Docstoc

Search Engine Marketing 101

Document Sample
Search Engine Marketing 101 Powered By Docstoc
					 

 

 

 

 

 



Search Engine Marketing 101 
A Guide for Small Businesses and Not‐For‐Profits to Engage in Search Engine Marketing 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Hendrikse  
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

December 11, 2008 
markhendrikse.com 

                                 
                                                                                                                                              Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                                                                       www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Table of Contents 

 
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 
Key Determinants of Organic SERP Results (Google) .................................................................................... 3 
Planning ........................................................................................................................................................ 3 
    Objectives & goals ..................................................................................................................................... 3 
    Target audiences ....................................................................................................................................... 4 
    Keyword search ......................................................................................................................................... 5 
Implementing ................................................................................................................................................ 6 
    Site architecture ........................................................................................................................................ 6 
    Content ..................................................................................................................................................... 6 
    Building pages ........................................................................................................................................... 7 
    Measuring effectiveness ........................................................................................................................... 8 
    Pay‐per‐click .............................................................................................................................................. 9 
Ongoing development and maintenance ................................................................................................... 10 
    Link building strategies ........................................................................................................................... 10 
    Keep content fresh .................................................................................................................................. 11 
    Measure and make changes ................................................................................................................... 11 
Final Thoughts ............................................................................................................................................. 12 
Bibliography ................................................................................................................................................ 13 
 

                                                   




                                                                                1 
 
                                                                                                  Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                           www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Introduction 

    Search Engine Marketing (SEM), one of the youngest marketing disciplines, is soon becoming one of 
the most powerful, engaging and measurable marketing activities employed by today’s leading 
marketing organizations.  Pay‐per‐click search marketing now comprises 40% of all US online advertising 
spending and is estimated to peak at $155 billion in 2008 (Krol, 2008).  These figures do not include the 
SEO marketing agencies involved and the countless hours of internal staff manually optimising each 
webpage for top organic search engine results page (SERP) listings. This large and growing dependence 
on SEM is due to 2 key facts: having a website is meaningless if no one knows it exists and websites are 
equally as meaningless if those who come to the site don’t value the content that is being provided or 
feel that it is relevant.  This requires search engines to be keenly aware of one’s website and this keen 
awareness provides them the ability to connect one’s site with well qualified visitors. 

    Search Engine Marketing is generally split into two different categories: search engine optimization 
(SEO) and pay‐per‐click search advertising (PPC).  SEO has a longer‐termed focus based on 
understanding what search engines value when they index a website and ensuring that one’s website 
follows those standards and best practices.  PPC typically has a shorter‐term focus and looks to increase 
website traffic by bidding on the placement of pertinent keywords on SERPs.  Most businesses that 
involve themselves in SEM typically allocate 30% of their budget on PPC campaigns and the remaining 
70% on SEO activities. 

    One of the most common misconceptions about SEM is that it is all about engaging in various 
activities that result in attaining one of the top SERP placements for a particular keyword. This 
misconception typically leads marketing managers to spend advertising dollars without getting tangible 
benefits in return, or even worse, engage in gray‐hat or black‐hat SEM activities (activities that aim to 
trick the search engines) that may lead to their eventual delisting from many of the major search 
engines. At its core, SEM is about getting the most qualified audiences to your website. With this 
philosophy, tricking untargeted visitors to a website provides no benefit to anyone. Secondly, by 
bringing qualified visitors to your website, the expectation becomes that your website is properly 
prepared for these visitors and various conversion metrics and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) have 
been established to measure the effectiveness of the SEM efforts. 




                                                     2 
 
                                                                                                   Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                            www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Key Determinants of Organic SERP Results (Google) 

        •      Overall website authority (as determined by the Google PageRank™ algorithm) and website 
               age  
        •      Keyword density within page title, description and page content. Web pages should have 
               more content than code. 
        •      Reputable (high ranking) and topically‐relevant websites linking to one’s website (in‐bound 
               links).  There is a high priority placed on the keywords within the link anchor on these 
               external sites 
        •      The number of times search engine users click on your link within the SERP and don’t 
               immediately bounce back to the SERP 
        •      Website is linking to other reputable and topically‐relevant websites (out‐bound links) 
        •      Frequency of content changes and updates made to the website; the more frequent the 
               better 
        •      Easy to find (for search robots) and complete site maps with a clear information hierarchy 


Planning 

Objectives & goals 

    There are three basic activities to online marketing: acquisition, conversion and retention.  Search 
Engine Marketing (SEM) is the primary tool to facilitate acquisition, but the quality of these acquisitions 
will be based on your ability to increase conversions. Acquisition, or site visitors, in‐and‐of themselves 
provides no real value you; it’s their conversion, or potential to conversion, is where the business 
derives its value. Setting up proper conversion metrics is critical to establishing an effective PPC and SEO 
campaign.   


            Conversion Metric                            Benefit to Organization 

            Whitepaper or case study download            Provided contact details for future 
                                                         follow‐up 

            Purchase made online                         Increased revenues 



                                                        3 
 
                                                                                                     Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                              www.markhendrikse.com 
 
            Information request form completed         Provided contact details and indicated 
                                                       specific interest in product or service 

            30‐day trail initiated                     Induced trial and provided contact 
                                                       details for future follow‐up 

            Free demo downloaded                       Induced trial and provided contact 
                                                       details for future follow‐up 

            Webinar registered                         Provided contact details and indicated 
                                                       specific interest in product or service 
 

    The first step in selecting the right combination of conversion metrics is to define your overall 
website objectives. Ask yourself: 

        •   What kind of website is it? 
        •   Is it a lead generating B‐to‐B site or is it a revenue generating B‐to‐C site? 
        •   How is the website being used to meet organizational objectives? 
        •   Is it primarily used to reduce costs or increase revenues? 

    Outlining a site’s key objectives will lead to easily identifying conversion metrics that can be used to 
successfully measure and qualify the effectiveness of the SEM campaign. 

    Once conversion metrics have been identified, creating a baseline analytical report is the next step. 
With this baseline report the present situation can be quantified, goals and targets can be accurately 
decided upon and budgets can be allocated to achieving those targets. Budgets should include how 
much will be allocated to PPC keyword placement, their management and the resources required for 
developing, measuring and adjusting internal SEO activities. 

Target audiences 

    Conversions are what you want and value, but what does the target audience want? Now that your 
objectives of your site have been established, you must cater to the perceptions and desires of the 
target audiences when determining keywords and site design. These targeted keywords will be used to 
acquire your site’s visitors and your site’s overall design will be used to persuade them in completing a 



                                                      4 
 
                                                                                                Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                         www.markhendrikse.com 
 
conversion activity. You must understand the following questions and use the responses to develop 
relevant keywords and meaningful content: 

    •   Who are the main target audiences of the website? 
    •   What are these individuals searching for? 
    •   What are their top 3 questions when they come to the site? 
    •   What are their overall objectives in coming to the site? 
    •   What does success mean for them? 

Keyword search 

    There are a few steps in determining the relevant keywords used in webpage SEO and PPC 
campaigns. The best way to begin is to create a Google Adwords account and use their free keywords 
tracking tool. This tool allows users to enter in any keyword or key‐phrase and it will return with data on 
hundreds of possible synonyms and combination keywords. This report also provides the average 
estimated cost per click, the approximate monthly search volume and the degree of advertiser 
competition for each suggested keyword or key‐phrase. This gives you a complete list of all the likely 
relevant keywords/key‐phrases and the costs associated with them. To help shorten this list, online 
tools like SEMrush, GoogSpy and KeyCompete can provide insights into what competitive sites are using 
for keywords in their SEM activities. 

    When determining the final list of keywords, it is important to stay away from generic terms as they 
typically have the highest PPC price and don’t provide the best qualified visitors. The more specific the 
term or phrase, the more qualified the visitor will be and typically, the lower the cost of the campaign. 
Secondly, remember that SEO has a long‐term focus and PPC has a short‐term focus. This means that 
you should optimize a website with more conservative keywords and experiment with risky or 
questionable keywords in the PPC campaign. If the keyword is not delivering as well as expected in the 
PPC campaign, the keyword can be easily changed in real time whereas altering the website’s SEO will 
take more time and effort. 




                                                     5 
 
                                                                                                  Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                           www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Implementing 

Site architecture 

    When designing the website’s overall navigational structure, there are three basic concepts to 
consider as it relates to SEM: 

        •   Use externally‐known terms for navigational items 
        •   Organize content in a manner that visitors appreciate and understand 
        •   Build with the end goal in mind – conversion 

    Don’t use product names, internal divisions, company technologies or jargon to name or categorize 
any page within the website. Page categories and titles are the highest valued pieces of content to 
search engines and individual searchers are rarely querying your product names or internal company 
nomenclature. Individuals are searching for product categories and the solutions they provide, giving 
significant benefits to building your site around common terminology. Additionally, if they are attracted 
to your site and see all internal phrases and keywords within the main navigation and content of your 
site, they many not feel that your site is relevant and quickly bounce back to the SERP.   

    Conversions are what provide meaning and value to your website from your perspective, so design 
the architecture with this in mind. Map out what is perceived to be the natural funnel from entry page 
to the desired conversion destination. For each conversion metric, map out these funnels and then 
combine all the funnels to build a blueprint of your site’s overall navigational structure. 

Content 

    When it comes to Search Engine Marketing (SEM), content is king. The web page’s content is the 
single biggest influencing factor in determining SERP results. Ensure that each page’s content has been 
carefully peppered with keywords or key‐phrases in the titles, page descriptions, headers and in the 
body copy. However, remember to optimize the page for the user, not search engines, as webpage’s 
that are too difficult to read or needlessly complex will likely cause the visitor to bounce back to the 




                                                      6 
 
                                                                                                            Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                                     www.markhendrikse.com 
 
SERP. Secondly, most search engines get suspicious if the keyword‐to‐content crosses the 7% keyword 
density threshold and may retaliate by reducing the page’s ranking on the SERP1. 


       Content Do’s                                                 Content Don’ts 

       •      Do have unique titles and page                        • Don’t duplicate content, make sure every 
              descriptions for each web page                           page has unique, compelling and relevant 
       •      Do tag all your images with descriptive text             content 
       •      Do use text format modifiers like header,             • Don’t bury key keyword information in 
              strong and emphasis tags                                 images, Flash, JavaScript or AJAX; keep 
       •      Do update your content regularly                         titles, headings and key content in the 
       •      Do make as many hyperlinks within your                   main text content of the page 
              content as possible; link keywords to other           • Don’t have too much on the page, this 
              pages about those specific topics                        destroys the visitor ability to know what to 
       •      Do link to external sites that are related to            do next or meet your conversion objective 
              page topics                                           • Don’t have more code within the page 
       •      Do use lots of bulleted lists that can be                than copy content when you examine the 
              scanned quickly and easily by visitors                   page’s source code 

       •      Do trim your content as much as possible – 
              get to the point and reduce the amount of 
              marketing‐speak 
       •      Do develop content with the goal in mind 
              with plenty of call‐to‐actions related to 
              conversion pages 

               

Building pages 

       The single greatest Search Engine Marketing (SEM) tactic you can employ when building web pages 
is to follow the W3C endorsed Web standards (http://webstandards.org) as thet relate to organizing and 
specifying the page’s code. By following Web standards, you ensure that the search engine 

                                                            
1
     Walter, Arron. Building Findable Websites, P106. 

                                                               7 
 
                                                                                                         Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                                  www.markhendrikse.com 
 
spiders/crawlers can easily understand the content of your pages and follow all the links throughout 
your site. Web standards were developed with specific accessibility issues in mind and following these 
standards not only aids those visiting your site with visual impairment, it also helps search engine 
spiders understand the graphical content of your site as well. Another key component to building pages 
with Web standards is separating content from page structure, formatting and functionality. In doing 
this it helps load times, assists the search engine spiders in focusing on content and decreases the ratio 
of code to content. 


    Programming Do’s                                        Programming Don’ts 

    •   Do have each page have its own URL – stay  •            Don’t use a meta refresh where visitors are 
        away from JavaScript, AJAX or Flash pages               automatically redirected to another page 
        that provide multiple pages within a single             after a specified period of time on the 
        URL                                                     original page 
    •   Do use search engine friendly URLs which            •   Don’t use frames or pop‐ups 
        are populated with legible keywords, not            •   Don’t try to trick the search engines with 
        database query strings                                  any unethical or fraudulent activities such 
    •   Do use custom 404 page not found error                  as cloaking, duplicating content, keyword 
        pages that redirect traffic to the                      stuffing and/or invisible text 
        homepage or site map 
    •   Do link to your site map on every page 

     

Measuring effectiveness 

    Before a fully Search Engine Optimized (SEO) web site can be properly launched on the Internet and 
Pay‐Per‐Click (PPC) campaigns can begin, your site needs to be primed for detailed analytical reporting. 
Google Analytics is free, easy to use and is quickly becoming the default standard in website analytics. 
An account can be easily set up and within minutes you can be adding the Google Analytics Tracking 
Code (GATC) to the header or footer of every webpage. Out‐of‐the‐box, Google Analytics provides 
detailed reports on the visitor counts and statistics, top entry pages, top referring websites, keywords 
used in search engines to get to your site, and page and site bounce rates. 



                                                       8 
 
                                                                                                Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                         www.markhendrikse.com 
 
    The real power of Google Analytics as it relates to SEM is that it seamlessly connects with your 
Google AdWords account and data from the two systems came be freely exchanged. Within Google 
Analytics you can specify successful conversions; typically the display of a thank you page after a 
completed transaction. Linking this information into Google AdWords, you can combine successful 
conversion data with the keyword originally used to get to your site from Google, the cost of that 
keyword and the estimated benefit to the company of the conversion‐transaction. This provides you 
with real‐time ROI on all the keyword pay‐per‐click advertisements currently being employed on the 
Google search engine. 

Pay‐per‐click 

    Much like a Google Analytics account, a Google AdWords account is very quick and easy to create. 
During the specific PPC campaign creation process, you will need to specify five key pieces of 
information: 

        •    The keywords or key‐phrases to be bid on 
        •    The URL the ad will be linked to 
        •    The maximum Cost‐Per‐Click (CPC) you’re willing to pay per keyword 
        •    The total daily budget 
        •    The ad copy that will appear on the SERP 

    The keywords to be bid on, the landing URL, the maximum CPC and the maximum daily budget 
should have been decided long before the initial SEM planning process. At this point the ad copy needs 
to be carefully crafted as the allowable size and length is very limiting. A Google AdWords text ad 
consists of four lines of text: 

        •    Headline 
        •    2 lines of description 
        •    Your URL 

    The headline can be up to 25 characters long and the description copy combined cannot be longer 
than 35 characters. Given the Cost‐Per‐Click and the brevity of the message, the ad copy must be to the 
point, noticeably relevant to the keyword, honest, and as clear as possible. You may be paying up to $10 
per click, so attracting untargeted visitors can quickly become a costly proposition. 


                                                     9 
 
                                                                                                   Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                            www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Ongoing development and maintenance 

Link building strategies 

    In the early 2000s, Google quickly surpassed all its competitors as the premier Internet search 
engine due to the significantly increased quality of the results provided on its SERPs. This enhanced 
quality can be largely attributed to their introduction of referral links into their search algorithm. Up to 
that point, the other search engines focused their indexing almost exclusively based on the content 
provided within the site itself as the key determinant of topic and relevance. The developers at Google 
believed that they should look at external sites and understand the context in which an external site is 
linking to a site and use these other sites as third‐party endorsements. For example, if a website has a 
relatively high degree of authority (determined by Google’s PageRank™ algorithm) and it has a webpage 
about ‘Topic A’ and it links to your site about ‘Topic A’, then your site must be about ‘Topic A’. If the 
words within the hyperlink to your site have the keywords ‘Topic A’ in them, then this is an even 
stronger endorsement that your site is about ‘Topic A’. 

    Given the priority these third‐party endorsements have in the Google search engine algorithm (all 
other major search engines now use this method as well), it becomes an ongoing imperative for you to 
indentify authoritative websites and have them link back to your site. This is typically done through 
searching out industry directories, working with channel partners, adding URLs throughout the copy of 
press releases and article submissions, and sending products for third‐party online reviews. More 
contemporary approaches typically involve using social media whereby content is created that has a 
high degree of viral‐ability to incent blog writers and other social media contributors to write about the 
topic and link back to the source. 

    In a similar but lesser degree, current search engines also consider the links on your site to other 
external sites. The underlying philosophy behind including this into the search algorithm is that if your 
site claims to be about ‘Topic A’ and it links to many authoritative sites about ‘Topic A’, then your site 
most likely is about ‘Topic A’. This can be easily achieved by listing and linking to partners, suppliers, 
channel members, industry associations, online industry publications, respected industry blogs... etc. 




                                                      10 
 
                                                                                                   Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                            www.markhendrikse.com 
 
    Google and other search engines warn against getting involved in various link exchange schemes as 
they see them as grey‐hat activities. Google recommends that you create valuable, engaging and original 
content which others will be compelled to link to without the need for artificial incentives. 

Keep content fresh 

    Search engines have always placed a high value on websites and web pages that are updated 
frequently. Stagnate and dated sites rarely make it to the top of the SERPs. Search engines believe that 
the more a website is updated and refreshed with new content, the more lively, engaging and 
authoritative the site is on almost any topic. Given this, developing new and updating content can 
become a full time job for any website owner. Most organizations have a steady flow of press releases, 
career postings and new products and services, but you need to remember to update your company 
profile, markets served, industry overview, and training web pages. To help free up the bottle neck 
when it comes to posting topical, new and updated content, you can engage the larger online 
community with a user review section, forums and a blog that encourages visitors to provide their own 
content to the topic. These online discussions will not only keep your website content fresh, they also 
may increase the number of topically relevant inbound and outbound links. 

Measure and make changes 

    Search Engine Marketing (SEM) is not a fire‐and‐forget medium like many other marketing activities; 
proper SEM needs to be constantly monitored and altered. You need to allocate a specified period of 
time per day or per week to measure and evaluate which keywords are generating the highest 
conversions, where the bottlenecks on your site are and what the overall ROI of each keyword 
campaign. Keywords must be changed if they are not meeting ROI expectations and the website’s 
content and navigation needs to be altered if prospects are not following the anticipated conversion 
funnel. 

    The final task in any effective SEM campaign is to close the loop. If your site is a lead generation site, 
the leads generated need to be qualified and tied to specific sales to determine the true value of the PPC 
keyword and the overall ROI of the campaign. If your site is a consumer e‐commerce site, the visitors 
coming to your site from the PPC keywords need to be tied to the sales made. It’s beneficial to 
understanding which keywords and PPC ads are driving traffic to your site, but it’s better to truly 




                                                     11 
 
                                                                                                  Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                           www.markhendrikse.com 
 
understand which keywords and ads are driving the most qualified visitors to your site, visitors that are 
converting into tangible business opportunities. 


Final Thoughts 

    Search Engine Marketing (SEM) is quickly becoming one of the most powerful marketing mediums in 
any industry today. This is because it can bring in targeted audiences, campaign effectiveness can be 
easily tracked, campaigns can be changed mid‐course, and it can produce one of the highest ROIs of any 
marketing communications activity. Marketing managers need to start developing competencies in SEM 
as it is not only an extremely effective tool to connect with targeted audiences, but also because its 
success builds on itself. The more entrenched your site becomes with a particular keyword or key‐
phrase, the harder it will be for others to dislodge it. The higher your site is ranked, the more times 
searchers have clicked on your site’s link and the more inbound links your site will get as more people 
interested in that topic will know about your site. The longer your site has been known to be about a 
particular topic, the more authoritative your site is perceived to be about that topic. All of this feeds on 
itself and those who don’t start working at SEM activities now will soon find it even harder and more 
expensive to get the top results and drive qualified visitors to their websites. 

         

                                  




                                                     12 
 
                                                                                                   Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                            www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Bibliography 

Anonymous. (November 2008). Interactive Viewpoints: The Evolution of Search. Marketing Week , 20. 

Anonymous. (2008, May). Search Marketin: Keeping Organic Results Natural. New Media Age , 11. 

Anonymous. (2007, November). Search Marketing: Taking a Search Strategy Abroad. New Media Age , 
11. 

Ash, T. (2008). Landing Page Optimization ‐ The Definitive Guide to Testing and Tuning for Conversions. 
Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing, Inc. 

Bannan, K. J. (2008). Getting the Basics Right Keeps Sites Useful, Effective. B to B , 93 (12), 17, 20. 

Clark, M. (2008). The Rules of the Game. Marketing , 62‐63. 

DeBevois, K., & Mummert, H. (July 1008). How Friendly Is Your SEM? Target Marketing , 26‐31. 

Flamberg, D. (2008). Fast, Cheap and in Control. B to B , 93 (16), 9. 

Grappone, J., & Couzin, G. (2008). Search Engine Optimization; An Hour a Day, Second Edition. New 
Jersey: Wiley Publishing, Inc. 

Gray, R. (2008, September). A Balancing Act. Marketing , 59‐60. 

Honigman, D. B. (February 2008). Peek‐A‐Boo, I SEO You. Online Marketing , 8. 

Jones, K. B. (2008). Search Engine Optimization ‐ Your Visual Blueprint for Effective Internet Marketing. 
Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing, Inc. 

Kenney, B. (March 2008). How Strong is Your Brand Online? Industry Week , 62‐63. 

Krol, C. (2008). Search Draws Big Spending. B to B.: Interactive Marketing Guide 2008 , 93 (4), 19‐21. 

Loveday, L., & Niehaus, S. (2008). Web Design for ROI ‐ Turning Browsers into Buyers & Prospects into 
Leads. Berkeley: New Riders. 

Martin, R. (2008). The Right Search Tool. Information Week (1024), 34‐39. 

Molander, J. (2008). Convergence Culture. Target Marketing , 31 (9), 23‐25. 

Murphy, D. (2008, March). A Measured Approach. Marketing , 47‐49. 

Schwarz, E. A. (2008). Harnessing the Potential of Search Engine Optimization. LIMRA's MarketFacts 
Quarterly , 27 (1), 70‐74. 

Simms, J. (2008, October). SMEs Look to Web Answers. Marketing , 33‐34. 


                                                      13 
 
                                                                                           Mark Hendrikse 
                                                                                    www.markhendrikse.com 
 
Walter, A. (2008). Building Findable Websites ‐ Web Standards, SEO and Beyond. Berkley: New Riders. 

 

 




                                                 14 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO