well
as the historical development of the texts as understood from an academic scholar’s
perspective. The course is designed to make students familiar with what is in the Bible, to
give them a layperson’s “working knowledge” of the Biblical texts, and to provide them
with a sense of how these texts function both as religious documents within two of the
world’s great religious traditions and as historical documents used by scholars for the study
of the history of religions. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
RELG 2101 Introduction to World Religions                                           3 hours
An introductory course designed to provide an analytical, critical, and comparative study of
the major world religious traditions including Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and
Christianity. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
RELG 2103 Religions In America                                                     3 hours
Introduces students to the religious experience of Americans from colonial times to the
present. Topics include but are not limited to Protestantism, Catholicism, Native American
religions, Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, African American religions, Hinduism, fundamentalist
religion, and women in religion. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
RELG 2105 Eastern Religions                                                         3 hours
An introduction to the religion and philosophy of the East through a selective historical
examination of major thinkers, texts, and cultural expressions. Primary emphases are on the
origins and development of indigenous traditions, the spread of religious views throughout
Southeast and Central Asia, and the relationship between intellectual thought and popular
practice. Topics include: polytheism, ritual, ethics, mysticism, death and the afterlife, and
salvation. The comparative approach also focuses on the issue of inter-faith dialogue and
methodological problems involved in the study of “other” religions. Prerequisites: READ
0099 and ENGL 0099.


RESEARCH STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY (RSCH)
RSCH 1501 Research Strategies                                                          1 hour
This interactive hands-on course is an introduction to the critical thinking and computer
searching strategies required in today’s information based society. It acquaints students with
various types of resource materials, familiarizes them with key tools, and assists them in
learning to acquire, evaluate, and organize information. Prerequisites: READ 0099 and
ENGL 0099.
RSCH 1502 Research Strategies and Technology                                           2 hours
This interactive hands-on course investigates modern information structures. It acquaints
students with various types of resource materials; familiarizes them with key tools; and
assists them in learning to acquire, evaluate, organize and present data collected via a variety
of media. The knowledge and skills gained in this course creates a foundation for academic
success and lifelong learning. Prerequisite: READ 0099. Not open to students with credit in
RSCH 1501.
240 / Gainesville College


RUSSIAN (RUSS)
The Russian courses will be taught using the National Association of Self-Instructional
Language Program (NASILP) methodology.

RUSS 1000 Introductory Russian                                                        3 hours
An introductory language course that presents the fundamentals in all skill areas and assists
students to develop basic skills necessary for understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
the target language. This course is specifically designed for students with very little or no
previous experience in the target language or who indicate a deficiency in foreign languages.
The class prepares students to enter a foreign language class at the 1001 level. A grade of C
will fulfill the CPC deficiency. Lab required.
RUSS 1001 Elementary Russian 1                                                     3,1 hours
The first of two elementary language courses designed to develop skills in speaking,
listening comprehension, reading, writing, as well as familiarize students with aspects of the
target culture. The course delivery combines three hours of in-class lecture with one hour
alternative instructional delivery through lab assignments, online course work, and service
learning where applicable. A grade of ‘C’ will fulfill the CPC deficiency. Prerequisite:
ENGL 0099, RUSS 1000 or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
RUSS 1002 Elementary Russian II                                                3,1 hours
Continuation of RUSS 1001 and skills development in speaking, listening, comprehension,
reading, writing, and familiarity with aspects of the target culture. The course delivery
combines three hours of in-class lecture with one hour alternative instructional delivery
through lab assignments, online course work, and service learning where applicable.
Prerequisite: RUSS 1001, or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
RUSS 2001 Intermediate Russian I                                                3 hours
Designed to increase proficiency in Russian skills through study of authentic materials:
dialogues, readings, writing exercises, and dictation/pronunciation drills. Prerequisite:
RUSS 1002 or two years of high school Russian and permission of instructor.
RUSS 2002 Intermediate Russian II                                                 3 hours
Focuses on conversation and reading comprehension using real world and culturally-oriented
readings to expand students' knowledge of the Russian-speaking world. Prerequisite: RUSS
2001.


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (SCTS)
SCTS 1502 Orientation to Science and Technology in Society                           2 hours
This course will provide an integrated introduction to the esthetic, ethical, historical,
philosophical, political, and socioeconomic aspects of science and technology. This course
seeks to help students better understand the world in which they live and the broader
implications of science and technology in society. Additionally, students will survey state of
the art applications in science and technology.


SCIENCE STUDY SKILLS (SSCI)
SSCI 1100 Science Study Skills                                                   2 hours
A required course for students entering Gainesville College with a CPC deficiency in
science. In this course students will develop the skills in math, critical thinking, and
                                                                       Courses of Instruction / 241


computer use necessary to function effectively in a college level science class. This course
must be taken prior to any science courses. Students must complete course with a grade of C
or higher.


SERVICE LEARNING (SVLN)
SVLN 1502 Service Learning                                                          2 hours
An introduction to the concept of service learning and the philosophy and principles that
serve as its foundation. It provides students with the opportunity to participate in service
learning and to integrate this experience with personal and societal values surrounding
important issues and problems in American society. The student is expected to complete a
service learning project during the semester at a designated agency. This course meets the
Area B institutional options requirement. Prerequisite: READ 0099.


SOCIAL WORK (SOWK)
SOWK 2000 Introduction to Social Work                                               3 hours
This course provides an introduction to the profession of social work, including the various
fields of practice and current issues facing the profession. Prerequisite: READ 0099


SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology                                                   3 hours
This course introduces students to the methods and theories used by sociologists to explore
the nature of society. Selected topics may include culture, socialization, social interaction,
groups, social organization, deviance, social institutions, and social stratification.
Prerequisite: READ 0099.
SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems                                         3 hours
This course focuses on selected current social problems, their social and cultural causes,
consequences, and various proposed solutions. It also examines the interconnectedness of
local, national, and global problems. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
SOCI 2293 Introduction to Marriage and Family                                  3 hours
This course involves a study of the family as a social institution in American society.
Selected topics may include love, dating, marital quality, communication, sex and
parenthood, conflict and power, family violence, divorce and remarriage. Prerequisite:
READ 0099.
SOCI 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Sociology                               1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
demand and interest. Topics may include but are not limited to race relations, juvenile
delinquency, drugs and drug abuse, human sexuality, sociology of death, gender inequality,
and family violence. Prerequisite: READ 0099.
242 / Gainesville College


SPANISH (SPAN)
A native speaker may not register for certain Spanish classes. A native speaker is
defined as a person who graduated from a secondary school in which the language of
instruction was Spanish.
SPAN 1000 Introductory Spanish                                                        3 hours
An introductory language course that presents the fundamentals in all skill areas and assists
students to develop basic skills necessary for understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
the target language. This course is specifically designed for students with very little or no
previous experience in the target language or who indicate a deficiency in foreign languages.
The class prepares students to enter a foreign language class at the 1001 level. A grade of C
will fulfill the CPC deficiency. Lab required.
SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish I                                                     3,1 hours
The first of two elementary language courses designed to develop skills in speaking,
listening comprehension, reading, and writing as well as familiarize students with aspects of
the target culture. The course delivery combines three hours of in-class lecture with one
hour alternative instructional delivery through lab assignments, online course work, and
service learning where applicable. A grade of ‘C’ will fulfill the CPC deficiency.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, SPAN 1000 or its equivalent, or permission of instructor.
SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II                                                    3,1 hours
Continuation of SPAN 1001 and skills development in speaking, listening, comprehension,
reading, writing, and familiarization with aspects of the target culture. The course delivery
combines three hours of in-class lecture with one hour alternative instructional delivery
through lab assignments, online course work, and service learning where applicable.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1001, or its equivalent, or permission of instructor.
SPAN 1006 Accelerated Beginning Spanish                                           6,2 hours
Accelerated 8-credit course for students with one to two years of a foreign language in high
school. Can be taken in lieu of SPAN 1001 and 1002 or their equivalent. This
communication-based program provides an intensive introduction to the first year of
Spanish. It stresses proficiency through fundamental grammar, conversation, composition,
and dication and familiarizes students with aspects of the target culture. The course
combines six hours of in-class lecture with two-hour alternative instructional delivery
through lab assignments, on-line course work, and service learning wehre applicable. May
not be taken by students who have completed SPAN 1001 and 1002 or their equivalent. Not
open to native or heritage speakers of the language. Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, SPAN 1000
or its equivalent, or permission by the instructor.

SPAN 1022 Heritage Language Spanish I                                               3 hours
In this first course of the Heritage Language Spanish sequence the student will master the
phonetics of reading in Spanish, will improve his/her vocabulary, and master the grammar of
Spanish in order to write accurately simple documents, and read journalistic writing with
comprehension. Appropriate use will be made of applicable software and the Internet. This
class will include lab work. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish I                                                    3 hours
Designed to increase proficiency in Spanish skills through study of authentic materials:
dialogues, readings, writing exercises, and dictation/pronunciation drills. This course
continues familiarizing students with the culture of Spanish speaking regions. Students who
completed a third year of high school Spanish with a grade of B or higher may take this
                                                                      Courses of Instruction / 243


course; students may also take a placement test to gain access to SPAN 2001. Prerequisite:
SPAN 1002 or high school equivalent as defined above.
SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish II                                                 3 hours
Focuses on conversation and reading comprehension using real world and culturally-oriented
readings to expand students' knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes a
comprehensive review of grammar designed to strengthen and consolidate earlier course
work. Twenty hours of laboratory work required. Prerequisites: SPAN 2001 or SPAN
2001H.
SPAN 2021 Heritage Language Spanish II                                             3 hours
In this second course of the Heritage Language Spanish sequence, the student will review
the phonetics of reading in Spanish, will improve his/her vocabulary, and review the
grammar of Spanish in order to write and read critically. Students will read historical and
literary documents relevant to Hispanic cultures as well as readings that relate to their
interests and majors. Appropriate use will be made of applicable software and the Internet.
This class will include lab work. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
SPAN 2121 Intermediate Conversation                                                 3 hours
Emphasis on oral proficiency. Guided conversation, realistic scenarios, vocabulary building,
and free discussion prepare students for authentic communication situations. Prerequisite:
SPAN 2001 or SPAN 2001H.
SPAN 2122 Critical Reading and Composition                                         3 hours
Emphasis on written communication and reading comprehension. Writing, both creatively
and critically, in response to issues raised in literary and non-literary sources. Classes
conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or SPAN 2002H.
SPAN 2125 Intensive Grammar and Written Communication Skills                       3 hours
A comprehensive review and synthesis of Spanish structure, with an introduction to syntax
and stylistics. Designed to provide students with extensive controlled and free expository
writing in order to prepare them for more effective participation in advanced courses, and
enable them to improve their ability to use and manipulate language with a higher degree of
accuracy. Open to Heritage and native speakers. May be taken concurrently with SPAN
2121. Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor.

SPAN 2500 Spanish Sound and Script                                                   3 hours
An intermediate study of the sound system in Spanish, syllabication, the phonetic alphabet
and its use. Intensive oral practice aimed at improving orthography nad pronunciation. An
introduction is given to speech characteristics and dialectical differences in Peninsular and
Spanish American phonology. Open to Heritage and native speakers, and non-native
students who have completed SPAN 1002 or its equivalent. Laboratory work required. May
be used to satisfy the Area F. Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or its equivalent or permission fo
the instructor.

SPAN 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Spanish                                1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may not be transferable are offered in response to student
interest and demand. Among such topics are: Introduction to the Twentieth-Century Spanish
Novel, Spanish Pronunciation, Modern Spanish Culture and other topics suggested by
students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
244 / Gainesville College


SPAN 2911, 2912, 2913 Spanish Practicum                                           1-3 hours
Spanish Practicum courses are designed to provide students with the opportunity to use their
language skills in everyday situations. Each student will choose, organize, and complete one
Spanish project. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
SPAN 2920 Spanish for Medical Personnel                                             2 hours
The student will study the oral and written Spanish appropriate to the needs of the medical
profession. Appropriate use will be made of applicable software and the Internet. This
course will include lab work. Students desiring credits in Area B should sign up for MFLA
1502: Foreign Language for Professionals. Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or permission of
instructor.
SPAN 2921 Spanish for Law Enforcement Professionals                                2 hours
The student will study the oral and written Spanish appropriate to the needs of law
enforcement professionals. Appropriate use will be made of applicable software and the
Internet. This course will include lab work. Students desiring credit in Area B should sign
up for MFLA 1502: Foreign Language for Professionals. Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or
permission of instructor.
SPAN 2922 Spanish for Business and Finance Professionals                            2 hours
The student will study the oral and written Spanish appropriate to the needs of business and
finance professionals. Appropriate use will be made of applicable software and the Internet.
This course will include lab work. Students desiring credit in Area B should sign up for
MFLA 1502: Foreign Language for Professionals. Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or permission
of instructor.


SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED)
SPED 2100 Exceptional Children                                                       3 hours
An overview of the wide range of abilities and exceptionalities representative of students in
schools and teaching practices that are effective with these abilities. Educational, legal,
medical, philosophical, and psychological needs are examined. Students are involved in
multidisciplinary teams providing screening and identification data, pre-referral strategies,
instruction, and input for placement decisions. Legislative and litigative foundations of
special education programming, the role of the general classroom teacher and outcomes
required by the University System of Georgia for students providing a BS degree in
education as mandated by House Bill 671 are also addressed. Training in current
technologies related to effective teaching is included. Field observation required.
Prerequisite: EDUC 2000.


SPORT MANAGEMENT (SPMG)
SPMG 2100                                                                            3 hours
An investigation of the scope of the sport industry which is a growing major business
enterprise in the US and in much of the world. The various functions of effective
management, and the skills, attributes and roles required of the sport manager are discussed.
Attention is focused on how the managerial process relates to sport organizations and the
products they provide. Students become acquainted with career opportunities in the sport
management field. The course is designed as an overview of sports administration with
emphasis on management principles and career opportunities.
                                                                        Courses of Instruction / 245




STATISTICS (STAT)
STAT 1501 Chance                                                                         1 hour
An area B course in which students will examine applications from a broad range of topics.
By reading and discussing current news stories and journal articles, students will examine
how statistics and statistical thinking are used in a variety of applications and activities. As
needed, articles will be supplemented with readings from the text on basic concepts in
probability and statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 0099, READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.
STAT 2400 Statistics                                                               3 hours
A basic course in elementary statistics at a level which does not require knowledge of
calculus. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions,
normal distribution, binomial distribution, hypotheses testing, linear correlation, and
regression. Credit will not be given to students who have credit for STAT 2400H.
Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or higher with a grade of C or higher, or SAT Math score of 550
or higher, or ACT Math score of 23 or higher.


SURVEY OF SCIENCE ETHICS (SSCE)
SSCE 1501 Ethical Issues in Science                                                     1 hour
A survey of the major positions concerning ethics, values and moral responsibility as they
relate to current issues of personal and social ethics in the scientific work place. The course
will emphasize ethical concerns in the areas of allied health, scientific research, and science
education. This course will serve as an Area B course for one hour credit. Prerequisites:
READ 0099 and ENGL 0099.


TEAM BUILDING (TBLD)
TBLD 1502 Team Building                                                              2 hours
This course will familiarize the student with concepts of team building utilizing experiential
leadership techniques including group dynamics, and facilitation and processing skills. This
course will focus on developing a supportive and challenging environment which addresses
communication issues, creative problem solving, risk taking strategies, stress reduction
techniques, and goal setting with teams. This experiential based approach will aid
individuals in groups to be members of a team.


THEATRE (THEA)
THEA 1010 Theatre Practicum                                                  2 hours
Practical work in all aspects of production. Students will learn scenery and costume
construction, box office and house management, lighting and sound operation, stage
management, and other production related subjects.
THEA 1021 Acting I                                                                       3 hours
Basic theories of acting; participating in theatrical exercises; and, scene study.
246 / Gainesville College


THEA 1070 Oral Interpretation                                              3 hours
Fundamentals of interpretation and performance of various forms of literature, with
emphasis on poetry, drama, and prose.
THEA 1100 Theatre Appreciation                                                   3 hours
Introduction to the art of the theatre emphasizing its theories, means of production, and
historical development.
THEA 1500 Stagecraft                                                                3 hours
Introduction to various elements of theatrical production, with emphasis on application of
techniques and skills in college theatre production crews. Course includes a lab component.
THEA 2022 Acting II                                                            3 hours
Theories of acting, improvisation, and further scene study. Prerequisite: THEA 1021 or
permission of instructor.
THEA 2150 Introduction to Design                                                  3 hours
A study of the basics of scene, lighting, and costume design.
THEA 2300 Voice and Movement                                                  3 hours
Introduction to the techniques of vocal production and control, and the techniques for
expressive stage movement. Emphasis upon the development of individual processes in a
studio setting.
THEA 2901, 2902, 2903 Special Topics in Theatre                                1-3 hours
Special interest courses which may or may not be transferable are offered in response to
student demand.
              IX
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA


THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

BOARD OF REGENTS
     Members
     Administrative Staff

INSTITUTIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
     Research Universities
     Regional Universities
     State Universities
     State Colleges
     Two-Year Colleges
248 / Gainesville College
                                                                 University System of Georgia / 249



        THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
     The University System of Georgia includes all state-operated institutions of higher
education in Georgia - four research universities, two regional universities, 13 state
universities, two state colleges, and 13 two-year colleges. These 34 public institutions are
located throughout the state.
     An 18-member constitutional Board of Regents governs the University System; which
has been in operation since 1931. Appointments of Board members are made by the
Governor, subject of confirmation by the State Senate. The term of Board members is seven
years.
     The Chairperson, the Vice Chairperson, and other officers of the Board are elected by
the members of the Board. The Board elects a Chancellor who serves as its chief executive
officer and the chief administrative officer of the University System.
    The overall programs and services of the University System are offered through three
major components: Instruction, Public Service/Continuing Education, and Research.

     INSTRUCTION consists of programs of study leading toward degrees, ranging
from the associate (two-year) level to the doctoral level, and certificates.
      Requirements for admission of students to instructional programs at each institution are
determined, pursuant to policies of the Board of Regents, by the institution. The Board
establishes minimum academic standards and leaves to each institution the prerogative to
establish higher standards. Application for admission should be addressed, in all cases, to
the institutions.

    PUBLIC SERVICE/CONTINUING EDUCATION consists primarily of
non-degree activities, and special types of college-degree-credit courses.
     The non-degree activities are of several types, including such as short courses,
seminars, conferences, lectures, and consultative and advisory services, in a large number of
areas of interest.
     Typical college-degree-credit public service/continuing education courses are those
offered through extension center programs and teacher education consortia.

     RESEARCH encompasses investigations conducted primarily for discovery and
application of knowledge. These investigations cover matters related to the educational
objectives of the institutions and to general societal needs.
    Most of the research is conducted through the universities; however, some of it is
conducted through several of the state universities.
      The policies of the Board of Regents provide autonomy of high degree for each
institution. The executive head of each institution is the President, whose election is
recommended by the Chancellor and approved by the Board.
250 / Gainesville College


     State appropriations for the University System are requested by, made to, and allocated
by the Board of Regents. Matriculation and nonresidential tuition fees for all institutions are
set by the Board. All resident students pay matriculation fees; out-of-state students pay
nonresident tuition in addition to matriculation. Fees for student services and activities are
established by each institution, subject to the Board’s approval.


                                   Board of Regents
                            The University System of Georgia
                              270 Washington Street, S.W.
                                Atlanta, Georgia 30334
                                                            University System of Georgia / 251



                        BOARD OF REGENTS
                    Members of the Board of Regents
J. Timothy Shelnut, Augusta, Chair
Patrick S. Pittard, Atlanta, Vice Chair
Hugh A. Carter, Jr., Atlanta
Connie Cater, (Mr.) Macon
William H. Cleveland, Atlanta
Michael J. Coles, Kennesaw
Joe Frank Harris, Cartersville
Julie Ewing Hunt, Tifton
W. Mansfield Jennings, Jr., Hawkinsville
James R. Jolly, Dalton
Donald M. Leebern, Jr., McDonough
Elridge W. McMillan, Atlanta
Martin W. NeSmith, Claxton
Doreen Stiles Poitevint, Bainbridge
Wanda Yancey Rodwell, Stone Mountain
Richard L. Tucker, Lawrenceville
Allan Vigil, Morrow
Glenn S. White, Lawrenceville
Joel O. Wooten, Jr., Columbus

            Administrative Staff of the Board of Regents
Corlis Cummings, Interim Chancellor

Daniel S. Papp, Senior Vice Chancellor - Office of Academics and Fiscal Affairs
Frank A. Butler, Vice Chancellor - Academics, Faculty and Student Affairs
Randall Thursby, Vice Chancellor - Information & Instructional Technology/CIO
Tonya Lam, Associate Vice Chancellor - Student Affairs
Cathie M. Hudson, Associate Vice Chancellor - Strategic Research & Analysis
Jan Kettlewell, Associate Vice Chancellor - P-16 Initiatives/Exec. Dir. USG Foundation
John T. Wolfe, Jr., Associate Vice Chancellor - Faculty Affairs
Dorothy Zinsmeister, Assistant Vice Chancellor – Academic Affairs / Associate Director
           for Higher Education, PRISM Initiative
Kris Biesinger, Assistant Vice Chancellor - Advanced Learning Technologies
Joseph J. Szutz, Assistant Vice Chancellor - Planning
Tom Maier, Assistant Vice Chancellor – Policy and Planning
William Bowes, Vice Chancellor - Office of Fiscal Affairs
Usha Ramachandran, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Fiscal Affairs
Thomas E. Daniel, Senior Vice Chancellor - Office of External Activities & Facilities
Linda M. Daniels, Vice Chancellor – Facilities
252 / Gainesville College


Hal Gibson, Assistant Vice Chancellor – Design & Constructions
Peter J. Hickey, Assistant Vice Chancellor - Real Properties
Arlethia Perry-Johnson, Associate Vice Chancellor - Media & Publications
Corlis Cummings, Senior Vice Chancellor - Office of Support Services
Elizabeth E. Neely, Associate Vice Chancellor - Legal Affairs
Ronald B. Stark, Associate Vice Chancellor - Internal Audit
William Wallace, Associate Vice Chancellor - Human Resources
Daryl Griswold, Assistant Vice Chancellor - Legal Affairs (Contracts)
J. Burns Newsome, Assistant Vice Chancellor - Legal Affairs (Prevention)
Lamar Veatch, Assistant Vice Chancellor - Georgia Public Library Service
John Millsaps, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Strategic Communications
                                                          University System of Georgia / 253



                INSTITUTIONS OF
       THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
                                  Research Universities

Georgia Institute of Technology                               Atlanta
Georgia State University                                      Atlanta
Medical College of Georgia                                    Augusta
The University of Georgia                                     Athens
                                  Regional Universities

Georgia Southern University                                   Statesboro
Valdosta State University                                     Valdosta
                                    State Universities

Albany State University                                       Albany
Armstrong Atlantic State University                           Savannah
Augusta State University                                      Augusta
Clayton College and State University                          Morrow
Columbus State University                                     Columbus
Fort Valley State University                                  Fort Valley
Georgia College and State University                          Milledgeville
Georgia Southwestern State University                         Americus
Kennesaw State University                                     Kennesaw
North Georgia College and State University                    Dahlonega
Savannah State University                                     Savannah
Southern Polytechnic State University                         Marietta
University of West Georgia                                    Carrollton


                                     State Colleges
Dalton State College                                          Dalton
Macon State College                                           Macon

                                   Two-Year Colleges

Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College                          Tifton
Atlanta Metropolitan College                                  Atlanta
Bainbridge College                                            Bainbridge
Coastal Georgia Community College                             Brunswick
Darton College                                                Albany
East Georgia College                                          Swainsboro
Gainesville College                                           Gainesville
Georgia Highlands College                                     Rome
Georgia Perimeter College                                     Decatur
Gordon College                                                Barnesville
Middle Georgia College                                        Cochran
South Georgia College                                         Douglas
Waycross College                                              Waycross
254 / Gainesville College
                               Personnel / 255




                 X
         COLLEGE PERSONNEL

FACULTY ROSTER

EMERITUS / EMERITA

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES/STAFF
256 / Gainesville College
                                                                         Personnel / 257



                          FACULTY ROSTER
AINSWORTH, ALLISON J.
Instructor of Communication
B.A., M.A., Northeast Louisiana University

ANDERSON, GARFIELD
Instructor of Information Systems
B.A., Limestone College; B.S., Southern Illinois University;
M.A., Webster University

BARDSLEY, LANCE W.
Assistant Professor of Political Science
B.A., Temple University; M.A., University of Texas at Austin

BARNETTE, ANDREA M.
Instructor of Physical Education
B.S., Catawba College; M.Ed., North Georgia College & State University

BEAMAN, WILLIAM S.
Associate Professor of Drama; Technical Director, Theatre Programs
A.A., Louisburg College; B.S., Radford University;
M.F.A., University of South Carolina

BLAIR, STEVEN F.
Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.B.A., M.B.A., Georgia College

BLAIS, DOROTHY J.
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Georgia State University; B.A., Northwestern State University;
M.A., University of Georgia

BOWERS-CAMPBELL, JOY K.
Instructor of Reading and English
B.A., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; M.A., Columbia University

BROWN, LINDA W.
Assistant Professor of Biology
A.S., Gainesville; B.S., Brenau College; M.Ed., North Georgia College

BURCHFIELD, CHARLES
Assistant Professor of Political Science and Philosophy
B.A., University of Alabama; M.A., University of Mississippi;
Ph.D., Louisiana State University & A & M College

BURNS, SARA
Assistant Professor of Spanish
B.A., National University of Trujillo, Peru; M.A., University of South Florida

BURNS, THOMAS J.
Assistant Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Illinois State University; M.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham
258 / Gainesville College


CABANISS, III, C. DANIEL
Associate Professor of English
A.B., Harvard University; M.A., The University of Georgia

CHAPMAN, BEATRIZ C.
Biology Lab Coordinator; Instructor of Biology Labs
B.S., The University of Georgia; M.Ed., North Georgia College

CHAPMAN, G. CAYWOOD
Professor of Biology
Acting Chair, Division of Natural Sciences & Engineering Technology
B.S., Valdosta State College; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

CLENDENNING, LEE ROY
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.E.E., M.S.E.E., Georgia Institute of Technology

COATES, REBECCA R.
Instructor of Library Science
B.A., University of Georgia; M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina

COLEMAN, H. PRESTON
Assistant Professor of Communications
A.B.J., M.A., The University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Iowa

COOK, DIANE B.
Professor of Psychology
B.S., Old Dominion University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University

COOK, LARRY E., Jr.
Assistant Professor of Theatre
B.S., Troy State University; M.F.A., The University of Georgia

CRANDALL, DALE S.
Associate Professor of Spanish/ESL/English
B.A., Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico; M.A., University of Texas

CROFT, ROBERT W.
Professor of English, Coordinator, Humanities & Fine Arts - Oconee
B.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ed.S., Valdosta State College;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

DANIELL. SUSAN J.
Director of Institutional Planning and Research
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

DOVE-WATERS, THERESA S.
Assistant Professor of Religion & Education
A.A., Florida Junior College; B.A.Ed., M.Ed., The University of North Florida;
M.Div., Emory University

DOYLE-PORTILLO, SUSANN M.
Professor of Psychology
B.S., University of Tulsa; B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma
                                                                       Personnel / 259


DREW, BYRON
Associate Professor of Business Administration;
Director, Library & Academic Computing Tutoring and Testing (ACTT) Center
B.S., Auburn University; B.S., University of Alabama; M.S., Troy State University

DUKE, ANNE C.
Assistant Professor of Accounting and Oconee Instructional Coordinator
B.B.A., M.A.C.C., The University of Georgia

EALEY, DOUGLAS E.
Assistant Professor of Political Science
A.B., The University of Georgia; M.A., Bowie State University;
M.Div. Fuller Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Clark Atlanta University

FALLOW, APRIL R.
Instructor English
B.A., University of Alabama; M.A., Jacksonville State University

FLOOD, MARGI G.
Instructor of Biology
B.A., College of the Holy Cross; M.S., University of Georgia

FOWLER, CHARLES J.
Associate Professor of Mathematics & Computer Science
B.S., M.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville;
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

GILLE, CATHERINE C.
Professor of French; Director, Teaching & Learning Center
B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., Georgia State University
Ph.D., Emory University

GRAFF, JENNIFER K.
Instructor of Art
B.F.A., Alfred University; M.F.A., The University of Georgia

GRAVEMAN, JERRY J.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.M.E., M.S.M.E., M.A.M., Auburn University

GREAVU-COMLEY, EUGENIA H.
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Western Kentucky University; M.Ed., The University of Georgia

GREEAR, DELBERT
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Shimer College; M.A., North Georgia College

GUYTON, ROBERT M.
Instructor of Mathematics
B.S., M.S., Baylor University
260 / Gainesville College


HAMILTON, JOHN M.
Professor of Biology
B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., Auburn University;
Ed.D., The University of Georgia

HAMMOND, JAMES B.
Professor of Speech and Drama; Director, Theatre Programs
B.S., Brenau University; M.F.A., University of Louisville

HANCOCK, ELIZABETH P.
Assistant Professor of History
B.A., University of Alabama; M.A., Emory University

HANCOCK, THOMAS W.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Central Michigan University; Ph.D., The University of Georgia

HARRIS-BOSSELMANN, TONNA J.
Instructor of ESL
B.A., M.S., Georgia State University

HARTFIELD, THOMAS E.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
A.A., Meridian Community College; B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi

HARTSOE, JANICE C.
Registrar
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.Ed., University of South Carolina

HEBDA, BEATA A.
Professor of Mathematics
M.A., University of Worclaw, Poland; Ph.D., The University of Georgia

HEBDA, PIOTR W.
Professor of Mathematics
M.S., University of Worclaw, Poland; Ph.D., The University of Georgia

HENDON, HELENE C.
Instructor of Mathematics
B.A., Davidson College; M.Ed., The University of Georgia

HETTICH, DANA
Instructor of Library Science, Instruction/Reference Librarian
B.A., M.A., M.L.S., University of Alabama

HOEKSTRA, JON D.
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; M.S., University of Arizona;
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana

HOMAN, REBECCA S.
Assistant Professor of Library Science; Technical Services Librarian
B.S., Jacksonville State University; M.L.S., University of Alabama
                                                                         Personnel / 261


HORTON, MATTHEW R.
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., University of Georgia

HOWARD, CAROL J.
Assistant Professor of English;
Director, Learning Support
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., The University of Georgia

HOWARD III, JAMES T.
Assistant Professor of Physical Education
B.A., Harding University; M.A.S., Queensland University of Technology, Australia

HOWARD, WREN N.
Biology/Chemistry Lab Coordinator
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic and State University; M.S., The University of Georgia

HOWELL, TIMOTHY J.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.A., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., Villanova University

HOWINGTON, HEATHER C.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.A., The University of Georgia

JOHNS, ALEXANDER B.
Instructor of English
B.A., M.A., The University of Georgia

JONICK, CHRISTINE A.
Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.A., State University of New York at Binghamton;
M.B.A., Adelphi University; Ed.D., The University of Georgia

KABAT, RIC A.
Professor of History
A.A., St. Petersburg Junior College; B.S., M.A., Ph. D., Florida State University

KARCHER, CHARLES J.
Professor of Sociology; Chair, Division of Social Sciences
B.A., Ohio Northern University; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

KLINE, BRIAN D.
Assistant Professor of Speech
B.S., Clarion University; M.A., Marshall University

KLUCZYKOWSKI, MONIQUE N.
Assistant Professor of English
B.S., M.A., Murray State University

KOFFMAN, STACY L.
Assistant Professor of Art; Director, Art Gallery
B.F.A., University of Tennessee; M.F.A., The University of Georgia
262 / Gainesville College


KONZELMAN, JAMES
Associate Professor of Chemistry
B.S., North Carolina State University; B.S., University of Alabama;
Ph.D, University of Florida

KROCHAK, NICOLE M.
Instructor of Mathematics
B.A., University of Chicago; M.S.T., University of Florida

LAMSON, NINA
Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., M.A., California State University at Sacramento;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

LAU, DANNY T.
Professor of Mathematics; Chair, Mathematics and Computer Science Division
B.S., Brigham Young University; M.S., Purdue University;
Ph.D., Washington State University

LORENCE, JAMES J.
Professor of History, Eminent Scholar
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

LOWERY, ALEX A.
Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., Illinois State University; M.S., University of Illinois at Chicago;
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana

LYMAN, PENELOPE M.
Instructor of Accounting
B.A., M.A.C.C., The University of Georgia

LYNN, LOIS E.
Associate Professor of Business Administration
A.A., Gainesville College; B.S., M.Ad., Brenau University

MCDANIEL, MICHALLENE G.
Assistant Professor of Sociology
A.A., Florida State University; B.A., University of North Florida
M.A., The University of Georgia

MCLEOD, GLENDA K.
Professor of English
A.B.J., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

MACFARLAND, SUSAN M.
Associate Professor of Political Science
B.A., Iowa Wesleyan College; M.A., Oklahoma State University;
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

MADDOX, BRENT D.
Assistant Professor of Theatre
A.A., Gainesville College; B.A., Brenau University; M.F.A., University of Alabama
                                                                         Personnel / 263


MANLEY, KELLY
Assistant Professor of Economics
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia

MARLER, JOAN H.
Associate Professor of Business Administration
Director of Paralegal Studies
B.A., University of Maryland; M.B.A., Stetson University; J.D., University of Florida

MAYHEW, MARY C.
Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin

MEGAW, ANGELA E.
Assistant Professor of Library Science
B.A., The University of Georgia; M.L.I.S., The University of South Carolina

MERRITT GARRY K.
Instructor of Spanish
A.A., Gainesville College; B.A., North Georgia College
M.A., Georgia State University

MILLER, MATTHEW E.
Instructor of GIS and Geography
B.S., Montreat College; M.A., Appalachian State University

MILLS, PENNY B.
Executive Dean, Oconee Campus; Professor of Political Science
B.S., M.A., Northern Arizona University; Ph.D. University of Arizona

MOSSER, JASON D.
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., The University of Georgia

MURRAY, PAUL B.
Assistant Professor of Computer Science
A.S., Broome Community College; B.S., M.S., SUNY Institute of Technology

NESBITT, MARTHA T.
President
B.A., M.A.T., Duke University; Ph. D., Georgia State University

NICHOLS, DANA J.
Assistant Professor of English
A.A., Gainesville College; B.A., Mercer University; M.A., Georgia State University

NODINE, PATRICIA F.
Instructor of Education
B.A., Mercer University/Atlanta; M.Ed., The University of Georgia

NOLIBOS, PAULA
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.A., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst
264 / Gainesville College


O'SULLIVAN, JOHN V.
Associate Professor of Education and Psychology
A.S., B.A., M.A., Ed.S., State University of West Georgia;
Ph.D., The University of North Carolina/Greensboro

OUZTS, KARL C.
Associate Professor of History
A.A., Anderson College; B.S. Ed., The University of Georgia;
M.A., West Georgia College; Ph.D., Florida State University

PALMOUR, W. MACK
Director of Admissions
B.S., North Georgia College and State University;
M.A., Northwestern State University

PARDUE, JEFFREY D.
Associate Professor of History
B.A., University of Wyoming; M.A., Ph.D., University of Waterloo

PARKER, ANTHONY J.
Instructor of Mathematics
B.S., Francis Marion University; M.S., University of Charleston

PONDERS, JASON
Chemistry Lab Coordinator
B.S., Kennesaw State University

PRESTON, CHARLES THOMAS, JR.
Professor of Communication
B.S.B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., University of North Carolina
Ph.D., University of Nebraska

PRESTRIDGE, SAM N.
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Mississippi College; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi
Ph.D., University of Georgia

REED, GINA F.
Professor of Mathematics
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; M.A., Pennsylvania State University

REEDER, AMY L.
Professor of Sociology
B.A., Northwestern State University of Louisiana;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

RINGGER, CONSTANCE S.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., Hendrix College; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

ROGERS, WILLIAM W.
Professor of History
B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Ph.D., Auburn University
                                                                        Personnel / 265


RONEY, KRISTEN S.
Instructor of English
B.A., Norfolk State University; M.A., University of Georgia
Ph.D., University of Georgia

RUBERTI, DIANE M.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Yale University; M.S., State University of New York at Cortland

RYAN, MICHAEL P.
Assistant Professor of Business Administration
B.B.A., University of Miami; M.S. Florida State University

SANTANDER, ANDREW M.
Associate Professor of Music; Director of Instrumental Music
B.M., M.M., Indiana University; D.M.A., The University of Georgia

SAURET, BELINDA A.
Associate Professor of Spanish
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Mississippi State University
Ph.D., University of Georgia

SAURET, THOMAS J.
Professor of English
B.A., University of Southern Maine; M.F.A., University of Arkansas

SCHULZE, JILL
Instructor of Biology and Instructional Coordinator – Oconee Campus
B.A., State University of New York; M.S., University of South Florida

SCHUT, ELEANOR G.
Instructor of Biology
B.A., University of Virginia; M.S., The University of Georgia

SEMERJIAN, CHRISTOPHER J.
Assistant Professor of Geography and Geographical Information Systems
B.A., The University of Georgia; M.A., Georgia State University

SEZGIN, PAMELA J.
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
B.A., Georgia State University
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University at Bloomington

SHARMA, JITENDRA B.
Professor of Physics
B.S., Jacksonville State University; M.S., The University of Georgia

SHERIFF, ALPHA O.
Assistant Professor of Sociology
B.A., Fourah Bay College (Sierra Leone);
M.A., University of Essex; Ph.D., Kansas State University
266 / Gainesville College


SIMMONS, KATHLEEN C.
Associate Professor of Business Administration;
Acting Chair, Division of Business
B.A.A., M.Ed., The University of Georgia

SKIPPER, GEORGE ERIC
Associate Professor of Spanish
B.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D., Florida State University

SLUTZKY, DAVID L.
Instructor of Mathematics
B.S., M.A., The University of Georgia

SMITH, SUSAN A.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Director of Financial Aid
A.S., Gainesville College; B.S., The University of Georgia; M.S., Clemson University

SNOWDEN, RAY-LYNN
Associate Professor of Speech
B.A., University of North Alabama; M.A., University of Memphis;
J.D., Cumberland School of Law

STEWART, KERRY R.
Associate Professor of Political Science and Philosophy
B.A., University of Hawaii at Hilo; M.A., Bowling Green State University;
Ph.D., Georgia State University

STOY, W. MICHAEL
Professor of Biology; Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty
A.A., Bismarck Junior College; B.A., Thomas More College;
M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., North Dakota State University

STRICKLAND, PEGGY R.
Professor of English
B.A., Furman University; M.A., M.Ed., Columbia University;
Ed.D., The University of Georgia

STRICKLAND, WILLIAM B.
Professor of English
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

SWILLEY, KELLEY
Assistant Professor of English
B.A. Shorter College; M.A., Valdosta State University;
Ph.D., Auburn University

TEEM, II, CLAYTON L.
Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of Hawaii, Manoa;
M.A., Ph.D., California School of Professional Psychology

THOMAS, ANDREW G. A.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Georgia
                                                                           Personnel / 267


TORRES, SIXTO E.
Professor of Spanish; Chair, Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
B.S., M.A., Kent State University; Ph.D., Florida State University

TURLINGTON, ANITA
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., M.A., University of Tennessee

TURK, H. JEFF
Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Engineering
Regents’ Engineering Transfer Coordinator
Campus Right to Know and HAZMAT Coordinator
A.A., A.S., Gainesville College; B.S., M.E., Florida Atlantic University

WALTER, TOM G.
Assistant Professor of Education;
Vice President for Student Development & Enrollment Management
B.S., M.S. in Ed., Illinois State University; Ph.D., The University of Georgia

WATSON, LISA L.
Assistant Professor of Physical Education
B.S., University of Florida; M.Ed., Georgia State University

WELCH, LILLIAN S.
Associate Professor of Physical Education
A.S., Gainesville College; B.S., The University of Georgia;
M.Ed., North Georgia College

WHITING, CATHARINE C.
Associate Professor of Biology
A.S., Waycross College; B.S., University of Georgia;
M.S.T., Ph.D., University of Florida

WILLIAMSON, MARGARET H.
Associate Professor of Sociology
B.A., M.A., Appalachian State University
Ph.D., Georgia State University

WILLS-TOKER, CAITLIN
Assistant Professor of Speech
B.A., Centre College; M.A., The University of Cincinnati;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

WILSON III, CHARLES H.
Instructor of History and Political Science
B.S., The University of Georgia; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology;
J.D., University of Toledo

WORRALL, PATRICIA B.
Associate Professor of English
B.A., M.A., Jacksonville State University
Ph.D., The University of Georgia
268 / Gainesville College


WYNNE, BENJAMIN R.
Assistant Professor of History
B.B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Mississippi College
Ph.D., The University of Mississippi

YEAGER, CHRISTY G.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
A.S., Gainesville College; B.S., M.S., Georgia Southern College

YOUNG, DOUGLAS P., JR.
Professor of Political Science and History
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Georgia


                            EMERITUS / EMERITA
ABERCROMBIE, FRANKIE J.
Professor Emerita of English
A.B., North Georgia College; M.A., The University of Georgia;
Th.M., Maranatha Bible Seminary; Ph.D., International Seminary

BAILEY, JOHN B.
Professor Emeritus of History
A.A., Young Harris College; A.B., Emory University; M.A.;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

BROCK, DOROTHY L.
Professor Emerita of Biology
A.B., Tift College; M.S., Oregon State University;
Ed.D., The University of Georgia

BROWN, FRANCES L.
Associate Professor Emerita of Music
A.B., Brenau University; B.M., M.M., Westminster Choir College;
Ed.S., George Peabody College

CABELL, JOSEPH E.
Professor Emeritus of Speech and Drama;
Chair Emeritus, Department of Speech and Fine Arts
B.A., Wake Forest College; M.F.A., The University of Georgia

DUHLING, SALLIE R.
Professor Emerita of English; Chair Emerita, Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

EDMONDS, WILLIAM B.
Registrar and Director of Admissions Emeritus
B.A., LaGrange College; M.Ed., The University of Georgia

ELROD, CAROL D.
Assistant Professor Emerita of Mathematics
A.A., Hiwassee College; B.S., University of Tennessee; M.Ed., North Georgia College

FORRESTER, ROY C.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Music; Director Emeritus, Instrumental Music
B.M., M.F.A., The University of Georgia
                                                                        Personnel / 269




FULLER, DONALD C., JR.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
A.B., M.A. in English, M.A. in Mathematics, The University of Georgia

FULLER, KATHERINE M.
Professor Emerita of Reading and English;
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty Emerita
A.B., Georgia College; M.Ed., Ed.S., Ph.D., The University of Georgia

GNANN, ALVIN HEYWARD
Associate Professor Emeritus of History
A.B., Georgia Southern College; M.A., The University of Georgia

GURR, CHARLES STEPHEN
Professor Emeritus of History;
Executive Vice President and Dean of the Faculty Emeritus
A.A., Georgia Southwestern College;
B.A., M.A., George Peabody College; Ph.D., The University of Georgia

HENLEY, TOMALLENE
Associate Professor Emerita of Social Sciences; Guidance Counselor
B.S., Mississippi State College; M.Ed., The University of Georgia;
Ed.S., Mississippi State University

HERMANN, BARBARA J.
Associate Professor Emerita of Behavioral Sciences
B.A., Denison University; M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University;
Ed.S., Georgia State University

HILER, M. JEAN
Professor Emerita of Reading and Sociology
B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

HOLCOMB, LOUISE C.
Professor Emerita of Business; Chair Emerita, Division of Business
A.A., Truett-McConnell College; A.B., Piedmont College;
M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

HOWINGTON, J. BOB
Vice-President Emeritus for Business and Finance
B.S. North Georgia College

JONES, JACK D.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Biology; Director Emeritus of Student Activities
B.S., The University of Georgia; M.A., George Peabody College;
Ed.D., Nova University

KELLEY, DAVID B.
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

KIRKLAND, JIMMY G.
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Physical Education
B.S.Ed., M.S.T., Georgia Southern College
270 / Gainesville College




KLINE, AUBREY J.
Professor Emeritus of English; Chair Emeritus, Division of Humanities
B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., The University of Georgia;
Ph.D., University of Nevada

LANGSTON, LINDA C.
Professor Emerita of Education and Political Science
B.A., Armstrong State College
M.A., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

LANGSTON, STEPHEN D.
Director of Financial Aid Emeritus
B.S., Armstrong State College
M.Ed., The University of Georgia

LOWE, SISTER THERESA CECILIA, S.N.J.M.
Associate Professor Emerita of English
B.S., M.A., Barry University; Ph.D., University of South Florida

MCGLAUN, GARRY
Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
B.S., East Texas State University; M.Ed., The University of Georgia

MCMICHAEL, CHARLES T.
Associate Professor Emeritus of English
A.A., State University of West Georgia; A.B., M.A., Georgia State University

MILLS, HUGH M., JR.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Education; President Emeritus
A.A., North Georgia College;
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

NEWBERRY, MARGARET P.
Associate Professor Emerita of History and Reading
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., The University of Georgia

OETINGER, GEORGE
Associate Professor Emeritus of Sociology
B.S., Pembroke State University; M.S., Ph.D., Mississippi State University

PAUL, JOEL H.
Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Geography; Academic Dean Emeritus
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

PAYNE, EARL R.
Associate Professor Emeritus of English
A.B., M.A., University of Kentucky; Ed.S., George Peabody College

PURVIS, BRENDA S.
Associate Professor Emerita of Library Science;
Director Emerita, Learning Resource Center
B.A., Agnes Scott College: M.LBM., D.A.S.L., Emory University
                                                                         Personnel / 271


RANKIN, PRISCILLA J.
Associate Professor Emerita of Library Science
B.A., Converse College; M.S., Florida State University;
D.A.S.L., Emory University

ROBBINS, EVELINE B.
Associate Professor Emerita of Mathematics
B.A., Vassar College; M.A.T., Yale University

ROBINSON, HERBERT W.
Dean Emeritus of College Relations
A.B., M.Ed., Ed.D., The University of Georgia

ROGERS, LEWIS F.
Professor Emeritus of Geology;
Chair Emeritus, Division of Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Technology
A.A., Meridian Junior College; B.S., University of Southern Mississippi;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

SEERLEY, NORMA R.
Professor Emerita of Sociology
B.S., Purdue University; M.S., South Dakota State University;
Ph.D., The University of Georgia

TAYLOR, BILLY J.
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
B.T.E., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.A., Western Carolina University

TILLEY, STEPHEN E.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Management
Director, Vice President Emeritus – Oconee Campus
A.S.B., M.A., Kent State University; Ph.D., Florida State University

TUGGLE, THOMAS T.
Professor Emeritus of English
A.B., M.A., The University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Iowa

WATKINS, J. FOSTER
Professor Emeritus of Education; President Emeritus
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University

WEBB, ANNE P.
Assistant Professor Emerita of Reading
B.A., Brenau University;
M.Ed., North Georgia College and State University

WEBB, THOMAS DOYLE
Associate Professor Emeritus of Education;
Director Emeritus, Office of Planning and Institutional Research
B.S.Ed., Georgia Teachers College; M.Ed., Ed.S., The University of Georgia

WEBSTER, BARBARA J.
Professor Emerita of Mathematics
B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of Alabama;
Ed.D., The University of Georgia
272 / Gainesville College




WESTERVELT, ROBERT F.
Professor Emeritus of Art
A.B., Williams College; M.F.A., Claremont Graduate School;
Ph.D., Emory University

WHITESIDE, WENDELL W.
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Physical Education;
Chairman Emeritus, Department of Physical Education
B.S., M.S., Auburn University

WOLF-SMITH, JANE H.
Professor Emerita of Social Work and Sociology
B.S., Murray State University; M.S.W., The University of Georgia;
Ph.D., Georgia State University
                                                                                                                Personnel / 273



             ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES/STAFF
                                              Gainesville Campus

PRESIDENT
Martha T. Nesbitt .................................................................................................President
Leora K. Myers ......................................................................... Administrative Assistant
Joan H. Marler.......................................................................................EEOC/AA Officer
Sloan W. Jones...............................................Director of Public Relations and Marketing
Jeff Turk........................................................................ Hazardous Materials Coordinator

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS AND
  DEAN OF THE FACULTY
W. Michael Stoy .............. Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty
Margaret Bailey. ......................................................................... Administrative Assistant
Dean Lieburn. .......................................................................................... Senior Secretary

      ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER
      Vacant ...................................................................... Director of Academic Advising
      Brenda Perry .................................................................................Academic Advisor

      OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
         PUBLIC SERVICE
      Wendy T. Thellman .............................................. Director of Continuing Education
      Eugene Hendrix........................................................................Facilities Coordinator
      Kimberly H. Savage .................................................................Program Coordinator
      Lisa K. Beck.............................................................. Coordinator of Office Services

      FITNESS CENTER
      Vacant ........................................................................................................... Director

      CENTER FOR TEACHING & LEARNING
      Chaudron Gille .............................................................................................. Director
      Sue Gittens ......................................................................... Administrative Assistant

      DIVISION OF BUSINESS
      Kathleen C. Simmons.............................................................................Acting Chair
      Deborah B. Lilly ............................................................... Administrative Assistant
      Joan H. Marler...............................................................Director of Paralegal Studies

      DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND
         ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
      G. Caywood Chapman ...........................................................................Acting Chair
      Mary P. McDade ................................................................. Administrative Assistant
      Beatriz Chapman................................................................ Biology Lab Coordinator
      Jason Ponders ..................................................................Chemistry Lab Coordinator

      DIVISION OF HEALTH, WELLNESS, & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
      Vacant ................................................................................................................Chair
      Joyce Ferguson................................................................... Administrative Assistant
274 / Gainesville College


      DIVISION OF HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS
      Sixto E. Torres .................................................................................................. Chair
      Sheree Gravenhorst ........................................................... Administrative Assistant
      Janice Nylander.................................................................. Administrative Assistant
      James B. Hammond ........................................................................ Theatre Director
      W. Stuart Beaman ......................................................... Technical Director - Theatre
      Francine C. Dibben .... Assistant to the Theatre Director/Theatre Business Manager
      Joslyn Hilliard ............................................... Audience Services Specialist - Theatre
      Larry E. Cook............................................... Associate Technical Director - Theatre
      Kyle Ankiel ................................................... Assistant Technical Director - Theatre

      DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND EDUCATION
      Charles J. Karcher ..............................................................................................Chair
      Julia B. Davies ................................................................... Administrative Assistant

             OFFICE OF EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION
             Child Care Resource and Referral Agency of Northeast Georgia
             Patricia F. Nodine................................................................. Executive Director
             Dru Thomas ......................................................................................... Director
             Jana Albertson .............................................. Quality Improvement Coordinator
             Stephany Vogel ....................................................................... Parent Counselor
             Kimberly Whitten....................................................... Administrative Specialist
             Vacant. .............................................................................. Education Specialist
             Teri Graham .................................................................... Inclusion Coordinator
             Rachel Nodine. .................................................. Administrative Assistant/Tutor
             Lisa Gaddis.......................................................................... Resource Specialist
             Laura Pomrenke. ............................................... Administrative Assistant/Tutor

      DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
      Danny Lau..........................................................................................................Chair
      Mary W. Hamby ................................................................ Administrative Assistant

      DEPARTMENT OF LEARNING SUPPORT
      Carol J. Howard .................................................................................................Chair
      Judy Forbes .......................................................... Coordinator of Academic Support
      Dede deLaughter ................................... Coordinator of Academic Support - Oconee
      Peggy Strickland .............................................................................. Reading Liaison
      Heather Howington ................................................................... Mathematics Liaison
      Eugenia H. Greavu-Comley .............................................................. English Liaison
      Tonna Harris Bosselmann ........................................................... Coordinator of ESL

      ACADEMIC COMPUTING, TUTORING, AND
        TESTING (ACTT) CENTER
      Byron Drew................................................................................................... Director
      Kelly Dahlin ..................................................................................Assistant Director
      Linnea Haag ...............................................................................Front Desk Manager
      Harry Childers..... Instructional Laboratory Assistant – Math and Computer Science
      Cheryl A. Harris................................................ Coordinator, Foreign Language Lab
      Page Ross ................................................. Instructional Laboratory Assistant – Math
      Carrie Wills ........................ Instructional Laboratory Assistant - Foreign Languages
      Frank G. Sherwood ...............................Instructional Laboratory Assistant - English
      Vacant .............................Instructional Laboratory Assistant – Front Desk and Math
      Al Walters ............................ Instructional Laboratory Assistant – Math and Physics
                                                                                                           Personnel / 275




      LIBRARY
      Byron Drew................................................................................................... Director
      Harry Childers.......................................................... Library Systems Administrator
      Dana Hettich ............................................................ Instruction/Reference Librarian
      Gail Emmett ....................................Administrative Assistant/Acquisitions Assistant
      Polly Swilley ........................................................................... Circulation Manager
      Rebecca S. Homan ........................................................Technical Services Librarian
      Angela E. Megaw................................................. Coordinator of Library Instruction
      Becky Webb............................................................................. ILL/Serials Specialist
      Penny Mraz .................................................................................. Evening Librarian
      John Ash............................................................................................ Media Services

VICE PRESIDENT FOR BUSINESS AND FINANCE
Paul Glaser ......................................................... Vice President for Business and Finance
Debbra A. Pilgrim ............................. Associate Vice President for Business and Finance
Wanda Aldridge ................................................................................ Accounting Director
Amy Collins ............................................................................ Human Resources Director
Ginger Porter..................................................................................... Personnel Specialist
Donna Kindon .....................................................................................Purchasing Director
Peggy S. Holton ......................................................................Accounts Payable Manager
Debbie L. Farmer .....................................................................................Payroll Manager
Carla Gibbs ..........................................................................Student Account Receivables
Melissa Gooch................................................................................... Cashiering Manager

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND
  ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT
Tom G. Walter ..........................Vice President for Student Development and Enrollment
                                             Management and Coordinator of Grants and Contracts
Alicia Caudill ......................................... Associate Vice President and Dean of Students
Jennifer Jacobs .......................................................................... Administrative Assistant
Theresa Dove-Waters....................................... Coordinator of Summer Scholars Institute
Claudia Monreal.............................. Administrative Assistant, Summer Scholars Institute

      ADMISSIONS OFFICE
      Mack Palmour ....................................................................... Director of Admissions
      Molly Potts.............................................................Assistant Director of Admissions
      Heather Page. ......................................................... International Services Counselor
      Niviea Williams ......................................................................Admissions Counselor
      Shelia Miccoli ......................................................................... Admissions Specialist
      Margaret Shirley ...................................................................... Front Desk Specialist
      Kelli Hays ............................................................................... Admissions Specialist
      Destiny Bergstad .......................................................................Data Entry Specialist
      Jill Raulerson.................................................................. Part-time Admissions Clerk
      Jeanine Merck ........................................................... Part-time Data Entry Specialist
      Vacant ...................................................................................... Front Desk Specialist
      Vacant ........................................................................Part-time Front Desk Assistant

      FINANCIAL AID
      Susan A. Smith................................................................... Director of Financial Aid
      Donna K. Grizzle ................................................Assistant Director of Financial Aid
      Sandra A. Garner.................................................Financial Aid Records Coordinator
      Amy Allen........................................................................... Financial Aid Counselor
      Alissia J. Scott...............................................Financial Aid Administrative Assistant
276 / Gainesville College


      Vickie Poole ....................................................................... Financial Aid Technician
      Andria Smith ..................................................................... Part-time Office Assistant

      COUNSELING AND CAREER SERVICES
      Joy D. Evans .................................... Director of Counseling & Career Development
                                                                                          & Licensed Psychologist
      Karen Pruett ...................................................... Coordinator of Career Development
      Major Nelson............................................Career Advisement and Testing Specialist
      Debbie Pierce ............................................................................... Office Coordinator

      DISABILITY SERVICES
      Carolyn Swindle..................................................Coordinator for Disability Services
      Dee Bennett........................................ Part-time Disability Services Office Assistant
      Adrienne Henley .......................................... Part-time Disability Services Specialist
      Stephanie Hungerford .................................. Part-time Disability Services Specialist

      MINORITY AFFAIRS AND MULTICULTURAL PROGRAMS
      Andre’ Cheek .......................Director of Minority Affairs & Multicultural Programs
      Margarita Munoz........................... Coordinator for Office of Hispanic Development
      Tashiana Cheeks................................... Part-time International Services Coordinator
      Guillermo Rodriguez........................................................... Administrative Assistant

      REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
      Janice C. Hartsoe..........................................................................................Registrar
      Teresa C. Johnston ....................................................................... Assistant Registrar
      Samantha Gooch ........................................................................Transcript Evaluator
      Paula Arckivy.................................................................. Student Services Specialist
      Carol Marinelli ................................................................ Student Services Specialist
      Nancy Buchanan ............................................................... Transfer Credit Processor

      STUDENT ACTIVITIES
      Alicia D. Caudill ......................................................... Director of Student Activities
      Brenda S. Adams............................................... Coordinator of Student Activities &
                                                                                Non-Traditional Student Services
      Nancy Mattson .................................................................... Administrative Assistant
      Michelle Lindsey.................................................................Part-time Night Manager
      Vacant .................................................................. Game Room/Cyber Café Manager

      TESTING CENTER
      David C. Johnston ........................................................................ Director of Testing
      Tammy Leach ................................................................. Part-time Testing Assistant

OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Richard A. Coker ................................................................................. Executive Director
Brandon E. Haag ...................................................................Assistant Director/Academic
Margaret A. Garmon .......................................... Assistant Director/Administrative; DBA
Laura Beth Wheeler .......................................Information Technology Support Specialist
Melody Little ................. Administrative Computing Coordinator/WebCT Administrator
Rick Crain ................................................................................................Systems Analyst
Alfred Barker .................................................. Computer and Network Support Specialist
Wally H. Beck.............................Chief PC Systems Analyst/Network Security Specialist
Nathan M. Corn............................................Computer and Network Support Specialist II
Brian Gibbs ......................................................................... Student Technology Manager
Valarie S. Reeves ........................................................ Coordinator of Web Development
                                                                                                               Personnel / 277


Todd Smith...................................................... Computer and Network Support Specialist
Eric Mullins ........................................... Student Helpdesk Computer Network Specialist
Brian Wesnofske ...................... Coordinator of Information Technology/Oconee Campus

OFFICE OF PLANNING AND INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH
Susan J. Daniell ...................................... Director of Institutional Planning and Research
Kimberly A. Campbell ................................................................ Administrative Assistant

FOUNDATION OFFICE
Pat Guthrie ......................................................Director of Development/CEO Foundation
Lynda C. Gastley ........................................................................ Administrative Assistant
Patricia Bunker............................................................................ Administrative Assistant
Michelle B. Brown...................................................................Director of Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY CENTER
Chaudron C. Gille ................................................................................................. Director
Rynda Ellis.................................................................................. Administrative Assistant
Vacant ......................................................................................... Administrative Assistant

PLANT OPERATIONS
Bill Moody ............................................................................................................ Director
Teresa Leckie ............................................................................. Administrative Assistant
Wallace C. Scott ......................................................................................... Skilled Trades
Edward C. Morgan ............................................................................Warehouse Manager
Kelies Hicks ............................................................................................... Skilled Trades
Steven J. Thellman........................................................................ Carpenter Crew Leader
Dennis B. Brown.............................................................................................. Carpenter I
Thomas L. Burson ......................................................................... Grounds Crew Leader
Merlin Childers ........................................................................................ Groundskeeper I
Brian S. Tarr ............................................................................................... Utility Worker
Otis Dover ................................................................................................ Groundskeeper I
James E. Thompson ................................................................................. Groundskeeper I
Alex Burgess ............................................................................................ Groundskeeper I
Tina W. Carter ...............................................................................Custodial Crew Leader
Nancy Braselton............................................................................................... Custodian I
Janyce A. Cole ................................................................................................. Custodian I
Ruby O. Curry.................................................................................................. Custodian I
Sabine Davis .................................................................................................... Custodian I
Nick Kidd......................................................................................................... Custodian I
Clint Manning .................................................................................................. Custodian I
Verlin Curry ..................................................................................................... Custodian I
Mary S. Sumner ............................................................................................... Custodian I
Wayne Roberts................................................................................................. Custodian I
Randy Tarr ....................................................................................................... Custodian I
Jeff Heagy ........................................................................................................ Custodian I
Evangelina Escalante ....................................................................................... Custodian I
Gabriel Reyes................................................................................................... Custodian I

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
Marion J. Darracott .............................................................................................. Director
Glenn D. Canada ....................................................................................Assistant Director
Darrell Ivey ...................................................................................... Public Safety Officer
Jerry H. Forrester ..............................................................................Public Safety Officer
278 / Gainesville College


Thomas C. Johnson ......................................................................... Public Safety Officer
Buddy M. Waldrep........................................................................... Public Safety Officer
Art Jetton ..........................................................................................Public Safety Officer
Jimmy Nash ...................................................................... Part-time Public Safety Officer

BOOKSTORE
Jacquelyne P. Mauldin ........................................Manager and Auxiliary Services Officer
Mary F. Pennington................................................................................................. Clerk I
Kimberly Towe ....................................................................................................... Clerk I
Tony R. Phillips ................................................................................................ Mail Clerk
                                                                                                           Personnel / 279



             ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES/STAFF
                                                Oconee Campus

VICE PRESIDENT
Penny B. Mills .......................................................................................... Executive Dean
Stephanie Austin ......................................................................... Administrative Assistant
Matthew Alexander.................................................................Director, Business Services
Wayne Smith............................................................................................Plant Operations
Dan Matthews .................................................................................................... Bookstore
Lisa Vaughn ........................................................................................ Bookstore / Courier

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT
Michelle S. Brown ................................................................................................ Director
Awbrey Smith ...............................................................................................Financial Aid
Melissa Adams........................................................................ Student Services Specialist
Melinda Ward ...................................................................................... Disability Services
Melinda Hawley ............................................................. Career and Personal Counseling
Heather Posey ........................................................................ Coordinator of Student Life

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Penny B. Mills .......................................................................................... Executive Dean
Dede DeLaughter .............................................................Coordinator, Academic Support
Vacant .................................................................................................Academic Advising
Robert W. Croft.................................Instructional Coordinator Humanities and Fine Arts
Anne Duke .................................................................. Instructional Coordinator Business
Amy L. Reeder.............................. Instructional Coordinator Social Sciences, Education,
     and Physical Education
Diane Ruberti ................... Instructional Coordinator Mathematics and Computer Science
Jill Schulze ......................................................Instructional Coordinator Natural Sciences

LIBRARY/ACTT CENTER
Rebecca Coates ....................................................................................................Librarian
Brian Hasenstab ...................................................................................................Librarian
Dawn Graham .......................................................... Evening Coordinator / English Tutor
Vacant ...............................................................................................Spanish / Math Tutor
Lara Knight .................................................................................................. English Tutor
David Simmons................................................................................................ Math Tutor
Diana Calano................................................................................................ Spanish Tutor

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Brian Wesnofske ................................................ Coordinator of Instructional Technology
Eric Mullins .................................................... Computer and Network Support Specialist
             XI
  MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION



MAPS

DIRECTORY

INDEX
Miscellaneous Information / 281
282 / Gainesville College




                    Road Map to Main Campus - Gainesville
Miscellaneous Information / 283
284 / Gainesville College




                                                DIRECTORY
                     (Area Code 770 for all numbers unless otherwise noted)

GENERAL INFORMATION ...........................................................................718-3639
ACTT Center......................................................................................................718-3766
Academic Advising Center ................................................................................718-3791
Academic Dean...................................................................................................718-3619
Admissions Office...............................................................................................718-3641
Alumni Affairs....................................................................................................718-3648
Bookstore ............................................................................................................718-3636
Business Office....................................................................................................718-3780
Comptroller's Office ..........................................................................................718-3780
Continuing Education ........................................................................................718-3605
Counseling and Career Services .......................................................................718-3660
Development Office............................................................................................718-3727
Disability Services ............................................................................................. 718-3855
Financial Aid .....................................................................................................718-3642
Learning Support ..........................................................................718-3694 or 718-3765
Library ................................................................................................................718-3653
Oconee Campus........................................................................................ (706) 310-2201
President .............................................................................................................718-3610
Plant Operations ................................................................................................718-3677
Public Relations/Marketing...............................................................................718-3836
Registrar’s Office ...............................................................................................718-3644
Security ...............................................................................................................294-7227
Student Activities ...............................................................................................718-3622
Student Development .........................................................................................718-3877
Student Government Association......................................................................718-3622
Testing ................................................................................................................718-3863
Theatre ................................................................................................................718-3624
University Center ...............................................................................................718-3875
Veteran's Benefits (Financial Aid) ....................................................................718-3642

Academic Divisions:
Business Division ................................................................................................718-3634
Health, Wellness, and Physical Education Division ........................................718-3645
Humanities and Fine Arts Division...................................................................718-3697
Natural Sciences, Engineering & Technology Division...................................718-3666
Mathematics & Computer Science Division ....................................................718-3757
Social Sciences & Education Division...............................................................718-3627

FAX Numbers:
Admissions Office...............................................................................................718-3643
Oconee Campus........................................................................................ (706) 310-2203
Comptroller’s Office ..........................................................................................718-3859
Counseling and Career Services .......................................................................718-3621
Financial Aid Office ...........................................................................................718-3673
Registrar’s Office ...............................................................................................718-3643
                                                                                            Miscellaneous Information / 285



                                    OCONEE DIRECTORY
                     (Area Code 706 for all numbers unless otherwise noted)

ACTT Center......................................................................................................310-2238
Academic Advising Center ................................................................................310-2204
Academic Dean...................................................................................................310-2219
Admissions Office...............................................................................................310-2201
Bookstore ............................................................................................................310-2210
Business Services Office.....................................................................................310-2206
Comptroller's Office ..........................................................................................310-2201
Counseling and Career Services .......................................................................310-2243
Disability Services ............................................................................................. 310-2204
Financial Aid .....................................................................................................310-2241
Learning Support ...............................................................................................310-2207
Library ................................................................................................................310-2238
Oconee Campus..................................................................................................310-2201
President ..................................................................................................... 770-718-3610
Registrar’s Office ...............................................................................................310-2201
Security ...............................................................................................................215-1474
Student Activities ...............................................................................................310-2293
Student Development .........................................................................................310-2208
Student Government Association......................................................................310-2293
Testing ................................................................................................................310-2207
Veteran’s Benefits (Financial Aid)....................................................................310-2241

Academic Divisions:
Business...............................................................................................................310-2228
Humanities & Fine Arts.....................................................................................310-2212
Natural Sciences, Engineering, & Technology.................................................310-2252
Mathematics & Computer Science ...................................................................310-2226
Social Sciences, Education, & Physical Education ..........................................310-2232

FAX Numbers:
Admissions Office...............................................................................................310-2202
Oconee Campus..................................................................................................310-2202
Comptroller’s Office ..........................................................................................310-2202
Counseling and Career Services .......................................................................310-2202
Financial Aid Office ...........................................................................................310-2202
Registrar’s Office ...............................................................................................310-2202
286 / Gainesville College




                                      Index

Absences, 81                                  Associate of Applied Science
Academic Advising, 86                           Degree Programs, 156
Academic Computing, Tutoring,                 Associate of Arts
   and Testing Center, 83                       Anthropology, 99
Academic Information, 67                        Art, 99
                                                Business Administration, 101
Academic Programs, 69
                                                English, 104
Academic Standing, 79                           Foreign Languages, 102, 105
Academic Support Services, 83                   General Studies, 119
ACT, 61                                         History, 107
                                                Journalism, 109
Activity Fee, 35
                                                Music, 110, 111
ACTT Center, 83                                 Philosophy, 112
Administrative Offices / Staff, 267             Political Science, 113
Advanced Placement Program, 74                  Psychology, 114
                                                Religion, 115
Agricultural Education, 149                     Social Work, 116
Agriculture - General, 120                      Sociology, 117
Agriculture - Poultry Science, 121              Theatre, 118
Agriculture - Poultry Science                 Associate of Arts Degree Programs,
   (Business Track), 122                        95
Air Force ROTC, 181                           Associate of Science
Anthropology, 99                                Agriculture - General, 120
                                                Agriculture - Poultry Science
Area Housing, 55                                   (Business Track), 122
Arranged Classes, 76                            Agriculture - Poultry Science
Art, 100                                           (Science Track), 121
Art Education, 149                              Chemistry, 123
                                                Computer Science, 124
Assessment, 3                                   Criminal Justice, 125
Associate of Applied Science                    Early Childhood Education
   Dental Hygiene, 160                             (Ages 0-5), 126
   Drafting, 162                                Early Childhood Education
   Electronics Technology, 163                     (Grades K-5), 127
   Medical Assisting, 166                       Engineering and Engineering
   Medical Laboratory                              Technology, 130
      Technology, 167                           Environmental Health, 135
   Paralegal Studies, 156, 157                  Exercise Science, 136
   Practical Nursing, 164, 165                  Forestry Resources, 137
                                                General Studies, 155
                                                Geology, 138
                                                 Miscellaneous Information / 287


   Mathematics, 139                  College Preparatory, 87
   Middle Grades Education, 140      COMPASS, 62
   Physical Geography, 141
                                     Computer Science, 124
   Physics, 142
   Pre-Medical Studies, 145          Continuing Education, 14
   Pre-Nursing, 147                  Continuing Education and Public
   Pre-Pharmacy, 148                    Service, 88
   Pre-Professional and Allied       Cooperative Programs, 89
      Health, 144
                                     Core Values, 12
   Secondary Education, 149
   Sport Management, 143             Counseling, 55
Associate of Science Degree          Course Abbreviations, 179
   Programs, 95                      Courses of Instruction, 177
Associate of Science Programs, 120   CPC, 87
Auditing, 76                         Credit By Examination, 74
Biology Education, 150               Criminal Justice, 125
Board of Regents, 244, 245           Curriculum, 87
Buildings, 13                        Dean's List, 77
Business Administration, 101         Dental Hygiene, 160
Business Education, 150              Directory, 274
Campus Activities Board, 59          Disability Services, 57, 86
Career Associate Degree, 70          Distance Learning, 64
Career Development, 55               Drafting, 162
Career Programs, 70, 156             Early Childhood Education, 126,
Certificate Programs, 71, 168           127, 128
   Environmental Sciences, 170       Earth Science Education, 151
   Environmental Studies, 171        Electronic Technology, 163
   European Union Studies, 172
   Geographic Information            Engineering and Engineering
      Science, 173                      Technology, 130
   Paralegal Studies, 174            Engineering Technology, 132
   Personal Training, 175            English, 104
Change of Grade, 79                  English Education, 151
Change of Schedule, 75               English for Speakers of other
Chemistry, 123                          Languages Program, 85
Chemistry Education, 150             Environmental Health, 135
CLEP, 61, 74                         Environmental Sciences, 170
Co-Curricular Transcripts, 60        Environmental Studies, 171
College Personnel, 249               ESL, 85
288 / Gainesville College


European Union Studies, 172             Spatial Analysis, 91
Exercise Science, 136                Journalism, 109
Faculty Roster, 251                  Learning Support, 62
Family Educational Rights and        Learning Support Programs, 84
   Privacey Act, 72                  Learning Support Suspension, 80
Federal Grants, 45                   Library, 14, 83
Federal Work-Study Program, 50       Loans, 49
Fees and Expenses, 35                Maps, 274
FERPA, 72                            Marketing Education, 152
Financial Aid, 41                    Math Exemption Test, 62
Fitness Center, 65                   Mathematics, 139
Foreign Languages, 102, 105          Mathematics Education, 152
Forestry Resources, 137              Medical Assisting, 166
Free Speech Policy, 63               Medical Laboratory Technology,
Gainesville College Alumni              167
   Association, 16                   Merit List, 77
Gainesville College Foundation, 16   Middle Grades Education, 140
Gainesville College Foundation       Minority Affairs, 57
   Scholarships, 45
                                     Mission, 10
GC On The Go, 72
                                     Music, 110, 111
General Education, 13
                                     Music Education, 153
General Studies, 119
                                     Non-Traditional Student, 59
Geographic Information Science,
                                     Oconee Campus, 15
   173
                                     Off-Campus Employment
Geology, 138
                                        Opportunities, 50
Grade Point Average Calculation,
                                     Office of Student Activities, 58
   79
                                     Paralegal Studies, 156, 157, 174
Grading System, 77
                                     Personal Counseling, 55
Graduation, 82
                                     Personal Training, 175
Graduation Requirements, 159
                                     Pets on Campus, 64
Hazardous Weather, 64
                                     Philosophy, 112
Health and Physical Education, 152
                                     Physical Geography, 141
History, 9, 107
                                     Physics, 142
Honors Program, 71
                                     Physics Education, 153
IESA, 91
                                     Political Science, 113
                                     Poultry Science, 121, 122
Institute for Environmental and
                                     Practical Nursing, 164, 165
                                                 Miscellaneous Information / 289


Pre-Medical Studies, 145              Semester Core Curriculum, 96
Pre-Nursing, 147                      Simultaneous Enrollment, 74
Pre-Pharmacy, 148                     SOAR, 59
Pre-Professional and Allied Health,   Social Sciences Education, 154
   144                                Social Work, 116
Probation, 80                         Sociology, 117
Program of Study, 82                  Sport Management, 143
Psychology, 114                       SRESFS, 90
Refund Policy, 37                     State Scholarships, 45
Regent's Engineering Transfer         Strategic Goals, 12
   Program, 89
                                      Student Activities, 58
Regent's Test, 44, 62
                                      Student Activities Building, 59
Regent's Testing, 85
                                      Student Budget Worksheet, 38
Registrar's Office, 57
                                      Student Clubs and Organizations,
Registration, 75                         59
Religion, 115                         Student Conduct, 60
Religious Holidays, 64                Student Development & Enrollment
Remediation, 84                          Management Office, 54
RETP, 89                              Student Government Association,
Satisfactory Academic Progress, 44       58
Savannah River Environmental          Student Identification Cards, 61
   Science Field Station, 90          Student Life - Oconee Campus, 59
Second Degree, 82                     Student Orientation, 59
Secondary Education, 149              Student Orientation, Advisement,
   Agricultural Education, 149           & Registration Program, 59
   Art Education, 149                 Student Publications, 60
   Biology Education, 150             Suspension, 80
   Business Education, 150
                                      Technical Programs, 70
   Chemistry Education, 150
   Earth Science Education, 151       Technology Education, 154
   English Education, 151             Technology Fee, 35
   Health and Physical Education,     Testing, 61
      152
                                      Theatre, 118
   Marketing Education, 152
   Mathematics Education, 152         TOEFL, 63
   Music Education, 153               Traffic Regulations, 63
   Physics Education, 153             Transfer Credit Appeals Process,
   Social Sciences Education, 154        74
   Technology Education, 154
290 / Gainesville College


Transfer Programs, 69               Veterans Administration
Tuition Remission and                 Educational Benefits, 50
   Reimbursement, 50                Vocational Rehabilitation and
University Center, 92                 Educational Assistance, 50
University Center Programs, 176     Withdrawal, 44, 81
University System of Georgia, 241

				
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