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2007-2008 Catalog - North Centra

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2007-2008 Catalog - North Centra Powered By Docstoc
					                                                  2007 – 2008
                                                   CATALOG


The information contained in this catalog is the most accurate available at the time of publication, but changes may become
effective before the next catalog is printed. It is ultimately the student’s responsibility to stay abreast of current regulations,
curricula, and the status of specific programs being offered. Further, the College reserves the right to modify requirements,
curricula offerings, and charges, and to add, alter, or delete courses and programs through appropriate procedures. While
reasonable efforts will be made to publicize such changes, a student is encouraged to seek current information from
appropriate offices. The North Central State College catalog is neither a contract nor an offer to contract. North Central
State College reserves the right to make changes in any material contained herein as deemed necessary without notice.


                                                 P. O. Box 698, 2441 Kenwood Circle
                                                     Mansfield, Ohio 44901-0698
                                                             419-755-4800
                                                       Toll Free: 888-755-4899
                                                Website: http://www.ncstatecollege.edu
                                                From the Desk of the President…
                                     At NC State, we take pride in the fact that over 90% of our graduates
                                 are employed, and that a growing number are continuing their education. If
                                 an associate degree is your goal, we offer the best value in the region for
                                 your investment. Surveys show that for the last several years, beginning
                                 earnings for associate degree graduates have been greater than those for
                                 bachelor’s degree graduates.
                                     We are proud of the quality and accomplishments of our graduates, as
                                 evidenced by their success in the workplace. We are equally proud of the
                                 increasing number of students, as much as 30%, who come to NC State to
                                 complete their degree and transfer to a university where they successfully
                                 complete a bachelor’s degree. For those of you who struggle to meet the
rising costs of higher education, completing the first half of your bachelor’s degree here can save you up
to half the cost of going to a public university, as much as $4,000 a year in tuition alone.
     We also recognize that many of our students would like to further their education beyond the associate
degree level, but due to family or work commitments, they are unable to do so. In order to help meet the
needs of these students, NC State established the University Center. The Center offers a variety of
bachelor’s degree completion programs right on our campus. We established partnerships with Ashland
University, Miami University, University of Cincinnati, Youngstown State University, Franklin University,
and Mt. Vernon Nazarene University. There is a number of bachelor degree programs offered through
these partnerships, and there is no need to leave our campus.
     According to the Ohio Job Outlook to 2012 published by the Ohio Department of Job and Family
Services, employment for Ohio associate degree graduates is expected to grow by 21.7% over the next
decade. Regardless of your career goals, NC State is now providing more options than ever and at an
affordable cost. We are striving to meet the higher education needs of our ever-changing students and
communities.




Dr. Ronald E. Abrams, President
North Central State College




                                                     2
                                                     THE COLLEGE

     Prior to its charter as North Central Technical College, the institution was known as the Mansfield School of
Technology. It was initiated by the Mansfield Board of Education in September 1961 and approved by the State Department
of Education. The rationale of the Mansfield Board of Education was to establish a two-year, post-high school diploma
granting school that would prepare men and women for various careers. The graduates were satisfying the rapidly-growing
employment needs in the industrial and business society of the area.
     The original location of the Mansfield School of Technology was 218 Marion Avenue, Mansfield, Ohio. The limited
physical facilities, projected enrollment growth, and need for additional student services led the school’s administration,
advisory committees, and the Mansfield Board of Education to seek the creation of a Technical College District in
compliance with the Ohio Revised Code. North Central Technical College was approved by the Ohio Board of Regents and
certified by the Secretary of State on September 26, 1968. This action of the Ohio Board of Regents and the Secretary of
State created the Technical College District in the contiguous counties of Ashland, Crawford, and Richland. In August of
1999, the Board of Trustees changed the name of the College to North Central State College.
     Currently, the NC State-OSU Campus houses North Central State College and a regional campus of The Ohio State
University. Certain physical facilities and services are shared by each institution. The campus represents a model in sharing
resources by two separate institutions. Each institution has its own faculty, curricula, policies, and operating procedures. NC
State also maintains an Advanced Technology Learning Center in Shelby.
     North Central State College is directed by a Board of Trustees, the members of which are public representatives of
Ashland, Crawford, and Richland counties. Copies of North Central State College's most recent financial statement are
available upon request. If interested, please contact the Business Office at 419-755-4816.
     Each program of instruction is guided by an advisory committee consisting of persons whose competence lies within the
occupation of the instructional program. North Central State College presently has advisory committees in the following
professional areas:
Accounting
Administrative Information Technology
Business Administration
Computer Information Systems
Criminal Justice
Digital Media Technology
Early Childhood Education
Educational Assisting
Engineering Technologies
Human Services
Nursing (R.N.)
Paralegal Studies
Physical Therapist Assistant
Practical Nursing
Radiological Sciences
Respiratory Care




                                                              3
                                               GENERAL INFORMATION
COMPUTER AND NETWORK RESOURCES USE POLICY
     North Central State College computer and network resources are privileges provided to conduct the legitimate business
of the College and to support the mission of the institution. The purpose of this statement is to outline the policies and
procedures that promote the security and integrity of the College’s computer systems and the information contained on
those systems and that provide a framework for responsible access to computing resources. The President of the College
and the Vice President for Learning, deans, or instructors may elect to impose additional requirements or restrictions. North
Central State College extends these principles and guidelines to systems outside the College which are accessed via the
College’s facilities. Computing or network providers outside of North Central State College may impose their own additional
conditions of appropriate use, for which users at North Central State College are responsible. A complete copy of the North
Central State College Computer and Network Resources Use Policy is available for review in the Office of Human
Resources.

THE FOUNDATION
    The North Central State College Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)(3), tax-exempt organization formed in 1990 to seek,
receive, and distribute funds, equipment, property, and other contributions for the benefit of the students and programs of
North Central State College.
    Its goals are:
       • To provide financial assistance to full-time and part-time students in the form of scholarships, grants, and aid.
       • To support on-going professional development of faculty and staff in order to provide the most current technological
           instruction.
       • To purchase or obtain gifts of equipment and supplies for use in various College technologies.
       • To build a general endowment fund for the support of NC State.
       • To enlist support for North Central State College within the community.
    For information, call the Office of Institutional Advancement: 419-755-4756. All gifts to the NC State Foundation are tax-
deductible under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

GUARANTEE OF JOB COMPETENCY
     North Central State College guarantees that graduates are occupationally competent. The guarantee applies only to job
skills identified in the program outcomes for a specific degree. The guarantee applies only to graduates employed on a full-
time basis in a position directly related to the area of their program concentration, during the 12 months immediately
following their graduation.
     If a graduate is judged by his or her employer to be lacking in technical job skills identified by the program outcomes for
his or her specific degree program, the graduate will be provided up to nine, tuition-free, quarter credit hours of additional
training by North Central State College under the conditions of the guarantee policy.
     Cost of books, insurance, uniforms, laboratory, and activity fees, and other course-related expenses are the
responsibility of the graduate and/or the employer.

SPECIAL CONDITIONS FOR THE GUARANTEE
The Employer must provide to the College:
   • Identification, in writing, of areas of deficiency within six months of the graduate’s initial employment.
   • Verification, in writing, of specific job skills the employee is lacking which relate directly to the degree’s program
      outcomes.
   • A written educational plan for retraining developed in cooperation with the appropriate academic department at the
      College.
   • Retraining will be limited to nine quarter hours of credit related to the identified skill deficiency and to those classes
      regularly scheduled during the period covered by the retraining plan and must be completed within a calendar year
      from the time the educational plan is agreed upon.
   • The guarantee does not imply the graduate will pass any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular career.


                                                               4
NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION
     It is the policy of North Central State College not to discriminate on the basis of sex, race, age, creed, religion, national
origin, disability status, veteran status or sexual orientation in its educational programs, activities, or employment practices.
     Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on race or national origin in any educational
program or activity of North Central State College.
     Title IX of the Educational Amendment of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program
or activity of North Central State College.
     Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 prohibits
discrimination on the basis of handicap status in any educational activity of North Central State College.
     An internal, formal grievance procedure for violation of such acts has been set forth by North Central State College.
Information on this policy is located in Admissions, Student Records, and Human Resources. Inquiries regarding the
College’s obligation in this area should be directed to:

Human Resources Director                                             Coordinator of Specialized Support Services
Title VI & IX Coordinator                                            Section 504 Coordinator
North Central State College                                          North Central State College
P. O. Box 698 / 2441 Kenwood Circle                                  P. O. Box 698 / 2441 Kenwood Circle
Henry R. Fallerius Technical Education Center                        Byron E. Kee Hall, Room 138A
Room 156                                                             Mansfield, Ohio 44901-0698
Mansfield, OH 44901-0698                                             419-755-4727
(419) 755-4871                                                       419-755-5611 (TTY/Voice)


ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS
     North Central State College is chartered by the Ohio Board of Regents as a state-assisted institution of higher
education and is approved by the State Department of Education, U.S. Department of Education; State Department of
Education for Veterans; Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation; and the Department of Justice, Immigration, and Naturalization
Service. The College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The College is either a
member of or recognized by the following organizations: American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions
Officers, American Physical Therapy Association, Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs, Association of
Community College Trustees, Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, Council for the
Advancement of Experiential Learning, Council for Resource Development, Commission on Accreditation in Physical
Therapy Education, Council of Higher Education in Criminal Justice, Council of North Central Community-Junior Colleges,
Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care, Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiological Technology,
Mansfield-Richland Area Chamber of Commerce, Marketing Club of North Central Ohio, Midwest Association of Student
Financial Aid Administrators, National Academic Advising Association, National Association of Student Personnel
Administrators, National College Testing Association, National Council for Marketing and Public Relations, National Institute
for Staff and Organizational Development, National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, North Central Ohio
Personnel Association, Ohio Association of Community Colleges, Ohio Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators,
Ohio Association of Two-Year Colleges, Ohio College Association, Ohio Board of Nursing, Ohio Department of Health, Ohio
Society for Education in the Health Professions, Ohio State Board of Pharmacy, American Association of Community and
Junior Colleges, Ohio Technical and Community College Association, Ohio Two-Year College Placement Association,
Postsecondary Education Alliance of Institutions/Districts, State Medical Board of Ohio, The National Association of
Colleges and Employers, College University Personnel Association, and National Association for the Education of Young
Children.

     North Central State College, a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, is accredited through
the Higher Learning Commission’s Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP). Through AQIP, the College focuses on
improving systems and processes to better meet the College’s mission while maintaining accreditation. Systems and
processes are addressed through the nine AQIP categories: helping students learn, accomplishing other distinctive
objectives, understanding students’ and other stakeholders’ needs, valuing people, leading and communicating, supporting
institutional operations, measuring effectiveness, planning continuous improvement, and building collaborative relationships.
                                                                5
PHYSICAL FACILITIES
     Located on a 600-acre tract of land, the campus offers a variety of physical facilities to support many academic and
extracurricular activities. The campus consists of ten buildings, encompassing an area of approximately 250,000 square
feet.
     The Henry R. Fallerius Technical Education Center contains classrooms, lecture halls, technical laboratories, data
center, faculty offices, and the administrative offices for North Central State College.
     The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Center serves as a comprehensive, student center which includes the student
union, quiet and active game areas, music-listening rooms, cafeteria, and a student coffee house.
     The Louis Bromfield Hall includes a library, classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices.
     The Byron E. Kee Hall houses a comprehensive array of services and educational support activities to assist students
as they pursue their educational careers. Departments and activities located in the Hall include student services offices;
Admissions; registration/student records; Financial Aid; Disability Support Services; assessment; Career Services; tutoring;
academic advising; personal counseling; support courses in reading, writing, and college survival skills; Institutional
Advancement; and Tech Prep.
     The Health Sciences Center contains classrooms, a lecture hall, laboratories, and faculty offices.
     The Child Development Center provides child care services for the children of students and staff and serves as a
teaching laboratory for college students preparing for careers working with young children and their families.
     The Campus Bookstore sells textbooks, academic supplies, and related items.
     The Campus Recreation Center provides various recreational facilities for tennis, basketball, volleyball, and a variety
of sports.
     The Richard C. Schuttera Service Center houses the campus maintenance department.
     The James W. Kehoe Center for Advanced Learning houses classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices.

                                                                  2007-2008 CALENDAR

FALL QUARTER 2007
Admissions, Financial Aid, Student Records Office, Student Success Center, and Welcome Center will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the following Saturdays during Fall Quarter: September 15, 22, October 6, November 10.

Last Day to Request Transfer of Credit/Credit by Exam ..................................................... August 17
Saturday before Labor Day - Classes WILL BE in Session ............................................September 1
Labor Day (College Closed) ...........................................................................................September 3
Final Fee Payment Date for Fall Quarter ......................................................................September 11
Fall Quarter Begins - Day/Evening Classes..................................................................September 17
100% Fee Refunds................................................................................................September 17 - 24
Last Day to Add a Class ...............................................................................................September 24
Last Day to Withdraw with 100% Refund......................................................................September 24
50% Refund Period................................................................................................... Sept. 25 - Oct. 6
Last Day to Apply for Graduation at End of Quarter .....................................................September 28
Columbus Day (No Classes - Offices Open)....................................................................... October 8
Current Student Priority Registration Begins ...................................................................November 6
Veterans Day Observed (No Classes/Offices Closed - Staff In-Service Training) .........November 12
Last Day to Withdraw with a Grade of “W”.....................................................................November 12
Thanksgiving Break (College Closed).......................................................................November 21-25
Final Exams................................................................................................................. December 3-9
Last Day of Quarter .........................................................................................................December 9
Final Fee Payment Date for Winter Quarter ..................................................................December 17
Christmas/New Year Holiday (College Closed) .............................................. Dec. 24, 25, 31, Jan. 1




                                                                                    6
WINTER QUARTER 2008
Admissions, Financial Aid, Student Records Office, Student Success Center, and Welcome Center will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the following Saturdays during Winter Quarter: January 5, 12, 26, March 1.

Last Day to Request Transfer Credit/Credit by Exam ....................................................November 20
Final Fee Payment Date for Winter Quarter ..................................................................December 17
Winter Quarter Begins - Day/Evening Classes ................................................................... January 7
100% Fee Refunds........................................................................................................ January 7-14
Last Day to Add a Class ................................................................................................... January 14
Last Day to Withdraw with 100% Refund.......................................................................... January 14
50% Refund Period...................................................................................................... January 15-26
Last Day to Apply for Graduation at End of Quarter ......................................................... January 18
Martin Luther King Day (College Closed) ......................................................................... January 21
President’s Day (College Open) ......................................................................................February 18
 (Holiday observed on Nov. 21 as part of Thanksgiving holiday)
Current Student Priority Registration Begins ...................................................................February 26
Last Day to Withdraw with a Grade of “W”............................................................................. March 3
Final Exams.................................................................................................................... March 17-22
Saturday before Easter - Classes WILL BE in Session ....................................................... March 22
Last Day of Quarter ............................................................................................................. March 22
Easter Sunday – College Closed......................................................................................... March 23
Final Fee Payment Date for Spring Quarter ........................................................................ March 26

SPRING QUARTER 2008
Admissions, Financial Aid, Student Records Office, Student Success Center, and Welcome Center will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the following Saturdays during Spring Quarter: March 29, April 5, 19, May 24.

Last Day to Request Transfer Credit/Credit by Exam ............................................................. Feb. 29
Final Fee Payment Date for Spring Quarter ........................................................................ March 26
Spring Quarter Begins - Day/Evening Classes .................................................................... March 31
100% Fee Refunds................................................................................................... March 31-April 7
Last Day to Add a Class ........................................................................................................... April 7
Last Day to Withdraw with 100% Refund.................................................................................. April 7
50% Refund Period..............................................................................................................April 8-19
Last Day to Apply for Graduation at End of Quarter ............................................................... April 11
Faculty/Staff In-Service Training – Offices Closed; No Day Classes ...................................... April 25
 (All classes starting before 4:30 p.m. are cancelled; classes beginning at 4:30 p.m.
 or later will meet as usual)
Current Student Priority Registration Begins (for Summer and Fall Quarters)........................ May 20
Saturday before Memorial Day - Classes WILL BE in session ............................................... May 24
Memorial Day (College Closed) .............................................................................................. May 26
 Last Day to Withdraw with a Grade of “W”............................................................................. May 27
Final Exams........................................................................................................................ June 9-15
Commencement .................................................................................................................... June 13
Last Day of Quarter ............................................................................................................... June 15
Final Fee Payment Date for Summer Quarter ....................................................................... June 18




                                                                                       7
SUMMER QUARTER 2008
Last Day to Request Transfer Credit/Credit by Exam ............................................................. May 23
Final Fee Payment Date for Summer Quarter ....................................................................... June 18
Summer Quarter Begins - Day/Evening Classes ................................................................... June 23
100% Fee Refunds........................................................................................................... June 23-30
Last Day to Add a Class ........................................................................................................ June 30
Last Day to Withdraw with 100% Refund............................................................................... June 30
50% Refund Period...............................................................................................................July 1-12
Last Day to Apply for Graduation at End of Quarter ..................................................................July 3
Independence Day (College Closed) .........................................................................................July 4
Saturday after July 4th holiday - Classes WILL BE in session....................................................July 5
Last Day to Withdraw with a Grade of “W” (8-week quarter)....................................................July 28
Last Day to Withdraw with a Grade of “W” (11-week quarter)............................................. August 18
Final Exams for Eight-Week Quarter .............................................................................August 11-17
Last Day of Eight-Week Quarter......................................................................................... August 17
Saturday before Labor Day - Classes WILL BE in session................................................. August 30
Labor Day (College Closed) ...........................................................................................September 1
Final Exams for Eleven-Week Quarter .................................................................................Sept. 2-7
Last Day of Eleven-Week Quarter ..................................................................................September 7
Fall Quarter 2008 Classes Begin ..................................................................................September 22




                                                                                    8
                                             SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
ADMISSIONS
     NC State is an “open door” institution. General admission is open to (a) high school graduates, (b) persons who have
attained high school equivalency, and (c) select high school students who qualify under the early admissions policy.
Advisors in Admissions assist new and re-entering students with enrollment and program information. The general
admission policy does not guarantee admittance to a specific course or program. For further details, contact the Admissions
Office in Kee Hall, Phone 419-755-4761.

Steps to enroll:
    1. Submit North Central State College application for admission to Admissions Office (No application fee required).
    2. Submit high school transcript or GED.
    3. Schedule an appointment with an Admissions Advisor.
    4. Complete COMPASS assessment (unless you qualify for a COMPASS waiver).
    5. Meet with an Advisor in the Student Success Center for advising and scheduling of classes.

ADVISING
     NC State believes that quality, academic advising services are critical to a student’s success. Several different kinds of
academic advisors are available to meet with students, each with a specific area of expertise. Advisors in the Student
Success Center (SSC) assist new, re-entering, and continuing students with developing goals and a course schedule, and
registering online. The SSC has a team of academic advisors on hand at all times to assist all students with questions
related to academic planning.
     The SSC advisors work closely with all new students and any others who need advising. They also work with students
who are part of the Directions program or on academic probation. These students are REQUIRED to work with an advisor in
the SSC each quarter. This ensures that the student is taking the necessary steps to be successful.
     Every student is also assigned a faculty advisor who is knowledgeable about the student’s declared major. Any
students with curriculum questions are encouraged to meet with the faculty advisor. Faculty advisors may be contacted by
phone, email, or by appointment through their faculty offices.

ASSESSMENT, STUDENT (COMPASS)
    North Central State College assesses new students for course placement purposes with an assessment program
developed by ACT. The COMPASS assesses students’ skills in the following areas: reading, writing, and mathematics.
    This assessment is best completed before the student enrolls in any classes. The assessment must be completed
before any of the following courses can be taken: RDG116, WRT 115, WRT 116, ENG 101, MTH 100, MTH 102, MTH 103,
MTH110, and MTH 121.
    Students who have already earned an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree may not be required to take the
COMPASS. Furthermore, students are not required to take certain portions of the COMPASS if they have achieved the
required scores in the various ACT subtests or if those students are transferring in college credit for specific English and/or
math classes. The following portions of the COMPASS are waived on the basis of the following criteria:
    Math - a score of 21 or better on the ACT Math subtest, or transfer of credit for any of the following: MTH121, MTH122,
      MTH130, MTH140.
    Reading - a score of 18 or better on the ACT Reading subtest, or transfer credit for ENG101.
    Writing - a score of 22 or better on the ACT Writing subtest, or transfer credit for ENG101.
Students who want to schedule an appointment to take the COMPASS should contact the Student Success Center.
Students who are unsure whether they need to take the COMPASS should contact the Admissions Office.

CIS ASSESSMENT (Computer Information Systems)
    This free assessment is required of any student wishing to take a computer class for the first time at the college. The
assessment evaluates the student’s knowledge of Windows and skills in typing. A student may waive this with transfer credit
or completion of specified computer classes. More information is available at the Student Success Center.


                                                              9
CAMPUS ACTIVITIES BOARD
     The Campus Activities Board (CAB) is the primary activities planning committee for the NC State/OSU-M campus. The
members are responsible for planning and implementing social, cultural, physical, emotional and spiritual programs for the
campus community. Some of the events include May Daze, Murder Mystery, Battle of the Bands, comedians, and lecturers,
just to mention a few. These events are open to all students, faculty, and staff. Select events are open to the public.
     CAB provides the opportunity and the tools necessary for students to gain useful co-curricular experiences and allows
them to develop various leadership and management skills they will find beneficial in their given careers.
     Any student interested in becoming a part of the Campus Activities Board should stop by the Office of Campus Life,
second floor of Eisenhower, or call 419-755-4312.

CAMPUS CAFE
    The Campus Cafe and the coffeehouse are located on the first floor of Eisenhower. The Campus Cafe serves breakfast
and lunch, which includes selections of hot entrees and sides, sandwiches, salads, and desserts. The coffeehouse space is
located just off the cafeteria with booths and tables for seating 90-100 people. Students also have access to vending
machines that are located in most buildings throughout the campus, as well as the coffee cart, located in the Bromfield
lobby.

CAMPUS RECREATION CENTER
    The Campus Recreation Center offers a diverse combination of intramural sports and tournaments, non-credit physical
education activities, and open recreation activities. The well-equipped aerobic and fitness areas are available to students,
faculty, staff, alumni pass holders, and their guests and family members* for leisure use. Students may participate in a
variety of unscheduled “pick-up” games throughout the day.
    Available in the Campus Recreation Center are two multi-station weight machines, four treadmills, two Airdyne bikes,
step machines, elliptical machine, volleyball equipment, free weights, and a multipurpose gym floor sufficient for playing a
variety of team and individual sports. A wide array of sports equipment, locks, and towels are available to be checked out
with a current NC State ID card. Locker room facilities for men and women are also found in the Campus Recreation
Center. Two outdoor tennis courts, outdoor basketball court, a football/soccer field, and softball diamond are near the
Campus Recreation Center. Competitive intramural programs are available in the areas of golf, volleyball, softball, and
basketball, all for both men and women. The Center may organize other activities based on interest.
    Additionally students can tryout for men’s and women’s soccer and basketball and cheerleading early in the Fall
quarter. We compete in the Ohio Regional Campus Conference.
    Non-credit physical education activities include martial arts, yoga instruction, dance, aerobics, and reiki classes. The
Campus Recreation Center also serves as a site for some campus activities, credit physical education classes, student
identification cards, tournaments, and clinics.
    *Contact the Campus Recreation Center for additional information about guest and family passes or drop in for a tour
and pick-up our more information.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER
       The Child Development Center (CDC) opened in 1994, with the dual purpose of serving the child care needs of NC
State and OSU-Mansfield students and serving as a teaching laboratory for college students preparing for careers with
young children and their families. While maintaining that purpose and assuring priority enrollment for children of students
from each institution, we have become providers of the following programs:
          The CDC is a federal Early Head Start (EHS) grantee, enrolling forty infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. EHS
is a program designed to respond to the unique strengths, interests, and needs of each child and family. Comprehensive
services and supports are layered into early care & education services, as well as health, nutrition, mental health,
disabilities, and parent involvement.
          As a provider of Ohio’s Early Learning Initiative (ELI), we assure that the care and education provided to enrolled
preschool children is based on Ohio’s Early Learning Content Standards. These describe essential early concepts,
understandings, and skills for children; set expectations for end-of-preschool experiences; and represent the potential of
ALL children. ELI also assures that support is provided in accessing health care and other resources for families of enrolled
children.

                                                             10
       The Center enrolls children from six weeks to kindergarten age. Open Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
the Center offers full-day, full-year services and flexible scheduling to meet the child care needs of students, faculty, and
staff.
       Children of students receive priority for enrollment. If you are interested in applying for your child to attend the CDC,
please call 419-755-5600 or stop by to fill out an application. Inquiries about the Center may also be sent to
bhenwood@ncstatecollege.edu .
       The Child Development Center is licensed by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and, in 2002,
achieved accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The greatest emphasis of this
accreditation is on the children’s relationships with the staff and how the program helps each child grow and learn.
       Students interested in work-study opportunities at the CDC are encouraged to call 419-755-4899—NC State or 419-
755-4223—OSU.

COLLEGE CLOSINGS
    Only in extremely rare circumstances will the College close due to inclement weather. There will be a number of times
when the public schools might close, but the campus will remain open. Also, the campus might close only for morning
classes and reopen for afternoon and evening classes. In the event of a forced cancellation, announcements will be made
on every major radio station surrounding the five or six county area. The stations will be notified by 7 a.m. Students are
encouraged not to call the College switchboard, but instead, listen carefully to the announcement for specific instructions on
one of the following radio or television stations.

    WAKR .............. Akron/Canton ............... 1590 AM                   WONE .............. Akron/Canton ................ 97.5 FM
    WNCO.............. Ashland ....................... 101.3 FM                WBCO .............. Bucyrus ........................1540 AM
    WQEL .............. Bucyrus ......................... 92.7 FM              WOSU .............. Columbus ...................... 89.7 FM
    WNCI ............... Columbus...................... 97.9 FM                WWBK.............. Fredericktown................ 98.3 FM
    WVMC.............. Mansfield Christian........ 90.7 FM                     WMAN.............. Mansfield......................1400 AM
    WOSV .............. Mansfield....................... 91.7 FM               WVNO .............. Mansfield..................... 106.1 FM
    WYHT .............. Mansfield..................... 105.3 FM                WQMX.............. Akron/Canton ................ 94.9 FM
    TV 68 ............... Mansfield....................................        WRGM ............. Mansfield......................1440 AM
    WMRN ............. Marion ........ 1490 AM/106.9 FM                        WBZW.............. Fredericktown.............. 107.7 FM
    WMVO ............. Mt. Vernon .................... 93.7 FM                 WFXN............... Galion.......................... 102.3 FM
    WQIO ............... Mt. Vernon ................... 1300 AM                WLKR............... Norwalk ........................1510 AM
    WLKR............... Norwalk ......................... 95.3 FM              WSWR ............. Mansfield..................... 100.1 FM
    WNST .............. Wooster....................... 104.5 FM

DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES
    Many adult students, as well as students just out of high school, have difficulties making the transition to college. These
transition difficulties are most apparent in the areas of math, reading and writing skills, study skills, test-taking skills, time
management, and decision-making. The purpose of the following courses is to help the student gain the necessary
background and coping skills for a successful college experience.

            ACC 100                     Essentials of Accounting
            CHE 100                     Introductory Chemistry
            FYE 101                     Orientation to College
            FYE 161                     College Survival Skills
            MTH 100                     Introductory Mathematics
            MTH 102                     Prealgebra
            MTH 103                     Introduction to Algebra
            RDG 116                     College Reading II
            WRT 115                     Introduction to College Writing I
            WRT 116                     Introduction to College Writing II

DISABILITY SERVICES (SEE STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER)
                                                                          11
HEALTH PROBLEMS
    Students who have physical or mental health problems that possibly could lead to injury to themselves or others in a
class and/or laboratory setting are required to discuss this privately with their faculty members at the beginning of a quarter.
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with the Coordinator of Disability Services to discuss what assistance may be
available for their condition.

IDENTIFICATION CARDS, STUDENT
     ID cards are provided free to all NC State students. The photos are taken in the Campus Recreation Center at times
posted in News Briefs, and on bulletin boards. The ID card must be presented upon entering the CRC and is required for
checking out sports equipment, using campus computer labs, receiving special student rates for campus activities, and for
library privileges. The ID card must be accompanied by a current validation sticker. Replacement ID cards cost $15 if lost,
stolen, or misplaced; damaged cards can be replaced for $5 and damaged card must be provided at time of replacement.
     Validation stickers are needed to acquire an ID and are obtained at the Cashier’s Office. Students should place this
sticker on the back of the NC State ID card to validate it for the current quarter. Students attending spring quarter may use
that ID for the summer, if they are not attending summer classes.

INSURANCE, STUDENT HEALTH
    Student health insurance information is available from the College Admissions Office. The low cost insurance program
is designed specifically for full-time students who traditionally are inadequately insured. In many cases, family insurance
plans do not cover family members beyond age 18 or 19. Additional student insurance is available for the dependents of
students upon request.

INSURANCE, STUDENT LIABILITY
     Students in the Early Childhood Education/Management, Educational Assisting Program (or Certificate), Human
Services (or Certificates), Nursing (R.N.), Physical Therapist Assistant , Practical Nursing, Radiological Sciences, and
Respiratory Care are required to purchase professional liability insurance. Over the past several years, there has been a
number of nationwide liability claims involving students enrolled in health technologies. These claims include error,
negligence and omission, as well as personal torts. A student in one of these technologies has personal responsibility for
his/her own activities in contact with patients, even though the student is not yet licensed, registered, or otherwise
accredited for his/her profession. Coverage for students pays up to $1,000,000 for each claim and up to a total of
$3,000,000 aggregate. The premium is assessed and paid through student fees. No student is permitted to attend a clinical
facility or practicum unless covered by the student liability insurance program.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
   NC State is approved for the attendance of foreign students. For further details, contact the Admissions Office.

LIBRARY
     Bromfield Library, serving the students, faculty, and staff of both North Central State College and The Ohio State
University at Mansfield, occupies the ground floor of Bromfield Hall. The Library provides traditional library services. Many
on-line services are also available; i.e., on-line catalog searching, borrowing, and renewal of books. The Library, through
OhioLINK, provides access to online, full-text databases, e-journals, and e-books. The Library collection consists of books,
print journals, videos and DVDs, musical CDs, leisure reading books, books on tape and CD, and other miscellaneous non-
print items. The Library staff provides group and individual tours, library-usage instruction, research strategies, and
electronic database searching. Tips are given for Internet searching and web site content evaluation.

Holdings of the Library (estimated):
    Books, Circulating ..................50,000        Books, Reference.....................3,500
    Journal Titles...............................300   Bound Journals ........................3,000
    Juvenile Literature.......................300      Videos, CDs, etc.......................1,100
    New York Times on microfilm.

                                                                    12
Circulation Policies:
    Books, Circulating .............................        Three week circulation with unlimited renewals
    Books, Reference..............................          Do not circulate
    Journals ............................................   Do not circulate
    Videos, CDs ......................................      One week circulation
    Juvenile Literature.............................        Three week circulation
    Closed Reserve Items.......................             Depending on item: 2 hour, 1 day, 3 day, or 7 day

     The penalty for disregarding fines for lost or non-returned materials may be temporary or even permanent withdrawal of
library privileges, withholding of grades, and suspension of subsequent registration.

Normal hours of service when classes are in session are:

     September through June                                 Summer Quarter
     M-T-W-Th.........8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.                 M-T-W-Th .........8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
     Friday ..............8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.             Friday ...............8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
     Saturday.........10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.                Saturday................................ Closed
     Sunday.............1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.               Sunday .................................. Closed

     A photo I.D. and a current validation sticker are required as proof of current enrollment to begin library circulation
privileges. A photo I.D. is required to borrow items at all times. Patrons can only borrow items in their own name, not as a
proxy for someone else.

POST-SECONDARY ENROLLMENT OPTION PROGRAM (PSEOP)
     High school students (grades 9 through 12) who possess both the academic ability and social maturity to succeed at the
college level may be eligible to enroll in college classes through a state-supported program called Post-Secondary
Enrollment Option Program. Details on the College’s admission criteria for this program are available through the
Admissions Office.

SAFETY AND SECURITY
   Security personnel patrol the campus buildings and grounds on a 24-hour basis. The security officers:
      a. Prevent and investigate criminal acts on campus property.
      b. Investigate traffic accidents.
      c. Enforce traffic and parking regulations.
      d. Assist in the aid of ill or injured persons.
      e. Provide for the security of campus buildings.
      f. Lend assistance in many other ways to the faculty, staff, students, guests, and visitors of this campus.
      g. Will provide an escort from a vehicle to class and back.

   You are encouraged to seek their assistance when needed. Security may be reached simply by contacting the campus
operator, or after hours, by calling 419-755-4346.
   As part of our commitment to safety on campus and in compliance with the Student Right to Know and Campus
Security Act of 1990, a campus safety and security report is provided annually. Copies of the report are available at
www.ncstatecollege.edu/studentsvcs/dean/crimestate/safety.pdf or in room 120 Kee Hall.

STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER
    The Student Success Center is a facility that offers an array of support services designed to help students be as
successful as they can be in their academic career. The Center is staffed by a team of professional staff members and
faculty. Located in room 136 of Kee Hall, the Student Success Center is conveniently open weekdays, many evenings, and
specified Saturdays.
    Services are offered in the areas of tutoring, academic advising, personal counseling, disability services, career
exploration and new-student assessment. The academic assistance and advising services offered by the Student Success
                                                                           13
Center are available, free of charge, to any student currently enrolled at NC State. Students are welcome in the Center on a
walk-in basis or by appointment.

ACADEMIC ADVISING
    Academic advisors are on hand year round to help students plan their class schedules, learn about the resources
available on campus, and learn more about how the academic environment operates. Students are encouraged to stop in to
the Student Success Center any time they have questions and are not sure where to go to get them answered.

TUTORING
     Free tutoring is available to currently enrolled NC State students. Tutoring may be provided by faculty and/or student
(peer) tutors in most subject areas. In addition to tutoring, the Student Success Center also houses instructional materials
such as videotapes, study guides, and numerous other flyers and handouts designed to help students succeed in their
college courses. Students are encouraged to visit the Student Success Center if they are interested either in being paid to
be a tutor or in getting free, academic assistance.

PERSONAL COUNSELING
    Free, personal counseling is available to currently enrolled NC State students who feel that certain problems in their
personal lives are preventing them from being able to focus on their academic work. The goal of this program is not to
provide long-term counseling, but rather to help students focus on their immediate barriers to success, explore options, and
take the actions necessary to be academically successful. Interested students should contact an advisor in the Student
Success Center.

SPECIALIZED SUPPORTIVE SERVICES
    The Office of Specialized Supportive Services provides resources and services to assist students with documented
disabilities in their efforts to reach their academic goals. Note-takers, taped textbooks, referral source contact, class
scheduling, and alternative testing accommodations are some of the services offered by this office. Support services are
provided through the cooperative efforts of the student, faculty, and staff involved. It is the responsibility of any student
needing these services to contact the Coordinator of Specialized Supportive Services.

NEW STUDENT ASSESSMENT
    New student assessment (COMPASS) is administered free through the Student Success Center, as well as basic
keyboarding and computer skill assessment. The NET/HOBET, SBI (Study Behavior Inventory), and CSI (College Student
Inventory) are also administered through this office.

CAREER EXPLORATION
     Career counseling and assessment services are available to help prospective and current students choose a major or
career path. ACT’s Career Assessment software, DISCOVER, helps students identify careers that match their interests,
abilities and values. Students are welcome in the Student Success Center on a walk-in basis or by appointment. For
assistance with resume writing, students may use the Career Resource Center in room 102 of Kee Hall. Also, for recent job
opportunities and postings, go to: www.ncstatecollege.edu/studentsvcs/admissions/careersvcs/JobPostings.htm.

STUDENT UNION/GAME ROOM AND TICKET BOX OFFICE
     The Student Union is located on the second floor of the Eisenhower. It offers the perfect environment for you to relax
between classes, meet new people, and hold group study sessions.
     These facilities include a big screen TV with plenty of seating; a gas log fireplace with overstuffed furniture; quite rooms
for events, meetings or studying; and a Game Room with pool tables, video games, ping pong, foos ball, air hockey and
more. Throughout the year, euchre and pool tournaments are held in the Game Room along with various types of
entertainment during the day in the Union area. In addition to the above activities, the Office of Campus Life serves as a
central office for campus student organizations and ticket sales on campus. Tickets are sold for a variety of events
including, but are not limited to, the Arts and Lecture series, theatre performances, and special events. For more
information, call 419-755-4312.



                                                               14
                                               ACADEMIC INFORMATION
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
    If you are in doubt about the meaning of any of the following policies, you are urged to seek explanatory advice and
guidance in person from the appropriate staff person. DO NOT SEEK ADVICE BY TELEPHONE.
    Each student is personally responsible for following all policies in this catalog which may affect her/his progress,
financial obligations, transferability of credits, and graduation.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
    It is the position of the College that the responsibility for academic honesty is that of the student. It is expected that the
student’s work will be the product of his/her own efforts, unless the student clearly indicates otherwise. Academic honesty is
an important element of mature, responsible learning.
    Every student should read and understand the Academic Honesty Policy, which is an addendum to the North Central
State College Judicial Code. The code and policy are posted on the College website: ncstatecollege.edu. Hard copies can
be obtained in the Student Success Center.
    Consequences for proven cases of dishonest scholarly practices shall be decided by the faculty of the program in which
the cheating occurred. Consequences may include:
       1. “F” being given for the particular test, project, paper, etc., on which the cheating has occurred; or,
       2. failure for the course in which the offense occurred; or,
       3. dismissal from the College.
    The student shall have the right to present his/her case through the student appeals procedure. Contact the Office of
the Vice President for Learning for more information. (See “Grade Appeal Policy” in this section.)
    It is recognized by the College that the prime responsibility for academic honesty belongs to the individual student;
however, the instructor will endeavor to create a learning environment that discourages cheating and encourages honest
scholarship.

ACADEMIC PROBATION / DISMISSAL POLICY
     In keeping with the College’s commitment to guiding students toward educational success, students who have
completed a minimum of 6 graded credit hours must maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average (GPA) in order to remain in
good academic standing. Any student who is unable to maintain at least a 2.0 GPA and who ahs completed at least 6 credit
hours of coursework at the College will be placed on academic probation.
     Student on academic probation must work with an academic advisor in the Student Success Center when registering for
classes and when making changes to their class schedule. Student son academic probation may not enroll in video or on-
line courses and are strongly discouraged from enrolling in classes that meet only once per week. Students on academic
probation may not enroll in more than 12 credit hours per quarter. If any student has already signed up for classes in a given
quarter before the status of academic probation ahs been assigned to that student, then that student will have until
Wednesday of the first week of classes to adjust their schedule according to this policy. The College reserved the right to
remove students who are on academic probation from any and all classes for a given quarter, in the event that the student
has registered for more than 12 credit hours before the status of academic probation ahs been assigned.

Probationary Status and VA Benefits
Veteran students and eligible dependents that have been certified for VA benefits are subject to a satisfactory progress
standard specified by the Veterans Administration. These student swill forfeit their certification for benefits when, after one
academic term of probationary status, they fail to improve their quarterly grade-point average during their next term of credit
course enrollment. While VA benefits must be terminated, these students are subject to the academic suspension and
dismissal policy described below.

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION & DISMISSAL
Students who remain on academic probation for more than two consecutive quarters are eligible for academic suspension
or dismissal. The Vice President for Learning makes decisions regarding academic suspension and dismissal. Students
who are academically suspended from the College must follow the readmission procedure for academically suspended

                                                               15
students. Students who are reinstated after academic suspension may be subject to restrictions or requirements designed
to improve opportunities for academic success.
Please note that academic suspension and dismissal is not the same as financial aid suspension and termination.
Questions about ongoing financial aid eligibility must be directed to the financial aid office.

ARTICULATION WITH HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS
    Students in selected programs in area high schools and career centers may receive advanced standing in NC State
programs. This is initiated through an articulation agreement between NC State and the high school or career center. These
agreements are reviewed annually. For further information, contact the Admissions Office.

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED BUSINESS
   The Associate in Applied Business Degree is awarded in the following programs:

Accounting
Administrative Information Technology                            Digital Media Technology
Business Administration                                              Broadcast Journalism Communications Major
   Business Management Major                                         Digital Arts Major
   Finance Major                                                     Web/Tech Communications Major
Computer Information Systems                                     Paralegal Studies

    Business Management and Finance are majors within Business Administration; Business Computer Programming and
Business Data Communications are majors within Computer Information Systems; Web/Tech Communications, Broadcast
Journalism Communications, and Digital Arts are majors within Digital Media Technology. Students who complete one of
the above majors will receive an associate degree in Business Administration, Computer Information Systems, or Digital
Media Technology, depending on the major completed.

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
   The Associate in Applied Science Degree is awarded in the following programs:

Criminal Justice                                                 Industrial Technology
Criminal Justice – Peace Officer Option                              Tool and Die Option
Early Childhood Education                                            Engineering Design Major
    Pre-Kindergarten Option                                      Human Services
    Administration Option                                        Mechanical Engineering Technology
    Associate Credential Option                                  Nursing (R.N.)
Educational Assisting                                            Physical Therapist Assistant
Electronic Engineering Technology                                Radiological Sciences
    Electrical Maintenance Option                                Respiratory Care

ASSOCIATE IN TECHNICAL STUDIES
     The Technical Studies program allows a student whose exact needs are not met by any single program at the College
to combine elements of several technologies in a meaningful and logical way under the guidance of a Technical Studies
Council, which consists of appropriate administrators and faculty members. The Technical Studies Council will help the
student formulate a course of study that closely matches his/her goals and needs. The course of study will be committed to
writing (including all individual classes that the student must take), and, upon successful completion of the program, the
student will be awarded the Associate of Technical Studies degree.
     An example, a Technical Studies program might occur if a student wanted to combine certain elements of the Business
Administration curriculum with parts of the Accounting curriculum. Another illustration is a program that combines parts of
the Human Services curriculum with elements of the Criminal Justice Technologies.
     The Technical Studies option is open to any student admitted to the College who is in good standing academically.
However, the student must have a logical and coherent goal in mind, and the student’s program must be approved by the
Technical Studies Council. A program that is not approved cannot be pursued for a degree.
                                                            16
    All Technical Studies programs must have certain elements in common, in addition to an overall coherence and the
approval of the Technical Studies Council. Each program must contain at least 48 credit hours of courses that are clearly
technical in nature, at least 21 credit hours of basic courses (those that closely support the technical courses, such as, in
some cases, mathematics), and at least 21 credit hours of general studies courses (including at least 12 credit hours in
English, one course of which must be SPE 101 Speech or SPE 105 Interpersonal Communication, and at least 9 credit
hours of Humanities/Social Science Electives). Overall, the program must contain a minimum of 100 credit hours and a
maximum of 110 credit hours.
    A student who wishes to pursue Technical Studies must, in addition to being admitted to the College, complete a
special Technical Studies application form available from the Admissions Office. A student will be considered admitted to
the Technical Studies program only after his/her course of study has been formulated and approved by the Technical
Studies Council (six weeks should be allowed for this process).

PRACTICAL NURSING CERTIFICATE
   A one-year Certificate of Achievement is awarded in the Practical Nursing Program.

OTHER CERTIFICATES
   Certificates are awarded upon completion of prescribed courses of study in:

    Accounting Tax Clerk                                               Graphic Design/Multimedia
    Alcohol/Drug Counseling                                            Integrated Systems Technology
    Behavior Management, EDU/ECE Track                                 Language Arts and Literacy
    Behavior Management, Human Services Track                          Microsoft Applications
    Child Development Associate (CDA)*                                 Networking-Microsoft
    Community Health Worker                                            Networking-Novell
    Computerized Accounting                                            Office Skills
    Design Engineering                                                 PC Repair
    Early Childhood Education                                          Real Estate Licensing and Sales
    Educational Assisting
    Family Service Worker

    *Awarded by an outside agency rather than by NC State.

     Some certificates have a special admission procedure or require special prerequisites. Contact the Admissions Office
for more information. Detailed information is available in the Curriculum Section of this catalog or from the Admissions
Office.
     To request a certificate, upon completion of the coursework, complete a Request for Credit Certificate Form in the
Office of Student Records. Audits will be conducted by the Registrar, and certificates will be mailed following the posting of
grades at the end of the academic term. There is no limit on the number of certificates a student may request, but a new
form must be completed for each. Please note - a minimum of a 2.00 grade-point average must be obtained for all required
courses in order to receive any certificate at North Central State College.




                                                             17
BACHELOR DEGREE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS

NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE/ASHLAND UNIVERSITY Partnership Programs
    Bachelor degrees in Nursing are available at North Central State College. Through an Agreement between Ashland
University and North Central State College, Ashland University offers evening and weekend, upper level courses in Nursing
at NC State. This Agreement allows those students who wish to pursue their education beyond their Associate Degree the
opportunity to obtain a baccalaureate degree at a minimum cost, in a familiar environment, with a schedule tailored to their
needs.

NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE/FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY Partnership Programs
     Through an education alliance between NC State and Franklin University, students with an associate degree or at least
60 hours of college credit and a minimum GPA of 2.5, now can move easily into a bachelor’s degree completion program
that provides the majority of the courses they need online. Bachelor’s degree programs offered through this arrangement
include Business Administration, Technical Administration, Computer Science, Health Services Administration,
Management Information Systems, or Digital Communications. See the North Central State Continuing
Education/Community Outreach Office for more details.

NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE/MIAMI UNIVERSITY Partnership Program
    Through a special agreement between Miami University and North Central State College, graduates of NC State’s
Electronics, Mechanical, or Manufacturing Engineering Technology programs can complete their Bachelor of Science in
Applied Science degree with a concentration in Electromechanical Engineering Technology without ever setting foot on the
Miami University campus. The Miami courses will be completed by means of a videoconference link with the Miami-
Hamilton campus. The courses will be broadcast from Hamilton directly to NC State where students will meet in class with
students from various other sites around Ohio. “Bridge” courses will be taken from North Central State College at NC State
College. See the NC State Continuing Education/Community Outreach Office for more details.

NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI Partnership Program
     Through a special agreement between University of Cincinnati and North Central State College, graduates of NC
State’s Human Services and Criminal Justice programs can complete their Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts: Social
Sciences with an Addiction Studies Focus, without ever setting foot on the UC campus. The University of Cincinnati courses
will be completed by means of a videoconference link with the UC campus. The courses will be broadcast from University of
Cincinnati directly to NC State, where students will meet in class with students from various other sites around Ohio.
“Bridge” courses will be taken from North Central State College at NC State College. For more information, please contact
the NC State Office of Continuing Education/Community Outreach.

NORTH CENTAL STATE COLLEGE/YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY Partnership Program
    Through a special agreement between Youngstown State University and North Central State College, graduates of NC
State’s Criminal Justice program can complete their Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice without ever setting foot
on the YSU campus. The Youngstown State University courses will be completed by means of a videoconference link with
the YSU campus. The courses will be broadcast from Youngstown State University directly to NC State, where students will
meet in class with students from various other sites around Ohio. “Bridge” courses will be taken from North Central State
College at NC State. For more information, contact NC State Office of Continuing Education/Community Outreach.




                                                            18
CODE OF CONDUCT, STUDENT/ JUDICIAL SYSTEM
     As part of its educational mission, North Central State College has established the Code of Student Conduct and
student judicial system. The Code and related system serve to educate students as to their civic and social responsibilities
as members of the campus community. The College also has the obligation to conduct its affairs in an orderly and efficient
manner. In prescribing the student judicial system, the rights and responsibilities of the individual are considered
concurrently with institutional rights and responsibilities. Unacceptable behavior is defined, and the consequences of such
behavior explained.
     North Central State College has established standards of student conduct and procedures for enforcement. The
standards of conduct are published as the Code of Student Conduct. The commission of any of the acts enumerated in the
Code will be considered violations of accepted conduct. In the enforcement of the code, all students will have the right to
fundamental fairness that includes notice of charges and the opportunity to be heard.
     The Code applies to North Central State College students and student organizations. Students and organizations are
subject to the Code of Student Conduct during academic terms for which they are enrolled, during breaks between terms,
during College holidays, breaks, and during periods of suspension. The Code of Student Conduct and judicial system
outline the rights and responsibilities of students, behaviors prohibited on or off campus, possible sanctions, and the
procedural rights of students and student organizations. Copies of the NC State Judicial Code are available at
www.ncstatecollege.edu/studentsvcs/dean/jcode.pdf or in room 120 Kee Hall.

COLLEGE TECH PREP
    College Tech Prep in Ohio is defined as a high school and college career path linked to business, industry, and labor
that ensures a specified seamless pathway from high school to college to careers, meeting Ohio’s technological
employment needs.
    Students graduating from regional high school College Tech Prep programs in Business/Computer Technology,
Business Information Systems, Electronics Technician, Robotics and Engineering Technology, Tool and Die Technology,
Computer Aided Drafting, Electrical Maintenance, and Health Technologies may enter the NC State Business, Engineering,
or Health Technologies programs.
    Ohio's 25 College Tech Prep consortia are supported by the Tech Prep Education Act, a part of the Carl D. Perkins
Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act Amendments of 1990. The North Central College Tech Prep Consortium
is made up of five secondary schools offering career focused programs (Ashland Co./West Holmes Career Center, Knox
County Career Center, Madison Comprehensive High School, Mansfield Senior High School, and Pioneer Career and
Technology Center), all of their associate or "home" schools, and NC State, the region's two-year technical college.
Regional businesses, industry, labor, health care providers, and governmental agencies also participate in the consortium.
    The North Central College Tech Prep Consortium is committed to providing youth and adults with:
    • the opportunity to gain advanced technical, rigorous academic, and strong employability competencies that will be
        enhanced in the workplace.
    • the opportunity to pursue a specific associate degree or certificate program at the college/technical school level.
    • the opportunity to continue for a baccalaureate degree at a four-year institution. College Tech Prep education
        programs prepare youth and adults to become economically, socially, and physically competent citizens. College
        Tech Prep is youth and adults, teachers, parents, counselors, employers, technical college personnel, and
        community organizations working together to provide a strong, competitive workforce for the future.
    The goals of each College Tech Prep program in this consortium are:
    • Provide new learning techniques necessary to meet the challenge of a technological society.
    • Integrate academic and technical instruction.
    • Relate occupational, technical, and employability skills to the workplace.
    • Ensure post-secondary entrance level student competencies in mathematics, science, and language arts.
    • Provide problem solving instruction.
    • Expand youth and adult career options.
    Each College Tech Prep program is a high-tech, high-skills occupational program, with a curriculum developed by a
team made up of regional workers in that field along with educators, both secondary and post-secondary.



                                                            19
     When they come to NC State, College Tech Prep students will already have occupational, academic, and employability
skills gained in two years of secondary College Tech Prep programs that prepare them to enter NC State programs with
advanced placement and will have sufficient job skills in their field to get and keep entry level jobs.
     The College Tech Prep secondary programs and their 2007-2008 locations are:
     • Automotive Technician                                Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center
                                                            Knox County Career Center
                                                            Mansfield Senior High School
                                                            Pioneer Career and Technology Center
     • Business Technologies                                Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center
                                                            Knox County Career Center
                                                            Mansfield Senior High School
                                                            Pioneer Career and Technology Center
     • Computer Aided Drafting                              Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center
                                                            Knox County Career Center
                                                            Madison Comprehensive High School
                                                            Mansfield Senior High School
                                                            Pioneer Career and Technology Center
     • Electrical Maintenance                               Madison Comprehensive High School
     • Electronics Technician                               Mansfield Senior High School
     • Health Technologies                                  Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center
                                                            Knox County Career Center
                                                            Madison Comprehensive High School
                                                            Mansfield Senior High School
                                                            Pioneer Career and Technology Center
     • Information Support and Service                      Knox County Career Center
                                                            Madison Comprehensive High School
                                                            Pioneer Career and Technology Center
     • Interactive Media                                    Madison Comprehensive High School
                                                            Pioneer Career and Technology Center
                                                            West Holmes High School
     • Networking                                           Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center
     • Tool and Die Technician                              Madison Comprehensive High School
     • Robotics & Engineering Technologies                  Pioneer Career and Technology Center

CREDIT-BY-EXAMINATION (CBE)
     You may earn proficiency credit by taking a specific comprehensive examination. This can be either a written exam or a
lab exam. A nominal fee is charged for each examination. When both a written examination and a lab are required, the
written examination will be administered first. If the written examination is successful, the student can then take the lab
portion of the exam. A CBE cannot be taken for a course in which a letter grade or P/NP has already been received. The
necessary forms to request CBE credit can be obtained in the academic division offices as well as online
(www.ncstatecollege.edu/academics).

CREDIT FOR LIFE/WORK EXPERIENCE
    In some curricular areas it is the policy of the College to recognize competencies acquired through life/work
experiences. In order to qualify, interested persons must register for a Credit for Life Experience course. Contact your
Divisional Dean/Director or Program Director to determine if this course is available in your degree major. This course
requires that a student translate life and work experience into competencies, match competencies with what is specified in
course outlines, and display these materials in a “portfolio.” Students who take the Credit for Life Experience course must
have five full years of relevant experience. Portfolios are evaluated by a review panel of no less than three persons with
expertise in the field.



                                                            20
CREDIT FROM EXTERNAL EXAMINATIONS
    A student may receive proficiency credit through the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and the American
College Testing Proficiency Examination Program (ACT PEP). The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a
national system of credit-by-examination for assessing college level competencies in five General Examinations (English,
humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, and social sciences-history) and a large number of Subject Examinations. The
American College Testing Proficiency Examination Program (ACT PEP) is a national testing program consisting of exams
developed by the faculty of the University of the State of New York. North Central State College has reviewed the CLEP and
ACT PEP examinations and found the following tests to be similar in content to its courses:
                                              Minimum
                                              Score for
                                              Awarding
CLEP General Exams                              Credit      College Course
English Composition with Essay                   420        ENG 101 Basic Composition
Mathematics                                      420        MTH 103 Introduction to Algebra
Humanities                                       420        HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities

CLEP Subject Exams
Introductory Accounting                        50       ACC 111    Accounting I AND
                                                        ACC 112    Accounting II
Human Growth & Development                     50       PSY 130    Human Growth & Development
Introductory Psychology                        50       PSY 110    Introduction to Psychology I
Introductory Sociology                         50       SOC 101    Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Management                     50       BUS 121    Management
Introductory Business Law                      50       BUS 134    Business Law

Principles of Marketing                        50       BUS 148    Marketing
Introductory Macroeconomics                    50       ECN 162    Macroeconomics
Introductory Microeconomics                    50       ECN 161    Microeconomics
Information Systems                            50       CIS 105    Introduction to Computer Science
         Computer Applications
College Composition                            50       ENG 101    Basic Composition
Freshman English                               50       ENG 101    Basic Composition
American Government                            50       POL 101    American Politics and Issues
College Algebra                                50       MTH 130    College Algebra OR
                                                        MTH 121    Technical Mathematics I
College Algebra, Trigonometry                  50       MTH 122    Technical Mathematics II -OR-
                                                        MTH 194    Applied Trigonometry
Calculus with Elem. Functions                  50       MTH 141    Calculus & Analytic Geometry I OR
                                                        MTH 123    Technical Mathematics III AND
                                                        MTH 124    Technical Mathematics IV
General Chemistry                              50       CHE 110    Chemistry

ACT PEP Exams
Statistics                                     45       STA 115    Statistical Methods in Business OR
                                                        STA 110    Probability and Statistics
Introductory Accounting                        45       ACC 111    Accounting I AND
                                                        ACC 112    Accounting II
Corporate Finance                              45       FIN 210    Business Finance
Principles of Management                       45       BUS 121    Business Management
Principles of Marketing                        45       BUS 148    Marketing
Abnormal Psychology                            45       PSY 150    Abnormal Psychology
Microbiology                                   45       BIO 155    Microbiology
                                                           21
    A student may obtain proficiency credit for any of these NC State courses provided that he or she successfully passes
the appropriate CLEP or ACT PEP examination including the essay section where applicable. Students seeking transfer
credit for CLEP or ACT PEP examinations must furnish the Student Records Office with appropriate documentation. Any
course which receives proficiency credit will be noted on the student’s academic record with the symbol “X”. Letter grades
and quality points are not used. The necessary forms to request proficiency credit can be obtained in the Student Success
Center.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS
    Students may earn credit through the Advanced Placement Program administered by the College Entrance Examination
Board. This program has been developed to give recognition and transfer credit to students who have taken college level
courses in high school. To be eligible, students must have the results of their Advanced Placement Examinations sent to the
Registrar for evaluation. Scores of 3 and above will generally transfer for entry level courses in the discipline that was
tested.

CURRICULUM CHANGES
    Students will be assigned to the curriculum in place at the time of matriculation. That curriculum should be followed,
even if subsequent catalogs contain curriculum changes. Students must request formal approval from the appropriate
academic dean in order to change the curriculum year that is being followed. Some students are not able to pursue
continuous enrollment. Students away from the College for one year or more will follow the curriculum in place when they
return.
    Over a period of time, curricula will change. As a result, some courses are dropped from a program and others are
added. When this occurs, the academic dean may choose to substitute one course for another. In order to fulfill graduation
requirements, course substitutions must be authorized by the appropriate academic dean.
    Academic credits (either NC State or external) that are older than eight years will be evaluated with special care. Their
acceptance toward an NC State certificate or degree may be denied based upon changes in the field of study. In addition,
some restricted admission programs at the College apply their own special requirements related to the age of academic
credits. For further information, contact the program director of the appropriate program or the division dean.

DEAN’S LIST
     A student who earns a 3.50 quarterly grade-point average or better without any grade less than “C-”, with no incomplete
grades or not-reported (NR) grades, and who is taking 12 or more credit hours, will be recognized by placement on the
Dean’s List, which is published in News Briefs and on the College’s web site after each quarter. Students who graduate with
a 3.50 grade-point average or better in all courses taken will graduate with honors. For the actual commencement program,
the cumulative grade-point average for the quarter immediately preceding the quarter in which the student is graduating will
determine honors recognition in the program.
     Part-time students who have earned a total of 12 or more quarter hours of credit with no grade below “C-” and no
unresolved incomplete grades in any academic year (Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring), and who have achieved a GPA of
3.5 or above for that academic year, will be recognized on the Dean’s List at the end of Spring quarter each year. Eligibility
for this distinction will be limited to students who have not attended full-time for any quarter during the academic year.
Students must attend at least two quarters during an academic year in order to be eligible for consideration for that year.
     No letter is mailed and your name will not appear on any published “Dean’s List” if you filled out a “Withhold Directory
Information” form.

DIRECTED STUDY
    Directed Study is a learning method whereby mature, self-directed students can acquire competencies as specified in a
course outline and syllabus. Under the direction of a faculty member who serves as a resource person, a student may
pursue a plan of study to acquire the prescribed competencies. A nonrefundable surcharge per credit hour attempted is
added to fees charged for courses taken by directed study.
    A student who wishes to take a course via the directed study method should contact the appropriate division dean. A
number of restrictions apply.



                                                             22
EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS
     Individuals requesting foreign credential evaluations shall be referred to a College-specified list of professional credit
evaluation services. The expertise and reliability of a professional evaluation report is recognized worldwide and will provide
the student and the College with consistent and valid credit evaluations. The cost for this service (approximately $120-$150)
will be paid by the student. The full text of this policy, which includes the list of College-approved evaluation services, can be
obtained from the Student Records Office.

FORGIVENESS POLICY
    North Central State College recognizes that some potentially good students enroll in curricula for which they may not be
prepared or suited, resulting in a quarter or a number of quarters of poor grades. These students, upon changing curricula
or becoming better prepared for their coursework, may become academically successful but are not able to overcome their
previously poor academic record. This may result in subsequent quarters of academic probation in spite of good grades.
    Because of this, the College permits such a student to petition the Vice President for Learning for “forgiveness”. Form is
available at the Student Records Office. Inquiries regarding this policy should be directed to the V.P. for Learning office. A
student qualifies for this petition process if the student:
    1. has been absent from the College for at least eight consecutive quarters OR
         has changed his/her technology or program major: changing from “pre” status to its associated major
         does not constitute a change of technology or program major; changing from UNDECLARED to a technology does
         not constitute a change of technology or major AND
    2. has completed at least 24 credit hours after re-enrolling at the College or changing majors (at least 12 of which
         must be either basic or technical courses in the student’s declared curriculum), AND
    3. has received a grade of “C-” or higher in each course included in the above-named 24 credit hours, AND
    4. has a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00 since re-enrolling or changing the major.
    If a student qualifies for forgiveness, all the grades earned prior to the absence from the College or the change in
technology that are either “NP” or less than “C-” will be forgiven. This results in those grades being replaced on the
student’s transcript with a code that denotes forgiveness. The courses with forgiven grades will continue to appear on the
student’s transcript but will not be calculated in the grade-point average.
    Students may use this policy only once. Courses in which the grade has been forgiven will not count toward graduation.
This policy does not alter any departmental policies on academic dismissal.
    Appeals in relation to this policy may be directed to the Vice President for Learning, who will chair an ad hoc committee
composed of a representative of the Academic Council and a representative from Student Services. This committee will
determine the student’s qualification for forgiveness.

GRADE APPEAL POLICY
    Any student wishing to have a course grade reviewed by the College must register an appeal within six weeks of the
end of the quarter in which the grade was given or, if the grade originally given was an incomplete, within six weeks of the
issuing of the final grade. The appeal should be registered first with the faculty member who gave the grade. If satisfaction
is not obtained from the faculty member, the student may appeal to the appropriate division dean. If the appeal (perceived
mistreatment and requested remedy) has not yet been put in writing, it must be at this point. The dean’s response must also
be in writing. The final level of appeal is to the Vice President for Learning, who will respond in writing. During a grade
appeal, the student is responsible for producing any course work that was returned to him/her that is relevant to the case.

GRADE REPLACEMENT POLICY
    A student may retake a course as many times as he/she wishes. Only the most recently earned grade (A, B, C, D, F, P,
NP) will count for credit or in the student’s accumulative average. However, an indication that the student attempted the
course more than once will remain on the transcript. This policy does not alter any departmental policies on academic
dismissal.




                                                               23
GRADING SYSTEM
    North Central State College uses the standard 4-point-scale letter grade system (with pluses and minuses). A student
must earn at least a 2.00 grade-point average to graduate. Student achievement is measured according to the following
system.
                                   Point                     Quality
     Letter Grade                  Value                     of Work
            A                      4.0                       Excellent
            A-                     3.67                      Excellent
            B+                     3.33                      Good
            B                      3.00                      Good
            B-                     2.67                      Good
            C+                     2.33                      Adequate
            C                      2.00                      Adequate
            C-                     1.67                      Adequate
            D+                     1.33                      Poor
            D                      1.00                      Poor
            D-                     0.67                      Poor
            F                      0.00                      Failing

FAILING - Credit for a course in which a failing grade has been received can be obtained only by repeating the course and
earning a “D-” or higher grade.

INCOMPLETE - An incomplete grade indicates that a student has not completed a small part of the course requirements
due to uncontrollable circumstances. An incomplete grade may be removed from the student’s record if the student
arranges with his/her instructor to have the course completed at the earliest possible time but not later than the deadline
date as specified in the College calendar. If the “I” grade is not changed within the specified period of time, the “I” grade
automatically will be changed to an “F”, and the course must be repeated for credit. In no case shall a student who has
received the mark “I” be permitted to repeat the course in which the mark was received until the “I” has been removed in the
method indicated.

P/NP - PASS/NO PASS - Courses graded in this manner count as credit hours only and are not considered in determining
the grade-point average. A passing grade (P) represents "C-" or higher.

W - WITHDRAWAL - Students may withdraw from any course at the College up until the deadline as stated in the College
calendar and receive a grade of “W”. Withdrawals from a course are not normally permitted after eight weeks. A student
may withdraw through Monday of the second week of the quarter without any grade placed on his/her permanent record.
Flexibly scheduled classes may have different withdrawal dates. Visit the Student Records Office for specific details.

K - TRANSFER CREDIT - This mark is used for work credited from other colleges, institutions, and service schools. “K”
credit is counted as hours only and is not considered in determining a student’s grade-point average.
X - PROFICIENCY CREDIT - This mark indicates credit awarded on the basis of a written examination, division evaluation,
portfolio evaluation, or high school articulation agreement. The level of achievement required of the student is determined
by the College division involved but is never less than a “C-”. Proficiency credit is not awarded to a student for a course in
which a letter grade or P/NP grade has been received at the College. “X” credit is counted as hours only and is not
considered in determining a student’s grade-point average.

R - AUDIT - This mark is used when a student is taking a course for interest only and not for credit. Changes from audit to
credit or credit to audit are allowed only within the official Add period of each quarter.

NR - NOT REPORTED - Grade not reported by faculty member by grade submission deadline date. All NR grades are
eventually changed once grade is reported.

                                                             24
LENGTH OF CURRICULUM
    NC State’s associate degree programs are designed so that a student who begins a program in the fall, or in the case of
Radiological Sciences and Physical Therapist Assistant, in the summer, can complete that program within two years of full-
time attendance following the recommended course load each quarter. A certificate program, like Practical Nursing, will
require a year of full-time, daytime study, while shorter term certificate programs like International Trade may require less
than a year. Students attending on a part-time basis can expect to spend three to five years or more in completing an
associate degree.
    In some programs, the course sequence and the prerequisites for courses can dictate the length of time necessary to
complete the program. For further details regarding the curriculum and prerequisites for a specific program, contact your
advisor or the Admissions Office.

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE NUMBER OF CREDIT HOURS
     The maximum number of credit hours that a student may register for in any given quarter without special permission is
23. If a student wishes to register for 24 or more credit hours in a single quarter, he/she must have an accumulative grade-
point average of 2.5 or higher and must obtain the permission of the Dean of the division in which his/her program resides
(the Dean must sign the course request form and specify the number of credit hours that he/she is approving the student to
take). The student should be prepared to explain to the Dean why he/she wishes or needs to take an unusually high number
of credit hours and how he/she plans on handling the heavy workload that this will entail.

NONCREDIT COURSES
    In order to better meet the educational needs of the community, NC State offers noncredit courses in specific areas.
Noncredit courses are open for general, student enrollment and follow no particular academic calendar. These courses are
often short in duration and may be held either on or off campus. Fees are charged on an individual class basis consistent
with course length and content. No official academic record of noncredit coursework is maintained.

PHI THETA KAPPA INTERNATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
     North Central State College is proud to have a chapter of Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society (Beta Theta
Eta). Membership is based upon academic achievement. In order to become a member, a full-time or part-time student
must have completed at least 12 credit hours of coursework and have a 3.5 accumulative grade point average. Membership
in Phi Theta Kappa offers many opportunities for scholarships, intellectual enrichment, and personal development through
programs based on Phi Theta Kappa’s four hallmarks of Scholarship, Leadership, Service, and Fellowship. For additional
information, please contact Diane Hipsher, Advisor, 419-755-4803.

PREREQUISITES, COURSE
    Students are required to have successfully completed course prerequisites as listed in each course description. If a
student registers for a course without having successfully completed the prerequisite, the instructor has the right to withdraw
the student from the course.

SPECIAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
    The departments of Associate Degree Nursing, Early Childhood Education, Educational Assisting, Human Services,
Practical Nursing, Radiological Sciences, Respiratory Care, and Physical Therapist Assistant publish student handbooks.
These student handbooks delineate specific department/program policies which are not explained in the general catalog.
The specific policies as described in the department student handbooks take precedence over any general policy outlined in
the College catalog. Copies may be requested through divisional deans.

TRANSFER CREDIT
     Transfer credit from other institutions of higher education will be determined upon receipt of an official transcript and
college catalog describing the courses. NC State will evaluate courses or credits which have been successfully completed
at regionally accredited, educational institutions and grant transfer credit based upon similarity of course content to the NC
State curriculum.
      For courses completed prior to September 2005 a grade of at least a C- must have been received in any course
accepted for transfer credit. For courses completed after September 2005, grades of D-, D and D+, will be considered for
                                                              25
transfer credit unless a specific department requires a higher grade for non-transfer students. In addition, some transfer
courses with D-, D and D+ grades may not meet prerequisite and graduation requirements for specific degree programs. A
minimum C- grade is required in all transfer courses for the NC State courses that are Pass/No Pass. Courses that are
considered for transfer credit must meet the same grade requirements as the NC State courses. See the Program
Description section of this catalog and individual program Curriculum Worksheets for specific course grade requirements.
     A completed Ohio Transfer Module will be evaluated according to the guidelines of the Ohio Board of Regents. Credit
for applicable course work completed at a regionally accredited institution may be accepted as transfer credit for up to eight
years following completion. After the eight year period, transfer credit may be allowed with special approval.
     For graduation, a minimum of 30 credits must be completed at NC State. At least 15 of those credits must be technical
courses in the field in which the degree is granted. At least 15 of those credits must be obtained through the traditional
course method.
     Transcripts are not automatically evaluated for transfer credit. Students should request that their transcripts be
evaluated prior to registration. Once they register for a course, they have waived their right to receive transfer credit for it.
Forms to request transfer credit are available in the Student Records Office.

TRANSFER MODULE
     The Ohio Board of Regents, following the directive of the Ohio General Assembly, has developed a statewide policy to
facilitate movement of students and transfer credits from one Ohio public college or university to another. The purpose of
the State Policy is to avoid duplication of course requirements and to enhance student mobility throughout Ohio’s higher
educational system. Since private colleges and universities in Ohio may or may not be participating in the transfer policy,
students interested in transferring to a private institution are encouraged to check with the college or university of their
choice regarding transfer agreements.
     The Ohio Board of Regents’ Transfer and Articulation Policy established the Transfer Module concept. North Central
State College’s transfer module consists of 56 to 60 quarter credit hours of coursework in English composition,
mathematics, arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and natural and physical sciences. Once a student
completes the NC State transfer module in its entirety, with a “D” or better in each course, the entire module is guaranteed
transferable to any state-supported college or university in Ohio in place of that institution’s module. The student must, of
course, meet the admissions criteria of the particular state-supported institution before the module can be transferred. Also,
students may be required by the receiving institution to meet additional general education requirements beyond those
included in the Transfer Module, so long as the same requirements apply to native students.
     Students meeting the requirements of the Transfer Module are subject to the following conditions:
     1. The policy encourages receiving institutions to give preferential consideration for admission to students who
          complete the Transfer Module with a “D” or better in each course and who have successfully completed altogether
          at least 90 quarter credit hours. These students must have an overall grade-point average of 2.00 in Transfer
          Module courses to be given credit for the Transfer Module, and only courses in which a “D” or better has been
          earned will transfer.
     2. The policy encourages receiving institutions to admit, on a non-preferential consideration basis, students who
          complete the Transfer Module with a grade of “D” or better in each course and who have successfully completed
          altogether less than 90 quarter credit hours. These students will be able to transfer all courses in which they
          received a grade of “D” or better.
     Admission to a given institution, however, does not guarantee that a transfer student will be automatically admitted to all
majors, minors, or fields of concentration at that institution. Once admitted, transfer students shall be subject to the same
regulations governing applicability of catalog requirements as all other students. Furthermore, transfer students shall be
accorded the same class standing and other privileges as all other students on the basis of the number of credits earned. All
residency requirements must be successfully completed at the receiving institution prior to the granting of a degree.
     In order to facilitate transfer with maximum applicability of transfer credit, prospective transfer students should plan a
course of study that will meet the requirements of a degree program at the receiving institution. Specifically, students should
identify early in their collegiate studies an institution and major to which they desire to transfer. Furthermore, students
should determine if there are any special course requirements that can be met during their time at NC State. This will enable
students to plan and pursue a course of study that will articulate with the receiving institution’s major. Students are
encouraged to seek further information regarding transfer from both the Continuing Education Office at NC State and the
college or university to which they plan to transfer.
                                                               26
    North Central State College has an appeals process for the use of any student who disagrees with the amount of
transfer credit he/she has been given by the College. Details about this procedure and the steps involved in filing an appeal
are available to students upon request in the Continuing Education Office. (Every other state-supported college or university
in Ohio is also required to have such an appeals process regarding transfer credit decisions.) If a transfer student’s appeal
is denied by the institution after all appeal levels within the institution have been exhausted, the student can appeal to the
state level Articulation and Transfer Appeals Review Committee.
    The Appeals Review Committee shall review and recommend to institutions the resolution of individual cases of appeal
from transfer students who have exhausted all local appeal mechanisms concerning applicability of transfer credits at
receiving institutions. The courses listed below are included in NC State’s transfer module. Additional information about the
Transfer Module, including a recommended sequence in which courses can be efficiently taken, is available in the
Admissions Office (Room 103 Kee Hall; phone 419-755-4761).

COURSES INCLUDED IN TRANSFER MODULE
English Composition
Choose              ENG 101        Basic Composition OR                                     3 quarter credit hours
One                 ENG 102        Basic Composition - Honors                               3
                    ENG 114        Composition and Literature                               3
                    ENG 201        Advanced Composition                                     3
                                              Total:                                        9 quarter credit hours

Mathematics
                         MTH 130                  College Algebra                           5 quarter credit hours
Choose                   STA 110                  Probability and Statistics                4
Two                      MTH 141                  Calculus & Analytic Geometry I            5
                         MTH 142                  Calculus & Analytic Geometry II           5
                         MTH 143                  Calculus & Analytic Geometry III          5
                         MTH 144                  Multiple Integrations                     3
                         MTH 145                  Differential Equations                    3
                                                                Total:                      8-10 quarter credit hrs.

Arts/Humanities
                         ART 110                  Introduction to the Humanities            3 quarter credit hours
                         PHI 120                  Great Ideas in Western Civilization       3
                         PHI 140                  Contemporary Ethical Issues               3
Choose                   PHI 170                  Science, Art, & Literature                3
One                      PHI 180                  The Philosophy of Technology              3
                         PHI 190                  The History of the Future                 3
                         HST 121                  US History to 1815                        3
                         HST 122                  US History from 1815 to 1900              3
                         HST 123                  US History from 1900 to Present           3
                                                               Total:                       12 quarter credit hours

Social and Behavioral Sciences
                        PSY 110                   Introduction to Psychology I              3 quarter credit hours
                        SOC 101                   Introduction to Sociology                 3
Choose                  ECN 101                   Economics                                 4
Three                   PSY 150                   Abnormal Psychology                       4
                        SOC 120                   Cultural Diversity and Racism             3
                        POL 101                   American Politics and Issues              3
                        PSY 130                   Human Growth & Development                5
                        SOC 115                   Introduction to Women’s Studies           3
                                                               Total:                       15-19 quarter credit hrs.
                                                             27
Natural and Physical Sciences
                        PHY 114                   General Physics                           4 quarter credit hours
Choose                  BIO 105                   Principles of Biology                     4
Three                   BIO 155                   Microbiology                              4
                        CHE 110                   Chemistry                                 4
                        BIO 110                   Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology      4
                                                               Total:                       12-13 quarter credit hrs.

In Arts & Humanities and Social & Behavioral Sciences categories courses in these categories must be chosen from at least
two different disciplinary areas.

TUTORING
    Free tutorial assistance is provided for current students, either with a faculty member or a peer. Tutoring assignments
are coordinated through the Student Success Center.

UNDECLARED STATUS: DECLARING A MAJOR
     For a variety of reasons, a new student may decide not to declare a major and to be initially classified in an undeclared
status. It is strongly recommended that students in undeclared status work closely with the college career services office in
order to explore career choices. A student may remain in undeclared status through the academic session in which the 24th
credit hour is completed. The student must then declare a major. Students who remain in undeclared status after this point
will have a “hold” placed on their future registrations. Students may complete the change of major form in the Student
Records Office, Room 142 Kee Hall, or may access the form at http://www.ncstatecollege.edu/studentsvcs/CHG-MAJR.pdf
and then fill out and mail it to the Student Records Office.




                                                             28
                                             RECORDS/REGISTRATION
ACADEMIC RECORDS
    North Central State College has a policy for administering and maintaining student education records which is in
compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The general principles of NC State’s policy, subject
to some exceptions, are as follows:
1. Educational Records are defined as those records, files, documents and other materials which contain information
    directly related to the student and are maintained by the College or by a person acting for the College.
2. Students have certain rights of access to this information.
3. Students who wish to review their files must contact the Office of Student Records to arrange an appointment. After
    reviewing their individual file, students may challenge a perceived inaccuracy, misleading statement, or other perceived
    violation of privacy or other rights.
4. The College has certain responsibilities to protect this information with the exception of directory information which
    includes the student’s name, local and permanent address, e-mail, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field
    of study, class schedule, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, dates of enrollment, degrees and
    awards received, high school graduated from, and most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by
    the student.
5. Students may restrict the publication and release of directory information by filing a written request in the Office of
    Student Records.
6. Documents submitted by or for the student in support of the application for admission or for transfer credit may not be
    returned to the student nor sent elsewhere at his/her request. The student should request these documents from the
    original institution. Original documents will be kept in the student master file; a copy will be given to the student upon
    request.
7. There are special conditions including unmet financial obligations under which NC State may choose to withhold grade
    reports, transcripts, certifications, or other information about a student.
8. Additional information about the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is available in the Office of Student
    Records.

ATTENDANCE POLICY
    All students are required to attend all scheduled classes and examinations. Each faculty member has the right to
establish regulations regarding attendance that he/she considers necessary for successful study.
    Students who do not attend classes may be administratively withdrawn from those classes. However, failure to attend
classes does not constitute withdrawal, and students are expected to process a formal withdrawal through the Student
Records Office if unable to complete a class.

AUDITING, COURSE
    Course auditing involves attending classes without submitting assignments or taking examinations. An auditor,
therefore, receives neither a grade nor course credit. The auditing fee is the same as for credit enrollment.
    Permission for course auditing is available from the Office of Student Records. Changes from audit to credit or credit to
audit will be allowed only within the Add period for the specified class.

CERTIFICATES, CREDIT
    There are a variety of credit programs that offer certificates in recognition of completion of areas of concentrated
coursework. Any student who has completed all such required coursework with a 2.00 or better cumulative grade-point
average may request a certificate by completing a Certificate Request form in the Office of Student Records. The Practical
Nursing Certificate requires a 2.00 or better cumulative grade-point average either in the required coursework or the overall
GPA. Details on specific requirements for credit certificates are listed in the technologies section of the catalog or may be
obtained from the appropriate division dean.

CREDIT/CONTACT HOUR DIFFERENTIAL
   All students will be assessed a $30.00 fee for each course contact hour that exceeds the credit hours for which they
have registered. Contact hour fees are subject to change without notice.
                                                             29
NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE
* FEE SCHEDULE 2007-2008 EFFECTIVE SUMMER QUARTER 2006
IN-STATE
Credit Hours        1        2         3         4          5          6           7          8         9         10           11       12       13       14       15
Instructional:    68.00    136.00   204.00    272.00      340.00     408.00     476.00     544.00     612.00     680.00       748.00   816.00   884.00   952.00 1,020.00
General:          12.75     25.50    38.25     51.00       63.75      76.50      89.25     102.00     114.75     127.50       140.25   153.00   165.75   178.50   191.25
Total Fee:        80.75    161.50   242.25    323.00      403.75     484.50     565.25     646.00     726.75     807.50       888.25   969.00 1,049.75 1,130.50 1,211.25
OUT-OF-STATE
Credit Hours        1        2         3         4          5          6           7          8         9         10           11       12       13       14       15
Instructional:   136.00    272.00   408.00    544.00      680.00     816.00     952.00 1,088.00 1,224.00 1,360.00 1,496.00 1,632.00 1,768.00 1,904.00 2,040.00
General:          25.50     51.00    76.50    102.00      127.50     153.00     178.50   204.00   229.50   255.00   280.50   306.00   331.50   357.00   382.50
Total Fee:       161.50    323.00   484.50    646.00      807.50     969.00 1,130.50 1,292.00 1,453.50 1,615.00 1,776.50 1,938.00 2,099.50 2,261.00 2,422.50




                                                                                                                                                                           30
INTERNATIONAL
Credit Hours        1        2         3         4          5          6           7          8         9         10           11       12       13       14       15
Instructional:   204.00    408.00   612.00    816.00    1,020.00 1,224.00 1,428.00 1,632.00 1,836.00 2,040.00 2,244.00 2,448.00 2,652.00 2,856.00 3,060.00
General:          38.25     76.50   114.75    153.00      191.25   229.50   267.75   306.00   344.25   382.50   420.75   459.00   497.25   535.50   573.75
Total Fee:       242.25    484.50   726.75    969.00    1,211.25 1,453.50 1,695.75 1,938.00 2,180.25 2,422.50 2,664.75 2,907.00 3,149.25 3,391.50 3,633.75
All students will be assessed a $30 fee for each contact hour that exceeds the credit hours for which they have registered.
* All fees are subject to change by action of the North Central State College Board of Trustees.
ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATIONS
   Request for enrollment certifications for insurance and other purposes are handled through the Office of Student
Records. Processing time for an enrollment certification is 24 to 48 hours.

FINAL GRADES
    Students will receive a report of grades at the end of each quarter. The report will show two grade-point averages.
These are quarterly grade-point averages, reflecting the results of the quarter just completed, and an accumulative grade-
point average, which reflects all academic work completed at NC State and is used to determine academic status. No
student grade information will be distributed verbally over the phone.




                                                           31
                                                     FINANCIAL AID

     North Central State College provides a complete financial aid program to assist eligible students who cannot meet their
financial obligations to attend North Central State College. Financial aid is available to full-time, part-time, and less than
half-time students.
     A full-time student is enrolled 12 or more credit hours.
     A three-quarter time student is enrolled 9-11 credit hours.
     A half-time student is enrolled 6 to 8 credit hours.
     A less than half-time student is enrolled 1-5 credit hours.
     Federal, state, and local programs include grants, loans, part-time work, and scholarships and are administered by the
Office of Financial Aid.

Grants
DO NOT HAVE TO BE REPAID
     Federal Pell Grant: Federally funded -- ranges from $0 to $4,050; can be used at full-time or part-time status. Award
depends on Federal allocation of funds.
     Ohio Instructional Grant (OIG): State funded -- ranges from $0 to $2,070; can be used for tuition only -- full-time status.
Part-time status may qualify for part-time State Grant if fund allocation from the State allows.
     Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG): Federally funded -- ranges from $100 to $4,000.
Loans
MUST BE REPAID
     Federal Stafford Student Loan (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan - GSL):
         Maximum loan limit -- $2,625 - 1st year; $3,500 - 2nd year (36 credit hours or more).
     Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS): Available to dependent students' parents.
     Applications for the loans are available from the NC State Office of Financial Aid. Details on interest rates and payback
schedules are available from the NC State Office of Financial Aid. Most all students are eligible for loans if enrolled for 6
credit hours or more.
Work
     Federal College Work-Study (FCWS) Program -- Under federal Title IV funding, this program provides part-time,
college, work-study employment for students who need to earn a portion of their educational expenses. Applications are
available at the Financial Aid Office.

Institutionally Supported Scholarships
DO NOT HAVE TO BE REPAID
The President’s Scholarship for Excellence -- Seniors attending area high schools are eligible to apply for this NC State
scholarship which will waive the College’s contact hour, general, and instructional fees. Applicants must rank in the upper
10% of their graduating class and be enrolled at NC State the subsequent summer or fall quarters. Interested students
should contact their high school counselor for an application. Deadline to apply is in April.

The Academic Dean’s Scholarship -- Seniors attending area high schools are eligible to apply for this scholarship. Students
must have a 2.5 grade-point average in high school work. This scholarship pays up to 55 hours toward an associate degree
at NC State. Students should check with their high school counselors to get an application. Deadline to apply is in April.

The Miller Carter Memorial Scholarship -- This scholarship is available to students who are majoring in business, science,
engineering, or health. Applications are available March 1 of each year and are available to both new and returning
students.

NC State Foundation Continuing Student Scholarship -- Students who have completed at least 36 NC State credit hours
and have attained a cumulative grade-point average of 3.3 or higher at the end of the spring quarter, are eligible to apply for
the Continuing Student Scholarship. Applicants must also demonstrate financial need.


                                                              32
Welsh News Scholarship -- Students who have completed at least 36 NC State credit hours, have attained a cumulative
grade-point average of 3.0 or higher at the end of spring quarter, and will be enrolled at least half-time but less than full-
time, are eligible to apply for the Welsh News Scholarship. Applicants must also demonstrate financial need.

Emerson/Therm-O-Disc Scholarship -- Students who have completed at least 36 NC State credit hours, have attained a
cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or higher at the end of spring quarter, will be enrolled at least half-time, and are in the
business or engineering technology, are eligible to apply for the Emerson/Therm-O-Disc Scholarship. Applicants must also
demonstrate financial need.

NC State Nursing Scholarship – Associate Degree Nursing students who have completed at least 36 credit hours in nursing
at the end of spring quarter are eligible to apply for this scholarship.
     Practical Nursing (PN) students are considered for a scholarship during their third quarter of the PN program. Every
student is eligible...NO APPLICATION REQUIRED.

NC State Faculty Scholarship -- Students who will be enrolled at least half-time but less than full-time are eligible to apply
for the NC State Faculty Scholarship. Applicants must demonstrate financial need, have a grade-point average of 3.0, and a
faculty letter of recommendation.

Robert L. Garber Radiography Scholarship -- Radiological Sciences students who are in their fourth quarter of study and
who have earned a 3.0 grade-point average are eligible to apply for this scholarship.

Haring Realty Inc. Scholarship -- Students who have completed at least one quarter and are enrolled full-time during the
award year are eligible for this scholarship. Students must have a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average or higher.

The Kroger Co. Scholarship -- For students who are employees or dependents of employees of Kroger and have
maintained a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average.

Russell & Mary Gimbel Foundation Scholarship -- Practical Nursing or Human Services students who have attained a 3.0
cumulative grade-point average are eligible to apply for this Scholarship. Students must also demonstrate financial need.

    Students who have passed 36 credit hours by the end of spring quarter are eligible to apply for the following
scholarships:
1. The Miller Carter Memorial Scholarship (business, science, engineering, or health majors)
2. Emerson/Therm-O-Disc Scholarship (business or engineering majors)
3. Gorman Rupp Scholarship
4. Gorman-Rupp Civic Fund/Herb E. Rupp/James C. Gorman Sr. Memorial Scholarship
5. Neer Manufacturing Scholarship
6. North Central Ohio Business Development Council Scholarship
7. NC State Foundation Continuing Education Scholarship
8. Nursing Scholarship (Associated Degree Nursing major)
9. Robert L. Garber Radiography Scholarship (Radiologic Sciences major)
10. Welsh News Scholarship (available to part-time students only)
11. Burton Preston Scholarship
Applications are available May 1 through June 30.

Financial Aid Application Process
PLEASE NOTE: Before a student can be awarded financial aid, the student must:
1. Complete and submit a North Central State College admissions application.
2. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The results of your Free Application for Federal Student Aid will
    be sent to NC State electronically.



                                                               33
3. Provide a copy of the high school diploma, transcript, or GED to the Financial Aid Office.
    Upon request at the Financial Aid Office, other financial aid materials related to student consumer information are
available as follows:
    * Statement of Satisfactory Progress
    * Financial Aid Programs
    * Criteria for Selecting Recipients
    * Rights and Responsibilities of Students Receiving Financial Aid
    * Criteria for Continued Eligibility
    * The Terms of and Expected Schedules for Repayment of any Loan
    * Student Loan Debt Management

Return/Repayment of Financial Aid Funds
    When a student who has received Title IV financial aid, either grants or loans, withdraws from or stops attending all
classes, the College is required to determine if any of the aid which the student received is required to be returned. The
College will, in compliance with Federal Law, calculate the amount of the required return and will bill the student for what the
student owes. A copy of the College’s Return and Repayment Policy is provided to each student who is awarded aid and is
available in the Financial Aid Office.

Emergency Student Loan Fund
    North Central State College provides short-term, limited emergency funds to assist eligible students to meet their direct
educational expenses. This loan fund is used only for expenses directly related to educational activities (i.e., textbooks,
educational supplies, uniforms, physical examinations, and limited emergency needs). Funds will not be approved for use
for daily living expenses (i.e., rent, utility bills, food, etc.). Students who have an emergency need for short-term funds
should contact the Financial Aid Office for eligibility guidelines and “Emergency Student Loan Fund” applications.

The Emergency Student Loan Fund is made available through the North Central State College Foundation.

FLEXIBLY SCHEDULED COURSES
    The College offers some classes which do not follow the traditional academic calendar. Dates for adding, dropping, and
receiving refunds for these classes may be different from the dates established for traditional classes. Information about
deadlines for flexibly scheduled classes appears on the student’s schedule of classes and is also available in the Office of
Student Records.

GRADUATION
     Graduation ceremonies are held at the end of Spring Quarter. A student may take part in these ceremonies upon a
satisfactory review of the student’s academic file to determine eligibility for graduation. This procedure is initiated by the
completion of a Petition to Graduate form with the Office of Student Records. This Petition is approved if the student has
successfully completed (or is presently enrolled in) all courses required for his/her program, is in good standing
academically (not on probation), and has fulfilled all financial obligations to the College. A student must earn at least a 2.00
cumulative grade-point average to graduate.
     Each quarter there may be students who, though they have petitioned, do not graduate. Reasons may include: course
failure, inability to submit a transcript from another college in a timely manner, inability to complete credit for life experience,
failure to fulfill financial obligations to the College, or an “I” incomplete grade. Students, except those with failing grades, will
be given six weeks from the end of the quarter in which they have petitioned to rectify the situation in order to receive a
degree for that quarter. Problems not rectified will necessitate re-petitioning with the result of the degree being conferred in
a later quarter. There is no charge to re-petition.
     Following completion of all coursework in a given discipline, a student will have one year to petition. After the one year
period, a student wishing to petition must receive the approval of the Petition Review Committee (PRC). The PRC will be
called by the Registrar who will serve as chair. The Committee shall consist of the Dean of Business and Education and one
faculty member representing the academic major program as designated by the Dean of the appropriate major technology.
The PRC shall have the obligation to determine if all academic requirements have been fulfilled within a program and shall

                                                                 34
have the right to specify any additional coursework which might be necessary to fulfill program requirements to ensure that
conferred degrees will reflect the current course program within each technology.

MANDATORY PLACEMENT GUIDELINES
     Students are placed into reading/writing/math courses based on their scores on initial assessment testing (COMPASS)
offered by the College. COMPASS scores may indicate that the student needs additional practice in these areas before
beginning college level mathematics and English courses. These mandatory placement requirements are designed to
promote student success and persistence.
     On the basis of their new-student assessment scores, students can be placed into one or more of the following courses:
FYE 161 College Survival Skills, RDG 116 College Reading II, WRT 115 Introduction to College Writing I, and WRT 116
Introduction to College Writing II, MTH 100 Introductory Mathematics, MTH 102 Pre-algebra, MTH 103 Introduction to
Algebra. Some of these courses must be successfully completed before the student registers for his or her 13th credit hour.
These courses are designed to help students succeed in higher-level courses.
     Students who believe they have been misplaced into a reading/writing/math course should see an advisor in the
Student Success Center about retesting BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF THE QUARTER‘S CLASSES. If students have
further questions, they can contact an advisor in the Student Success Center in 136 Kee Hall, 419-755-4764.

MY NCSTATE-STUDENT
    The student web portal, known as MyNCState-Student gives students the ability to access class schedules, grades, and
financial aid records, search courses, perform degree audits and register for classes online. For more information about
MyNCState-Student, go to the college website at www.ncstatecollege.edu.

PROGRAM 60
    Persons who are 60 years of age or older are entitled to register for courses on a space available basis, for no credit, at
no charge other than any applicable lab fee. Textbooks must be purchased and are available at the College bookstore.

REFUND POLICY AND WITHDRAWAL
     The College has a policy of scheduled refunds for students who withdraw from credit courses during a standard
academic term. (NOTE: Recipients of financial aid who withdraw from all classes should refer to the Return of Title IV Funds
Policy in the Financial Aid section of this catalog.) Students who withdraw through the first week of classes will receive a
100% refund. A 50% refund will be granted for official withdrawals through the second and third week of classes. No refund
is available after the third week of classes. Flexibly scheduled classes have individual refund and withdrawal dates. Contact
the Student Records Office for information regarding a specific flexibly scheduled course.

REGISTRATION
     Student registration is conducted via the web or can be done in person at the Office of Student Records. Students in the
Directions advising program or on probation are required to meet with an advisor first before registering. Web registration is
available each quarter beginning with the first day of Priority Registration and ending on the last day to add a class. Web
registration is available to eligible students. Contact the Office of Student Records with questions about eligibility or the
Student Success Center for help with choosing classes.
     New students and students returning to NC State after an absence of one year or more are required to complete the
application to the college and meet with an Admissions Advisor and then a Student Success Advisor before registering for
classes.
     Students may process no more than two registrations per visit to the Office of Student Records. Courses may be added
to a student's schedule through the first week of the quarter only. Courses can be dropped from a schedule through the
withdrawal date established on the academic calendar for the quarter. Student initiated withdrawals are processed in the
Office of Student Records (see Withdrawing from a Course).
     Students are required to pay fees or arrange for fee payment on an installment basis by the payment deadline in each
registration period. Students with unpaid fees may be administratively withdrawn from classes after the payment deadline
has passed. Formal confirmation of class availability and fee adjustments can be obtained through the Office of Student
Records and/or the Cashier's Office.

                                                              35
RESIDENCY
      The Office of Student Records is responsible for assuring that each student at North Central State College has the
proper residency status. The fees charged to students are based on the student’s residency. Residency information is
available at the Office of Student Records.
      Students may apply for a change in their residency status through the Office of Student Records. Applications for a
change in residency status must be submitted, along with all required documentation, no later than one week prior to the
first day of the quarter in order to be considered for that quarter. Applications received after this date, if approved, will take
effect for the subsequent quarter.

SECOND DEGREE
     Any student may wish to pursue a second degree. To be eligible, a student must complete all required coursework
within a second technology as listed in the program section of this catalog, complete a Petition to Graduate form in the
Office of Student Records, and pay the graduation fee. Questions concerning limitations of financial aid or veteran’s benefits
in support of second degree programs should be addressed to the Financial Aid Office or Office of Student Records,
respectively.
     Several of the program technologies have more than one major. Students enrolled in any one of these several majors
will be eligible for an associate degree in the technology upon completion of required coursework and the filing of the
Petition to Graduate. Completion of a second or subsequent major within the same technology does not lead to a second
degree. This applies to Computer Information Systems, Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Early Childhood
Education, Digital Media, and Industrial Technology. The official student course transcript, however, will note the second
major, provided that the student completes a Petition form in the Office of Student Records. Currently, federal financial aid
and veteran’s educational benefits are not available for the completion of a second major within a program technology.

SELECTIVE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS
    As a publicly funded, associate degree granting college, North Central State College is required to collect information
from all male students regarding their selective service status. Forms used for collecting this information are included with
NC State applications and also distributed during registration. Completed forms should be returned to the Office of Student
Records. Failure to comply with this request will result in the assessment of the “out-of-state” tuition surcharge and the loss
of certain financial aid benefits.

STUDENT EMAIL ACCOUNTS
    All registered NC State students are assigned an email account. Student email accounts should be checked on a
regular basis for college news and announcement. Students should use their assigned email accounts when communicating
via email with faculty members or other college personnel. For more information about student email accounts, go to
www.ncstatecollege.edu/it.

TRANSCRIPTS, GRADE
    Official transcripts of grades may be requested through the Office of Student Records. Requests must bear the
student’s name, student number, dates of attendance, and signature. Incomplete requests will not be honored. Official
transcripts cost $2.00 each. Processing time for an official transcript is 24 to 72 hours.
    Students may pick up their transcript at the Office of Student Records, or they may request that the transcript be mailed
to them. Students may request transcripts by fax machine. Such requests must contain the student’s name, student
number, dates of attendance, and signature. All transcripts transmitted by fax will be “unofficial transcripts” and will be
marked as such. There is no charge for an unofficial transcript.

TRANSIENT STUDENTS
    Students may complete a number of credits at another college and transfer them to NC State. In order to do this as
smoothly as possible, the Transfer Credit Contract form, available in the Office of Student Records, must be completed.
Prior approval from the appropriate division dean is necessary. An official transcript of all credits earned as a transient
student should be sent to the Office of Student Records in order to apply such credits to graduation requirements.



                                                               36
VETERANS’ BENEFITS
    Military veterans and their dependents may be eligible for educational benefits from the Veterans Administration while
attending NC State. The VA accepts North Central State College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide
educational services under the provisions of the War Orphans Assistance Act and the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act.
The Office of Student Records will assist you in the area of veterans’ affairs. However, for your information:
1. Applications for G.I. benefits are available in the Office of Student Records.
2. Processing time for applications for G.I. benefits is eight weeks or more.
3. The Office of Student Records will send applications for G.I. benefits to the Veterans’ Administration.
4. The Veterans’ Administration will notify applicants directly of their benefits.
    Veterans/students at NC State have responsibility for making satisfactory academic progress toward an educational
objective (defined as an accumulative grade-point average of 2.0), attending classes, maintaining an acceptable cumulative
grade average, and, of equal importance, of notifying the Office of Student Records of enrollment and any changes in
enrollment such as: adding, dropping, or repeating a class or classes in an academic program. Students/veterans should be
certain that all courses for which they register are applicable to their technology (one technology at a time). The College, in
turn, accepts responsibility for certifying veterans’ enrollment to the VA as well as notifying them of academic status
changes, failure to attend classes, and failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress. Additional information can be
obtained from the Office of Student Records.

WITHDRAWING FROM A COURSE
      As a student you are expected to attend class. If you are unable or choose not to attend class, or if for whatever reason
you are unable to keep up with the requirements of a course, you need to officially drop the class at the Student Records
Office. If you registered for classes in the Student Success Center, you should return there to officially withdraw from any
class. The official last day to drop a class will vary according to the length of the class. The last day to officially drop a class
is listed in the weekly News Briefs and is available at the Student Records Office (room 142 in Kee Hall).
      Failure to attend classes does not constitute withdrawal. If students leave the College without completing the withdrawal
procedures, they will receive a grade of "F" in all courses in which they were registered and will forfeit any right to a refund
of fees.
      If you are unable or choose not to complete a class, process an official withdrawal through the Student Records Office.
Withdrawals must be processed in person, by registered mail, or by fax 419-755-4729. Withdrawals by telephone will only
be accepted when a student totally withdraws from the College (drops ALL scheduled classes). Financial aid students
desiring withdrawal from the College will require approval from the Financial Aid Office before the withdrawal will be
processed.




                                                                37
                                WORKFORCE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY
     Workforce & Community Development works with business and industry partners to design customized hands-on
training programs. Previous customers have been small companies, large corporations, and public and private employers.
The programs are quality, college-level learning experiences designed specifically to customer specifications.
     As part of North Central State College’s commitment to meeting the needs of business and industry, Workforce &
Community Development provides on-demand training. Each program and/or training can be customized to meet specific
productivity goals, strategic plans, and/or contractual agreements of individual companies.
     With technology changing in almost every field, employee development and training have become an ongoing
requirement in the workplace. The hands-on training programs that are available provide employees with the background
and knowledge necessary to upgrade their skills and result in increased productivity and successful performance on the job.
As an added service to our customers, trainees can earn college credits for training. Credits earned can be applied toward
an Associate Degree. The benefits companies can receive from North Central State College’s Workforce & Community
Development include:
     * Programs tailored to meet your company’s needs and delivered on-site or off-site.
     * Programs that offer a blend of job-related, hands-on training and technical information.
     * Flexible programming to meet business/industry schedules.
     * Reduced travel costs, time, and convenience.
     * Follow-up evaluation after training.
     * Credit or noncredit, short and long-term training available.
     * Opportunity for contract training and a partnership with your local college.
     * Funding assistance may be available.

Some of the organizations that have recently taken advantage of the training programs offered by Workforce &
Community Development include:
AK Steel                              Hedstrom                                Neer Manufacturing
Ashland Precision                     Hess Industries                         Newman Technology
Cooper Industries                     Hi Stat                                 Ohio Valley
Copperweld, Shelby Division           HPM Inc.                                Packaging Corp. of America
Covert Manufacturing                  Hydromatic Pump                         Pepperidge Farms
Crane Plumbing                        Jay Industries                          PR Machine
Designed Metal Products, Inc          Kokosing                                Shelby Tube
FT Precision                          Lakeland Park                           Shafer Valve
General Electric                      MedCentral Health Systems               Shiloh Tool & Die
General Motors/MFD                    Midwest Ind.                            Taylor Metal
Gorman Rupp                           Milark Industries                       Therm-O-Disc
                                                                              Tri-R Tooling

SKILLSMAX CENTER
     A comprehensive human capital development solution that works for both human resource professionals and
individuals. The key is identifying skill levels and preferences to match the right person with the right job.

        Job Profiling – Characteristics and qualities required for performance
        Assessment – Discover what jobs best match your company employees’ skills, abilities, and preferences
        Skill Gap Analysis – Find out which skills need improvement
        Job Matching – Placing the right person in the right position
        Training Referrals – We help you find the right education and training for your employees
        Skill Certification – Consultants will verify your competencies



                                                            38
INTEGRATED SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY CENTER (IST)
    IST workers maintain, calibrate, and repair the high-tech electrical, mechanical, and electronic equipment found in
today’s industrial environments. The lab offers Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Piping Systems, Electro-Fluid Power, Electronic
Sensors, Mechanical Drives, Electrical Control Circuits, Electrical Wiring, and Programmable Logic Controllers.
      Self-Paced Training
      One-On-One Instruction
      Hands-On Training Modules

TOOL AND DIE CENTER
This new facility and program prepares individuals for careers and upgrading skills involving the production, maintenance,
and repair of various types of dies, machining, super-abrasive cutting, grinding, welding and CNC programming operations
used in industrial manufacturing.
      New facility
      Two new die presses
      Two new machining cells
      Advanced manufacturing training and curriculum
      Technical seminars

                       Additional training needs can be addressed by contacting the
                            Workforce & Community Development Department.




                                                           39
 GENERAL
EDUCATION




     40
                                        NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE
                                            GENERAL EDUCATION

DEFINITION
    General education is the foundation of a student’s education. It is intended to impart core knowledge, intellectual skills,
and attitudes that every educated person should possess and integrate into their personal and professional lives.

PHILOSOPHY
     While students graduating from North Central State College must be educated within their chosen technical field, they
must also have an educational experience that enables them to be conversant and interested in areas beyond the scope of
their technical areas.

    General education should enable students to think about their technical areas in relation to what is going on in the
society around them, make students more involved in developing their own sense of self and their role as an educated
person in society and spark interest in self-directed and lifelong learning.

    There are three major and equally important components of general education:
       1.) Core areas of knowledge – A broad base of concepts outside of the student’s chosen technical field including,
            but not limited to, the arts, humanities, philosophy, and science.

        2.) Intellectual skills – The personal and professional skills required to understand, apply, and communicate
            general and technical concepts.

        3.) Attitudes – Concepts needed for the development of positive, personal perspectives as related to self and
            others.

    General education courses should be introduced as early as possible in the curriculum and in a manner which is
educationally sound. They should develop skills and/or knowledge that is common to and permeates through all other
courses within the degree program.

GOALS
     General education at North Central State College is designed to provide all students the opportunity to achieve each of
the following goals.

Core Knowledge
    * To understand concepts of ethics, philosophy, theology, history, and aesthetics.
    * To understand concepts of social science, law, politics, and economics.
    * To understand concepts of literature, performing arts, and visual arts.
    * To understand concepts of science and technology.
Intellectual Skills
    * To develop the ability to read with comprehension, to communicate effectively in writing and speech, and to work
         effectively in groups.
    * To develop the ability to comprehend and apply mathematical concepts.
    * To develop the ability to research a problem or a topic by using library skills, computer skills, and community
         resources.
    * To become independent planners, creative problem solvers, effective decision makers, and independent critical
         thinkers, using mathematics, computers, and communication skills as appropriate.




                                                              41
Attitudes
    • To develop self-respect, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.
    • To develop sensitivity to other people by recognizing the common elements of the human condition.
    • To develop the desire to be lifelong and self-directed learners.
    North Central State College students will be able to integrate the core knowledge, intellectual skills, and attitudes to
evaluating and solving problems throughout their personal and professional lives.

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
Written Communication                                                      Class/Lab       Credit
        ENG 101      Basic Composition                                         3/0           3
        ENG 102      Basic Composition - Honors                                3/0           3
        ENG 114      Composition and Literature                                3/0           3
        ENG 201      Advanced Composition                                      3/0           3
        ENG 202      Research Writing                                          3/0           3
        ENG 210      Technical Writing                                         3/0           3
        ENG 211      Business Communication and Research                       3/0           3

Oral Communication
       SPE 101     Speech                                                       3/0           3
       SPE 105     Interpersonal Communication                                  3/0           3

Humanities
      HUM 110           Introduction to the Humanities                          3/0           3
      HUM 290           Special Topics in Humanities                            3/0           4
      HST 121           US History to 1815                                      3/0           3
      HST 122           US History 1815 to 1900                                 3/0           3
      HST 123           US History 1900 to Present                              3/0           3
      HUM 150           Leadership and the Classics                             3/0           3
      HUM 199           Humanities Elective                                     3/0           3
      PHI 120           Great Ideas in Western Civilization                     3/0           3
      PHI 140           Contemporary Ethical Issues                             3/0           3
      PHI 170           Science, Art, and Literature                            3/0           3
      PHI 180           Philosophy of Technology                                3/0           3
      PHI 190           History of the Future                                   3/0           3
      PHI 290           Special Topics in Philosophy                            3/0           3




                                                              42
Social Sciences
        ECN 101   Economics                                4/0   4
        POL 101   American Politics and Issues             3/0   3
        PSY 105   Personal Adjustment                      3/0   3
        PSY 110   Introduction to Psychology I             3/0   3
        PSY 111   Introduction to Psychology II            3/0   3
        PSY 115   Introduction to Women’s Studies          3/0   3
        PSY 130   Human Growth and Development             5/0   5
        PSY 135   Aging in America                         3/0   3
        PSY 150   Abnormal Psychology                      4/0   4
        PSY 160   Human Sexuality                          3/0   3
        PSY 170   Death, Grief, and Recovery               4/0   4
        PSY 290   Special Topics in Psychology             3/0   3
        SOC 101   Introduction to Sociology                3/0   3
        SOC 110   Human Relations                          3/0   3
        SOC 120   Cultural Diversity and Racism            3/0   3
        SOC 290   Special Topics in Sociology              3/0   3
        SSC 199   Social Science Elective                  3/0   3
        SSC 290   Special Topics in Social Sciences        3/0   3




                                                      43
                       BUSINESS
                         and
                      EDUCATION
                      PROGRAMS
The mission of the Business and Education Division is to support the mission of the College by
providing quality programs, keeping curriculum current, relevant, and affording opportunities for
professional growth of faculty and staff.




                                                 44
ACCOUNTING

       Accounting graduates advise and assist management in controlling the financial operations of
a business and in planning for its growth. They prepare accounting entries from source documents as
well as post and summarize that information into meaningful financial statements. Accounting is well-
suited to persons who like their problem solving skills to be challenged and enjoy working with detail.

        Accountants provide professional services as advisors to management on financial matters
affecting the firm in the areas of planning, forecasting, cost control, taxes, and inventory control. They
prepare federal, state, and local income and payroll tax reports.

      An important part of the management team, accountants today work primarily in an
environment that includes using professionally prepared accounting, tax, and payroll computer
programs. They also use spreadsheet programs to assemble information and prepare reports.

        The Accounting curriculum at North Central State College provides the student with the basic
tools in all areas of accounting and expertise in the area of assembling information to prepare
meaningful reports. Accounting students at North Central take numerous courses including
accounting principles, managerial accounting, intermediate accounting, business finance, taxation,
governmental accounting, auditing, accounting information systems, and special problems in
accounting. Students are also exposed to the two key software programs used in the industry.

      Students are also introduced to a wide variety of basic subjects which accountants need to
know to function well in today's complex business world. Basic courses include one course in
management, one course in marketing, two courses in business law, an economics course, and a
business ethics course.

       Each Accounting student must take three writing courses, one oral communications course,
and three general electives in such courses as Contemporary Ethical Issues, Introduction to
Sociology, and American Politics and Issues.

       Program graduates are well qualified for entry level accounting positions in business and
industry. Some graduates choose to pursue a four-year baccalaureate degree while others pursue
the C.P.A. (Certified Public Accountant) designation. Contact the Ohio CPA Board in Columbus for
details.

        A recommended quarter-by-quarter curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is
available in the Student Development Office. The Associate in Applied Business degree is awarded
for the completion of this program. Long range plans for the department will be reviewed and
updated.

      The Accounting program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and
Programs (ACBSP).




                                                    45
                                                   Accounting
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                 Technical Courses (Choose at least seventeen)
                                                                                             Class/Lab     Credit
Technical Courses                                                                              Hours       Hours
      ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                       4/0          4
      ACC112 ACCOUNTING II                                                                      4/0          4
      ACC131 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I                                                          4/0          4
      ACC132 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II                                                         4/0          4
      ACC140 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                                                              4/0          4
      ACC202 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING                                                2/2          3
      ACC211 TAXATION I                                                                         4/0          4
      ACC212 TAXATION II                                                                        4/0          4
      ACC225 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                                     4/0          4
      ACC230 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING                                                            4/0          4
      ACC250 AUDITING                                                                           4/0          4
      ACC260 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ACCOUNTING                                                     4/0          4
      CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                 1/2          2
      CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                1/2          2
      CIS123     MICROSOFT ACCESS                                                               1/2          2
      CIS125     MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                           1/2          2
      FIN210     BUSINESS FINANCE                                                               4/0          4

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least six)
Basic Courses
       BUS134 BUSINESS LAW                                                                      3/2           4
       BUS148 MARKETING                                                                         4/0           4
       BUS285 BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                   3/0           3
       MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                              4/0           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN161 MICROECONOMICS                                                                    4/0           4
       ECN162 MACROECONOMICS                                                                    4/0           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
       BUS110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                          4/0           4
       BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                        4/0           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                       3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                       3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                             3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                 3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                3/0           3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                              3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                           3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                           1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                          3/0           3

                                                           46
                          Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                  3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                        3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                     3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                        3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                   0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                          3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                   4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                          3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                         3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                        3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                       3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                         3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                             3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                       3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                         3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                          3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                               0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                     3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                  3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                        3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                     3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                        3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                   0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                          3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                   4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                          3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                         3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                        3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                       3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                         3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                             3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                       3/0    3

                                                     47
SOC120   CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM        3/0    3
SOC290   SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY         3-5/0   3
SSC199   SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE              0/0    5
SSC290   SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES    3/0    3




                                        48
ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

        The administrative assistant occupies a central position within the office information network. As a result, the
administrative assistant interacts with a number of individuals both within and outside the organization. Duties typically
performed include: composing and editing correspondence; researching and abstracting information; interpreting, analyzing,
and presenting data; coordinating meetings and taking minutes; making travel arrangements; transcribing; managing
records; coordinating verbal and electronic communications; processing mail; and scheduling appointments.

          Graduates of this program are prepared to work in business and industry, in governmental agencies, in educational
institutions, and in professional offices requiring special knowledge and skills in medical, legal, or technical areas.

         The personal qualities of the successful office professional include displaying a positive attitude; functioning as a
team member; and being adaptable, conscientious, and trustworthy. Recognizing the importance of confidentiality and
ethical behavior in the business environment is vital to this position.

        Students who pursue a degree in Administrative Information Technology take courses that emphasize the
knowledge, techniques, and skills needed to be an effective office professional. Some of these courses include word
processing, spreadsheet applications, web page design, database applications, medical/legal terminology and transcription,
records management, office communications, human resource, management, accounting, and business law.

       The Administrative Information Technology program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business
Schools and Programs (ACBSP).




                                                               49
                                   Administrative Information Technology
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least fourteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      AIT103     OFFICE COMMUNICATIONS                                                             4/0           4
      AIT110     KEYBOARDING I                                                                     1/2           2
      AIT112     KEYBOARDING II                                                                    3/2           4
      AIT113     KEYBOARDING III                                                                   3/2           4
      AIT130     RECORDS MANAGEMENT                                                                3/2           4
      AIT133     MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION                                                             1/2           2
      AIT216     MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION                                             2/4           4
      AIT217     LEGAL TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION                                               2/4           4
      AIT220     ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE PROCEDURES                                                  3/2           4
      AIT249     INTEGRATED OFFICE APPLICATIONS                                                    3/2           4
      AIT252     WORD PROCESSING                                                                   2/4           4
      AIT253     ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING                                                          2/4           4
      CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                   1/2           2
      CIS128     MICROSOFT EXCEL ADVANCED                                                          1/2           2

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least eleven)
Basic Courses
       ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                         4/0           4
       ACC112 ACCOUNTING II                                                                        4/0           4
       BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                           4/0           4
       BUS134 BUSINESS LAW                                                                         3/2           4
       BUS224 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                                            3/0           3
       BUS285 BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                      3/0           3
       CIS123     MICROSOFT ACCESS                                                                 1/2           2
       CIS125     MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                             1/2           2
       CIS126     MICROSOFT FRONTPAGE                                                              1/2           2
       MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                                 4/0           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN161 MICROECONOMICS                                                                       4/0           4
       ECN162 MACROECONOMICS                                                                       4/0           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                                 3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3



                                                           50
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3


                                                      51
SOC110   HUMAN RELATIONS                       3/0    3
SOC120   CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM         3/0    3
SOC290   SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY          3-5/0   3
SSC199   SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE               0/0    5
SSC290   SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES     3/0    3




                                         52
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Business Management Major

         The Business Management program at North Central State College is designed to be an academically rigorous,
highly practical, and immediately applicable course of study. This major provides students with the broad range of essential
business skills which are considered prerequisites to success and advancement by contemporary business organizations.

         The academic foundation for success in the contemporary marketplace is presented in courses such as economics,
management and marketing. Advanced courses continue to build upon this foundation. Some second-year courses can lead
to options in specialized areas such as International Business and Marketing.

         Strong emphasis is placed upon strengthening and enhancing the student's oral and written communication skills to
a professional level. Case studies, involving critical thinking and problem solving skills, are an important part of this
curriculum.

          The necessity of a positive business ethical perspective is an underlying theme within this curriculum. Common
ethical issues are interwoven and discussed within the study of the various technical disciplines of marketing, personnel
management, and computerized information technology.

         Demand for successful business graduates comes from all segments of the economy. Non-profit institutions, as well
as profit oriented organizations in the manufacturing, service, transportation, and government sector, continue to experience
a growing need for personnel who possess essential business expertise.

        The Business Management program at NC State provides an ideal foundation for those who seek the flexibility of
obtaining an immediate marketable skill as well as the necessary academic prerequisites for advanced collegiate
achievements at the baccalaureate level and beyond. The long range plan for this department is reviewed, modified, and
updated on an annual basis.

      The Business Management program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs
(ACBSP).




                                                             53
                                         Business Management Major
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                     Technical Courses (Choose at least eleven)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      BUS110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                              4/0           4
      BUS115 SUPERVISION                                                                           3/0           3
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS224 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                                             3/0           3
      BUS226 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS                                                   3/0           3
      BUS230 QUALITY                                                                               4/0           4
      BUS242 LOGISTICS                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS280 CASE STUDIES IN BUSINESS                                                              5/0           5
Technical Electives (Choose at least two of the following)
      BUS123 E-COMMERCE                                                                            2/0           2
      BUS126 CUSTOMER SERVICE                                                                      2/0           2
      BUS140 PRINCIPLES OF SELLING                                                                 3/0           3
      BUS199 BUSINESS ELECTIVE                                                                     0/0           5
      BUS200 BUSINESS PRACTICUM AND CONSULTATION                                                  1/14           3
      BUS244 ADVERTISING                                                                           3/0           3
      BUS270 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE                                                   3/0           3
      BUS271 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CULTURE                                                        3/0           3
      BUS276 GLOBAL COMPETITION                                                                    4/0           4
      BUS290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS                                                           1-6/0          6
      REA201 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES                                                    4/0           4
      REA202 REAL ESTATE LAW                                                                       4/0           4
      STA110 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS                                                            3/2           4

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least twelve)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       ACC112     ACCOUNTING II                                                                    4/0           4
       ACC140     MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                                                            4/0           4
       BUS134     BUSINESS LAW                                                                     3/2           4
       BUS285     BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                  3/0           3
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                  1/2           2
       CIS128     MICROSOFT EXCEL ADVANCED                                                         1/2           2
       ECN161     MICROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       ECN162     MACROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       HUM150     LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                                      3/0           3
       MTH110     BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                             4/0           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                    3/0           3
       ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                           3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
       ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                           3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                 3/0           3
       ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                     3/0           3

                                                           54
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                   3/0     3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                 3/0     3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                              3/0     3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                              1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                             3/0     3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                  3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                        3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                     3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                        3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                   0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                          3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                          3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                         3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                       3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                         3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                             3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                       3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                         3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                          3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                               0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                     3/0    3




                                                     55
                         Business Adminstration International Business Option
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                     Technical Courses (Choose at least twelve)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      BUS110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                              4/0           4
      BUS115 SUPERVISION                                                                           3/0           3
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS224 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                                             3/0           3
      BUS226 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS                                                   3/0           3
      BUS230 QUALITY                                                                               4/0           4
      BUS242 LOGISTICS                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS270 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE                                                   3/0           3
      BUS271 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CULTURE                                                        3/0           3
      BUS276 GLOBAL COMPETITION                                                                    4/0           4
      BUS280 CASE STUDIES IN BUSINESS                                                              5/0           5

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least twelve)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       ACC112     ACCOUNTING II                                                                    4/0           4
       ACC140     MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                                                            4/0           4
       BUS134     BUSINESS LAW                                                                     3/2           4
       BUS285     BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                  3/0           3
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                  1/2           2
       CIS128     MICROSOFT EXCEL ADVANCED                                                         1/2           2
       ECN161     MICROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       ECN162     MACROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       HUM150     LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                                      3/0           3
       MTH110     BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                             4/0           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                                 3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           56
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                  3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                        3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                     3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                        3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                   0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                          3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                          3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                         3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                       3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                         3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                             3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                       3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                         3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                          3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                               0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                     3/0    3




                                                     57
                                Business Administration Marketing Option
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least thirteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      BUS110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                              4/0           4
      BUS115 SUPERVISION                                                                           3/0           3
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS123 E-COMMERCE                                                                            2/0           2
      BUS126 CUSTOMER SERVICE                                                                      2/0           2
      BUS140 PRINCIPLES OF SELLING                                                                 3/0           3
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS224 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                                             3/0           3
      BUS226 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS                                                   3/0           3
      BUS230 QUALITY                                                                               4/0           4
      BUS242 LOGISTICS                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS244 ADVERTISING                                                                           3/0           3
      BUS280 CASE STUDIES IN BUSINESS                                                              5/0           5

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least twelve)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       ACC112     ACCOUNTING II                                                                    4/0           4
       ACC140     MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                                                            4/0           4
       BUS134     BUSINESS LAW                                                                     3/2           4
       BUS285     BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                  3/0           3
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                  1/2           2
       CIS128     MICROSOFT EXCEL ADVANCED                                                         1/2           2
       ECN161     MICROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       ECN162     MACROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       HUM150     LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                                      3/0           3
       MTH110     BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                             4/0           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                                 3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           58
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                  3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                        3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                     3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                        3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                   0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                          3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                          3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                         3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                       3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                         3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                             3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                       3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                         3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                          3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                               0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                     3/0    3




                                                     59
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Finance Major

        The Finance degree is designed for those who enjoy dealing with money. Whether you want to count it, invest it, or
manage it, the financial management field is for you. Banks, savings and loans, insurance companies and agencies, credit
unions, brokerage firms, as well as, industry all provide employment opportunities for the well-educated, motivated
graduate.

         The purpose of this program is to provide students with the skills required to complete the National Association of
Securities Dealers (NASD) Series 6 Exam. This exam entitles the student who completes the exam to solicit and sell mutual
funds, variable annuities and variable life insurance contracts. An additional finance seminar course will prepare students for
the exam.

        The Finance curriculum builds on a solid base of accounting and computer courses. Students receive a base of
accounting and economic theory, applied to finance issues. Financial statement analysis, interest rate concepts, and an
introduction to personal finance issues are some of the additional topics covered in the curriculum.

          Program graduates are qualified for an entry-level position in business and industry in the financial field. Some
graduates choose to pursue a four-year baccalaureate degree at one of the universities North Central State College has
articulation agreements with.

       A recommended quarter-by-quarter curriculum worksheet for the two-year program is available in the Student
Development Office. The Associate in Applied Business degree is awarded for the completion of this program.

      The Financial Management program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs
(ACBSP).




                                                              60
                                                       Finance
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least thirteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                          4/0           4
      ACC112 ACCOUNTING II                                                                         4/0           4
      ACC140 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                                                                 4/0           4
      ACC211 TAXATION I                                                                            4/0           4
      ACC212 TAXATION II                                                                           4/0           4
      BUS110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                              4/0           4
      FIN150     INSTITUTIONS & FINANCIAL MARKETS                                                  3/0           4
      FIN187     PERSONAL FINANCE I                                                                1/0           1
      FIN188     PERSONAL FINANCE II                                                               3/0           3
      FIN210     BUSINESS FINANCE                                                                  4/0           4
      FIN220     LENDING INSTITUTIONS                                                              4/0           4
      FIN262     UNDERSTANDING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS                                                1/0           1
      FIN290     FINANCIAL SEMINAR                                                                 4/0           4

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least nine)
Basic Courses
       BUS134 BUSINESS LAW                                                                         3/2           4
       BUS148 MARKETING                                                                            4/0           4
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                  1/2           2
       CIS123     MICROSOFT ACCESS                                                                 1/2           2
       CIS125     MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                             1/2           2
       MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                                 4/0           4
       STA110 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS                                                           3/2           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN161 MICROECONOMICS                                                                       4/0           4
       ECN162 MACROECONOMICS                                                                       4/0           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                                 3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           61
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3


                                                      62
SOC290   SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY          3-5/0   3
SSC199   SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE               0/0    5
SSC290   SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES     3/0    3




                                         63
                            Business Education & Teacher Education Option
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                     Technical Courses (Choose at least twelve)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      ACC140 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                                                                 4/0           4
      BUS110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                              4/0           4
      BUS115 SUPERVISION                                                                           3/0           3
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS140 PRINCIPLES OF SELLING                                                                 3/0           3
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS224 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                                             3/0           3
      BUS226 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS                                                   3/0           3
      BUS228 LABOR RELATIONS                                                                       3/0           3
      BUS230 QUALITY                                                                               4/0           4
      BUS242 LOGISTICS                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS280 CASE STUDIES IN BUSINESS                                                              5/0           5

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least eleven)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       ACC112     ACCOUNTING II                                                                    4/0           4
       BUS134     BUSINESS LAW                                                                     3/2           4
       BUS285     BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                  3/0           3
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                  1/2           2
       CIS125     MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                             1/2           2
       ECN161     MICROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       ECN162     MACROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       MTH110     BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                             4/0           4
       STA110     PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS                                                       3/2           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least four)
Humanities/Soc Science Courses
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                                   3/0           3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                                         3/0           3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                                      3/0           3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                                              3/0           3




                                                           64
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Administration Option

        This option is designed to meet the needs of individuals who have had some experience and may currently be
employed in administrative positions. Individuals completing this program will more than meet requirements for
administrators of licensed programs, but will not meet requirements for the Department of Education Pre-kindergarten
Associate Teaching License. Practicum and student teaching requirements are reduced, and various technical electives are
added to aid the student in developing their administrative skills. All ECE courses must have a “C” or higher grade.




                                                           65
                                 Early Childhood Education Adminstration
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                  Technical Courses (fifty-eight credits minimum)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      ECE104 CREATIVE PLAY                                                                         1/2           2
      ECE105 HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION                                                         3/0           3
      ECE108 CREATIVE EXPRESSION                                                                   1/2           2
      ECE121 TEACHING MATH TO YOUNG CHILDREN                                                       3/0           3
      ECE123 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT                                                                 2/2           3
      ECE124 LANGUAGE ARTS                                                                         1/2           2
      ECE126 SCIENCE EXPERIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD                                                 2/2           3
      ECE130 PRESCHOOL PRACTICUM                                                                   0/7           1
      ECE132 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                     2/0           2
      ECE150 INFANT/TODDLER PRACTICUM                                                              0/7           1
      ECE152 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR                                                                2/0           2
      ECE200 ADMINISTRATION                                                                        5/0           5
      ECE203 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT                                                            3/2           4
      ECE206 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT                                                                    3/0           3
      ECE216 FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS                                                           5/0           5
      ECE230 DIVERSITY PRACTICUM                                                                   0/7           1
      ECE232 DIVERSITY PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                           2/0           2
      ECE270 CAPSTONE SEMINAR                                                                      2/0           2
(Choose a minimum of fifteen credits)
      ACC100 ESSENTIALS OF ACCOUNTING                                                              3/0           3
      BUS224 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                                             3/0           3
      CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                   1/2           2
      ECE199 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ELECTIVE                                                    0/0           5
      ECE290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                          1-4/0          4
      HSV103 EXPERIENCE IN SMALL GROUPS                                                            2/2           3
      HSV110 INTRODUCTION TO CASE MANAGEMENT                                                       4/0           4
      HSV115 CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                                      4/0           4
      HSV116 INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                               2/2           3
      HSV118 INTRODUCTION TO NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS                                               3/0           3
      HSV201 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS I                                                             2/2           3
      HSV202 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS II                                                            2/2           3
      HSV218 GRANTWRITING                                                                          3/0           3
      HSV220 ORIENTATION TO DEAFNESS                                                               3/0           3
      HSV225 VOLUNTEER PROGRAMMING                                                                 3/0           3

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least seven)
Basic Courses
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       HSV115     CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                                 4/0           4
       MAS120     CPR/FIRST AID                                                                    2/0           1
       PSY110     INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                     3/0           3
       PSY238     CHILD PSYCHOLOGY                                                                 4/0           4
       SOC120     CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                                    3/0           3
       ECE101     INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                        2/2           3

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                    3/0           3
       ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                           3/0           3

                                                           66
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                          3/0     3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                3/0     3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                    3/0     3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                   3/0     3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                 3/0     3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                              3/0     3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                              1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                             3/0     3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     67
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Child Development Associate Credential Option

        Individuals who are working full-time in a preschool or infant/toddler program may elect the CDA option. Upon
completion of this course work, the student will be awarded an associate degree and will be ready to apply to the National
Council for Professional Recognition for the Child Development Associate Credential. Students considering this option
should consult with the Early Childhood Education Program Director before enrolling. This option meets the Ohio
Department of Human Services requirements for administrators of licensed programs. It does not meet the requirements for
the Ohio Department of Education Pre-kindergarten Associate Teaching License.

        This certificate alone will not meet the Federal/State Head Start teacher (minimum requirement by 2003). All ECE
courses must have a “C” or higher grade.




                                                            68
                                 Child Development Associate Credential
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                 Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty-two)
                                                                                             Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
      ECE104 CREATIVE PLAY                                                                       1/2          2
      ECE105 HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION                                                       3/0          3
      ECE108 CREATIVE EXPRESSION                                                                 1/2          2
      ECE109 MUSIC AND MOVEMENT                                                                  2/2          3
      ECE121 TEACHING MATH TO YOUNG CHILDREN                                                     3/0          3
      ECE123 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT                                                               2/2          3
      ECE124 LANGUAGE ARTS                                                                       1/2          2
      ECE126 SCIENCE EXPERIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD                                               2/2          3
      ECE150 INFANT/TODDLER PRACTICUM                                                            0/7          1
      ECE152 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR                                                              2/0          2
      ECE200 ADMINISTRATION                                                                      5/0          5
      ECE203 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT                                                          3/2          4
      ECE206 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT                                                                  3/0          3
      ECE209 LITERATURE & LITERACY                                                               3/0          3
      ECE210 WORKING WITH DIVERSE LEARNERS                                                       4/0          4
      ECE216 FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS                                                         5/0          5
      ECE240 PRACTICUM                                                                           0/7          1
      ECE242 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                   2/0          2
      ECE260 CDA INTERNSHIP                                                                     0/30          6
      ECE261 CDA SEMINAR I                                                                       3/0          3
      ECE262 CDA SEMINAR II                                                                      3/0          3
      ECE270 CAPSTONE SEMINAR                                                                    2/0          2

                                      Basic Courses (Choose at least seven)
Basic Courses
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                 1/2           2
       HSV115     CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                               4/0           4
       MAS120     CPR/FIRST AID                                                                  2/0           1
       PSY110     INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                   3/0           3
       PSY238     CHILD PSYCHOLOGY                                                               4/0           4
       SOC120     CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                                  3/0           3
       ECE101     INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                      2/2           3

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                 3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                        3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                        3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                              3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                  3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                 3/0           3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                               3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                            3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)


                                                          69
      FYE101    ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                            1/0     1
      FYE161    COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                           3/0     3

                           Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                   3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                         3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                      3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                         3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                    0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                           3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                               3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                       3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                      3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                      3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                         3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                     3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                              4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                   3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                         3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                      3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                         3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                    0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                           3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                               3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                       3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                      3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                      3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                         3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                     3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                           3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                    4/0    4
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                          3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                         3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                           5/0    5
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                    4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                        3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                          3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                              3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                        3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                           3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                      3/0    3




                                                    70
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Pre-Kindergarten Option

         The Early Childhood Education Pre-Kindergarten Option prepares individuals to care for and educate young
children in settings, such as public and private schools, preschools, pre-kindergartens, child care centers, and Head Start
programs. The early childhood teacher plans and implements activities involving art, science, literature, music, language
arts, dramatic play, social studies, and motor skills. Early childhood teachers work closely with families, assisting parents in
understanding stages of development and meeting each child’s needs.

       The person who selects a career with young children should be patient, creative, alert, flexible, decisive, healthy,
responsible, empathic, and people-oriented.

          Coursework includes understanding the growth and development of children, planning the Early Childhood
curriculum, guidance and discipline, nutrition, understanding and working with families, working with children with
disabilities, and administering child care programs.

         The Early Childhood Education Pre-Kindergarten Option is accredited by the Ohio Department of Education. Upon
satisfactory completion of the coursework including the Direct Practice (student teaching), graduates are eligible to take the
Ohio Department of Education Examination and receive the Ohio Pre-kindergarten Associate Teaching License. The option
also meets the Ohio Department of Human Services requirements for administrator of licensed programs.

         This is a limited enrollment program. Copies of the entrance requirements are available in the Admissions Office.
The Early Childhood Education Department publishes a student handbook which delineates specific department/program
policies that are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the department’s student
handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog. All ECE courses must have a “C” or
higher grade.

Medical Insurance
The College strongly recommends that students in the various Business Division programs be covered by hospitalization
insurance, which can be purchased either through a private carrier or through the college-sponsored insurance program. To
obtain an application for the college-sponsored insurance program, contact the Admissions Office (Room 103 Kee Hall,
Phone 419-755-4888).




                                                               71
                                      Early Childhood Education (Pre-K)
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                 Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty-three)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      ECE104 CREATIVE PLAY                                                                         1/2           2
      ECE108 CREATIVE EXPRESSION                                                                   1/2           2
      ECE121 TEACHING MATH TO YOUNG CHILDREN                                                       3/0           3
      ECE123 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT                                                                 2/2           3
      ECE124 LANGUAGE ARTS                                                                         1/2           2
      ECE126 SCIENCE EXPERIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD                                                 2/2           3
      ECE130 PRESCHOOL PRACTICUM                                                                   0/7           1
      ECE132 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                     2/0           2
      ECE200 ADMINISTRATION                                                                        5/0           5
      ECE203 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT                                                            3/2           4
      ECE206 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT                                                                    3/0           3
      ECE209 LITERATURE & LITERACY                                                                 3/0           3
      ECE210 WORKING WITH DIVERSE LEARNERS                                                         4/0           4
      ECE216 FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS                                                           5/0           5
      ECE230 DIVERSITY PRACTICUM                                                                   0/7           1
      ECE232 DIVERSITY PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                           2/0           2
      ECE240 PRACTICUM                                                                             0/7           1
      ECE242 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                     2/0           2
      ECE270 CAPSTONE SEMINAR                                                                      2/0           2
(Choose at least one of the following)
      ECE140 PRACTICUM                                                                             0/7           1
      ECE150 INFANT/TODDLER PRACTICUM                                                              0/7           1
      ECE160 LITERACY PRACTICUM                                                                    0/7           1
(Choose at least one of the following)
      ECE142 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      ECE152 INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR                                                                 2/0          2
      ECE162 LITERACY SEMINAR                                                                       2/0          2
      ECE250 DIRECTED PRACTICE                                                                     0/15          3
      ECE252 DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR                                                             2/0           2

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least nine)
Basic Courses
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       HSV115     CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                                 4/0           4
       MAS120     CPR/FIRST AID                                                                    2/0           1
       PSY110     INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                     3/0           3
       PSY238     CHILD PSYCHOLOGY                                                                 4/0           4
       SOC120     CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                                    3/0           3
       ECE101     INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                        2/2           3
       ECE105     HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION                                                    3/0           3
       ECE109     MUSIC AND MOVEMENT                                                               2/2           3

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                    3/0           3
       ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                           3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
       ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                           3/0           3

                                                           72
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                3/0     3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                    3/0     3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                   3/0     3
        ENG211 BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION                                 3/0     3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                              3/0     3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                              1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                             3/0     3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     73
EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING

        The complexity of today’s classroom requires paraprofessionals that have a thorough understanding of the learning
process, including the instruction of students with special needs and the recognition of appropriate classroom management
techniques.

          Trained paraprofessionals will be better prepared for the challenges they may face in the classroom. The burden
placed on teachers is lessened due to the increased training a paraprofessional will have through the opportunities to learn
and apply the learned skills in actual situations during scheduled practicums. An articulation with Ashland University
provides students the opportunity to continue their education to become licensed intervention specialist teachers. A
certificate program is also available. For more information, please contact the Admissions Office or the Program Director.

        For ECE160/ECE162 and EDU261/EDU263 the combination of practicum and seminar must be taken together and
each combination counts as one technical elective. The Educational Assisting Department publishes a student handbook
which delineates specific department/program policies which are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies
as described in the department’s student handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog.
A minimum grade of C- is required in all EDU, ECE and HSV courses in order to meet prerequisite and graduation
requirements.

        An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required in order to begin the
practicum sequence. Various practicum sites have specific background check requirements. Individuals with a felony and/or
domestic violence conviction may not be permitted to complete the practicums. Please contact the Program Director for
more information.




                                                             74
                                              Educational Assisting
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                  Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty-two)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      ECE123 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT                                                                  2/2          3
      ECE203 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT                                                             3/2          4
      ECE210 WORKING WITH DIVERSE LEARNERS                                                          4/0          4
      EDU103 FOUNDATION OF EDUCATION                                                                3/0          3
      EDU131 PRACTICUM                                                                              0/7          1
      EDU133 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      EDU141 PRACTICUM                                                                             0/14          2
      EDU143 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      EDU200 INCLUSION IN PUBLIC EDUCATION                                                          3/0          3
      EDU203 PHONICS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION                                                        5/0          5
      EDU204 FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY                                                                5/0          5
      EDU205 UNDERSTANDING ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER                                               4/0          4
      EDU210 MOTIVATING CHILDREN                                                                    3/0          3
      EDU212 MANAGING CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT                                                         5/0          5
      EDU231 PRACTICUM                                                                             0/14          2
      EDU233 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      EDU241 PRACTICUM                                                                             0/14          2
      EDU243 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      HSV114 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II                                                                 3/0          3
      HSV222 THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT                                                          2/0          2
Technical Electives (six credits minimum)
      ECE160 LITERACY PRACTICUM                                                                    0/7           1
      ECE162 LITERACY SEMINAR                                                                      2/0           2
      ECE216 FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS                                                           5/0           5
      ECE281 LANGUAGE LITERACY AND PLAY                                                            2/2           3
      EDU199 EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING TECHNICAL ELECTIVE                                              0/0           3
      EDU215 AUTISM                                                                                3/0           3
      EDU220 HELPING SKILLS FOR CHILDREN                                                           2/2           3
      EDU225 OCCUPATIONAL, PHYSICAL, AND SPEECH THERAPIES                                          3/0           3
      EDU261 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM                                                        0/14           2
      EDU263 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM SEM                                                     2/0           2
      EDU290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION                                                          1-5/0          5
      HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                                 4/0           4
      HSV218 GRANTWRITING                                                                          3/0           3
      HSV220 ORIENTATION TO DEAFNESS                                                               3/0           3

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least four)
Basic Courses
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       EDU150     WRITING/STUDY SKILLS FOR CHILDREN                                                3/0           3
       EDU160     INTRODUCTION TO THE PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTIONAL                                  3/0           3
                  TECHNOLOGY
Basic Electives (Choose at least one of the following)
       BIO105     PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY                                                            3/2           4
       BIO107     LIFETIME WELLNESS                                                                3/0           3
       BIO110     INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY                                             3/2           4
       CHE100 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY                                                               3/2           4
       EDU198 CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE                                                           2/0           2




                                                           75
                                       General Courses (Choose at least eight)
General Courses
        PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                        3/0     3
        PSY238 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY                                                    4/0     4
        SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                       3/0     3
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                   3/0     3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                          3/0     3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                          3/0     3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                3/0     3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                    3/0     3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                              3/0     3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                              1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                             3/0     3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3




                                                         76
        HEALTH SCIENCE
             and
        PUBLIC SERVICE
          PROGRAMS
BCI&I/DRUG SCREENING
An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report/FBI background
check is required to enter the clinical or practicum sequence of many of the Health Science
Programs. Some programs also require drug screening. Contact the specific Program Directors for
current information.

CPR
Program CPR requirements can be met by taking the appropriate non-credit coursework or MAS
120 CPR/First Aid.

MEDICAL INSURANCE
The College strongly recommends that students in the various Health Sciences programs be
covered by medical insurance, which can be purchased either through a private carrier or through
the College-sponsored insurance program. To obtain an application for the College-sponsored
insurance program, contact the Student Admissions Office (Rotunda in Kee Hall, phone 419-755-
4888).

HEALTH PHYSICAL AND REQUIRED IMMUNIZATIONS
Associate Degree Nursing, Practical Nursing, Radiological Sciences, Physical Therapist Assistant,
Massage Therapy and Respiratory Care all require an acceptable health physical and verification
of immunizations/immunities in order to participate in the program clinical, practicum or lab
activities. Contact the specific Program Directors for current information.




                                                77
CRIMINAL JUSTICE

        Graduates of the Criminal Justice program may find employment within city, county, and state agencies who are
involved with the enforcement of laws, the investigation of criminal acts, corrections, probation, and parole. Positions are
also available in the private industry where security and loss prevention are paramount. Some graduates will continue to
pursue a bachelor’s degree, which expands the employment market to include federal agencies.

         The qualities that a person should have to be successful include: keen powers of observation; mental alertness,
emotional stability; ability to work within prescribed rules and regulations; and the ability to handle responsibility, and
discipline.

         As the field of criminal justice becomes more sophisticated and complex, advanced training and education become
more critical. The two-year curriculum includes courses in forensic science, juvenile delinquency, drugs and narcotics,
photography, family violence, criminal law, criminology, and criminal investigations. Electives include courses in gangs and
forensic psychology.

        INDIVIDUALS WITH A FELONY AND/OR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CONVICTION MAY EXPERIENCE DIFFICULTY
GAINING EMPLOYMENT IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE FIELD. Students with misdemeanor convictions should seek advice
from an advisor in the Criminal Justice program.

Medical Insurance
The College strongly recommends that students in the various Heath and Public Service programs be covered by
hospitalization insurance, which can be purchased either through a private carrier or through the college-sponsored
insurance program. To obtain an application for the college-sponsored insurance program, contact the Admissions Office
(Room 103 Kee Hall, Phone 419-755-4888).




                                                              78
                                                 Criminal Justice
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                   Technical Courses (Choose at least seventeen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      CRJ113 INTRODUCTION TO PRIVATE SECURITY AND LOSS PREVENTION                                   3/0          3
      CRJ115 CRIMINAL JUSTICE REPORT WRITING                                                        3/0          3
      CRJ140 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW                                                                     4/0          4
      CRJ160 INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS                                                            4/0          4
      CRJ171 GANGS                                                                                  4/0          4
      CRJ175 FAMILY VIOLENCE                                                                        3/0          3
      CRJ180 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY                                                                   4/0          4
      CRJ185 INTRODUCTION TO POLICE OPERATIONS                                                      4/0          4
      CRJ225 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION I                                                               3/4          5
      CRJ226 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY                                            3/4          5
      CRJ245 CRIMINOLOGY                                                                            4/0          4
      CRJ280 TERRORISM & HOMELAND SECURITY                                                          4/0          4
      CRJ295 COMMUNITY BASED CORRECTIONS                                                            4/0          4
      CRJ297 CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM                                                            0/14          2
      CRJ298 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMINAR                                                               2/2          2
      PLG122 CRIMINAL LAW                                                                           4/0          4
(Choose at least one of the following)
      CRJ118 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0           4
      CRJ119 SUCCESS SKILLS FOR THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROFESSIONAL                                  3/0           3

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least seven)
Basic Courses
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CRJ111     CRIMINAL JUSTICE PHOTOGRAPHY                                                     1/2           2
       CRJ145     INTRODUCTION TO THE UNITED STATES JUDICIAL AND CRIMINAL                          4/0           4
                  JUSTICE SYSTEMS
       CRJ235 DRUGS AND NARCOTICS                                                                  3/0           3
       CRJ265 DEFENSIVE TACTICS (FOR CRJ DEGREE STUDENTS)                                          2/2           3
       CRJ282 ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALISM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                       4/0           4
Basic Electives (Choose at least one of the following)
       HSV110 INTRODUCTION TO CASE MANAGEMENT                                                      4/0           4
       HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                                4/0           4
       HSV116 INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                              2/2           3
       HSV201 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS I                                                            2/2           3
       HSV220 ORIENTATION TO DEAFNESS                                                              3/0           3
       HSV249 POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES                                                         4/0           4
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                                         3/0           3

                                      General Courses (Choose at least eight)
General Courses
       PHI140     CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                                      3/0           3
       PSY110     INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                     3/0           3
       SOC120     CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                                    3/0           3
English Courses
       ENG101     BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
       ENG114     COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                       3/0           3
       ENG201     ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                             3/0           3




                                                           79
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                               3/0   3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                               1/0   1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                              3/0   3




                                                               80
CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Peace Officer Option

         This program is designed for students seeking careers in entry level positions in law enforcement agencies in the
State of Ohio. These agencies include; city police departments, village or township police departments, or county Sheriff
departments. While it is not required, it is an added benefit for those seeking careers in probation or parole.

         The Ohio Revised Code enables North Central State College to incorporate The Ohio Peace Officer's Training
Academy into the Criminal Justice Associate Degree program. The Academy requirements are included in 13 of the
required courses for an associate degree in Criminal Justice. Upon completion of the Academy requirements, the student
will be eligible to take the State certification examination to become a peace officer in the State of Ohio.

          Students may choose to attend either the day Academy which begins winter quarter and ends spring quarter, or
they may attend the evening Academy which begins fall quarter and ends winter quarter. Students must complete an
Academy application in order to be considered for this program. Applications for the evening academy are available
beginning the first day of summer quarter. Applications for the day academy are available beginning the first day of fall
quarter. Applications are available in the Health Science and Public Service Division. The Academy must be completed on a
full-time basis. In addition, students will be required to pass a physical examination, a state certification exam, and be
capable of being hired by a law enforcement agency. INDIVIDUALS WITH A FELONY AND/OR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CONVICTION ARE NOT PERMITTED TO ENTER THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PEACE OFFICER OPTION PROGRAM.
Students with misdemeanor convictions should seek advice from the Police Academy Commanders in the Criminal Justice
program.

       The Police Academy program of North Central State College has a reputation for excellence. Employers across
Ohio have indicated our graduates are well prepared for the challenges they face as they embark on their profession.

        A fingerprint check is required under this program.

BCI&I
An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required to enter the Peace Officer
Academy.




                                                              81
                                      Criminal Justice (Peace Officer)
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                  Technical Courses (Choose at least fourteen)
                                                                                             Class/Lab     Credit
Technical Courses                                                                              Hours       Hours
      CRJ151 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - PHYSICAL CONDITIONING                                      3/0          3
      CRJ215 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - PATROL OPERATIONS                                          5/0          5
      CRJ217 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - POLICE SKILLS I                                            4/0          4
      CRJ220 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - CRIMINAL LAW I                                             3/0          3
      CRJ222 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - CRIMINAL LAW II                                            5/0          5
      CRJ224 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION                                     5/0          5
      CRJ245 CRIMINOLOGY                                                                        4/0          4
      CRJ266 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - SUBJECT CONTROL                                            2/4          4
      CRJ275 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - TRAFFIC INVESTIGATION I                                    4/0          4
      CRJ276 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - TRAFFIC INVESTIGATION II                                   1/2          2
      CRJ285 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - FIREARMS                                                   2/4          4
      CRJ287 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - POLICE SKILLS II                                           5/0          5
      CRJ289 PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - POLICE SKILLS III                                          4/0          4
(Choose at least one of the following)
      CRJ118 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY                                                4/0           4
      CRJ119 SUCCESS SKILLS FOR THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROFESSIONAL                               3/0           3
      CRJ171 GANGS                                                                              4/0           4

                                      Basic Courses (Choose at least eight)
Basic Courses
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                1/2           2
       CRJ111     CRIMINAL JUSTICE PHOTOGRAPHY                                                  1/2           2
       CRJ113     INTRODUCTION TO PRIVATE SECURITY AND LOSS PREVENTION                          3/0           3
       CRJ140     CONSTITUTIONAL LAW                                                            4/0           4
       CRJ160     INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS                                                   4/0           4
       CRJ180     JUVENILE DELINQUENCY                                                          4/0           4
       CRJ226     INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY                                   3/4           5
       CRJ292     PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - EMERGENCY CARE AND SERVICES                           2/0           2


                                    General Courses (Choose at least seven)
General Courses
        PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                                   3/0           3
        PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                     3/0           3
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                       3/0           3
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                             3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                           3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                           1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                          3/0           3




                                                           82
                          Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one)
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                             4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                  3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                        3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                     3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                        3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                   0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                          3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                              3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                     3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                     3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                        3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                    3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                          3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                   4/0    4
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                         3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                        3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0    5
     PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0    3
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                       3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                         3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                             3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                       3/0    3
     SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                         3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                          3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                               0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                     3/0    3




                                                    83
HUMAN SERVICES

        The associate degree human service professional is recognized as an important member of a team of professionals
working to assist persons with a variety of disabilities or problems. Employment opportunities exist in various settings in
both public and private sectors. Specific roles vary from agency to agency and are as broad as human needs are.

          The successful student will be a caring individual who will acquire the skills necessary to provide services or
opportunities to a variety of persons in many different situations. Work settings include: mental health centers, mental
retardation agencies, drug and alcohol programs, public schools, domestic violence shelters, juvenile and adult correction
facilities, nursing homes, social welfare agencies, and the like.

        In addition to the technical courses in this program, the student will have opportunities to learn and apply the
learned skills in actual situations through three scheduled practicums and a directed practice for a total of 580 hours of
hands-on experiences.

      Graduates of the Human Services program qualify to apply to the Ohio Counselor and Social Worker Board to
become Social Worker Assistants.

        An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required in order to begin the
practicum sequence. Various practicum sites have specific background check requirements. Individuals with a felony and/or
domestic violence conviction may not be permitted to complete practicum experiences at some specific sites.

         Students must follow a special admissions procedure to enter into the Human Services Program. Please contact
the Admissions Office for details. There is no waiting list to enter into the program and enrollment is not limited to a
particular number of students.

         The Human Services Department publishes a student handbook which delineates specific department/program
policies that are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the department’s student
handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog. A copy of the handbook is available for
review in the Admissions Office. A minimum grade of C- is required in all HSV and THR courses in order to meet
prerequisite and graduation requirements.




                                                              84
                                                 Human Services
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                  Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty-one)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      HSV100 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK                                                            3/0          3
      HSV102 PROFESSIONALISM IN HUMAN SERVICES                                                      3/0          3
      HSV103 EXPERIENCE IN SMALL GROUPS                                                             2/2          3
      HSV107 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES                                                         4/0          4
      HSV110 INTRODUCTION TO CASE MANAGEMENT                                                        4/0          4
      HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                                  4/0          4
      HSV116 INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                                2/2          3
      HSV121 SURVEY OF HUMAN DISABILITIES                                                           4/0          4
      HSV124 FAMILIES IN CRISIS                                                                     4/0          4
      HSV140 PRACTICUM                                                                              0/7          1
      HSV142 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      HSV201 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS I                                                              2/2          3
      HSV230 PRACTICUM                                                                              0/7          1
      HSV232 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      HSV240 PRACTICUM                                                                             0/14          2
      HSV242 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                      2/0          2
      HSV249 POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES                                                           4/0          4
      HSV250 DIRECTED PRACTICE                                                                     0/30          6
(Choose at least two of the following)
      HSV253 DIRECTED PRACTICE I                                                                   0/15          3
      HSV254 DIRECTED PRACTICE II                                                                  0/15          3
      HSV252 DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR                                                              3/0          3
(Choose at least two of the following)
      HSV255 DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR I                                                           2/0           2
      HSV256 DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR II                                                          2/0           2
Technical Electives (Choose at least two of the following)
      HSV114 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II                                                                3/0           3
      HSV115 CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                                      4/0           4
      HSV202 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS II                                                            2/2           3
      HSV204 SMALL GROUP FACILITATION                                                              2/2           3
      HSV210 TRANSITIONAL PROCESS                                                                  3/0           3
      HSV212 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING                                                 3/0           3
      HSV218 GRANTWRITING                                                                          3/0           3
      HSV222 THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT                                                         2/0           2
      HSV248 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT                                               4/0           4
      HSV271 COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER TRAINING                                                      3/2           4
      HSV290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN SERVICES                                                     1-4/0          4




                                                           85
                                          Basic Courses (Choose at least six)
Basic Courses
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                          5/0     5
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                   4/0     4
       HSV109 SOCIAL PROBLEMS                                                       3/0     3
Basic Electives (Choose at least two of the following)
       CRJ180 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY                                                  4/0     4
       HSV198 CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE                                            2/0     2
       HSV199 HUMAN SERVICES BASIC ELECTIVE                                         0/0     3
       HSV215 PET FACILITATED THERAPY                                               3/0     3
       HSV219 DRUG ABUSE AND TREATMENT                                              4/0     4
       HSV220 ORIENTATION TO DEAFNESS                                               3/0     3
       PSY100 STRESS/LIFE MANAGEMENT                                                1/0     1
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                      3/0     3
       PSY170 DEATH, GRIEF AND RECOVERY                                             4/0     4
       THR100 INTRODUCTION TO RECREATION                                            4/0     4
       THR102 THERAPEUTIC RECREATION                                                4/0     4
       THR106 THERAPEUTIC RECREATION METHODS                                        3/0     3
(Choose at least one of the following)
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                    1/2     2
       CIS190     INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS                                           1/2     2

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                    3/0     3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                           3/0     3
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                 3/0     3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                               3/0     3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                               1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                              3/0     3

                           Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                     3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                           3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                        3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                           3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                              3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                      0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                             3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                 3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                         3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                        3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                        3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                           3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                       3-4/0   3




                                                         86
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                  4/0    4
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                               3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                        4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                               3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                              3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                             3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                            3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                              3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                  3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                            3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                              3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                               3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                    0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                          3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                  4/0    4
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                       3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                             3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                          3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                             3/0    3
       HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                        0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                               3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                     3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                             3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                            3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                            3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                               3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                           3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                               3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                        4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                               3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                              3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                             3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                            3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                              3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                  3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                            3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                              3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                               3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                    0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                          3/0    3




                                                          87
PARALEGAL STUDIES

         Paralegals are involved in substantial legal work that requires specific knowledge of law and the legal system. They
will assist lawyers by researching law, helping in case preparation, and by analyzing facts and legal questions. Paralegals
make use of law libraries and computers in performing their legal research and in preparing legal documents.

       Paralegals are most frequently employed in private law firms. They will also find employment in government
agencies, legal aid offices, legal departments of corporations, offices of special interest groups, criminal law offices, service
companies, and consulting firms.

        The paralegal career is best suited for someone who likes working in a formal and organized atmosphere, enjoys
working with detail and accuracy, takes pleasure in searching for answers, and has good organizational skills.

        The paralegal student is introduced to the major areas of law. These include tort law, legal research, litigation,
probate, family law, and criminal law. Real estate transactions and debtor-creditor relations are also studied. In addition, a
course in law office practices and an internship prepare the graduate for immediate entry into the position of a paralegal.

         Individuals with a felony conviction may experience difficulty gaining employment in the paralegal field. Students
with felony convictions should seek advice from the Paralegal Program Director.




                                                                88
                                                Paralegal Studies
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                   Technical Courses (Choose at least fourteen)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                Hours        Hours
      PLG110 INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGAL STUDIES                                                     4/0          4
      PLG120 TORT LAW                                                                              3/0          3
      PLG122 CRIMINAL LAW                                                                         4/0           4
      PLG131 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING I                                                         4/0           4
      PLG132 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING II                                                         4/0          4
      PLG135 LEGAL ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY                                          2/0          2
      PLG143 LITIGATION                                                                            4/0          4
      PLG210 PROBATE ADMINISTRATION                                                                4/0          4
      PLG220 FAMILY LAW                                                                            4/0          4
      PLG225 REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS                                                             4/0           4
      PLG230 DEBTOR-CREDITOR RELATIONS                                                            4/0           4
      PLG240 PARALEGAL INTERNSHIP                                                                 0/14          2
      PLG241 PARALEGAL SEMINAR                                                                    2/0           2
      PLG250 LAW OFFICE PROCEDURES AND MANAGEMENT                                                 3/0           3

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least seven)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       ACC112     ACCOUNTING II                                                                    4/0           4
       ACC211     TAXATION I                                                                       4/0           4
       CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
       CRJ145     INTRODUCTION TO THE UNITED STATES JUDICIAL AND CRIMINAL                          4/0           4
                  JUSTICE SYSTEMS
       MTH110     BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                             4/0           4
       BUS134     BUSINESS LAW                                                                     3/2           4

                                     General Courses (Choose at least seven)
General Courses
        PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                                      3/0           3
        POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                                        3/0           3
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           89
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one)
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
     PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
     PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
     SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     90
PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT

         As a physical therapist assistant, you will provide the hands-on treatment for individuals that have experienced a
traumatic illness or injury, under the direction of a physical therapist. This treatment may take place in numerous health care
settings including: hospitals, sports medicine clinics, private offices, individual homes, nursing homes, or school systems.
This career path will provide knowledge in the use of modern technology and specialized techniques including: exercise to
improve muscle strength and coordination; gait training with devices; and application of heat, cold, water or electricity; thus,
motivating the individual towards physical independence. This career choice may be a steppingstone to further professional
development in medicine.

         Our physical therapist assistant program has achieved the highest standard in accreditation from the Commission
on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (1111 N. Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, 800-999-2782) since
November 2, 1994, with re-accreditation on June 28, 1999 for a nine-year period. North Central State College re-confirms
the position of total support through human resources and fiscal measures towards the accreditation process.

         As a licensed physical therapist assistant, you will experience a level of employment that is both personally and
financially rewarding. This professional area of study is well respected by other health professionals and the public. In
addition to the ability to succeed academically, the program allows students to learn teamwork, patience, tactfulness,
emotional stability, as well as an overall desire to help people.

         Enrollment in the Physical Therapist Assistant program is limited. There is a special admission procedure. Please
contact the Admissions Office for details. The program is an eight-quarter sequence that starts every Summer Quarter.
Students must successfully complete the entrance requirements and have been selected through the competitive point
system. Pre-Physical Therapist Assistant status does not guarantee admission into the Physical Therapist Assistant courses
or program. Students may begin non-PTA courses any quarter.

         The Physical Therapist Assistant program publishes a student handbook delineating specific program policies that
are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the program handbook take precedence over
any general policy outlined in the College catalog. A copy of the handbook is available for review in the PTA Program
Director’s Office and the Admissions Office. An acceptable health physical and verification of immunizations are required.
Some practicum sites may require an acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report/FBI
background check and drug screening. A minimum grade of C- is required in BIO 145, BIO 146, BIO 147, MTH121*,
PHY114*, SCI115* and all PTA classes in order to meet prerequisite and graduation requirements.




                                                               91
                                         Physical Therapist Assistant
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      PTA100 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY                                                      3/0           3
      PTA110 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES I                                                         3/3           4
      PTA111 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES II                                                        3/3           4
      PTA112 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES III                                                       3/3           4
      PTA150 KINESIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS FOR PHYSICAL THERAPIST                                   3/2           4
                 ASSISTANTS
      PTA200 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES I                                                                3/3          4
      PTA201 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES II                                                               3/3          4
      PTA210 CLINICAL CONDITIONS I                                                                  3/0          3
      PTA211 CLINICAL CONDITIONS II                                                                 3/0          3
      PTA212 CLINICAL CONDITIONS III                                                                3/0          3
      PTA235 PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICUM I                                                           0/7          1
      PTA245 PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICUM II                                                         0/14          2
      PTA247 PRACTICUM SEMINAR I & II                                                               2/0          2
      PTA255 PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICUM III                                                        0/21          3
      PTA257 PRACTICUM SEMINAR III                                                                  2/0          2
      PTA260 TRENDS AND MANAGEMENT                                                                  3/0          3
      PTA265 PHYSICAL THERAPY DIRECTED PRACTICE                                                    0/30          6
      PTA267 DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR                                                              1/0          1
      PTA270 PHYSICAL THERAPY SEMINAR                                                               2/0          2
      PTA280 PHYSICAL THERAPY TREATMENT APPROACH                                                    2/0          2

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least seven)
Basic Courses
       PHI160     LEGAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE                                         2/0           2
       BIO145     HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I                                                     4/3           5
       BIO146     HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II                                                    4/3           5
       BIO147     HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY III                                                   3/3           4
       PHY114 GENERAL PHYSICS                                                                      3/3           4
       SCI115     MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY                                                              2/0           2
(Choose at least one of the following)
       MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                              4/0           4
       MTH130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                                      5/0           5
       MTH131 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRIC AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY                                          5/0           5
       MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                                     5/0           5

                                        General Courses (Choose at least six)
General Courses
        PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                                        5/0           5
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3



                                                           92
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
     PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
     PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
     PSY170 DEATH, GRIEF AND RECOVERY                                               4/0    4
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
     SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     93
ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING

        A registered nurse (RN) deals with people - sick, injured, and well. They are present at the most critical times in a
person’s life - at birth and death, at times of joy and sorrow. They work in a variety of settings including hospitals, long-term
care centers, home health agencies, hospices, group medical practices, and community-related programs. In addition to
providing direct patient care, the RN often coordinates the health care team.

         This career is suited to persons who are caring and sensitive to others’ thoughts and feelings. Honesty,
compassion, intelligence, and motivation are important qualities for the RN, as well as leadership, organization, and
attention to detail.

         Students take courses in anatomy/physiology, psychology, social sciences, as well as gerontological, medical-
surgical, psychiatric, pediatric, and obstetrical nursing. Upon completion of the program, the graduate is eligible to take the
licensing exam for registered nurses (NCLEX). NC State graduates have an outstanding success rate of passing the
licensing examination.

        The Associate Degree Nursing program is a seven-quarter program that is approved by the Ohio Board of Nursing
and the National League for Nursing. Specific information about the program accreditation may be obtained from the
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, 800-669-1656.

        LPN to Associate Degree RN: LPNs may articulate into the RN program to complete their Associate Degree in
Nursing. Students who have successfully completed ENG 101 or 103, BIO 101, BIO 145, 146, 147, BIO 155, PSY 130, CHE
110 and PSY 110, or who have received transfer credit, qualify to take ADN 125 - Transitional Concepts in Nursing. (CHE
110 and PSY 110 may be taken concurrently). Following successful completion of ADN 125, students may enroll in 2nd
level ADN courses: ADN 235, 236, 237 and 240.

          Enrollment in the Associate Degree Nursing program is limited. There is a special admission procedure. LPN to RN
articulation programs are also available. Please contact the Admissions Office for details.

         The Board of Nursing may, at its discretion, refuse to accept the application for licensure of any person who has
been convicted or has charges pending against them for a felony or who has been convicted of a misdemeanor resulting
from or related to the use of drugs or alcohol.

          The Associate Degree Nursing department publishes a student handbook which delineates specific
department/program policies which are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the
department's student handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog. A copy of the
handbook is available for review in the Admissions Office. A minimum grade of C- is required in BIO 145, BIO 146, BIO 147,
BIO 101*, BIO 155*, CHE 110*, and all ADN classes in order to meet prerequisite and graduation requirements (*applies
only if taken on or after Fall 1998).

          The Associate Degree Nursing program contains a sequence of clinical classes that begin in the Fall Quarter each
year. Entrance into this clinical sequence is limited to students who have successfully completed the entrance requirements.
Copies of the entrance requirements are available from the Admissions Office. An acceptable health physical and
verification of immunizations/immunities is required. Students may begin non-ADN courses any quarter. An acceptable
Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report/FBI background check and drug screening is required in
order to enter the clinical sequence.

        The department also requires that students attend an NCLEX review course as a required component of the last
nursing course and successfully complete a comprehensive exit examination (HESI).

         FYE 101 Orientation to College is not a required course in this program, but it is highly recommended. See your
faculty advisor.
                                                                94
                                           Associate Degree Nursing
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                       Technical Courses (Choose at least six)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
       ADN142 PHARMACOLOGY                                                                          3/0          3
       ADN235 NURSING - ADVANCED CONCEPTS                                                          3/18          9
       ADN236 NURSING - ADVANCED CONCEPTS                                                          3/18          9
       ADN237 NURSING - ADVANCED CONCEPTS                                                          3/18          9
       ADN240 NURSING TRENDS AND TRANSITIONS                                                        1/6          3
       ADN125 NURSING - TRANSITIONS CONCEPTS IN NURSING                                             6/9          9
(Or the following four courses instead of ADN125)
       ADN131 NURSING - BASIC CONCEPTS                                                              3/9          6
       ADN132 NURSING - INTERMEDIATE CONCEPTS I                                                     3/9          6
       ADN133 INTERMEDIATE CONCEPTS II                                                             4/12          8
       ADN134 NURSING - INTERMEDIATE CONCEPTS III                                                  4/12          8

                                         Basic Courses (Choose at least six)
Basic Courses
       BIO101      NUTRITION                                                                       3/0           3
       BIO147      HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY III                                                  3/3           4
       BIO155      MICROBIOLOGY                                                                    2/2           3
       CHE110 CHEMISTRY                                                                            3/3           4
       BIO145      HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I                                                    4/3           5
       BIO146      HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II                                                   4/3           5
(Or the following course may be substituted for BIO145 and BIO146)
       BIO149      ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY BRIDGE COURSE                                              4/4           6

                                       General Courses (Choose at least seven)
General Courses
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                         3/0           3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                                         5/0           5
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                    3/0           3
       ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                           3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
       ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                           3/0           3
       ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                 3/0           3
Speech Courses
       SPE101 SPEECH                                                                               3/0           3
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                                 3/0           3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                                       3/0           3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                                    3/0           3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                                       3/0           3
       HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                                          3/0           3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                                  0/0           3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                                         3/0           4
       PHI120     GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                              3/0           3
       PHI140     CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                                      3/0           3
       PHI170     SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                                     3/0           3
       PHI180     THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                                     3/0           3
       PHI190     THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                                        3/0           3
       PHI290     SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                                    3-4/0          3
                                                           95
RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

       The mission of the Radiological Sciences program is to produce competent entry-level radiographers. Our
graduates will demonstrate compassion and empathy toward patients, possess critical thinking and problem solving skills
and demonstrate professionalism.

         A radiographer uses learned skills to produce images of the body using ionizing radiation. During the course of a
day, a radiographer could be involved in general radiographic exams (hands, chest, feet, abdomen), trauma exams (car
accidents, falls), or specialized exams (involving the use of contrast media).

        Radiographers need to be adaptable, creative, and personable. There is a high degree of patient involvement. The
radiographer needs to be courteous and outgoing to help patients through their exams. Employment opportunities exist in
hospitals, clinics, private offices, or with mobile services.

        The goal of the Radiological Sciences program is to provide a well-balanced, educational and clinical experience.
The program further provides the students with the theory and labs to augment their practical/clinical experience. During the
eight quarter clinical sequence (the program begins in the Summer Quarter), students receive instruction in diagnostic
imaging and are given short rotations in CT, MRI, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound, and Radiation Oncology, Angiography and
Heart Catherization Lab. Some evenings are included as part of clinical education for additional trauma experience.
Students also rotate, on a limited basis, to other clinical sites. Courses include Radiographic Procedures, Patient Care,
Anatomy and Physiology, Radiation Biology, Physics, Pathology, Special Procedures, Quality Control, and Film Evaluation.

        The program is accredited by the Ohio Department of Health and The Joint Review Committee on Education in
Radiologic Technology (JRCERT, 20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, Illinois 60606-2901, 312-704-5300). The
JRCERT is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as an accreditation agency and evaluates programs using
standards endorsed by the ASRT.

       Enrollment in the Radiological Sciences program is limited. There is a special admission procedure. Please contact
the Admissions Office for details.

        The Radiological Sciences department publishes a student Policy and Procedure Manual which delineates specific
department/program policies which are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the
department’s student Policy and Procedure Manual take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog.
A copy of the Policy and Procedure Manual is available for review in the Admission’s Office. An acceptable health physical
and verification of immunizations/immunities are required. An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation
(BCI&I) report/FBI background check and drug screening is required in order to enter the clinical sequence. A minimum
grade of C- is required in MTH 121, BIO 145, BIO 146, BIO 147, PHY 120, and all RAD classes in order to meet
prerequisite and graduation requirements.

        The Radiological Sciences program contains a sequence of clinical classes that begin in the Summer Quarter each
year. Entrance into this clinical sequence is limited to students who have successfully completed the entrance requirements.
Copies of the entrance requirements are available from the Student Development Office. Students may begin non-RAD
courses (except PHY 120) any quarter. The department strongly suggests that MTH 121 be taken concurrent with RAD 141.




                                                             96
                                              Radiological Sciences
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                  Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty-five)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      RAD110 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/16          2
      RAD111 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/16          2
      RAD112 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/16          2
      RAD113 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/16          2
      RAD123 RADIATION PROTECTION                                                                   1/0          1
      RAD125 RADIOLOGIC EXPOSURE/FILM EVALUATION I                                                  3/0          3
      RAD126 RADIOLOGIC EXPOSURE/FILM EVALUATION II                                                 3/0          3
      RAD127 SPECIAL PROCEDURES/PHARMACOLOGY                                                        2/0          2
      RAD131 PATIENT CARE                                                                           3/2          4
      RAD141 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES I                                                              2/2          3
      RAD142 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II                                                             1/3          2
      RAD143 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES III                                                            2/2          3
      RAD144 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES IV                                                             2/2          3
      RAD160 RADIOLOGY CONCEPTS                                                                     2/0          2
      RAD161 RADIOLOGY CONCEPTS II                                                                  3/0          3
      RAD214 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/18          3
      RAD215 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/24          3
      RAD216 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/24          3
      RAD217 CLINICAL EDUCATION                                                                    0/24          3
      RAD227 SPECIALS I                                                                             3/0          3
      RAD228 SPECIALS II                                                                            4/0          3
      RAD229 QUALITY CONTROL IN IMAGING SCIENCES                                                    4/0          3
      RAD234 RADIATION BIOLOGY                                                                      2/0          2
      RAD236 PATHOLOGY                                                                              3/0          3
      RAD251 RADIOLOGIC SEMINAR                                                                     5/0          5

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least six)
Basic Courses
       BIO145     HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I                                                      4/3          5
       BIO146     HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II                                                     4/3          5
       BIO147     HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY III                                                    3/3          4
       PHI160     LEGAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE                                          2/0          2
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                                         3/0          3
(Choose at least one of the following)
       MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                               4/0          4
       MTH130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                                       5/0          5
       MTH131 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRIC AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY                                           5/0          5
       MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                                      5/0          5

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                     3/0          3
       ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                            3/0          3
(Must complete the following)
       ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                            3/0          3
       ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                  3/0          3
Speech Courses
       SPE101 SPEECH                                                                                3/0          3



                                                            97
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                              1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                             3/0     3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
     PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
     PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
     PSY170 DEATH, GRIEF AND RECOVERY                                               4/0    4
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                               98
RESPIRATORY CARE

        According to the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), Respiratory Care is: "a health care specialty
under medical direction in the assessment, treatment, management, diagnostic evaluation, and care of patients with
deficiencies and abnormalities of the cardiopulmonary system."

      There are more than 132,000 respiratory care practitioners in the United States. Respiratory Therapists are
members of the allied health care team.

         In a recent study conducted by the AARC, seventy-five percent of respiratory care practitioners work in hospitals
side-by-side with physicians and nurses as a vital part of the health care team. They work in intensive care, the emergency
department, medical-surgical floors, and labor and delivery. The additional twenty-five percent of practicing therapists work
in laboratories, home care settings, skilled nursing facilities, physician offices, in sales, education and research.

          Respiratory therapists are highly motivated individuals. They are intelligent, caring, able to employ critical thinking
skills, and are willing to grow with the profession. You may learn more about the Respiratory Care profession by contacting
the AARC at http://www.aarc.org or The Ohio Society for Respiratory Care at http://www.osrc.org.

         The Respiratory Care program of North Central State College provides the student with a strong background in the
use of respiratory equipment, patient assessment, cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology. The
student receives direct, hands-on, patient care experience in various hospitals and facilities throughout their clinical
education.

        The Respiratory Care program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education
Programs (CAAHEP) upon recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), 1248
Harwood Road, Bedford, Texas 76021-2835, 817-283-2835. Graduates are eligible and well prepared to begin the National
Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) examination process to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist and to attain the
Respiratory Care license in the state of Ohio.

       Enrollment in the Respiratory Care program is limited. There is a special admission procedure. Please contact the
Admissions Office or Robert Slabodnick, Program Director, at 419-755-4891 for details.

         The Respiratory Care department publishes a student handbook which delineates specific department/program
policies which are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the department’s student
handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog. A copy of the handbook is available for
review in the Admissions Office. An acceptable health physical and verification of immunizations/immunities and an
acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report/FBI background check and drug screening is
required in order to enter the technical (RES) course sequence. A minimum grade of C- is required in MTH 121, BIO 121,
BIO 122, BIO 155*, CHM 110*, PHY 114* (*if taken after Summer, 2002), and all RES classes in order to meet prerequisite
and graduation requirements.

        The Respiratory Care program contains a sequence of technical (RES) classes that begin in the Fall Quarter each
year. Entrance into this sequence is limited to students who have successfully completed the entrance requirements.
Copies of the entrance requirements are available from the Admissions Office. Persons who are currently Certified
Respiratory Therapy Technicians by the National Board for Respiratory Care may apply for advanced standing in the
program. Students may begin non-RES courses (and RES 101) any quarter.




                                                                99
                                       Respiratory Therapy Technology
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                  Technical Courses (Choose at least twenty-two)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      RES101 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY AND INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY                                   1/0           1
                 THERAPY
      RES103 CARDIOPULMONARY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I                                               4/0          4
      RES104 CARDIOPULMONARY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II                                              4/0          4
      RES130 RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES I                                         4/4          6
      RES131 RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES II                                        4/3          5
      RES132 RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES III                                       4/3          5
      RES133 RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES IV                                        2/3          3
      RES140 CLINICAL EDUCATION I                                                                   0/6          1
      RES141 CLINICAL EDUCATION II                                                                 0/12          2
      RES142 CLINICAL EDUCATION III                                                                0/16          2
      RES151 PHYSICIANS SEMINAR I                                                                   2/0          2
      RES152 PHYSICIANS SEMINAR II                                                                  2/0          2
      RES207 PHARMACOLOGY                                                                           4/0          4
      RES210 PATHOLOGY I                                                                            3/0          3
      RES211 PATHOLOGY II                                                                           3/0          3
      RES222 RESPIRATORY THERAPY ADMINISTRATION                                                     2/0          2
      RES225 RESPIRATORY THERAPY REVIEW                                                             3/0          3
      RES234 RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES V                                         2/3          3
      RES243 CLINICAL EDUCATION IV                                                                 0/16          2
      RES244 CLINICAL EDUCATION V (PEDIATRICS)                                                     0/16          2
      RES245 CLINICAL EDUCATION VI (ADVANCED PROCEDURES)                                           0/24          4
      RES253 PHYSICIANS SEMINAR III                                                                 2/0          2

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least seven)
Basic Courses
       BIO121     BASIC ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I                                                     2/2           3
       BIO122     BASIC ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II                                                    2/2           3
       BIO155     MICROBIOLOGY                                                                     2/2           3
       CHE110 CHEMISTRY                                                                            3/3           4
       PHI160     LEGAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE                                         2/0           2
       PHY114 GENERAL PHYSICS                                                                      3/3           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
       MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                              4/0           4
       MTH130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                                      5/0           5

                                        General Courses (Choose at least six)
General Courses
        PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                        3/0           3
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3



                                                           100
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                               4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
     HUM150 LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS                                             3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                        3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                       3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                       3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                          3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                      3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                     4/0    4
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                          3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                            5/0    5
     PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                        3/0    3
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                     4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
     PSY170 DEATH, GRIEF AND RECOVERY                                               4/0    4
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
     SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                    101
TECHNOLOGY
& WORKFORCE
DEVELOPMENT
 PROGRAMS




     102
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

The use of computers in the business environment has changed expectations for the workforce. No longer only used for
collecting and tabulating data, computers are used for every facet of business. This requires that those entering the field
have a solid foundation. This includes business principles and ethics, programming, operations, design and testing,
networking, sales, maintenance, and training.

The Computer Information Systems program exposes students to the basic concepts and practices of a business
environment, as well as basic skills in programming, networking, and user support, including the critical “people” skills
needed in a business enterprise. Additionally, CIS students are trained in business etiquette, and presentation skills.

CIS graduates are employed as programmer/analysts, service and maintenance technicians, help desk
personnel, network administrators, systems administrators, and operators, in various businesses such as, banks, insurance
companies, internet sales companies, manufacturing enterprises, government agencies, and educational institutions.
Graduates also are involved in the areas of program design, testing, and maintenance of existing programs, and may be
involved in developing and writing programs that enable companies to organize information and solve business problems.
CIS graduates also interact with the other departments in the enterprise, analyzing and solving problems for various user s
and are responsible for providing accurate and timely information to all departments within the company.

The curriculum provides sufficient breadth and depth to enable students to secure entry level jobs in the field. CIS students
learn programming, as well as fundamentals of operating systems, maintenance and upgrading of equipment, and basic
business and accounting principles. They have a working knowledge of databases, the core of any successful “e-business”,
and complete a capstone project that requires them to draw upon their own expertise and that of their teammates, in order
to effectively analyze a situation and develop solutions.

CIS students are expected to have a minimum competency in the computer environment, as evaluated by using the CIS
assessment. Students who do not meet the minimum standards are required to take additional preparatory coursework. CIS
students must maintain a grade of “C” or higher to continue in the program. Those not achieving the required grade must
retake those courses and earn the minimum grade.




                                                              103
                                       Computer Information Systems
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least sixteen)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                Hours        Hours
      CIS107      BUSINESS SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY                                                     2/2           3
      CIS109      DATABASE ANALYSIS & DESIGN                                                      4/0           4
      CIS110      PROGRAM LOGIC                                                                   4/0           4
      CIS121      MICROSOFT WORD                                                                  1/2           2
      CIS122      MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                 1/2           2
      CIS125      MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                            1/2           2
      CIS206      PC UPGRADE / SUPPORT / REPAIR I                                                 3/3           4
      CIS226      C++ PROGRAMMING I                                                               4/0           4
      CIS227      C++ PROGRAMMING II                                                              4/0           4
      CIS261      CISCO ACADEMY I                                                                 2/4           4
      CIS296      CIS CASE STUDIES                                                                2/4           4
Technical Electives (twenty credits minimum)
      CIS131      VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING I                                                       4/0           4
      CIS132      VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING II                                                      4/0           4
      CIS134      MARKUP AND SCRIPTING LANGUAGES                                                   4/0           4
      CIS141      COBOL PROGRAMMING I                                                              3/3           4
      CIS207      PC UPGRADE /SUPPORT/ REPAIR II                                                   3/3           4
      CIS222      JAVA PROGRAMMING I                                                               4/0           4
      CIS230      RPG PROGRAMMING I                                                                3/3           4
      CIS236      WEB-BASED DATABASES                                                              4/0           4
      CIS262      CISCO ACADEMY II                                                                 2/4           4
      CIS263      CISCO ACADEMY III                                                                2/4           4
      CIS264      CISCO ACADEMY IV                                                                 2/4           4
      CIS270      LINUX I                                                                          3/3           4
      CIS271      LINUX II                                                                         3/3           4
      CIS273      NETWORK SECURITY                                                                 3/3           4
      CIS275      STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE (SQL)                                                  4/0           4
      CIS281      NOVELL NETWARE I                                                                 3/3           4
      CIS282      NOVELL NETWARE II                                                                3/3           4
      CIS292      WINDOWS SERVER I                                                                 3/3           4
      CIS293      WINDOWS SERVER II                                                                3/3           4
      ELE150      TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING                                                      3/2           4

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least five)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       BUS110     INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                         4/0           4
       BUS285     BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                  3/0           3
       MTH119     CIS MATH                                                                         4/0           4
       CIS104     OPERATING SYSTEMS                                                                3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
       ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                    3/0           3
       ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                           3/0           3
(Must take the following)
       ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                           3/0           3



                                                          104
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                 3/0     3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                     3/0     3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                    3/0     3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                               3/0     3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                               1/0     1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                              3/0     3

                           Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                   3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                         3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                      3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                         3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                    0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                           3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                 3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                         3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                        3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                        3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                           3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                       3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                              4/0    4
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                           3/0    3
       PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                                    4/0    4
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                           3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                          3/0    3
       PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                                         3/0    3
       PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                           5/0    5
       PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                                       3/0    3
       PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                    4/0    4
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                        3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                          3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                              3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                        3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                          3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                           3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                      3/0    3




                                                           105
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     ECN101 ECONOMICS                                                    4/0    4
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                         3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                               3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                            3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                               3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                          0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                 3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                     3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                             3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                            3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                            3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                               3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                           3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                 3/0    3
     PSY105 PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT                                          4/0    4
     PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                 3/0    3
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                3/0    3
     PSY115 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES                               3/0    3
     PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                 5/0    5
     PSY135 AGING IN AMERICA                                             3/0    3
     PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                          4/0    4
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                              3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                    3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                              3/0    3
     SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                 3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                      0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                            3/0    3




                                                         106
                                      Career Technical Teaching Option
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                     Technical Courses (Choose at least twelve)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      CIS107      BUSINESS SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY                                                      2/2           3
      CIS109      DATABASE ANALYSIS & DESIGN                                                       4/0           4
      CIS110      PROGRAM LOGIC                                                                    4/0           4
      CIS121      MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
      CIS131      VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING I                                                       4/0           4
      CIS222      JAVA PROGRAMMING I                                                               4/0           4
      CIS226      C++ PROGRAMMING I                                                                4/0           4
      CIS227      C++ PROGRAMMING II                                                               4/0           4
      CIS236      WEB-BASED DATABASES                                                              4/0           4
      CIS270      LINUX I                                                                          3/3           4
      CIS275      STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE (SQL)                                                  4/0           4
      CIS296      CIS CASE STUDIES                                                                 2/4           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
      CIS134      MARKUP AND SCRIPTING LANGUAGES                                                   4/0           4
      CIS222      JAVA PROGRAMMING I                                                               4/0           4

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least eight)
Basic Courses
       ACC111     ACCOUNTING I                                                                     4/0           4
       BUS110     INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                         4/0           4
       BUS285     BUSINESS ETHICS                                                                  3/0           3
       ECN161     MICROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       ECN162     MACROECONOMICS                                                                   4/0           4
       MTH119     CIS MATH                                                                         4/0           4
       STA110     PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS                                                       3/2           4
       CIS104     OPERATING SYSTEMS                                                                3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3

                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least five)
Humanities/Soc Science Courses
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                                   3/0           3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                                         3/0           3
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                               3/0           3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                                       3/0           3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                                              3/0           3



                                                           107
DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Broadcast Journalism Communications Major

        The electronic and print media opportunities continue to expand, especially in the field of digital communications
and telecommunications. This study path of the Digital Media Technology department will fill the growing need for trained
people in both the production and performance areas.

         Broadcast students will have access to a “state-of-the-art” television studio for use as a “real world” lab in which to
put their classroom knowledge to practice. All areas of broadcast journalism from those who want to be in front of the
camera or microphone to others who wish to produce and direct the finished product will be covered. The students will have
the use of computer labs and other electronic equipment on campus.

         A major focus of this area will be the reporting of news for all media. There will also be courses offered in all of the
necessary areas: writing; interviewing; reporting; and delivering the news for radio, television, and print outlets. Students
must have mastery of the computer skills presented in AIT 100 (Intro. to Keyboarding) and CIS 190 (Intro. to Windows) prior
to entering this program. This can be demonstrated by completing the courses successfully, passing the Credit by Exam for
each course, or transferring credit for similar courses from another college.

         Students graduating with a degree in Broadcast Journalism can seek careers in radio, TV, and print media arenas.
Job titles include: broadcast technician, video editor, video camera operator, videographer, audio operator, photo journalist,
TV producer/director, news/sports reporter, and print media journalist.




                                                               108
                                   Broadcast Journalism Communication
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                   Technical Courses (Choose at least nineteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      DMT102 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                        2/2           3
      DMT105 IMAGE MANIPULATION I                                                                  2/4           4
      DMT109 PRINCIPLES OF AUDIO PRODUCTION                                                        2/2           3
      DMT110 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS                                                             3/2           4
      DMT118 RADIO PRODUCTION I                                                                    0/2           1
      DMT124 MEDIA INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                         2/2           3
      DMT126 MEDIA REPORTING                                                                       1/2           2
      DMT140 PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                           2/2           3
      DMT201 FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL ANIMATION                                                     2/2           3
      DMT205 SET DESIGN AND LIGHTING                                                               2/2           3
      DMT210 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL AUDIO AND VIDEO EDITING                                       2/2           3
      DMT216 FUNDAMENTALS OF TV STUDIO PRODUCTION                                                  2/2           3
      DMT218 RADIO AND TV PROGRAMMING MANAGEMENT                                                   2/2           3
      DMT219 RADIO PRODUCTION II                                                                   0/2           1
      DMT230 MULTIMEDIA PROJECT (CAPSTONE)                                                         2/2           3
      DMT240 INTERNSHIP                                                                            0/7           1
      DMT242 BROADCAST PERFORMING                                                                  2/2           3
      DMT255 SEMINAR                                                                               1/1           1

                                   Non Technical Courses (Choose at least fifteen)
Non Technical Courses
      ART120 DRAWING I                                                                             3/2           4
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS244 ADVERTISING                                                                           3/0           3
      CIS121      MICROSOFT WORD                                                                   1/2           2
      CIS125      MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                             1/2           2
      ENG113 BASICS OF JOURNALISTIC WRITING                                                        2/2           3
      ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                            3/0           3
      ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                     3/0           3
      PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                              3/0           3
      POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                                          3/0           3
      SPE101 SPEECH                                                                                3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                     3/0           3
      ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                            3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                          3/0           3
      SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                                       3/0           3




                                                           109
(Choose at least one of the following)
     MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                   4/0      4
     MTH119 CIS MATH                                                               4/0      4
     MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                4/0      4
     MTH122 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II                                               4/0      4
     MTH123 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III                                              4/0      4
     MTH130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                        5/0      5
     MTH131 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRIC AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY                            5/0      5
     MTH132 ANALYTIC AND PRE-CALCULUS TOPICS                                       5/0      5
     MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                       5/0      5
     MTH142 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II                                      5/0      5
     MTH143 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III                                     5/0      5
     MTH144 MULTIPLE INTEGRATIONS                                                  3/0      3
     MTH145 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS                                                 3/0      3
     MTH194 APPLIED GEOMETRY & TRIGONOMETRY                                        4/0      4
(Choose at least one of the following)
     DMT290 SPECIAL TOPICS                                                        1-6/1-6   6
     ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                        3/0     3
     ENG215 EDITING AND PUBLISHING                                                  3/0     3

                                    First Year Experience (Choose at least one)
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                              1/0      1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                             3/0      3




                                                        110
DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Digital Arts Major

          The Digital Arts major of the Digital Media degree program incorporates design skills, technical training, as well as
critical thinking skills in its curriculum. Students are provided a balance of theory, practice, and production in a major which
includes work in graphic design, typography, digital image manipulation, animation, and other multimedia software
applications. Students apply multimedia technology to assemble graphics, text, sound, and video into meaningful
productions.

          Students must have mastery of the computer skills presented in AIT 100 (Intro. to Keyboarding) and CIS 190 (Intro.
to Windows) prior to entering this program. This can be demonstrated by completing the courses successfully, passing the
Credit by Exam for each course, or transferring credit for similar courses from another college. Students will gain experience
utilizing a variety of software applications, design techniques, as well as learning about the creative process.

         Students graduating with a degree in Digital Arts Media Technology may seek careers not only in the traditional
advertising and printing fields, but also in new areas that include multimedia and interactive design. Traditional print media
careers include graphic designer, desktop publisher, image specialist, photo retoucher, prepress technician, and print
production. Multimedia careers include multimedia producer, interactive artist, animator, information manager, CD-ROM
developer, interactive system designer, and many new jobs yet to be defined in this expanding field.




                                                               111
                                                     Digital Arts
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least sixteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      DMT102 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                        2/2           3
      DMT105 IMAGE MANIPULATION I                                                                  2/4           4
      DMT110 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS                                                             3/2           4
      DMT128 ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                               3/2           4
      DMT135 IMAGE MANIPULATION II                                                                 2/4           4
      DMT140 PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                           2/2           3
      DMT201 FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL ANIMATION                                                     2/2           3
      DMT204 DIGITAL GRAPHIC CREATION                                                              2/2           3
      DMT211 INTERMEDIATE ANIMATION                                                                2/4           4
      DMT212 IMAGE MANIPULATION III                                                                2/2           3
      DMT221 ADVANCED ANIMATION                                                                    2/4           4
      DMT228 APPLIED DESKTOP PUBLISHING                                                            1/2           2
      DMT230 MULTIMEDIA PROJECT (CAPSTONE)                                                         2/2           3
      DMT240 INTERNSHIP                                                                            0/7           1
      DMT255 SEMINAR                                                                               1/1           1

                                   Non Technical Courses (Choose at least fifteen)
Non Technical Courses
      ART120 DRAWING I                                                                             3/2           4
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS244 ADVERTISING                                                                           3/0           3
      CIS125      MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                             1/2           2
      ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                            3/0           3
      ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                     3/0           3
      HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                                        3/0           3
      POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                                          3/0           3
      SPE101 SPEECH                                                                                3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                     3/0           3
      ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                            3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                          4/0           4
      BUS134 BUSINESS LAW                                                                          3/2           4
      DMT107 PRINCIPLES OF WEB DESIGN                                                              2/2           3
      DMT109 PRINCIPLES OF AUDIO PRODUCTION                                                        2/2           3
      DMT205 SET DESIGN AND LIGHTING                                                               2/2           3
      DMT210 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL AUDIO AND VIDEO EDITING                                       2/2           3
      DMT220 DEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING MATERIALS                                                     2/2           3
      ECN161 MICROECONOMICS                                                                        4/0           4
      ECN162 MACROECONOMICS                                                                        4/0           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
      BUS140 PRINCIPLES OF SELLING                                                                 3/0           3
      BUS226 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS                                                   3/0           3
      DMT290 SPECIAL TOPICS                                                                      1-6/1-6         6
(Choose at least one of the following)
      PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                          3/0           3
      SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                                       3/0           3



                                                           112
(Choose at least one of the following)
     MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                  4/0   4
     MTH119 CIS MATH                                                              4/0   4
     MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                               4/0   4
     MTH122 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II                                              4/0   4
     MTH123 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III                                             4/0   4
     MTH130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                       5/0   5
     MTH131 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRIC AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY                           5/0   5
     MTH132 ANALYTIC AND PRE-CALCULUS TOPICS                                      5/0   5
     MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                      5/0   5
     MTH142 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II                                     5/0   5
     MTH143 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III                                    5/0   5
     MTH144 MULTIPLE INTEGRATIONS                                                 3/0   3
     MTH145 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS                                                3/0   3
     MTH194 APPLIED GEOMETRY & TRIGONOMETRY                                       4/0   4
(Choose at least one of the following)
     ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                      3/0   3
     ENG215 EDITING AND PUBLISHING                                                3/0   3

                                    First Year Experience (Choose at least one)
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                             1/0   1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                            3/0   3




                                                        113
DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Web/Tech Communications Major

         Digital Media is rapidly changing the skills needed to effectively utilize the tools and means of communication in the
21st Century. Computers, Internet, and a vast array of electronic equipment have introduced an entirely new
communications media which has greatly impacted the entire communication community and society at large. The Digital
Media Web/Tech Communications major brings together the study of all media -- visual, textual, and audio -- to include the
study of visual communication, web-site design, graphic design, written communications, and computer-based media.

         Students will gain experience with the latest tools; learn perspectives in design, production, the creative process;
and exploring marketing strategies and impacts of the new media. The computer is the primary tool of interaction and
production with information as the commodity which travels through electronic cyberspace. Students must have mastery of
the computer skills presented in AIT 100 (Intro. to Keyboarding) and CIS 190 (Intro. to Windows) prior to entering this
program. This can be demonstrated by completing the courses successfully, passing the Credit by Exam for each course, or
transferring credit for similar courses from another college.

        With the skills gained in this program, graduates can find work in numerous environments. The career opportunities
include web site designer and developer, interactive writers, interface designer, creative directors, graphic designers, project
managers or producers, technical writers, webmaster, web programmer, and e-business support specialist.




                                                              114
                                          Web/Tech Communications
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least sixteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      CIS123     MICROSOFT ACCESS                                                                  1/2           2
      DMT102 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                        2/2           3
      DMT105 IMAGE MANIPULATION I                                                                  2/4           4
      DMT110 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS                                                             3/2           4
      DMT120 ADVANCED WEB DESIGN                                                                   2/2           3
      DMT128 ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                               3/2           4
      DMT134 SCRIPTING FOR WEB DESIGN                                                              3/3           4
      DMT135 IMAGE MANIPULATION II                                                                 2/4           4
      DMT140 PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                           2/2           3
      DMT201 FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL ANIMATION                                                     2/2           3
      DMT210 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL AUDIO AND VIDEO EDITING                                       2/2           3
      DMT214 WEB SERVERS AND DATABASES                                                             2/2           3
      DMT230 MULTIMEDIA PROJECT (CAPSTONE)                                                         2/2           3
      DMT240 INTERNSHIP                                                                            0/7           1
      DMT255 SEMINAR                                                                               1/1           1
      DMT290 SPECIAL TOPICS                                                                      1-6/1-6         6

                                   Non Technical Courses (Choose at least sixteen)
Non Technical Courses
      ART120 DRAWING I                                                                             3/2           4
      BUS121 MANAGEMENT                                                                            4/0           4
      BUS148 MARKETING                                                                             4/0           4
      BUS244 ADVERTISING                                                                           3/0           3
      DMT107 PRINCIPLES OF WEB DESIGN                                                              2/2           3
      DMT220 DEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING MATERIALS                                                     2/2           3
      ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                            3/0           3
      ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                     3/0           3
      HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                                        3/0           3
      POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                                          3/0           3
      SPE101 SPEECH                                                                                3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                     3/0           3
      ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                            3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      BUS140 PRINCIPLES OF SELLING                                                                 3/0           3
      BUS226 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS                                                   3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                          3/0           3
      SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                                       3/0           3




                                                           115
(Choose at least one of the following)
     MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                  4/0   4
     MTH119 CIS MATH                                                              4/0   4
     MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                               4/0   4
     MTH122 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II                                              4/0   4
     MTH123 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III                                             4/0   4
     MTH130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                       5/0   5
     MTH131 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRIC AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY                           5/0   5
     MTH132 ANALYTIC AND PRE-CALCULUS TOPICS                                      5/0   5
     MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                      5/0   5
     MTH142 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II                                     5/0   5
     MTH143 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III                                    5/0   5
     MTH144 MULTIPLE INTEGRATIONS                                                 3/0   3
     MTH145 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS                                                3/0   3
     MTH194 APPLIED GEOMETRY & TRIGONOMETRY                                       4/0   4
(Choose at least one of the following)
     ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                      3/0   3
     ENG215 EDITING AND PUBLISHING                                                3/0   3

                                    First Year Experience (Choose at least one)
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                             1/0   1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                            3/0   3




                                                        116
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

        A graduate of Electronic Engineering Technology will be involved with applications engineering. He or she will be
involved in a wide range of activities such as design, troubleshooting, repair and maintenance of communications systems,
computer circuits, telemetry, numerical controls, industrial electronics, automation, fiber optics, and laser technology. They
may also be involved with design and development, customer service, purchasing, quality control, technical sales, and
technical writing.

        Although most electronic engineering technicians find jobs in manufacturing industries and service industries, they
may also work for governmental agencies or in research and development activities. Jobs may be situated in the production
shop, the design engineering offices, research laboratories, or in the field traveling to on-site locations or in technical sales.

        The individual that has an interest in knowing how things work, determining how things may work better, and who
has an interest in problem solving may find Electronic Engineering Technology an appropriate career choice. The individual
should also have an interest in and aptitude for mathematics and science.

         The student in Electronic Engineering Technology will study electronics circuits, integrated circuits, digital
electronics, communications systems, microprocessors, industrial electronics, and instrumentation. In addition, this program
is transferable to several institutions in Ohio that have B.S. Degrees in Engineering Technology.




                                                               117
                                          Electronic Engineering Tech
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least eighteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      DRD271 ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAFTING                                                           1/2           2
      ELE150      TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING                                                      3/2           4
      ELE151      DC ELECTRICITY                                                                   3/2           4
      ELE152      AC ELECTRICITY                                                                   3/2           4
      ELE153      DIGITAL PRINCIPLES                                                               2/2           3
      ELE154      LADDER DIAGRAMS                                                                  2/2           3
      ELE155      ELECTRICAL MOTORS                                                                3/2           4
      ELE171      INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS                                                         2/2           3
      ELE210      AC/DC DRIVES                                                                     2/2           3
      ELE224      PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS I                                                 2/2           3
      ELE245      ELECTRONICS                                                                      2/2           3
      ELE257      MICROCONTROLLERS I                                                               2/2           3
      ELE258      MICROCONTROLLERS II                                                              2/2           3
      ELE276      ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION                                                         2/2           3
Technical Electives (Choose at least one of the following)
      ELM225 PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS II                                                     2/2           3
      ELM230 PROCESS CONTROLS                                                                      2/3           4
      MEC175 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS                                                             1/2           2
      MEC285 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS                                                                 3/0           3
Technical Math Electives (Choose at least three of the following)
      MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                               4/0           4
      MTH122 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II                                                              4/0           4
      MTH123 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III                                                             4/0           4
      MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                                      5/0           5
      MTH142 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II                                                     5/0           5
      MTH143 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III                                                    5/0           5

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least three)
Basic Courses
       ENR101     INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                                                      3/2           4
       PHY111     COLLEGE PHYSICS I                                                                3/3           4
       PHY112     COLLEGE PHYSICS II                                                               3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3

                                                           118
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     119
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Electrical Maintenance Option

        A graduate of the Electrical Maintenance option will be involved in the maintenance and repair of electrical and
electronic manufacturing systems commonly used on the factory floor today. Troubleshooting and problem-solving skills will
be a requirement of this position due to the complex nature of the computerized control systems in use today.

       Most graduates will find employment in both large and small manufacturing companies. They may also find work in
government agencies, service organizations, technical sales or research, and development activities.

         The individual that has an interest in knowing how things work, determining how to fix things and make them run
better, and who has an interest in problem-solving may find the Electrical Maintenance option an appropriate career choice.
The individual should have an interest in and an aptitude for mathematics and science.

         The will study DC/AC circuits, microcomputer programming, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, troubleshooting and
repair, digital electronics, microprocessors, programmable logic controllers, data communications systems, and
instrumentation.




                                                            120
                                         Electrical Maintenance Option
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Technical Courses (Choose at least eighteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      ELE150      TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING                                                      3/2           4
      ELE151      DC ELECTRICITY                                                                   3/2           4
      ELE152      AC ELECTRICITY                                                                   3/2           4
      ELE153      DIGITAL PRINCIPLES                                                               2/2           3
      ELE154      LADDER DIAGRAMS                                                                  2/2           3
      ELE155      ELECTRICAL MOTORS                                                                3/2           4
      ELE171      INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS                                                         2/2           3
      ELE210      AC/DC DRIVES                                                                     2/2           3
      ELE224      PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS I                                                 2/2           3
      ELE257      MICROCONTROLLERS I                                                               2/2           3
      ELM115 ELECTRICAL CODES                                                                      2/2           3
      ELM130 INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTATION                                                            2/2           3
      ELM225 PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS II                                                     2/2           3
      ELM230 PROCESS CONTROLS                                                                      2/3           4
      ELM244 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS                                                                1/2           2
Technical Math Electives (Choose at least three of the following)
      MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                               4/0           4
      MTH122 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II                                                              4/0           4
      MTH123 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III                                                             4/0           4
      MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                                      5/0           5
      MTH142 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II                                                     5/0           5
      MTH143 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III                                                    5/0           5

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least three)
Basic Courses
       ENR101     INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                                                      3/2           4
       PHY111     COLLEGE PHYSICS I                                                                3/3           4
       PHY112     COLLEGE PHYSICS II                                                               3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           121
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     122
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

Engineering Design Major

         A design technician prepares detailed drawings based on rough sketches, specifications, and calculations made by
engineers, architects, and designers. The final drawings contain a detailed view of an object from all sides, specifications for
materials, and the procedures to follow. The technician can expect to find employment in engineering departments in
industry and private consulting firms (both architectural and engineering related).

       The traditional drafter use to sit at a drawing board using compasses, T-squares, and protractors. The modern
method of drafting uses computer-aided drafting (CAD)systems which allows more freedom from routine and flexibility in
drawings.

       The field of design is suited to persons who enjoy applying their technical knowledge to a particular problem and
conveying their solutions to another person in a neat and precise manner through the use of drafting techniques.

        The Design Engineering curriculum at North Central State College provides the student with background in
electromechanical, piping, and civil drafting. Additional courses include Tool Design, Die Design, Geometrical Dimensioning
and Tolerancing, and Engineering Computer Applications. Students will also become proficient in Computer Aided Drafting.
They will take four courses in CAD.




                                                              123
                                               Engineering Design
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                   Technical Courses (Choose at least nineteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      DRD215 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I                                                               2/2           3
      DRD216 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN II                                                              2/3           4
      DRD217 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN III                                                             2/2           3
      DRD218 MAP AND TOPOGRAPHIC DRAFTING                                                          2/2           3
      DRD219 PIPING AND SHEET METAL                                                                2/2           3
      DRD225 DESIGN PRESENTATION                                                                   1/2           2
      DRD226 SOLID MODELING                                                                        2/2           3
      DRD235 GEOMETRIC DIMENSIONING AND TOLERANCING                                                2/2           3
      DRD264 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN                                                                  2/2           3
      DRD271 ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAFTING                                                           1/2           2
      DRD299 SURVEYING                                                                             2/2           3
      ELE150     TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING                                                       3/2           4
      MEC111 MACHINING PROCESSES                                                                   2/2           3
      MEC115 FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING DESIGN                                                    2/2           3
      MEC130 WELDING AND WELDING EQUIPMENT                                                         2/2           3
      MEC175 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS                                                             1/2           2
      MEC264 COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURING                                                          2/2           3
      MEC285 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS                                                                 3/0           3
      TND101 TOOL AND DIE DESIGN                                                                   3/2           4

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least four)
Basic Courses
       ENR101     INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                                                      3/2           4
       MTH121     TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                          4/0           4
       MTH194     APPLIED GEOMETRY & TRIGONOMETRY                                                  4/0           4
       PHY114     GENERAL PHYSICS                                                                  3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least four)
English Courses
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           124
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     125
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

Tool and Die Option

        A graduate of the Tool and Die Option will be involved in the production and/or maintenance of various types of
production dies. The technician may work in a job shop, maintenance shop, or directly on the production floor.
Troubleshooting and problem-solving skills will be a requirement of this position due to the complex nature of the
computerized machines used today.

       Most graduates will find employment in both large and small manufacturing companies. They may also find work in
government agencies, service organizations, or research and development activities.

         The individual that has an interest in knowing how things work, determining how to fix things and make them run
better, and who has an interest in problem-solving may find the Tool and Die Major an appropriate career choice. The
individual should have an interest in and an aptitude for mathematics.

        The student in the Tool and Die Option will study machine technology, superabrasive cutting and grinding, CNC
programming and operations, manufacturing AutoCAD, tool and die design, die mechanics, press technology, and applied
die construction.




                                                            126
                                                    Tool and Die
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                   Technical Courses (Choose at least nineteen)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      DRD215 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I                                                               2/2           3
      MEC111 MACHINING PROCESSES                                                                   2/2           3
      MEC115 FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING DESIGN                                                    2/2           3
      MEC130 WELDING AND WELDING EQUIPMENT                                                         2/2           3
      MEC175 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS                                                             1/2           2
      MEC223 ENGINEERING MATERIALS                                                                 3/2           4
      MEC264 COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURING                                                          2/2           3
      TND101 TOOL AND DIE DESIGN                                                                   3/2           4
      TND110 ADVANCED MACHINING WITH SUPERABRASIVES                                                2/2           3
      TND206 CNC PROGRAMMING OPERATIONS II W-CAM                                                   2/2           3
      TND225 INTRODUCTION TO PRESS TECHNOLOGY                                                      3/0           3
      TND235 METAL STAMPING DIES                                                                   3/0           3
      TND290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN TOOL AND DIE                                                        4/0           4
      TND291 TOOL AND DIE TECHNOLOGY PROJECT                                                       4/0           4
Technical Electives
      AIM101      ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE                                                           3/2           4
      AIM102      FUNDAMENTALS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS                                               2/2           3
      AIM103      ESSENTIALS OF HYDRAULICS                                                         3/2           4
      AIM104      ESSENTIALS OF PNEUMATICS                                                         1/2           2
      AIM105      PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL                                                       2/2           3

                                        Basic Courses (Choose at least four)
Basic Courses
       ENR101     INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                                                      3/2           4
       MTH121     TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                          4/0           4
       MTH194     APPLIED GEOMETRY & TRIGONOMETRY                                                  4/0           4
       PHY114     GENERAL PHYSICS                                                                  3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3




                                                           127
                           Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                     3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                           3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                        3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                           3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                      0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                             3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                 3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                         3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                        3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                        3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                           3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                       3-4/0   3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least two of the following)
     HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                     3/0    3
     HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                           3/0    3
     HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                        3/0    3
     HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                           3/0    3
     HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                      0/0    3
     HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                             3/0    4
     PHI120      GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                 3/0    3
     PHI140      CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                         3/0    3
     PHI170      SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                        3/0    3
     PHI180      THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                        3/0    3
     PHI190      THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                           3/0    3
     PHI290      SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                       3-4/0   3
     POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                             3/0    3
     PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                             3/0    3
     PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                            3/0    3
     PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                          3/0    3
     PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                            3-6/0   3
     SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                                3/0    3
     SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                          3/0    3
     SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                            3/0    3
     SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                             3-5/0   3
     SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                  0/0    5
     SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                        3/0    3




                                                     128
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

         The Mechanical Engineering Technician may be involved with a variety of tasks on the job. These tasks might
involve preparing design specifications; production analysis; and the installation, maintenance, and operation of machines,
tools, products, and devices that produce power from coal, oil, gas, water, and nuclear fuels. Other job functions may
include working as a laboratory assistant, designer, estimator, and technical sales.

       Although most mechanical engineering technicians find jobs in manufacturing industries, they may also work for
government agencies or in research and development activities. Jobs may be situated in the production shop, the design
engineering offices, research laboratories, in the field traveling to on-site locations, or in technical sales.

        The individual that has an interest in knowing how things work, determining how things may work better, and who
has an interest in problem solving may find Mechanical Engineering Technology an appropriate career choice. The
individual should also have an interest in and aptitude for mathematics and science.

          The student in Mechanical Engineering Technology will study engineering drawing, mechanical design technology,
machine design technology, and materials science. The student will also be introduced to computer-aided drafting, industrial
electricity and electronics, and manufacturing processes. In addition, this program is transferable to several institutions in
Ohio that have B.S. Degrees in Engineering Technology.




                                                             129
                                    Mechanical Engineering Technology
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                   Technical Courses (Choose at least nineteen)

                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                                 Hours        Hours
      DRD215 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I                                                               2/2           3
      ELE171      INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS                                                         2/2           3
      ELE254      INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY                                                           1/2           2
      MEC111 MACHINING PROCESSES                                                                   2/2           3
      MEC115 FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING DESIGN                                                    2/2           3
      MEC130 WELDING AND WELDING EQUIPMENT                                                         2/2           3
      MEC175 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS                                                             1/2           2
      MEC223 ENGINEERING MATERIALS                                                                 3/2           4
      MEC233 STATICS                                                                               2/2           3
      MEC244 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS                                                                 2/2           3
      MEC245 MACHINE DESIGN                                                                        2/2           3
      MEC264 COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURING                                                          2/2           3
      MEC285 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS                                                                 3/0           3
      MEC291 MECHANICAL DESIGN PROJECT I                                                           1/2           2
      MEC292 MECHANICAL DESIGN PROJECT II                                                          1/2           2
      TND101 TOOL AND DIE DESIGN                                                                   3/2           4
Technical Math Electives (Choose at least three of the following)
      MTH121 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I                                                               4/0           4
      MTH122 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II                                                              4/0           4
      MTH123 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III                                                             4/0           4
      MTH141 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I                                                      5/0           5
      MTH142 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II                                                     5/0           5
      MTH143 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III                                                    5/0           5

                                         Basic Courses (Choose at least six)
Basic Courses
       ENR101     INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                                                      3/2           4
       ENR222     INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION                                                          3/0           3
       ENR280     ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY                                                            2/2           3
       PHY111     COLLEGE PHYSICS I                                                                3/3           4
       PHY112     COLLEGE PHYSICS II                                                               3/3           4
       PHY113     COLLEGE PHYSICS III                                                              3/3           4

                                       General Courses (Choose at least five)
English Courses
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Must complete the following)
        ENG114 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG201 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                3/0           3
        ENG202 RESEARCH WRITING                                                                    3/0           3
        ENG210 TECHNICAL WRITING                                                                   3/0           3
Speech Courses
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                              3/0           3
First Year Experience (Choose at least one of the following)
        FYE101 ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE                                                              1/0           1
        FYE161 COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS                                                             3/0           3
                                                           130
                            Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least three)
Humanities Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
Social Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3
Humanities/Soc Science Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
       HST121 U.S. HISTORY TO 1815                                                    3/0    3
       HST122 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900                                          3/0    3
       HST123 U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT                                       3/0    3
       HUM110 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES                                          3/0    3
       HUM199 HUMANITIES ELECTIVE                                                     0/0    3
       HUM290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES                                            3/0    4
       PHI120    GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION                                  3/0    3
       PHI140    CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES                                          3/0    3
       PHI170    SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE                                         3/0    3
       PHI180    THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY                                         3/0    3
       PHI190    THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE                                            3/0    3
       PHI290    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY                                        3-4/0   3
       POL101 AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES                                            3/0    3
       PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                            3/0    3
       PSY111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II                                           3/0    3
       PSY160 HUMAN SEXUALITY                                                         3/0    3
       PSY290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY                                           3-6/0   3
       SOC101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                               3/0    3
       SOC110 HUMAN RELATIONS                                                         3/0    3
       SOC120 CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM                                           3/0    3
       SOC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY                                            3-5/0   3
       SSC199 SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE                                                 0/0    5
       SSC290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES                                       3/0    3




                                                     131
                                           CERTIFICATE
                                            PROGRAMS


North Central State College offers certificate programs which are designed to allow students to complete a cluster of
coordinated courses in a shorter period of time than an associate degree. Students in associate degree programs may
benefit from adding a certificate to their areas of expertise.

Upon successful completion of a certificate program, a “Certificate Request” form must be completed in the Office of
Student Records in order to receive a certificate.

Except for the Practical Nursing Certificate, a minimum of a 2.00 grade-point average must be obtained for all required
courses in order to receive any certificate. The Practical Nursing Certificate requires a 2.00 or better cumulative grade-
point average either in the required courses or the overall GPA.




                                                             132
                               BUSINESS AND EDUCATION CERTIFICATES
                                      Accounting Tax Clerk Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                    Certificate Courses (Choose at least seven)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                       4/0           4
        ACC112 ACCOUNTING II                                                                      4/0           4
        ACC211 TAXATION I                                                                         4/0           4
        ACC212 TAXATION II                                                                        4/0           4
        CIS121    MICROSOFT WORD                                                                  1/2           2
        CIS122    MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                 1/2           2
        MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                               4/0           4


                                 Child Development Associate Certificate
Should a student elect to continue toward completion of the degree program, a completed CDA Credential, awarded by
the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition, will be substituted for the required two practicums and two
seminars. The specific practicums will be determined for each student based on the number of years of experience and
the level of responsibility the student has assumed within his/her agency.

The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                    Certificate Courses (Choose at least seven)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        ECE101 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                          2/2           3
        ECE104 CREATIVE PLAY                                                                      1/2           2
        ECE216 FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS                                                         5/0          5
        ECE260 CDA INTERNSHIP                                                                     0/30          6
        ECE261 CDA SEMINAR I                                                                      3/0           3
        ECE262 CDA SEMINAR II                                                                     3/0           3
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0          3

                                    Computerized Accounting Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least eight)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                       4/0           4
        ACC112 ACCOUNTING II                                                                      4/0           4
        ACC202 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING                                                2/2           3
        ACC211 TAXATION I                                                                         4/0           4
        CIS122    MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                 1/2           2
        CIS123    MICROSOFT ACCESS                                                                1/2           2
        CIS128    MICROSOFT EXCEL ADVANCED                                                        1/2           2
        MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                               4/0           4




                                                          133
                                   Early Childhood Education Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                    Certificate Courses (Choose at least sixteen)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        ECE101 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                          2/2           3
        ECE104 CREATIVE PLAY                                                                      1/2           2
        ECE105 HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION                                                      3/0           3
        ECE108 CREATIVE EXPRESSION                                                                1/2           2
        ECE121 TEACHING MATH TO YOUNG CHILDREN                                                    3/0           3
        ECE124 LANGUAGE ARTS                                                                      1/2           2
        ECE126 SCIENCE EXPERIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD                                              2/2           3
        ECE130 PRESCHOOL PRACTICUM                                                                0/7           1
        ECE132 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                  2/0           2
        ECE140 PRACTICUM                                                                          0/7           1
        ECE142 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                  2/0           2
        ECE216 FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS                                                        5/0           5
        PSY110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I                                                       3/0           3
        PSY238 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY                                                                   4/0           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3




                                                          134
                                       Educational Assisting Certificate
Students who complete this certificate program develop the skills to work with a teacher in a classroom environment. An
educational assistant is trained in behavior management, professionalism, family/parenting, counseling, crisis
management, and working with special needs children. There is a total of 210 practicum hours in a classroom
supervised by a trained educational assistant teacher in this certificate. Courses may be completed in one year or more
if on a part-time basis. A minimum grade of C- is required in all ECE, EDU, and HSV each courses and an overall
certificate grade-point average of 2.00. An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report
is required in order to begin the practicum sequence. Various practicum sites have specific background check
requirements. Individuals with a felony and/or domestic violence conviction may not be permitted to complete the
practicums. Please contact the Program Director for more information.

The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                    Certificate Courses (Choose at least fourteen)
                                                                                                 Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                                Hours        Hours
        ECE203 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT                                                            3/2          4
        ECE210 WORKING WITH DIVERSE LEARNERS                                                         4/0          4
        EDU103 FOUNDATION OF EDUCATION                                                               3/0          3
        EDU131 PRACTICUM                                                                            0/7           1
        EDU133 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                    2/0           2
        EDU141 PRACTICUM                                                                            0/14          2
        EDU143 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                    2/0           2
        EDU203 PHONICS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION                                                      5/0           5
        EDU204 FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY                                                               5/0          5
        HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                                 4/0          4
        HSV114 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II                                                                3/0          3
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                                3/0          3
Electives (Choose at least one of the following)
        EDU200 INCLUSION IN PUBLIC EDUCATION                                                         3/0           3
        EDU205 UNDERSTANDING ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER                                              4/0           4
        EDU210 MOTIVATING CHILDREN                                                                   3/0           3
        EDU215 AUTISM                                                                                3/0           3
        HSV222 THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT                                                         2/0           2
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                     3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                            3/0           3




                                                           135
                                    Language Arts & Literacy Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.


                                   Certificate Courses (Choose at least eighteen)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        ECE101 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION                                          2/2           3
        ECE104 CREATIVE PLAY                                                                      1/2           2
        ECE123 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT                                                              2/2           3
        ECE124 LANGUAGE ARTS                                                                      1/2           2
        ECE160 LITERACY PRACTICUM                                                                 0/7           1
        ECE162 LITERACY SEMINAR                                                                   2/0           2
        ECE206 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT                                                                 3/0           3
        ECE209 LITERATURE & LITERACY                                                              3/0           3
        EDU103 FOUNDATION OF EDUCATION                                                            3/0           3
        EDU150 WRITING/STUDY SKILLS FOR CHILDREN                                                  3/0           3
        EDU160 INTRODUCTION TO THE PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTIONAL                                    3/0           3
        EDU203 PHONICS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION                                                    5/0           5
        EDU204 FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY                                                            5/0           5
        EDU205 UNDERSTANDING ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER                                           4/0           4
        EDU215 AUTISM                                                                             3/0           3
        HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                              4/0           4
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                             3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3

                                             Office Skills Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.


                                    Certificate Courses (Choose at least twelve)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        ACC111 ACCOUNTING I                                                                       4/0           4
        AIT103    OFFICE COMMUNICATIONS                                                           4/0           4
        AIT110    KEYBOARDING I                                                                   1/2           2
        AIT112    KEYBOARDING II                                                                  3/2           4
        AIT113    KEYBOARDING III                                                                 3/2           4
        AIT130    RECORDS MANAGEMENT                                                              3/2           4
        AIT133    MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION                                                           1/2           2
        AIT252    WORD PROCESSING                                                                 2/4           4
        CIS122    MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                 1/2           2
        ENG115 BUSINESS AND CORPORATE COMMUNICATION                                               3/0           3
        MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                               4/0           4
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
        ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3




                                                          136
                                  Real Estate License & Sales Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.


                                    Certificate Courses (Choose at least seven)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        BUS148 MARKETING                                                                          4/0           4
        MTH110 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                                                               4/0           4
        REA201 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES                                                 4/0           4
        REA202 REAL ESTATE LAW                                                                    4/0           4
        REA203 REAL ESTATE FINANCE                                                                2/0           2
        REA204 REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL                                                              2/0           2
        SPE101 SPEECH                                                                             3/0           3




                                                          137
                            HEALTH AND PUBLIC SERVICE CERTIFICATES
                                   Alcohol/Drug Counseling Certificate
With the new license standards of the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addictions Services, the minimal
educational requirement to eventually become licensed as a certified Chemical Dependency Counselor is an
associate degree. Completion of the Human Services program fulfills this minimal degree requirement. But, this
certificate still can be a valuable resource for employment.

Practicum must be taken at an approved (see Human Services Program Director for prior approval of practicum site
and permission to enroll) Drug/Alcohol treatment facility. Courses must be completed within a three-year period
(exceptions require approval of the Dean of Health Sciences). A minimum grade of C- is required in all HSV courses
and an overall certificate grade-point average of 2.00. An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and
Investigation (BCI&I) report is required in order to begin the practicum(s). Various practicum sites have specific
background check requirements.

PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS: All courses in the certificate must be completed PRIOR to taking
HSV240/HSV242 Practicum and Practicum Seminar.
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least ten)
                                                                                             Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                            Hours        Hours
        HSV103 EXPERIENCE IN SMALL GROUPS                                                        2/2          3
        HSV107 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES                                                    4/0          4
        HSV110 INTRODUCTION TO CASE MANAGEMENT                                                   4/0          4
        HSV116 INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                           2/2          3
        HSV124 FAMILIES IN CRISIS                                                                4/0          4
        HSV201 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS I                                                         2/2          3
        HSV219 DRUG ABUSE AND TREATMENT                                                          4/0          4
        HSV240 PRACTICUM                                                                        0/14          2
        HSV242 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                 2/0          2
        PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                               4/0          4




                                                          138
                                       Behavior Management Certificate
                                              Educ/ECE Track
Students in this certificate program develop observation skills leading to the ability to differentiate basic human needs
from behavioral needs. The practicum must be taken at an approved setting (see EDU Program Director for prior
approval of practicum site and permission to enroll). Experience must be assisting with and/or developing and
implementing behavioral plans. Courses must be completed within a three-year period (exceptions require the
approval of the Dean of Health Sciences). A minimum grade of C- is required in all ECE, EDU and HSV courses and
an overall certificate grade-point average of 2.00. An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation
(BCI&I) report is required in order to begin the practicum(s). Various practicum sites have specific background check
requirements. The opportunity to do behavior management can be specialized for educational settings or early
childhood settings (arranged by behavior management certificate instructor).

PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS: HSV113, HSV114 and HSV222 must be completed PRIOR to taking
EDU261/EDU263. HSV115 will substitute for ECE203 if taken prior to Summer 2005.
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least eight)
                                                                                                 Class/Lab       Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                                Hours         Hours
        ECE203 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT                                                            3/2           4
        EDU261 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM                                                        0/14           2
        EDU263 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM SEM                                                     2/0           2
        HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                                 4/0           4
        HSV114 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II                                                                3/0           3
        HSV222 THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT                                                         2/0           2
(Choose at least one of the following)
        ECE108 CREATIVE EXPRESSION                                                                   1/2           2
        EDU205 UNDERSTANDING ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER                                              4/0           4
        EDU210 MOTIVATING CHILDREN                                                                   3/0           3
        EDU215 AUTISM                                                                                3/0           3
        PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                                   4/0           4




                                                            139
                                      Behavior Management Certificate
                                                Human Services Track
Students in this certificate program develop observation skills leading to the ability to differentiate basic human needs
from behavioral needs. The practicum must be taken at an approved setting (see Human Services Program Director
for prior approval of practicum site and permission to enroll). Experience must be assisting with and/or developing and
implementing behavioral plans. Courses must be completed within a three-year period (exceptions require approval of
the Dean of Health Sciences). A minimum grade of C- is required in all HSV courses and an overall certificate grade-
point average of 2.00. An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required in
order to begin the practicum(s). Various practicum sites have specific background check requirements. The
opportunity to do behavior management can be specialized for educational settings or early childhood settings
(arranged by behavior management certificate instructor).

PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS: HSV113, HSV114 and HSV222 must be completed PRIOR to taking
HSV240/HSV242.

The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least eight)
                                                                                                Class/Lab       Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours         Hours
        HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                                4/0           4
        HSV114 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II                                                               3/0           3
        HSV115 CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                                     4/0           4
        HSV116 INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                              2/2           3
        HSV222 THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT                                                        2/0           2
        HSV240 PRACTICUM                                                                           0/14           2
        HSV242 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                    2/0           2
        PSY150 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                                  4/0           4




                                                            140
                                  Community Health Worker Certification
Students who complete this certificate program are eligible to be certified by the Ohio Board of Nursing as a
Community Health Worker (CHW). The CHW will work in the community as an outreach resource assisting clients in
six major areas: health care, community resources, communication skills, individual & community advocacy, health
education and skills and responsibilities. Practicum experiences in the community will be a major component of the
certificate. A minimum grade of C- is required in all HSV courses and an overall certificate grade- point average of
2.00. An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required. Various practicum
sites for HSV275 may have specific background check and drug testing requirements.

HSV271, HSV275 and HSV276 must be completed within a two year period (exceptions require approval of the Dean
of Health Sciences).

HSV275/HSV276 will substitute for HSV240/HSV242, and HSV271 will count as a technical elective in the Human
Services program.


The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                                (Choose at least four)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        HSV271 COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER TRAINING                                                    3/2          4
        HSV275 COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER PRACTICUM                                                  0/14          2
        HSV276 COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER SEMINAR                                                     1/0          1
        PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                                        5/0          5

                                      Family Service Worker Certificate
Completion of this certificate program meets the Head Start state credential requirements for family services unless
employed at Head Start. Practicum must be taken at Head Start working directly with Family Service workers (see
Human Services Program Director for prior approval of practicum site and permission to enroll). Courses must be
completed within a three-year period (exceptions require approval of the Dean of Health Sciences). A minimum grade
of C- is required in all HSV courses and an overall certificate grade-point average of 2.00. An acceptable Bureau of
Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required in order to begin the practicum(s). Various
practicum sites have specific background check requirements.

PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS: HSV103, HSV113, HSV114, HSV116 and HSV222 must be completed PRIOR to
taking HSV140/HSV142.
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least ten)
                                                                                               Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
        HSV103 EXPERIENCE IN SMALL GROUPS                                                         2/2           3
        HSV109 SOCIAL PROBLEMS                                                                    3/0           3
        HSV113 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I                                                              4/0           4
        HSV114 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II                                                             3/0           3
        HSV115 CHILD MANAGEMENT                                                                   4/0           4
        HSV116 INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES                                                            2/2           3
        HSV124 FAMILIES IN CRISIS                                                                 4/0           4
        HSV140 PRACTICUM                                                                          0/7           1
        HSV142 PRACTICUM SEMINAR                                                                  2/0           2
        HSV222 THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT                                                      2/0           2




                                                           141
                                        Practical Nursing Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Technical Courses (Choose at least six)
                                                                                             Class/Lab      Credit
Technical Courses                                                                              Hours        Hours
      PNR142 PHARMACOLOGY                                                                        3/0          3
      PNR144 TRENDS IN PRACTICAL NURSING                                                         2/0          2
      PNR151 PRACTICAL NURSING                                                                   5/9          8
      PNR152 PRACTICAL NURSING                                                                  4/15          9
      PNR153 PRACTICAL NURSING                                                                  6/18         12
      PNR154 PRACTICAL NURSING                                                                  6/15         11

                                       Basic Courses (Choose at least four)
Basic Courses
       BIO101     NUTRITION                                                                      3/0           3
       BIO121     BASIC ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I                                                   2/2           3
       BIO122     BASIC ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II                                                  2/2           3
       BIO155     MICROBIOLOGY                                                                   2/2           3

                                       General Courses (Choose at least two)
General Courses (Choose at least one of the following)
      ENG101 BASIC COMPOSITION                                                                   3/0           3
      ENG102 BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS                                                          3/0           3
(Choose at least one of the following)
      PSY130 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT                                                        5/0           5




                                                          142
                 TECHNOLOGY AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATES
                             Integrated Systems Technology
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.
                                                 (Choose at least five)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        AIM101     ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE                                                          3/2           4
        AIM102     FUNDAMENTALS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS                                              2/2           3
        AIM103     ESSENTIALS OF HYDRAULICS                                                        3/2           4
        AIM104     ESSENTIALS OF PNEUMATICS                                                        1/2           2
        AIM105     PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL                                                      2/2           3

                                             Design Tech Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                      Certificate Courses (Choose at least six)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        DRD215 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I                                                             2/2           3
        DRD216 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN II                                                            2/3           4
        DRD217 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN III                                                           2/2           3
        DRD226 SOLID MODELING                                                                      2/2           3
        ENR101 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                                                         3/2           4
        TND101 TOOL AND DIE DESIGN                                                                 3/2           4

                                       Graphic Design/Multimedia Cert
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least seven)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        ART120 DRAWING I                                                                           3/2           4
        BUS244 ADVERTISING                                                                         3/0           3
        DMT102 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                      2/2           3
        DMT105 IMAGE MANIPULATION I                                                                2/4           4
        DMT107 PRINCIPLES OF WEB DESIGN                                                            2/2           3
        DMT110 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS                                                           3/2           4
        DMT140 PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                         2/2           3




                                                           143
                                      Microsoft Applications Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least seven)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        CIS121     MICROSOFT WORD                                                                  1/2           2
        CIS122     MICROSOFT EXCEL                                                                 1/2           2
        CIS123     MICROSOFT ACCESS                                                                1/2           2
        CIS124     MICROSOFT OFFICE INTEGRATION                                                    1/2           2
        CIS125     MICROSOFT POWERPOINT                                                            1/2           2
        CIS126     MICROSOFT FRONTPAGE                                                             1/2           2
        CIS104     OPERATING SYSTEMS                                                               3/3           4

                                      Networking Certificate - Microsoft
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                     Certificate Courses (Choose at least seven)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        CIS104     OPERATING SYSTEMS                                                               3/3           4
        CIS206     PC UPGRADE / SUPPORT / REPAIR I                                                 3/3           4
        CIS207     PC UPGRADE /SUPPORT/ REPAIR II                                                  3/3           4
        CIS261     CISCO ACADEMY I                                                                 2/4           4
        CIS273     NETWORK SECURITY                                                                3/3           4
        CIS292     WINDOWS SERVER I                                                                3/3           4
        CIS293     WINDOWS SERVER II                                                               3/3           4

                                        Networking Certificate - Novell
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                      Certificate Courses (Choose at least ten)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        CIS104     OPERATING SYSTEMS                                                               3/3           4
        CIS107     BUSINESS SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY                                                     2/2           3
        CIS109     DATABASE ANALYSIS & DESIGN                                                      4/0           4
        CIS110     PROGRAM LOGIC                                                                   4/0           4
        CIS206     PC UPGRADE / SUPPORT / REPAIR I                                                 3/3           4
        CIS207     PC UPGRADE /SUPPORT/ REPAIR II                                                  3/3           4
        CIS261     CISCO ACADEMY I                                                                 2/4           4
        CIS273     NETWORK SECURITY                                                                3/3           4
        CIS281     NOVELL NETWARE I                                                                3/3           4
        CIS282     NOVELL NETWARE II                                                               3/3           4




                                                           144
                                              PC Repair Certificate
The following is the distribution of courses required to graduate from this program. A recommended quarter-by-quarter
curriculum worksheet for this two-year program is available in the Admissions Office.

                                      Certificate Courses (Choose at least five)
                                                                                                Class/Lab      Credit
Certificate Courses                                                                               Hours        Hours
        CIS104     OPERATING SYSTEMS                                                               3/3           4
        CIS206     PC UPGRADE / SUPPORT / REPAIR I                                                 3/3           4
        CIS207     PC UPGRADE /SUPPORT/ REPAIR II                                                  3/3           4
        CIS261     CISCO ACADEMY I                                                                 2/4           4
        ELE150     TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING                                                     3/2           4




                                                           145
                             COURSE
                           DESCRIPTIONS
These course descriptions are included in the catalog in order to provide general information about courses. Modifications in
course content may be made based upon unique needs and/or abilities of students enrolled in a class.




                                                             146
COURSE PREFIXES
ACC     Accounting
ADN     Associate Degree Nursing (Registered)
AIM     Advanced Integrated Manufacturing
AIT     Administrative Information Technology
ART     Art
BIO     Biology
BRS     Business Related Studies
BUS     Business Administration
CHE     Chemistry
CIS     Computer Information Systems
CRJ     Criminal Justice
DMT     Digital Media Technology
DRD     Drafting and Design
ECE     Early Childhood Education
ECN     Economics
EDU     Educational Assisting
ELE     Electronic Engineering Technology
ELM     Electrical Maintenance
ENG     English (Communications)
ENR     Engineering (General)
FIN     Financial Management
FYE     College Orientation/Study Skills
HST     History
HSV     Human Services
HUM     Humanities
IND     Independent Studies
MEC     Mechanical Engineering Technology
MTH     Mathematics
PHI     Philosophy
PHY     Physics
PLG     Paralegal Studies
PNR     Practical Nursing
POL     Politics
PSY     Psychology
PTA     Physical Therapist Assistant
RAD     Radiological Sciences
RDG     College Reading
REA     Real Estate
RES     Respiratory Care
SCI     Science
SOC     Sociology
SPE     Speech
SSC     Social Sciences
STA     Statistics
THR     Therapeutic Recreation
TND     Tool and Die
WRT     College Writing




                                                147
ACCOUNTING
ACC 100 - ESSENTIALS OF ACCOUNTING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to give students the basics of accounting in order to prepare them for ACC 111 Accounting I .
The pace of the course will be relaxed, allowing accounting concepts to be absorbed. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp,
Su; Evening - F

ACC 111 - ACCOUNTING I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Basic concepts and procedures essential to an understanding of the accounting functions of collecting, summarizing,
presenting, and interpreting financial information and its use in management. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

ACC 112 - ACCOUNTING II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A continuation of Accounting I with emphasis on the concepts and principles in the accounting for plant and equipment,
natural resources, intangible assets, long-term investments, liabilities, payroll, partnerships, corporations, statement of
cash flows, and analyzing financial statements. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): ACC111, and can be concurrent with MTH110

ACC 131 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A detailed analysis of current accounting treatment of balance sheet items. Emphasis is given to an evaluation of the
theory underlying modern accounting practices, as well as to a comprehensive study of the accounting techniques
involved. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ACC112

ACC 132 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A continuation of ACC 131 with an analysis of current accounting treatments of balance sheet items, such as inventory,
operational/intangible assets, liabilities, and investments in debt/equity securities. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening -
W
Prerequisite(s): ACC131

ACC 140 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Managerial Accounting provides information for assisting the management of a business entity in making decisions and
for evaluating the effectiveness of those decisions. Topics covered i n t h e c o u r s e i n c l u d e c o s t i n g o f p r o d u c t s ,
cost-volume-profit analysis, budgetary planning and control, and decision-making related to products and long-term
investments. Quarters Available: Day - F; Sp; Evening - F, Sp
Prerequisite(s): ACC112

ACC 199 - ACCOUNTING ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only Quarters Available: Offered based on need

ACC 202 - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course uses a computerized, integrated, accounting software package, computerized spreadsheet applications, and
several practice sets to provide the student with a thorough review of all the major accounting systems commonly found in
computerized accounting environments. Students will work with software packages capable of handling the processing
for: businesses that are organized as sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; service and merchandising
businesses; departmentalized and non-departmentalized businesses; voucher and non-voucher systems; fixed assets,
inventory, and payroll. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ACC111




                                                                    148
ACC 211 - TAXATION I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Income tax concepts will be stressed in this course, such as income, exclusions, deductions, adjusted gross income,
capital gains and losses, exemptions, tax credits, and determination of income from business, trade, or profession .
Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ACC112

ACC 212 - TAXATION II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Income taxes, as they pertain to individuals, partnerships, and corporations, is the basis of this course. Attention is given
to the reasoning behind major tax regulations and their effects upon the business firm and the impact of tax regulations
upon managerial decision-making. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ACC211

ACC 225 - ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of accounting information systems design, analysis, and implementation. The course is designed to identify the
distinct information systems knowledge required by accountants as they prepare for careers as management
accountants, auditors, or consultants. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ACC112

ACC 230 - GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Principles and operation of fund accounting including financial reporting and budgetary control for state and local
governments. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ACC112

ACC 250 - AUDITING
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Auditing theory, procedures, and practices of independent examinations of financial records. Lectures and hypothetical
cases provide experience in preparation of various auditing work papers, including evaluations of internal control systems .
Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp--even years only
Prerequisite(s): ACC132

ACC 260 - SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ACCOUNTING
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
An overview of generally accepted accounting practices and procedures. Students will be required to substantiate their
overall accounting knowledge through the use of simulation of various assessment tools, as well as an individual
presentation as it relates to the accounting profession. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp--even years only
Prerequisite(s): ACC132, and ACC140, and ACC225, and can be concurrent with ACC250




                                                             149
NURSING
ADN 125 - NURSING - Transitions Concepts in Nursing
9 credit hours; 6 class hours; 9 lab hours
This course recognizes and builds on the previous education and work experience of the L.P.N. It explores increasing
complexity of new role responsibilities, as well as scope of practice changes inherent in new role development. Emphasis
of study is upon utilization of the nursing process to maintain and/or restore optimal level health for individuals with
common recurring health problems. Theoretical content and clinical experiences focus on the stress adaptation process
as it relates to the basic human needs of oxygenation, nutrition and elimination, activity and rest, safety and security,
mental health and behavioral adjustment, and sexual role satisfaction. Theory regarding stress adaptation, therapeutic
communication, nutrition, developmental levels/tasks, pharmacology, culture, community resources, and ethical/legal
boundaries is integrated into the course. Laboratory and clinical experiences are planned to review and enrich knowledge
of technical skills and nursing care. Some evening experiences may be scheduled during the quarter. Quarters Available:
Day - Su (Offered based on need); Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO101, and BIO147, and BIO155, and ENG101 or ENG102, and PSY130, and can be concurrent with
CHE110, and can be concurrent with PSY110

ADN 131 - NURSING - BASIC CONCEPTS
6 credit hours; 3 class hours; 9 lab hours
An introduction to fundamental nursing skills, interpersonal communication and relationships, ethical/legal issues of
nursing practice, and cognitive development with a focus on critical thinking. Emphasis is placed on interviewing and
physical assessment skills; safe, hygienic client care; emotional, spiritual, and cultural concerns; infection control; and
excretory stressors. Stress adaptation/wellness, documentation, computer research, and community nursing resources
are all integral aspects of this course. Utilization of the nursing process is emphasized in classroom, clinical, and
laboratory experiences. Extended care facilities are utilized for clinical rotation to integrate gerontological theory with
practice. Some evening clinical experiences may be scheduled. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with BIO145 or BIO149, and can be concurrent with PSY130

ADN 132 - NURSING - INTERMEDIATE CONCEPTS I
6 credit hours; 3 class hours; 9 lab hours
A continuation of ADN 131. Acute care settings are utilized for clinical rotations to integrate previously learned concepts
and for the development of new knowledge and skills in meeting basic human needs of the client in restoring an optimal
level health. A major emphasis is on sterile asepsis and related procedures, the perioperative period, medication
administration, and management of urinary stressors. The nursing process, stress-adaptation, critical thinking, nutrition
care, pharmacology, therapeutic communication, developmental levels/tasks, teaching and learning principles, discharge
planning, community health and resources, culture, and ethical/legal boundaries are integrated into the course. Some
evening clinical experiences may be scheduled. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ADN142, and can be concurrent with BIO101, and can be concurrent with BIO146
or BIO149, and ADN131, and PSY130

ADN 133 - INTERMEDIATE CONCEPTS II
8 credit hours; 4 class hours; 12 lab hours
This intermediate course builds on basic skills and knowledge gained in ADN 131 and ADN 132. The focus of study is on
the response of clients to respiratory, gastrointestinal, neurological, orthopedic, diabetic, fluid balance stressors, and
vascular stressors. Extensive emphasis is placed on meeting basic human needs, restoration of wellness, health
maintenance, and promotion. Critical thinking, therapeutic communication, client teaching, developmental level tasks,
cultural influences, and ethical/legal issues of nursing practice are also integrated throughout the course. Application of
the nursing process is emphasized in classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences. Acute care and community settings
are utilized for clinical rotation with the possibility of some evening clinical scheduled during the quarter. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ADN132, and ADN142, and BIO101, and can be concurrent with BIO147, and can be concurrent with
BIO155, and can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102




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ADN 134 - NURSING - INTERMEDIATE CONCEPTS III
8 credit hours; 4 class hours; 12 lab hours
This intermediate course utilizes and builds on basic skills and knowledge of ADN 131, ADN 132, and ADN 133. The
focus of study is on the utilization of the nursing process as it relates to meeting basic human needs. Stressors affecting
sexual role satisfaction are studied. A major emphasis is on adaptation to childbearing, parenting, changing family roles,
women's health, and IV skills. Knowledge regarding the nursing process, critical thinking, stress-adaptation, nutritional
therapy, pharmacology, therapeutic communication, developmental levels/tasks, community health resources, culture,
and ethical/legal boundaries are integrated into the course. Some evening clinical experience may be scheduled during
the quarter. Quarters Available: Day - Su
Prerequisite(s): ADN133, and BIO147, and BIO155, and ENG101 or ENG102, and can be concurrent with CHE110, and
can be concurrent with PSY110

ADN 142 - PHARMACOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Pharmacology ADN 142 provides an introduction to the study of drugs. Content also includes classifications of drugs,
dosage calculations, legal aspects of drug administration, and preparation and administration of drugs. Uses, actions,
and side effects of selected drugs will be studied. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): ADN131, and BIO145 or BIO149, and PSY130, and can be concurrent with ADN132, and can be
concurrent with BIO101, and can be concurrent with BIO146

ADN 235 - NURSING - ADVANCED CONCEPTS
9 credit hours; 3 class hours; 18 lab hours
This course is designed to assist the student in integrating and expanding concepts and skills learned in previous nursing
courses. Basic communication concepts and group process skills will be practiced. Problem solving and decision making
will be explored with leadership and management concepts. Critical thinking will be utilized in implementing the nursing
process to maintain and/or restore optimal level of health for individuals who respond to anxiety with abnormal behavior
patterns. Theoretical content and clinical experiences will focus upon the stress-adaptation process as it relates to the
basic human needs of mental health, behavioral adjustments, and sexual role satisfaction. Knowledge regarding
therapeutic communication, diet therapy, pharmacology, developmental levels, tasks, community health and resources,
culture, and ethical/legal boundaries are integrated in the course. Clinical experiences occur in a number of different
settings and include different shift times. Clinical experiences include acute hospitals, psychiatric hospitals, and
community agencies. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): ADN134, and CHE110, and PSY110

ADN 236 - NURSING - ADVANCED CONCEPTS
9 credit hours; 3 class hours; 18 lab hours
This course is designed to assist the student to integrate and build on concepts and skills learned in previous nursing
courses. Emphasis of study is upon utilization of the nursing process to maintain and/or restore optimal level health for
individuals who present immediate and complex nursing needs. Critical thinking will be utilized in the exploration of
theoretical content and clinical experiences. The focus of study is on the stress-adaptation process as it relates to the
basic human needs of nutrition and elimination, safety and security, oxygenation, activity and rest, and mental health and
behavioral adjustments. Health promotion in growth and development is a strong component of the course. Skills of
self-evaluation, organization, discharge planning, and referral will be developed. Knowledge regarding therapeutic
communication, diet therapy, pharmacology, developmental levels/tasks, community health and resources, culture, and
ethical/legal boundaries are integrated into the course. Clinical experiences are planned to work with children,
adolescents, and young adults. Clinical experiences are planned in community agencies with preceptors. Some evening
clinical experiences may be scheduled during the quarter. Group leaders are expected to make clinical assignments the
day prior to the clinical experience. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): ADN134, and CHE110, and PSY110




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ADN 237 - NURSING - ADVANCED CONCEPTS
9 credit hours; 3 class hours; 18 lab hours
This course is designed to assist the student in integrating and expanding concepts and skills learned in previous nursing
courses. Critical thinking will be utilized in implementing the nursing process to maintain and/or restore optimal level
health for individuals with complex nursing needs. Theoretical content and clinical experiences will focus on the
stress-adaptation process as it related to the basic human needs of oxygenation, nutrition and elimination, and safety and
sec u r i t y . S k i l l s o f s e l f e v a l u a t i o n a n d w o r k o r g a n i z a t i o n w i l l b e d e v e l o p e d . K n o w l e d g e r e g a r d i n g t h e r a p e u t i c
communications, diet therapy, pharmacology, developmental levels/tasks, community health and resources, culture, and
ethical/legal boundaries are integrated in the course. Clinical experiences are planned which allow the student to meet
the course objectives. Some evening clinical sessions may be scheduled during the quarter. Team leaders are expected
to make clinical assignments the day prior to the clinical experience. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): ADN134, and CHE110, and PSY110

ADN 240 - NURSING TRENDS AND TRANSITIONS
3 credit hours; 1 class hours; 6 lab hours
A study of the complex processes that occur and influence the student's transition into nursing practice. Reality shock,
the changing health care delivery system, as well as legal and ethical responsibilities and issues are included. The role of
governing boards and nursing organizations as they relate to the practice of nursing is covered. The nurse's role in the
political arena is explored. Delegation as an integral part of nursing care delivery is examined. Requirements for initial
and continued licensure and employee expectations are included. Theory of role transition is emphasized in combination
with specific clinical experiences under the guidance of a preceptor. This course is offered during the final quarter of the
nursing program. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ADN134, and can be concurrent with ADN235 or ADN236 or ADN237




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ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL MACHINING
AIM 101 - ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
Studies the science and essential concepts of current. The fundamentals include: Ohm’s Law, voltage, current and
resistance measurements, series and parallel circuits, inductance, capacitance, and transformers. Other topics include
electric motor control, control wiring, power distribution. The laboratory experience consists of hands-on experiments
designed to reinforce concepts presented. Contains demonstrations, lab projects and simulations. Quarters Available:
Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

AIM 102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Fundamentals of mechanical systems includes: introduction to mechanical fasteners, measuring instruments, motors,
power transmissions systems. Other topics include: introduction to mechanical fasteners, sensors, and applications of
sensors, and piping and piping installation. The laboratory experience consists of hands-on experiments designed to
reinforce concepts presented. Contains demonstrations, lab projects and simulations. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp,
Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

AIM 103 - ESSENTIALS OF HYDRAULICS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
Essentials of hydraulics includes: hydraulic power, basic circuits, symbols and principles of pressure and flow,
electro-fluid power, hydraulic troubleshooting, piping and piping installation. The laboratory experience consists of
hands-on experiments designed to reinforce concepts presented. Contains demonstrations, lab projects and simulations .
Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

AIM 104 - ESSENTIALS OF PNEUMATICS
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
Essentials of pneumatics includes: pneumatic power, basic circuits, symbols and schematic diagrams, principles of
pressure and flow, and speed control, directional control valves, air logic controls and pneumatic maintenance. Other
topics include: assembling pneumatic components, pneumatic cylinders, air compressors, and vacuum systems. The
laboratory experience consists of hands-on experiments designed to reinforce concepts presented. Contains
demonstrations, lab projects and simulations. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

AIM 105 - PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Studies the operation and fundamental programming techniques of industrial programmable controllers. Includes basic
industrial control circuits, I/O modules programmable controller maintenance, and program documentation, numberings
systems, basic troubleshooting and history of programmable controllers. The lab currently uses Allen Bradley SLC500
trainers. All instruction consists of hands-on experiments designed to reinforce concepts presented. Contains
demonstrations, lab projects and simulations. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su




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ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
AIT 100 - INTRODUCTION TO KEYBOARDING
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides an introduction to keyboard operation for the student who has had no previous keyboarding
instruction. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of appropriate technique as the student learns to key the letters, numbers,
symbols, and numeric keypad by touch. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp

AIT 103 - OFFICE COMMUNICATIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is designed to strengthen student knowledge of communication/language arts skills and related
decision-making skills through the use of realistic business documents and correspondence in the following areas :
punctuation, vocabulary, capitalization, number expression, abbreviation usage, grammar usage, homonyms, misused
similar words, subject-verb agreement, pronoun rules, composition, and proofreading. Quarters Available: Day - F;
Evening - F

AIT 110 - KEYBOARDING I
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides keyboarding instruction by using Microsoft Word software. Topics include: introduction of basic
word processing functions; proper formatting of business letters, memos and reports; speed and accuracy drills coupled
with control techniques; and language arts exercises. Proofreading and editing techniques are emphasized. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with AIT100

AIT 112 - KEYBOARDING II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of AIT 110. Topics include: tables; columns and newsletters; graphics; specialized letters,
memos and reports; and an office simulation project. Speed and accuracy drills as well as language arts exercises are
also included. Proofreading and editing techniques are emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): AIT110

AIT 113 - KEYBOARDING III
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of AIT 112 with increasingly stringent standards for speed and accuracy. Topics include :
advanced tables and newsletters; various business forms and financial documents; mail merge documents; employment
documents; an integrated office project; and language arts exercises. Proofreading and editing techniques are
emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): AIT112

AIT 130 - RECORDS MANAGEMENT
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course combines the specific concepts of records administration with basic management principles. It includes the
criteria by which records are created, classified, stored, retrieved, retained, transferred, and destroyed or archived .
Procedures for the operation and control of manual and electronic storage systems are explained, as well as the
principles for the selection of records personnel, equipment, and supplies. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W

AIT 133 - MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
A course designed to develop the transcription techniques required to produce accurate, mailable copy from dictation
generated by audio computer software. Students will combine the skill elements of keyboarding, word processing,
proofreading, listening, and language arts to complete simulated office projects covering a wide variety of office settings .
Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): AIT103, and AIT112

AIT 199 - OFFICE ADMINISTRATION ELECTIVE
3 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need




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AIT 216 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This is an introductory course to familiarize the student with medical terminology by transcribing medical reports from
dictation. The medical reports include history and physical examinations, radiology, operative, pathology reports,
requests for consultation, discharge summaries, death summaries, and autopsy reports. Quarters Available: Day - F--odd
years as needed; Evening - F--odd years only
Prerequisite(s): AIT113, and AIT133

AIT 217 - LEGAL TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This is an introductory course to familiarize the student with legal terminology by transcribing a variety of legal documents
from dictation as well as rough draft copy. The following specialties of law are covered: litigation, probate, and family law .
Quarters Available: Day - W--odd years as needed; Evening - W--odd years only
Prerequisite(s): AIT113, and AIT133

AIT 220 - ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE PROCEDURES
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to develop the necessary competencies for success in today's office. Topics include: job
definitions and responsibilities, the office environment, time and task management, telecommunications, composition of
business correspondence, presentation of business reports, making travel arrangements, planning meetings and
conferences, human relations, the employment process, and the office professional's future. Quarters Available: Day -
Sp--even years as needed; Evening - Sp--even years only
Prerequisite(s): AIT103, and AIT253, and CIS123, and CIS125, and CIS128, and ENG201 or ENG202 or ENG210

AIT 249 - INTEGRATED OFFICE APPLICATIONS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides instruction in the integration of various Microsoft Office programs. Proofreading and proper
keyboarding procedures will be emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - Sp--odd years as needed; Evening - Sp--odd
years only
Prerequisite(s): AIT253, and CIS123, and CIS125

AIT 252 - WORD PROCESSING
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course covers the intermediate and advanced features that are included on the Microsoft Word Specialist and
Expert-level certification tests. Topics include: formatting and editing various Word documents; using reference tools,
grammar checkers, and search and replace functions; manipulating columns of text; page numbering; headers and
footers, footnotes and endnotes; tables; graphics; merging documents; sorting and selecting data; creating a table of
contents and an index; recording and editing macros; and creating fill-in forms. Proofreading and proper keyboarding
procedures are emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): AIT112

AIT 253 - ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course provides an introduction to the terminology and concepts of desktop publishing along with applications using
the advanced features available in Microsoft Word. Topics include: basic typography terminology; page layout and
design; importation of graphic images; and the creation of letterheads, envelopes, forms, business cards, resumes,
brochures; web pages, newsletters, long reports, and other specialty promotional documents. Proofreading and proper
keyboarding procedures are emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - F--even years as needed; Evening - F--even years
only
Prerequisite(s): AIT252




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ARTS AND HUMANITIES
ART 120 - DRAWING I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course presents drawing concepts that can serve as a foundation for drawing itself and benefit other visual arts
disciplines. The basic fundementals of drawing, line form, gesture, and spatial illusion will be examined. Studio practice
will emphasize observational drawing to provide concrete and measurable examples of pictorial space. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

ART 130 - CERAMIC I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is designed to introduce students to artistic expression through the basic principles and techniques of making
pottery. This course does not fulfill the College Humanities requirement. Quarters Available: Evening - F




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BIOLOGY
BIO 101 - NUTRITION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
An introduction to the principles of nutrition and its relationship to health. Included are practical applications in daily life,
as well as nutritional assessment of individuals. Emphasis is on essential nutrients, their supply and function. This
course is also available as a video course. Quarters Available: Day - F, W SP, SU; Evening - F, W, SP

BIO 105 - PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed as an introduction to biology for nonmajors. The course will provide the fundamentals of biology
for students as an introduction to further college biology courses. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need. ;
Evening - Offered based on need.

BIO 107 - LIFETIME WELLNESS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
An examination and application of the components that contribute to the concept of wellness, a process of moving toward
optimal health and vitality that emphasizes individual responsibility for well being through the practice of self assessment
and adoption of health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered
based on need

BIO 110 - INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is an introductory study of life processes and biological principles. Special reference to the human organism
is used in describing the nature of life sustaining functions. Cellular function and the structure and function of the
integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and
reproductive systems are introduced. A laboratory experience is included each week and is correlated with the lecture
topics. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - Offered based on need.

BIO 121 - BASIC ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course presents the basic terms and concepts that deal with the structure and processes of the human body. It
involves examination of the body as a whole, the cell, and tissues. The ba s i c s t r u c t u r e a n d p h y s i o l o g y o f t h e
integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous systems and senses are presented. Laboratory exercises enhance and
support the lecture topics. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - F, Sp

BIO 122 - BASIC ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of SCI 121. It examines the basic structure and physiology of the cardiovascular, lymphatic,
respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Laboratory exercises enhance and support the
lecture topics. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - W, Su
Prerequisite(s): BIO121

BIO 145 - HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is a detailed study of the principles of human anatomy and physiology. It includes the examination of the
body as a whole, the cell, tissues, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, and the
endocrine system. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture topics and include microscopy, the study of
models, dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - W

BIO 146 - HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 3 lab hours
This cours e i s a c o n t i n u a t i o n o f S C I 1 4 5 . I t i n c l u d e s t h e e x a m i n a t i o n o f t h e n e r v o u s s y s t e m , s p e c i a l s e n s e s ,
cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, immunity, and blood. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture
topics and include microscopy, the study of models, dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): BIO145




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BIO 147 - HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY III
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is a continuation of SCI 146. It includes the examination of the digestive, respiratory, urinary, and
reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture topics and include microscopy, the study
of models, dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Su
Prerequisite(s): BIO146 or BIO149

BIO 149 - ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY BRIDGE COURSE
6 credit hours; 4 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course is an intense, accelerated class covering many of the objectives for both BIO 145 and BIO 146. Upon
successful completion of the class, the student receives credit by examination for BIO 145 and the earned grade for BIO
146. In order to handle the amount of material covered in this course, the student must already have a good foundation in
anatomy and physiology (ie.: BIO 121 and BIO 122 or their equivalent). Extra time for study and preparation should be
available to the student. Students who have been out of college for more than ten years and forgotten much of their
foundation anatomy and physiology courses may not want to register for this course. Quarters Available: Evening - For W
Prerequisite(s): BIO121, and BIO122

BIO 155 - MICROBIOLOGY
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course presents the basic principles of microbiology and involves the study of microorganisms in relation to health
and disease. Laboratory exercises enhance and support the lecture topics. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su;
Evening - F




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BUSINESS RELATED STUDIES
BRS 293 - BUSINESS RELATED STUDIES I
15 credit hours; 1-15 class hours; 1-15 lab hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific business knowledge and skills and generally
classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Credit applies to the Associate
of Technical Studies degree only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

BRS 294 - BUSINESS RELATED STUDIES II
15 credit hours; 1-15 class hours; 1-15 lab hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific business knowledge and skills and generally
classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Credit applies to the Associate
of Technical Studies degree only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

BRS 295 - BUSINESS RELATED STUDIES III
15 credit hours; 1-15 class hours; 1-15 lab hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific business knowledge and skills and generally
classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Credit applies to the Associate
of Technical Studies degree only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need




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BUSINESS
BUS 110 - INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course provides the basic undertanding of five functions of business. All business enterprises require fundamentals
in operations, marketing, finance, accounting, and management. Other topics covered include the global environment,
entrepreneurship, quality and how economics affect busienss. Quarters Available: Day - FWSpSu; Evening - FWSpSu

BUS 115 - SUPERVISION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an introduction to the supervisor's role in management. Challenges for supervisors include: planning,
problem solving, organizing, staffing,training,leading and working with individuals and teams along with controlling costs
and improving results. Quarters Available: Day - FWS; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

BUS 121 - MANAGEMENT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of the principles and practices relating to the successful management of modern business. Topics include
planning, organizing, designing, and decision making. Ethics and organizational change are also covered. Cases are
used to provide practice in the application of management concepts. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - F, Sp

BUS 123 - E-COMMERCE
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course surveys the opportunities and challenges faced in an increasingly digital world. More and mroe product
information and selling strategies are linked to the world-wide web. Topics include the buying and selling processes
supported by electronic means. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

BUS 126 - CUSTOMER SERVICE
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This hands-on course provides practical lessons on how customer service will increase the organization's bottom line .
Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

BUS 134 - BUSINESS LAW
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This basic business law course involves a survey of the sources and nature of American law, administrative law,the
federal court system, the litigation process, basic tort law relating to business, product liability law, contract law, propoerty
law, agency and employment law, partnership law, corporate law, antitrust law, securities regulation, business ethics and
social responsiblity. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

BUS 140 - PRINCIPLES OF SELLING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course provides a conceptual understanding of the skills, duties, and resp o n s i b i l i t i e s r e q u i r e d o f m o d e r n ,
professional salespeople. Both the concepts and the applicatory student exercises are presented and practiced from
within an organizational business-to-business context. Course emphasis is placed upon enabling the student to generate
effective applications of the Marketing Concept Strategy for both manufacturing and service organizations. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

BUS 148 - MARKETING
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of functions and agencies relating to the process of distributing merchandise from the producer or manufacturer
to the ultimate consumer. Quarters Available: Day - F, W; Evening - F, Su

BUS 199 - BUSINESS ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need




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BUS 200 - BUSINESS PRACTICUM AND CONSULTATION
3 credit hours; 1 class hours; 14 lab hours
This course allows a student to gain knowledge while working at a practicum site. The practicum site will provide learning
experiences consistent with the student's interests and learning desires while meeting the approval of the department .
This course requires a minimum of 14 hours per week of an appr o v e d b u s i n e s s s i t e a n d o n e h o u r p e r w e e k i n
consultation with a faculty member. Responsibility for securing a practicum site rests with the student. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): BUS121, and BUS148, and ENG101, and MTH110

BUS 224 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Human resource management investigates a variety of functions considered essential to the personnel function of
institutions, including: job analysis, recruiting, selection, motivation, training, evaluation, and career development .
Special attention is paid to federal hiring requirements and the issues of health and safety. Quarters Available: Day - Sp,
Su; Evening - Sp, Su

BUS 226 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
To develop an understanding of the economic and social environment within which small concerns function. To provide
the student assistance in career choice and finally, to afford practice in decision making under conditions of uncertainty
and incomplete facts. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp, Su

BUS 230 - QUALITY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Quality improvement is recognized as an essential function in any successful organization. Leading corporations have
demonstrated that improved quality raises profits, reduces costs, and provides competitive advantage. This course will
explore the foundations of quality; tools and methods for analy t i c s t u d y a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e s y s t e m s f o r q u a l i t y
managment. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): BUS121

BUS 242 - LOGISTICS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course explores the essential nature and strategic role of logistical operations for the American business enterprise .
Included will be the design and control of the flow of goods, services and personnel to its destination and management of
the flow within the supply chain. Focus will include inventory, warehousing, packaging, environmental concerns, and
transportation modes. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): BUS121

BUS 244 - ADVERTISING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Advertising and sales promotion are major communicative tools for businesses of any size. The student will consider the
whys and hows of these persuasive tools as they relate to strategy for both retail and industrial firms. Areas to be studied
include research, setting objectives, positioning, message selection, layout, copy media, evaluation, budgeting, and
control with a focus on local advertising strategies. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - F, W

BUS 270 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Introduction to International Trade is designed to give students a basic understanding of exporting and importing functions
that relate to goods, services, employment, and marketing/management opportunities. Topics in the course include
significance and benefits of international trade, the positions of the United States and Ohio in international trade, how to
get started in international trade, international marketing techniques, international finance, transportation, foreign
customs, foreign government regulations, and employment opportunities. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

BUS 271 - INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CULTURE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
International Socioeconomics will help the student understand behavior in different cultural, political, economic, and
economic geographic settings in order to engage in export and import activities. Targeted world areas include: the
Middle East, Africa, the Far East, South/Central America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and other areas of special
interest to the class. Quarters Available: Day - N/A; Evening - W




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BUS 273 - GLOBAL ECONOMICS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course provides a comprehensive picture of the global economy and its impact on business, industry, and the daily
lives of citizens around the world. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

BUS 276 - GLOBAL COMPETITION
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course provides a comprehensive treatment of busienss global competition. The topics include international
managment, finance, global strategy and marketing. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

BUS 280 - CASE STUDIES IN BUSINESS
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
An application course in which some of the methods of identifying and solving business problems are applied to case
studies. Emphasis is given to qualitative analysis and the application of the material and concepts taught in previous
courses. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ACC111, and BUS121 or BUS226, and BUS148, and ENG110 or ENG114 or ENG115 or ENG201 or
ENG202 or ENG210

BUS 285 - BUSINESS ETHICS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will challenge the student to consider personal, managerial, and organizational ethics as prerequisites for
sound decision making. A strong focus, when possible, will be applied to identifying ethically correct and socially
responsible decisions. Current and classical examples, from the macro and micro environments of the business
enterprise, will be thoroughly discussed. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - F, W
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

BUS 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS
6 credit hours; 1-6 class hours
The course presents a specific topic in Business Administration that is not normally covered in the current Business
Administration curriculum. Credit hours and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need




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CHEMISTRY
CHE 100 - INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed as an introductory course in chemistry for those students who have no previous chemistry
background. The factor-unit method of problem solving, mathematical operations used in solving chemistry problems,
chemical terminology, and basic laws of chemistry are covered. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - W;
Weekend - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with MTH100 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH102 (minimum grade of C-
required) or MTH103 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH110 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH121 (minimum
grade of C- required) or MTH122 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH123 (minimum grade of C- required)

CHE 110 - CHEMISTRY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course presents the basic concepts of inorganic and organic chemistry with emphasis on those areas applicable to
the medical field. Laboratory exercises enhance and support the lecture topics. Quarters Available: Day - Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): One year of high school chemistry (minimum grade of C- required) or CHE100 (minimum grade of C-
required)




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COMPUTERS
CIS 104 - OPERATING SYSTEMS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course covers various components of DOS and Windows including utilities and tools commonly found in these
environments. Configuring the user environment, working with applications, managing disk storage, performing backups,
and sharing data are covered as well. The use of the Windows registry and profiles on various OS platforms are topics of
interest in this course. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 107 - BUSINESS SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course covers various topics associated with a technical support position. Customer service/help desk skills,
interpersonal communications, professionalism, business ethics, multicultural issues, and personal time management
tools will be covered. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 109 - DATABASE ANALYSIS & DESIGN
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course introduces the principles of relational database design. Students will apply the fundamentals learned in lab
exercises to design entity-relationship diagrams that show the information relationships in simple databases. Students
will also learn the core MOUS competencies for Microsoft Access. They will then demonstrate their understanding of the
concepts learned in the course by designing and creating an Access database for an existing business. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 110 - PROGRAM LOGIC
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A course in problem solving as it applies to computer programming in business. The content includes instruction in
pseudocode and structured logic and the application of these techniques to business-oriented problems. Topics include
simple report generation with final totals, comparing and branching, complex reports with various sub-totals, table and
array processing, maintaining sequential files, simple methods of sorting, and the requirements of interactive processing .
Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 121 - MICROSOFT WORD
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introductory course in word processing using Microsoft Word for Windows. Through a series of hands-on exercises,
the student will create, edit, format and print documents. Topics include: creating, saving, retrieving, formatting, editing,
printing, inserting graphic elements, merging, creating hyperlinks and web pages, maintaining file organization and using
the help system. NOT FOR AIT MAJORS. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 122 - MICROSOFT EXCEL
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introductory course in spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel for Windows. Through a series of hands-on exercises, the
student will create, edit, format, and print worksheets. Topics include: creating, saving, retrieving, formatting, editing,
printing, creating formulas, naming cells and ranges; creating charts, inserting graphic elements, creating hyperlinks and
web pages, maintaining file organization and using the help system. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F,
W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 123 - MICROSOFT ACCESS
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introductory course in databases using Microsoft Access for Windows. Through a series of hands-on exercises, the
student will create and edit databases. Topics include: creating, saving, retrieving, formatting, and editing tables; printing
reports; changing fonts; simple calculations and creating formulas; working with records; creating forms; and establishing
table relations. The student will use queries to extract information from tables. Quarters Available: Day - W, Sp; Evening
- W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190




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CIS 124 - MICROSOFT OFFICE INTEGRATION
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course covers the intermediate skills necessary for using Microsoft Office. Through instruction and a series of
hands-on exercises, the student will utilize the different features in Office to exchange documents, compose and transmit
faxes, and embed data from Access in Word and Excel. The student will utilize Outlook and Briefcase to coordinate
various documents, faxes, schedules, etc. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - W, Su
Prerequisite(s): CIS121, and CIS122, and CIS123 or CIS109

CIS 125 - MICROSOFT POWERPOINT
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introductory course in presentation software using Microsoft PowerPoint for Windows. Through a series of hands-on
exercises, the student will create, edit, format, and print presentations. Topics include: creating, saving, retrieving,
formatting, editing, printing and running presentations; inserting graphic elements; creating hyperlinks and web pages;
linking and embedding; and using the help system. Quarters Available: Day - F, W; Evening - Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 126 - MICROSOFT FRONTPAGE
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides an introduction to creating web pages using Microsoft FrontPage. Through a series of hands-on
exercises, the student will be introduced to the most important topics including creating new websites, integrating a
database with a FrontPage web page, and using simple HTML code. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

CIS 127 - MICROSOFT WORD ADVANCED
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This second level course covers advanced Word features including formatting with special features enhancing the visual
display and clarity of documents, working with multiple documents, creating and merging main documents with data
source documents, creating tables and indexes, creating and editing macros, and creating fill-in forms. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): CIS121

CIS 128 - MICROSOFT EXCEL ADVANCED
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This second level course covers expert Excel features including formatting with advanced techniques, working with
templates and workbooks, working with lists, using analysis tools, managing and auditing worksheets, collaborating with
workgroups, and using advanced format functions. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered
based on need
Prerequisite(s): CIS122

CIS 129 - MICROSOFT ACCESS ADVANCED
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This second level course covers expert Access features including building and modifying advanced tables, building and
modifying forms, refining queries, using advanced report features, defining relationships, and using Access tools .
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): CIS109 or CIS123

CIS 131 - VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A course in the application of the Visual Basic programming language. This course will describe the fundamental
techniques for creating, modifying, saving, and printing Visual Basic programs. This course also describes the
characteristics, behavior, and properties of such form controls as Labels, Text Boxes, Command Buttons, Check Boxes,
Frames, Shapes, Option Buttons, Scroll Bars, Input Boxes, Message Boxes, and form Windows. Quarters Available: Day
- F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): CIS226




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CIS 132 - VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
An advanced Visual Basic (VB) programming course designed to further the student's knowledge of the VB environment .
Topics include: programming fundamentals, such as a sequence structure, loop structures, decision structures, array
handling techniques (one-dimensional and multi-dimensional arrays), sequential file access techniques, interfacing with
databases, and the use of the crystal report writer. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS131

CIS 134 - MARKUP AND SCRIPTING LANGUAGES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is designed to give an introduction to various markup and scripting languages such as HTML, DHTML, PHP,
XML, and others. It serves as a foundation for those interested in the programming side of web pages. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp - every odd year; Evening - Sp - every odd year
Prerequisite(s): CIS226

CIS 141 - COBOL PROGRAMMING I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
COBOL, which stands for Common Business Oriented Language, is a higher level, business-oriented, programming
language. This course is designed to give the student knowledge of the basic concepts of structured programming and
the COBOL language through the use of practical, business applications. Quarters Available: Day - W - every odd year;
Evening - W - every odd year
Prerequisite(s): CIS226

CIS 190 - INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides an introductory overview of the Microsoft Windows operating system. The components of a window
and basic window procedures are described. The course begins with the most common and basic topics and moves
forward into more specialized subjects. Topics include: navigation, configuring and optimizing, customizing, working with
applications, sharing data effectively, and managing disk drives and backups. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

CIS 197 - PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum is an opportunity for acquiring further knowledge and skills through on-the-job experiences with local
employers. The practicum will take place in a local business under close supervision and will provide learning
experiences consistent with the student's interests. Completion of 27 credit hours in the student's major, approval of the
instructor, and the student's advisor. The student must also enroll in the seminar (CIS 198) during the same quarter .
Note: the practicum and seminar cannot be used more than twice to satisfy the requirments of a degree program .
Offered based on need. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with CIS198

CIS 198 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar, offered concurrently with the practicum, provides a forum for the student to critique work
experiences in the practicum. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the work
environment, the characteristics of professional behavior, business ethics, and common business practices. The
acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an effective employee in Information Services is also covered .
Enrollment is restricted to those students who have completed at least 27 credit hours in their major. The practicum
cannot be used more than two times to satisfy the requirements of the degree program. Quarters Available: Day - Offered
based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with CIS197

CIS 199 - COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need




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CIS 206 - PC UPGRADE / SUPPORT / REPAIR I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course develops knowledge and skill in several areas, including installation, configuration, upgrading, and
troubleshooting. Safety, diagnostic techniques, preventive maintenance, and internal hardware, such as the
motherboard, CPUs, memory expansion cards, and power supplies are covered as well as peripheral devices. (This
course is the first of two that presents material needed for the A+ Certification Core exam.) Quarters Available: Day - F,W;
Evening - F,W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with CIS104 (minimum grade of C- required)

CIS 207 - PC UPGRADE /SUPPORT/ REPAIR II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
The course is a continuation of CIS 206. It examines PC systems in detail, including printers, scanners and other
peripheral devices n o t c o v e r e d i n t h e f i r s t c o u r s e . T o p i c s i n c l u d e a d v a n c e d t r o u b l e s h o o t i n g , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d
configuration of serial/parallel communication devices and various peripherals. (This course is the second of two that
presents material needed for the A+ Certification Core Exam.) Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS206

CIS 222 - JAVA PROGRAMMING I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is an introduction to Java as an Internet programming language. Topics include an introduction to Java
Applets, Control Structures, Graphics, and the user interface. Java database connectivity, exception handling, Servlets,
Java Beans, and Java Utilities are also covered at an introductory level. Quarters Available: Day - Sp - every even year;
Evening - Sp - every even year
Prerequisite(s): CIS226

CIS 226 - C++ PROGRAMMING I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
The course covers the fundamental features of the C++ language as a modern structured programming language. The
basic instruction set is discussed including data types, operators, functions, arrays, control statements, pointers, and I/ O
functions. Many programs are included to illustrate the various commands. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with CIS110

CIS 227 - C++ PROGRAMMING II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
The course covers more advanced features of the C++ language as a modern object-oriented design tool. It emphasizes
polymorphism, class inheritance, overloading operators, templates, exceptions handlers, and file processing .
Techniques for constructing data structures from linked lists to binary trees are also covered. Topics on developing a
ôWindowsö interface are explained. Various programs are examined to illustrate the commands and concepts. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS226

CIS 230 - RPG PROGRAMMING I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course covers basic programming techniques using the RPG/ILE language and the OS/400 operating environment .
Assigned programs will develop the student's abilities in simple data manipulation, file updating, interactive data entry,
and report generation. Students will compile and execute programs on an IBM AS/400 computer. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp - every even year; Evening - Sp - every even year
Prerequisite(s): CIS226

CIS 236 - WEB-BASED DATABASES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course covers the implementation of a web-based database using search software with a relational database, and a
programming language to tie the two together. Emphasis is on using software that is freely available. Current software
includes Apache Server, MySql, and PHP. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS275 (minimum grade of C- required)




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CIS 261 - Cisco Academy I
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement, administer, and troubleshoot basic
networking systems. It covers the basic concepts involved in the electronic transmission of business data from one
computer system to another utilizing local and wide area networks. The major types of network topologies, protocols, and
infrastructures are also discussed. The course also presents various networking models and standards, including the
International Standards Organization's OSI (Open System Interconnection) model and IEEE 802 Standard. [The course
presents material needed to prepare for a Cisco Certification Exam.]. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS104, and CIS190

CIS 262 - Cisco Academy II
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course is the second of a four course series designed to provide students the skills and knowledge necessary to
design, build, and maintain small to medium size networks. Router concepts and theory, TCP/IP transport protocols, and
router configuration are covered. Students will have hands-on experience with Cisco routers in a networked lab
environment. [The course presents material needed to prepare for a Cisco Certification Exam.] Quarters Available: Day -
F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): CIS261

CIS 263 - Cisco Academy III
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course is the third of a four course series and will extend the student's knowledge and experience with switches,
Virtual LANs, the IPX protocol, and network segmentation. The benefits and features of Ethernet and Fast Ethernet
networks are also covered. [The course presents material needed to prepare for a Cisco Certification Exam.] Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS262

CIS 264 - Cisco Academy IV
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course is the last of a four course series and will extend the student's knowledge and experience with switches and
routers in a WAN environment, PPP, and ISDN services. WAN design and various WAN protocols, including ATM and
Frame Relay are discussed. Students will gain hands-on experience with Cisco routers in various WAN environments .
[The course presents material needed to prepare for a Cisco Certification Exam.] Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening -
Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS263

CIS 270 - LINUX I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course presents an overview of the LINUX operating systems and an introduction to data communication concepts in
a LINUX environment. Processes, memory, and file system management are also covered. The basic LINUX shell
commands are demonstrated, and students learn how to combine several simple commands together to perform complex
file and text manipulation. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): CIS261 (minimum grade of C- required)

CIS 271 - LINUX II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is a continuation of CIS 270. Management and configuration of HTTP, FTP, DNS, and telnet servers in UNIX
environments will be introduced. Students will also configure and administer lpd print servers, secure network and
system resources, compile modules into a UNIX system, and modify system configuration files. Various management
utilities, such as Linuxconfig and webmin tools, will be discussed. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS270

CIS 273 - NETWORK SECURITY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course presents material on network security and intrusion detection systems. Protocols used in Linux, Unix,
Windows, and Netware networks will be examined. A detailed discussion of the TCP/IP protocol suite and Ethernet
operation will lead to students performing hands-on labs using various tools to capture, analyze and generate IP traffic .
Tools and techniques used to exploit protocol weaknesses and perform more advanced network attacks will also be
explored. Students will then learn defensive solutions to netowrk attacks, including HRT, policy routing, and traffic
shaping. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS261, and CIS270



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CIS 275 - STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE (SQL)
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course explains the principles of managing relational database systems using a SQL (Structured Query Language).
Coverage includes creating, populating and dropping tables, views, and synonyms; querying databases; updating
databases; and fundamental a Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS226 (minimum grade of C- required)

CIS 281 - NOVELL NETWARE I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement, administer, and troubleshoot
information systems that utilize Novell NetWare. Topics include user access, workstation management, file sharing and
security, NDS security, NetWare Application Launcher, and network printing. [The course presents material needed for
the Certified Novell Engineer (CNE) Exam.] Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS261 (minimum grade of C- required)

CIS 282 - NOVELL NETWARE II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course teaches the student how to install and configure NetWare operating systems, upgrade servers, and install
NetWare client software. [The course presents material needed for the Certified Novell Engineer (CNE) Exam.] Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS281

CIS 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
4 credit hours; 1-6 class hours
The course presents a specific topic in Computer Information Systems (CIS) that is not normally covered in the current
CIS curriculum. Credit hours and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Class hours: 2-6. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need

CIS 292 - WINDOWS SERVER I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete day-to-day administrative tasks in a
single-domain or multiple-domain network. Upon completing the course, students will be able to install, configure,
troubleshoot, and support servers and workstations using the MS Windows Network Operating System. [The course
covers material needed to prepare for a Microsoft Certified Professional Exam.] Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS261 (minimum grade of C- required)

CIS 293 - WINDOWS SERVER II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze, plan, troubleshoot, and administer the
Microsoft Windows infrastructure in an enterprise. [The course covers material needed to prepare for a Microsoft
Certified Professional Exam.] Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS292 (minimum grade of C- required)

CIS 296 - CIS CASE STUDIES
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This capstone course presents analysis, design, and project management techniques needed to create a solution for a
comprehensive project. As team members, students will utilize their programming and data communication skills to
prototype a solution for the assigned project. Teams will document their work in a professional, written report submitted
at the conclusion of the course. In addition, each team will make an oral presentation of its project and the solution
developed by the team. Both items will be reviewed by professionals in information systems. Quarters Available: Day -
Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS109 (minimum grade of C- required), and CIS227 (minimum grade of C- required), and CIS261
(minimum grade of C- required), and ENG201 (minimum grade of C- required) or ENG202 (minimum grade of C-
required) or ENG210 (minimum grade of C- required)




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CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJ 111 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE PHOTOGRAPHY
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to teach the student small evidence photography, crime scene photography, surveillance
photography, accident investigation photography, and the legal aspects of photography. This course will include the use
of digital cameras and video cameras. All equipment is furnished by the CRJ Department. Quarters Available: Day - F,
Sp; Evening - W, Sp

CRJ 113 - INTRODUCTION TO PRIVATE SECURITY AND LOSS PREVENTION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a study of the development, philosophy, responsibility, and functions of private security. It focuses on the
present state of private security, its principles, its legal authority, and its effect on society, in general. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101

CRJ 115 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE REPORT WRITING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will examine the various types of reports written and used in the various parts of the criminal justice system .
This course will also provide the students with the various means of report writing from observation to the final report .
The student will prepare a number of reports in various formats during the course. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening -
Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with CIS121, and can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102

CRJ 118 - INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will examine the relationship between psychology and the different components of the criminal justice system .
It will also explore the applications of psychological principles to the resolution of problems within the criminal justice field .
Quarters Available: Day - F, W; Evening - W

CRJ 119 - SUCCESS SKILLS FOR THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROFESSIONAL
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course provides students with an introduction to personal vision, leadership, and management concepts. It further
introduces to the student, their role and responsibilities in the filed of Criminal Justice and how to balance this with the
demands of their personal life. Topics include interpersonal leadership, empathic communication, creative cooperation,
self-renewal and situational leadership concepts. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp

CRJ 140 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course closely examines past and current legal cases/decisions that affect the role of individuals within the criminal
justice field. This course examines case law that pertains to the first, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth
amendments. Quarters Available: Day - SP; Evening - SP
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101

CRJ 145 - INTRODUCTION TO THE UNITED STATES JUDICIAL AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will examine the development of the American Judicial and Criminal Justice Systems, the historical
development, the organizational hierarchy of the courts, and the role and process of the courts within the criminal justice
system. This course will also specifically examine the Ohio court structure and process. Quarters Available: Day - F, W,
Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101

CRJ 151 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - PHYSICAL CONDITIONING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course meets OPOTC requirements for the needs, purpose, and importance of physical conditioning. This will
include classroom, as well as actual physical conditioning, which includes strength and cardiovascular development. This
includes rigorous physical activity and requires passsing a physical examination by a physician. This course is for Peace
Officer Academy students only and students must pass a physical exam by a physician in order to enroll. This course is
graded pass (P)no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - W




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CRJ 160 - INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will examine the development of the American Correctional System, the historical development, the role of
corrections in the Criminal Justice System, the philosophies and operations of corrections, and the legal concepts of
corrections. This course will also specifically examine the Ohio Correctional System. Quarters Available: Day - F;
Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101

CRJ 171 - GANGS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the structure and organization of gangs. Investigation techniques
will be discussed concerning recognizing gang activities, graffiti, symbols, and methods of recruitment of new gang
members. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - Sp

CRJ 175 - FAMILY VIOLENCE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course examines the characteristics of the growing numbers of families "on the fault line" of present day society in
the United States. Causes and solutions that have been proposed to understand, control, and readdress problems of
at-risk families are discussed. Topics include social intervention, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, crimes
against the elderly, and judicial relations. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101

CRJ 180 - JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course examines the causation factors, theoretical approaches, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. This course
specifically examines the Ohio Juvenile Justice System, the historical development, treatment of juvenile offenders, and
the control of juvenile offenders. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

CRJ 185 - INTRODUCTION TO POLICE OPERATIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the history of policing, the purposes of policing, and the various
methods of police operations including community policing. This course further examines the avenues of police
communications, police equipment, reports and reporting systems, support services, personnel issues, an d t h e
patrol/investigative techniques used within the law enforcement field. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101

CRJ 199 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE BASIC ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

CRJ 215 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - PATROL OPERATIONS
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course is to acquaint the student with the various patrol functions including the following, police report writing,
communications, building searches, auto theft, gang awareness, and prisoner booking and handling. Peace Officer
Academy students only. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - W

CRJ 217 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - POLICE SKILLS I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course covers 12 specific police skills subjects: Introduction to Basic Training, Role of the American Peace Officer,
Philosophies and Principles of the American Justice System, the Criminal Justice System and Structure of the American
Courts, Ethics & Professionalism, Community Policing, Introduction to Report Writing, Communicating with the Public and
the Media, Handling the Special Needs Population Juvenile Justice System, and Victims Rights & Crime Prevention .
Peace Officer Academy students only. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - F

CRJ 220 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - CRIMINAL LAW I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course examines the theory of the legislative process, and the American system of jurisprudence. This couse will
also cover each of the criminal law statutes located within the Ohio Revised Code Title 29. Peace Officer Academy
students only. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - F




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CRJ 222 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - CRIMINAL LAW II
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course meets OPOTC requirements for laws of arrest, search & seizure, legal aspects of interview & interrogations,
civil liability & use of force, testifying in court, and rules of evidence. Peace Officer Academy students only. Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - F

CRJ 224 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course introduces the student to the study of investigative procedures including initial contact by an officer,
preliminary investigation, primary phase follow-up, and methods of handling "hot and cold cases." Additional topics
covered within this course include interview and interrogation techniques, crime scene searches, evidence collection
techniques, photography, sketching, and search warrants and execution. Peace Officer Academy students only. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - W

CRJ 225 - CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION I
5 credit hours; 3 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course introduces the student to the study of investigative procedures including initial contact by an officer,
preliminary investigation, primary phase follow-up, and methods of handling "hot and cold cases." Additional topics
covered within this course include crime scene searches, crime scene sketches, evidence identification and search
warrant requirements. The laboratory will provide actual investigation situations. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): MTH102 (minimum grade of C- required), and CRJ111, and CRJ145, and ENG201

CRJ 226 - INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
5 credit hours; 3 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the updated techniques describing Forensic Analysis, as well
as procedures and practices relating to the proper collection and preservation of evidence at crime scenes. The nature of
physical evidence is emphasized along with the limitations that technology and knowledge impose on its individualization
and characterization. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CRJ225, and CRJ235

CRJ 235 - DRUGS AND NARCOTICS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course studies the social and physical implications of legal and illegal drugs and substances. Drug and substance
usage and its psychological and physiological impacts are also discussed for each of the various categories of
substances that are seen in society today. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): CRJ145, and ENG201 or ENG202

CRJ 245 - CRIMINOLOGY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a study of the framework of criminology. The course includes the study of theories of criminology, the
forms of criminal behavior, the criminal justice systems, and the characteristic motives and roles enacted by persons
whose behavior is considered deviant. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CRJ145 or CRJ217, and ENG201 or ENG202

CRJ 265 - DEFENSIVE TACTICS (FOR CRJ DEGREE STUDENTS)
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides the student with the basic principles and tactics of unarmed self-defense, and how to defned against
physical attack, control aggressive behavior, and how to arrest/subdue an individual using the minimum amount of
force.This course is graded pass(P)no pass(NP). Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W

CRJ 266 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - SUBJECT CONTROL
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course provides the student with the basic principles and tactics of unarmed self-defense, and how to defend against
physical attacks, control, aggressive behavior, and how to arrest/subdue an individual using the minimum amount of
force. Peace Officer Academy students only. This course is graded pass (P)no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W




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CRJ 275 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - TRAFFIC INVESTIGATION I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will examine the fundamental concepts of traffic accident investigation, the protection of the scene, the
recording of information, the collection of evidence, and the analyzation of the accident. Peace Officer Academy students
only. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - W

CRJ 276 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - TRAFFIC INVESTIGATION II
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course meets OPOTC requirements for traffic enforcement technologies & alcohol detection, apprehension, and
prosecution. Peace Officer Academy students only. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - W

CRJ 280 - TERRORISM & HOMELAND SECURITY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will examine the history, structure, and current trends of domestic and international terorist and terrorist
organizations along with the development and structure of Homeland Security. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): CRJ140, and CRJ145, and ENG201 or ENG202

CRJ 282 - ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALISM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will introduce the student to the diverse ethical, professional, and legal issues and dilemmas confronting all
fields of the criminal justice profession as well as proper resolution(s) of these conflicts. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CRJ140, and CRJ145, and ENG201 or ENG202, and SPE101, and can be concurrent with PHI140

CRJ 285 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - FIREARMS
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course will introduce the student to the historical perspective of firearms. The lawful and unlawful use of weapons
under current legal controls, and the restrictions concerning firearms. Thorough training on precision pistol shooting and
police combat will be covered in the lab sessions. This course is for Police Academy Students only. This course is graded
pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - F

CRJ 287 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - POLICE SKILLS II
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course is introduced to the student in three separate sections. Part one of the course deals with handling domestic
disputes. The student will understand the philosophy of a law enforcement agency as it relates to domestic violence and
learn the appropriate police responses to violent and non-violent domestic disputes. The student will also become
familiar with the dynamics of the victim of domestic violence and learn the appropriate procedures for handling such
victims. Part two of this course includes the topics of crisis intervention, child abuse and neglect, and missing children
investigations. Part three of this course includes the new (1993) mandated 24 hours in cultural differences. Peace Officer
Academy students only. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - F

CRJ 289 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - POLICE SKILLS III
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course introduces the student to the knowledge and skills including a practical exercise in defensive driving tactics
and pursuit driving. Part two of this course deals with handling nonviolent and hostile crowds, riot formations, chemical
agents, and bombs and explosives. Also included is domestic and international terrorism and hazardous materials .
Peace Officer Academy students only. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - W

CRJ 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
6 credit hours; 1-6 class hours
This course presents a specific topic in Criminal Justice that is not normally covered in the current Criminal Justice
curriculum. Credit hours and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need

CRJ 292 - PEACE OFFICER ACADEMY - EMERGENCY CARE AND SERVICES
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course teaches the student the knowledge and skills necessary to administer emergency aid to the injured and ill
until care can be obtained, and also teaches the skills that are necessary to administer emergency care to victims of
respiratory and circulatory emergencies. Peace Officer Academy students only. This course is graded pass (P)no pass
(NP). Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - F




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CRJ 295 - COMMUNITY BASED CORRECTIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course focuses on the services delivered to the correctional client by such agencies as probation, parole, halfway
houses, drug-alcohol, mental health, and other social services agencies. A focus on community programs, agencies, and
facilities used in restructuring the correctional client within society will also be covered. Quarters Available: Day - Sp;
Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CRJ145, and CRJ160, and ENG201 or ENG202

CRJ 297 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This course involves placement of the student into an actual work environment within a setting in the Criminal Justice
field. It requires the student to have reliable transportation. The work experience includes job tasks and assignments
providing exposure to the functions of the various Criminal Justice fields. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP).
Minimum of 50 credit hours completed within the CRJ curriculum. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W,
Sp,Su
Prerequisite(s): CRJ145, and ENG201 or ENG202, and must be concurrent with CRJ298

CRJ 298 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course must be taken concurrently with CRJ-297 Criminal Justice Practicum and involves discussions of the
operations, issues, and events of the placement of the student in CRJ-297 in a Criminal Justice work environment. This
course is graded pass (P)no pass (NP). Minimum of 50 credit hours completed within the CRJ curriculum. Quarters
Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): CRJ145, and ENG201 or ENG202, and must be concurrent with CRJ297




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DIGITAL MEDIA
DMT 102 - INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introduction to the elements and principles of digital graphic design as they are applied to print, web, and video
production. The leading computer software applications will be used to explore the processes of design and layout of
different types of documents and media. This introductory course provides an overview of design,typography and the
courses in the Digital Media Technology department. Quarters Available: Day - F,W; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190, and must be concurrent with DMT105

DMT 105 - IMAGE MANIPULATION I
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
Course work includes an introduction to the vocabulary and production processes necessary to create images for printing,
web design, and video, including desktop scanning and resolution. Using the leading computer software applications,
students will explore raster and vector based imagery, illustration, photo restoration, color correction and image
compositing. Quarters Available: Day - F,W; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190, and must be concurrent with DMT102

DMT 107 - PRINCIPLES OF WEB DESIGN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts and practices in web design. It includes some very basic
HTML instruction, a review of several kinds of web sites, and experience in one or more HTML editors, imaging software,
and use of various design techniques. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with DMT110

DMT 109 - PRINCIPLES OF AUDIO PRODUCTION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course presents an overview of related hardware and software for audio productions and editing. Students will also
learn correct microphone placement and sound creation within the recording environment in radio and television. Quarters
Available: Day - F

DMT 110 - MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introduction to basic multimedia development which includes integration of text, graphics, sound, video, animation,
and interactivity. Study includes sound editing, screen design for film, video, multimedia, the study of time based issues
in planning for multimedia design and animation, including storyboarding, and flow charting. Design issues will be
covered, and supporting software, including authoring software, for sound, video, and multimedia. Quarters Available :
Day - SU,W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): AIT100, and CIS190

DMT 118 - RADIO PRODUCTION I
1 credit hours; 2 lab hours
This course builds on the skills learned in DMT 109 and allows the student a chance for further in-depth hands-on
experiences in prdoucing radio programs for the College's radio station. The student is expected to participate as a staff
member of the station for two hours per week in producing a weekly program. Quarters Available: Day - W, Sp; Evening -
W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): DMT109

DMT 120 - ADVANCED WEB DESIGN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Building on previous skills learned, students will use a leading industry software for web design. Such topics as file
transfer protocol (FTP) methods, web site management, creation of frames, layers, tables, dynamic server page contact,
and databases will be covered. Course components include further exploration of web-based interactivity, cascading
style sheets (CSS), video, audio, graphics, and animation; and introduces the essential concepts that support electronic
business sites. Quarters Available: Day - Sp--every even year; Evening - Sp--every even year
Prerequisite(s): DMT102 (minimum grade of C- required), and DMT107 (minimum grade of C- required)




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DMT 124 - MEDIA INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of how to prepare for and conduct news and sports interviews for both the electronic and print medias. This
course would include pre-arranged and “spot” interviews with an emphasis on interview type, structure, question
formulation, listening and improvisation. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DMT109, and ENG113, and SPE101, and can be concurrent with DMT126

DMT 126 - MEDIA REPORTING
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
Newsgathering for a variety of types of stories, from the simple and factual to the complex and investigative. Distinctions
will be made between the information usually necessary for newsgathering and that used for on-air TV and radio news
reports. Quarters Available: Day - Sp--every even year; Evening - Sp--every even year
Prerequisite(s): DMT109, and ENG113, and can be concurrent with DMT124

DMT 128 - ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
Expanding on student’s knowledge of graphic design elements and principles covered in DMT 102, students will further
explore print production design. Emphasis will be on typography for layout and design. History of typography, graphic
design, and printing processes are studied. Projects include advertisements, logos, brochures, and other methods of
printed mass media communication. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DMT102 (minimum grade of C- required), and DMT105 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 134 - SCRIPTING FOR WEB DESIGN
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is designed to give web designers an introduction to the various markup languages such as PHP, Action
Script, and Javascript. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): CIS110, and must be concurrent with DMT107

DMT 135 - IMAGE MANIPULATION II
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course will continue to expand on the vocabulary and production processes learned in DMT 105. Emphasis will be
on raster based images produced from the leading graphic software applications. Digital photography, developing images
for the Internet, and more complex compositing techniques will be covered. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DMT105 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 140 - PHOTOGRAPHY
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introduction to the elements and principles of photography as they are applied to print, web, and video production .
This course will provide theory and practical aspects of taking well-composed photographs that visually communicate a
message. Students must provide camera and film or a digital equivalent camera with manual focus setting preferred .
Quarters Available: Day - W,Sp; Evening - W

DMT 199 - DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

DMT 201 - FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL ANIMATION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Introduction to the concepts and processes utilized in the production of artwork with digital tools. A variety of techniques
are explored for storyboarding, basic illustration, frame animation, tweening, interactivity, publishing and exporting
animation. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with DMT120, and DMT110 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 204 - DIGITAL GRAPHIC CREATION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of digital illustration which includes text effects, fill patterns, bezier/vector based drawing, information graphics,
technical illustrations, and cartography for print. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): DMT105 (minimum grade of C- required)




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DMT 205 - SET DESIGN AND LIGHTING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of effective design and lighting techniques of the TV set for production. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

DMT 210 - INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL AUDIO AND VIDEO EDITING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A comprehensive introduction to the techniques of generating and manipulating digital audio and video. Study also
includes digital video format standards, the principles of video recording, editing and delivery, in addition to basics of
digital audio, editing for video and the synchronization of audio and video files. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): DMT110 (minimum grade of C- required), and DMT140 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 211 - INTERMEDIATE ANIMATION
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course includes a further study of development and evaluation of effective animation, using a 3-D application,
modeling, polygons, vertex maps, lighting, camera management, and storyboarding techniques. Quarters Available: Day -
W
Prerequisite(s): DMT201

DMT 212 - IMAGE MANIPULATION III
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will cover advanced imaging techniques. Students will produce samples for their portfolio that demonstrates
their skills in image manipulation, including advanced color correction, advanced photo retouching techniques, and photo
montage. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): DMT135 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 214 - WEB SERVERS AND DATABASES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Students will build on previous scripting and database skills working with server side communication. Aspects such as
FTP, Apache, Linux, SQL, MySQL will be discussed. Quarters Available: Day - Sp--every even year; Evening - Sp--every
even year
Prerequisite(s): CIS123, and must be concurrent with DMT120

DMT 216 - FUNDAMENTALS OF TV STUDIO PRODUCTION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introduction to the fundamentals of TV studio pre-production, production, and direction. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): DMT109

DMT 218 - RADIO AND TV PROGRAMMING MANAGEMENT
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The study of issues related to scheduling of programming of radio and TV stations, as well as an introduction to managing
media outlets. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ENG210

DMT 219 - RADIO PRODUCTION II
1 credit hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of DMT 118 and provides for further in-depth, hands-on experiences in producing programs
for the College'e radio station. The student is expected to participate as a management member and staff member of the
station for two hours per week in producing weekly programs. Quarters Available: Day - F,W; Evening - F,W
Prerequisite(s): DMT118

DMT 220 - DEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING MATERIALS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The course centers on creating effective, computer-based training materials. Topics covered will include effective CBT
design and development of principles, types of CBT materials, and learning theory and its application to training materials .
Students will design course materials from scratch, as well as support materials. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening -
W
Prerequisite(s): DMT110, and DMT120, and DMT201, and ENG110




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DMT 221 - ADVANCED ANIMATION
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 4 lab hours
This course builds a basic understanding of character animation, environments, and special effects in addition to
developing a solid foundation in using a 3-D animation software. Students will have an opportunity to enlarge their
portfolio with various hands-on projects. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DMT201 (minimum grade of C- required), and DMT211 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 228 - APPLIED DESKTOP PUBLISHING
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
Applying student’s knowledge of graphic design, imaging and copywriting to prepare documents for publication using
master pages and style sheets. Advanced typesetting, copy fitting, and page design will be covered. Projects include
newspapers, newsletters, magazines, brochures, catalogs and other large publications. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): DMT128 (minimum grade of C- required), and DMT135 (minimum grade of C- required)

DMT 230 - MULTIMEDIA PROJECT (CAPSTONE)
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to take a multimedia project idea from concept to finished product. Students will be expected to
utilize all skills acquired in the DMT program to assemble an electronic portfolio of their work which can be used for
employment interviews. Other topics including interviewing and resumes will be covered. Taken within 20 credit hours of
graduation. Quarters Available: Day - Sp

DMT 240 - INTERNSHIP
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The student will earn college credit while attaining practical work experience. This work experience compliments the
formal classroom instruction. The work experience is coordinated by a faculty member who visits the job site for a
conference with the supervisor. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with DMT255

DMT 242 - BROADCAST PERFORMING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The development of the basic skills needed to become an effective radio and TV communicator including news casting,
sports casting, and commercial announcing. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

DMT 255 - SEMINAR
1 credit hours; 1 class hours; 1 lab hours
This course must be taken concurrently with DMT 240. Students will be presented with the functions and procedures of
the work place. Work experiences will be used as a basis for discussion. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening
- F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with DMT240

DMT 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS
6 credit hours; 1-6 class hours; 1-6 lab hours
This course presents a specific topic in Digital Media Technology (DMT) that is not normally covered in the current DMT
curriculum. Credit hours and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day -
Based upon need; Evening - Based upon need




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DRAFTING
DRD 215 - COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamentals of AutoCAD. Topics include screen layout, menu
structure, and display control, basic drawing and editing commands. There is a one-to-one ratio of students to computers .
Learning is primarily accomplished by hands-on use of the software. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): MEC115

DRD 216 - COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN II
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is a continuation of Computer Aided Design I. The student will be introduced to the advanced menu options
for Computer Aided Design. Such as: ARRAY, LAYER, COLOR, POLYLINES, MULTI VIEW DISPLAY, ATTRIBUTES,
ATTRIBUTE EDITING, CREATING A TEMPLATE FILE, and CHANGE COMMANDS. Quarters Available: Day - Sp;
Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DRD215

DRD 217 - COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN III
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to apply the knowledge of software systems options, such as custom menus, polylines, menu
Icons, scripts, and slides. The student will create solid models and use them to generate 2D drawings. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): DRD216

DRD 218 - MAP AND TOPOGRAPHIC DRAFTING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introduction to topographic and map drawing. Surveyors notes are used to develop drawings. Aerial maps, contour
maps and plan profile sheets are introduced. Students will become familiar with survey equipment. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DRD216

DRD 219 - PIPING AND SHEET METAL
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will introduce the student to the symbols and techniques for producing drawings of piping systems and sheet
metal developments, revolutions, and intersections. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): DRD216

DRD 225 - DESIGN PRESENTATION
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
Graphic communication with computer methods of drawing construction. Isometric, one point and two point perspective
techniques used to construct part, exploded, and sectioned assembly drawings. Drawings merged into a desktop
publishing program for the addition of notes, assembly/repair instructions and specifications for the preparation of
assembly and repair manuals. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): DRD217

DRD 226 - SOLID MODELING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This quarter we are using AutoDesk Inventor software for the course. Inventor 8 is an advanced computer aided
drafting/design course using a 3D fearture-based parametric solid modeler to create complex 3D parametric solid models,
surface models, assemblies, and generate 2D views from those models. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with DRD217

DRD 235 - GEOMETRIC DIMENSIONING AND TOLERANCING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The study of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing techniques, principles, practices, and symbols. Students will
develop working drawings using geometric dimensioning and tolerancing practices. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening
- Sp
Prerequisite(s): DRD215




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DRD 264 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course deals with architectural and structural working drawings. Students will develop plans, elevations, details, and
sections. Structural layout, column and beam detailing, and structural symbols are included. Electrical wiring and
symbols for residential and commercial buildings will be reviewed. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): DRD216

DRD 271 - ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAFTING
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
The student is introduced to wiring diagrams, schematics, and printed circuits. A study of symbols and an introduction to
chassis and panel layout and design is included. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

DRD 299 - SURVEYING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A course involving the use of surveying equipment and the recording of field data to solve civil engineering problems .
Major emphasis will be placed on precision distance measurement, differential leveling, topographic surveying, and
traversing (property surveying). A correlation will be made with the development of map drafting from the surveying data
base. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): DRD215, and MTH194




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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ECE 101 - INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The course provides an overview of early childhood programs, licensing agencies, and regulations. Developing effective
programming to support the development of the whole child with consideration for diversity issues will be stressed. The
importance of writing objective and detailed observation reports is included. The course requires 8 hours of observation
in the North Central State/OSU Mansfield Child Development Center including classrooms for infants, toddlers, and
preschool age children. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Su; Evening - F

ECE 104 - CREATIVE PLAY
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will define play and provide creative and appropriate play experiences for the students within a preschool play
environment. Choices and options in play environment (gross motor, fine motor, sensory integration experiences,
construction, dramatic and block play, etc.) will be explored. Developing the optimum environment for learning by
integrating goals, curriculum, and interest areas to meet the Ohio Dept. of Education Early Learning Content Standards is
stressed. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

ECE 105 - HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will cover basic health, safety, and nutrition concepts related to meeting the needs of the young child in group
settings. Psychological issues related to feeding children, as well as state and federal regulations will be studied .
Students will receive state mandated training in communicable disease recognition and prevention, and child abuse
recognition and training. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

ECE 108 - CREATIVE EXPRESSION
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
The content of this course study will provide opportunity for students to develop ideas and techniques that will stimulate
children to experiment with language, writing materials, space, and ideas in individual ways to express their creative
abilities. This class will also promote positive growth in the child’s cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development .
Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

ECE 109 - MUSIC AND MOVEMENT
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course includes the development of movement and musical abilities in the young children. Techniques for teaching
music and movement to young children will be included. Students will learn to use the autoharp and to use music and
movement as an instructional classroom management tool. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W

ECE 121 - TEACHING MATH TO YOUNG CHILDREN
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to help teachers create age appropriate active learning environments to support the mathematical
development of young children. The Early Learning Content Standards for Mathematics from the Ohio Department of
Education Office of Early Learning and School Readiness (Pre-K to grade 3) provide the framework for developing the
prekindergarten mathematics curriculum. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 123 - COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will prepare students to use a variety of developmentally appropriate methods to support children’ s
intellectual curiosity, problem solving abilities, and critical thinking skills. Current trends and theories in Early Childhood
Education will be applied to lesson planning and teacher/child interaction in the preschool classroom. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required) or EDU103

ECE 124 - LANGUAGE ARTS
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for the student to better understand the communication skills of
young children. Students will develop skills that support the child's ability to understand, acquire, and use verbal and
nonverbal means of communication. Students will develop a repertoire of developmentally appropriate language arts
activities, using the Ohio Department of Education Early Learning Content Standards for Language. Quarters Available:
Day - W; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required) or EDU103


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ECE 126 - SCIENCE EXPERIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to help teachers create an age appropriate active learning environment to support the science
basics in the development of young children. The Early Learning Content Standards for Science established by the Ohio
Department of Education Office of Early Learning and School Readiness (Pre K - grade 3) provide the framework for
developing the science curriculum. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 130 - PRESCHOOL PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum experience is a “hands-on” experience providing on-the-job opportunities to apply principles acquired in
ECE 101, ECE 104, ECE 108, and ECE 109. Students plan and implement activities with individuals and small groups in
curriculum areas included in the Ohio Department of Education Early Learning Content Standards. The practicum takes
place in a licensed child care facility or a public prekindergarten classroom. Students work a minimum of seven hours per
week. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE108 (minimum grade of C required) or ECE109
(minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE132 (minimum grade of C required), and ENG101, and
PSY110 or PSY132

ECE 132 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the
work setting and child behavior, helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an
effective teacher of young children. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE104 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE108
(minimum grade of C required) or ECE109 (minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE130
(minimum grade of C required), and ENG101, and PSY132 or PSY110

ECE 140 - PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum experience is a “hands-on” experience providing on-the-job opportunities to apply principles acquired in
ECE 101, ECE 104, ECE 108, and ECE 109. Students plan and implement activities with individuals and small groups
based on the Ohio Department of Education Early Learning Content Standards. The practicum takes place in a licensed
child care facility, a public pre-kindergarten program or public kindergarten. Students work a minimum of seven hours per
week. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ECE104 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE130 (minimum grade of C required), and must be
concurrent with ECE142 (minimum grade of C required), and can be concurrent with ENG110 or ENG114

ECE 142 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the
work setting and child behavior, helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an
effective teacher of young children. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ECE104 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE132 (minimum grade of C required), and must be
concurrent with ECE140 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 150 - INFANT/TODDLER PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum involves working with infants and toddlers in a child care setting or an infant stimulation program. The
“hands-on” experience reinforces the student’s understanding of the developmental needs of the very young and the
importance of providing developmentally appropriate stimulating environments. Students work a minimum of seven (7 )
hours per week in an approved facility. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on
need
Prerequisite(s): ECE130 (minimum grade of C required), and can be concurrent with ECE203 (minimum grade of C
required), and must be concurrent with ECE152 (minimum grade of C required), and can be concurrent with ENG110 or
ENG114




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ECE 152 - INFANT/TODDLER SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the
work setting and child behavior, helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an
effective teacher of young children. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ECE132 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE203 (minimum grade of C required), and must be
concurrent with ECE150 (minimum grade of C required), and ENG110 or ENG114

ECE 160 - LITERACY PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
This practicum is designed for students wanting to receive language and literacy certification and/or wanting to become
more proficient in language and literacy skills. Students will continue to perfect teaching skills in language arts and
literacy. Activities will be implemented with individual children, as well as small and large groups. Students work a
minimum of seven (7) hours per week in an approved facility. Quarters Available: Day - Based upon need; Evening -
Based upon need
Prerequisite(s): ECE123 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE124 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE209
(minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE162 (minimum grade of C required), and EDU204, and
ENG101 or ENG102

ECE 162 - LITERACY SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the experiences of
the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the work setting and
child behavior, helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to literacy. Quarters Available: Day -
Based upon need; Evening - Based upon need
Prerequisite(s): ECE123 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE124 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE209
(minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE160 (minimum grade of C required), and EDU204, and
ENG101 or ENG102

ECE 199 - EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

ECE 200 - ADMINISTRATION
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic administrative issues related to the operation of a licensed
preschool and/or child care facility. The student will become familiar with legal requirements, financial operations,
enrollment patterns, and staffing considerations. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 203 - INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
The needs of infants and toddlers are unique. This course introduces principles of development and planning a
stimulating, nurturing environment which enhances language, motor, cognitive, social, and emotional development .
Health and safety issues related to the care of infants and toddlers will be discussed. Methods will be introduced in
dealing with behaviors related to young children. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required) or EDU103

ECE 206 - SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to help students develop the ability to understand and support young children’s social
development. The role of the teacher in providing an environment that encourages the development of prosocial attitudes
and behaviors will be explored. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE104 (minimum grade of C required)




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ECE 209 - LITERATURE & LITERACY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course concentrates on a survey of critical study of children's literature including folk literature, modern stories,
picture books, and poetry. Students will explore the role of literature in early childhood program development. The
selection and use of television, film, and video will be included. Students will design and demonstrate appropriate literacy
activities based on the ODE Early Learning Content Standards. Quarters Available: Day - N/A; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 210 - WORKING WITH DIVERSE LEARNERS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
The accommodation of special needs of children in an early childhood environment will be the focus of this course. An
overview of handicapping conditions in young children, issues of normalization, least restrictive environment,
individualization of learning programs, working with ancillary services (P.T., O.T., SLP), and experiences in segregated
and integrated settings will be addressed. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required) or EDU103

ECE 216 - FAMILY/SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
The course emphasizes the importance of effective communication between parents and educators. Factors affecting the
home/school relationship and the role of the school or center in establishing a strong working relationship is stressed .
Emphasis is placed on encouraging active parent participation in the early childhood programs both private and public .
The course includes history of education and the impact on families both past and present, the examination of models of
the healthy families, diverse families, and the effect of drugs, alcohol, and disabilities on the family unit. The course
includes creating written communications with families and any requirements designated by the state and/or school
system. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ECE101 (minimum grade of C required) or EDU103 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 230 - DIVERSITY PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
This practicum is a continuation of ECE 130. Students will continue to perfect teaching skills with 3-5 year old children
and will implement science, math, language arts activities, social studies, and the arts (curricular areas as presented by
Ohio Department of Education Early Learning Content Standards). Activities will be implemented with individual children,
as well as small and large groups. The focus of these activities will be primarly around families' diversities. Students work
a minimum of seven (7) hours per week in an approved facility. Students who wish to receive credit for CDA’s or Career
Center credit must attend a one-day seminar prior to the beginning of the quarter. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening -
N/A
Prerequisite(s): ECE121 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE123 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE124
(minimum grade of C required), and ECE130 (minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE232
(minimum grade of C required)

ECE 232 - DIVERSITY PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the
work setting and child behavior, helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an
effective teacher of young children with diverse backgrounds. Quarters Available: Day - F
Prerequisite(s): ECE121 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE123 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE124
(minimum grade of C required), and ECE132 (minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE230
(minimum grade of C required)

ECE 240 - PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
This practicum provides “hands-on” experience working with preschool aged children with a documented disability. The
student will assume responsibility for planning and adapting classroom activities to meet the needs of individual children
within least restrictive environments. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE230 (minimum grade of C required), and can be concurrent with ECE210 (minimum grade of C
required), and must be concurrent with ECE242 (minimum grade of C required)




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ECE 242 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the
work setting and child behavior, helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an
effective teacher of young children. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ECE232 (minimum grade of C required), and can be concurrent with ECE210 (minimum grade of C
required), and must be concurrent with ECE240 (minimum grade of C required), and can be concurrent with ENG110 or
ENG114

ECE 250 - DIRECTED PRACTICE
3 credit hours; 15 lab hours
During the student teaching experience the student will function as a staff member of the cooperating agency and will
assume major responsibility for planning and implementing the prekindergarten program. Students are expected to
comply with agency policies and conduct themselves in a professional manner in accordance with National Association of
Young Children Code of Ethical Conduct. Students must receive a letter grade of “B” or higher to be eligible for state
licensure. Activities will meet Ohio Department of Education Early Learning Content Standards. Quarters Available: Day -
W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): ECE140 (minimum grade of C required), and ECE230 (minimum grade of C required), and must be
concurrent with ECE252 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 252 - DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
Students will be scheduled on campus or online for at least two hours each week in order to discuss, evaluate, and
reinforce the directed practice. Current trends and issues in early childhood education will be discussed. Students must
receive a letter grade of B or higher to receive state licensure. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - Offered based on
need
Prerequisite(s): ECE232 (minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE250 (minimum grade of C
required)

ECE 260 - CDA INTERNSHIP
6 credit hours; 30 lab hours
A supervised field internship in CDA approved training sites for those students requiring credentials as a Child
Development Associate (CDA). Interaction with young children will be observed under controlled settings. Interviews
with students and supervisors will take place, and students will become involved with preschool program development .
Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): ECE230 (minimum grade of C required), and must be concurrent with ECE261 (minimum grade of C
required)

ECE 261 - CDA SEMINAR I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The student must be employed or volunteer full-time with a preschool or day care program. The Seminar will acquaint the
student with the CDA process. Students will complete a self-assessment and begin assembling the documentation
needed to complete the CDA process. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with ECE260 (minimum grade of C required)

ECE 262 - CDA SEMINAR II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a continuation of CDA Seminar I. The student will complete the application process and the documentation
necessary to attain a CDA Credential. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE261 (minimum grade of C required)




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ECE 270 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The graduate seminar is a capstone course, providing students an opportunity to explore current trends and issues in the
field. Students will discuss the implications of the Code of Ethics of National Association for the Education of young
Children and synthesize practice and theory into a personal philosophy of education. Students will increase their use of
advocacy skills by researching an approved topic and providing an oral presentation of the topic.

Must be within 18 credit hours of graduation, 30 hours community service hours completed, and attend an approved
professional seminar. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): SPE101

ECE 280 - ASSESSMENT AND DOCUMENTATION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will explore the role of documentation in assessment and decision making. Students will examine and apply
strategies for matching various types of documentation to the purpose. Quarters Available: Evening - Offered based on
need

ECE 281 - LANGUAGE LITERACY AND PLAY
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course offers students an in-depth study of language development including oral language, reading, and writing. The
importance of play and the role of adults in fostering language development and early literacy is examined. Quarters
Available: Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ECE101, and ECE124

ECE 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
4 credit hours; 1-4 class hours
This course is designed to allow groups of students to study various topics of current relevance on a one-time-only basis .
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need




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ECONOMICS
ECN 101 - ECONOMICS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is an introduction to both micro- and macroeconomics. Microeconomic topics include demand and supply
analysis, surplus and shortage conditions, elasticity of demand, opportunity cost, as well as marginal cost and marginal
revenue analysis for the business firm under various market conditions. Macroeconomic topics include an analysis of the
classic, Keynesian, and monetarist “schools” of thought. The course concludes with an investigation into the topics of
money, banking, inflation, and the Federal Reserve system. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening - F, Sp, Su

ECN 161 - MICROECONOMICS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course of study focuses upon how the conditions of scarcity affects the decisions of individuals, households, and
business firms in their roles as producers and consumers. In particular, the price mechanism is addressed at length and
explained by the conceptual and graphical representation of supply and demand. Applications of such concepts as
elasticity of demand, as well as marginal cost and revenue calculations are used by the student to determine optimum
pricing, profit, and revenue strategies for the firm. The advantages and disadvantages of relative economies of scale in
both the long-run and short-run are explored. The market conditions of monopoly, oligopoly, as well as perfect
competition are analyzed with the goal of giving the student an understanding and appreciation of their socio-economic
implications. Quarters Available: Day - W, Sp; Evening - W, Su

ECN 162 - MACROECONOMICS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course of study focuses upon how the major sectors and institutions of our modern economy (such as industry,
consumers, and the federal Government) interrelate overall to achieve economic growth. In-depth analysis of such topics
as wealth productions, gross national product, unemployment, inflation, and the business cycle are emphasized as
important components of this course. In particular, the tools and goals of monetary policy and fiscal policy are analyzed
in light of the contrasting perspectives of the classical, Keynesian, Monetarist, and Austrian schools of thought. Quarters
Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su




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EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING
EDU 103 - FOUNDATION OF EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will help the student understand that teaching is a profession, the need for professionalism, the historical
philosophical contexts, the governmental and economic contexts, challenges of meeting students diverse educational
needs, curriculum and instruction, and the major legal issues before the education community. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - F; Additional offerings based on need

EDU 131 - PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum experience is a “hands on” reality experience providing on-the-job opportunities for individuals to learn and
practice skills and to learn more about themselves in the school classroom. This practicum experience provides a
foundation for more advanced practical experiences. Each person is expected to progress in respect to knowledge and
skill in the field of education. This practicum will take place in schools that can provide learning experiences consistent
with the person’s skills. This practicum is a minimum of seven hours per week working in an approved educational
setting. Quarters Available: Day - F,W,Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102, and must be concurrent with EDU133, and EDU102
(minimum grade of C- required) or EDU103 (minimum grade of C- required)

EDU 133 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it
serves as an opportunity to critique the experiences of the individual in the school. Secondly, each seminar will serve as
an opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge. In general, the seminar will focus on self-understanding,
understanding of the classroom students at the site school, and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102, and must be concurrent with EDU131, and EDU103
(minimum grade of C- required) or EDU102 (minimum grade of C- required)

EDU 141 - PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum builds on the objectives in EDU 131 and contains an additional time emphasis. This practicum consists of
a minimum of 14 hours per week working in an approved educational setting under the supervision of a specifically
trained teacher. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU143, and EDU131 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU133 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 143 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it
serves as an opportunity to critique the experiences of the individual in the school. Secondly, each seminar will serve as
an opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge. In general, the seminar will focus on self-understanding,
understanding of the classroom students at the site school, and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU141, and EDU131 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU133 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 150 - WRITING/STUDY SKILLS FOR CHILDREN
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course introduces the student to the world of child learning. Specific course content will develop the abilities of the
student in children’s writing skills and study skills. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - F;
Additional offerings based on need

EDU 160 - INTRODUCTION TO THE PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course offers students an introduction to the theories and principles of instructional technology. There are five main
areas of focus in this course: (1) Research, theory, and history of instructional technology; (2) Visual Literacy; (3 )
Evaluation of instructional technology (including information on design criteria); (4) The relationship of instructional
technology to learning styles; and (5) Instructional computing experiences. To assist in developing a link between theory
and practice, students will also have some hands-on experience with various forms of instructional technology and with
problem solving techniques appropriate to the media. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - Offered based on need;
Additional offerings based




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EDU 198 - CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
Credit for Life Experience is a course in which students learn to evaluate their life experience, determine what learning
may meet the outcomes of college courses for college credit, and prepare documentation to verify that these outcomes
have been met. This course counts as a basic elective in the Educational Assisting Program. Enrollment in this course
requires approval of the Divisional Dean and successful completion of ENG101 or ENG102. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

EDU 199 - EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING TECHNICAL ELECTIVE
3 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

EDU 200 - INCLUSION IN PUBLIC EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A basic course about including special needs students in regular school classes. The course describes strategies that
educators have used to include students who were separated in the past and are now in regular classrooms. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Sp; Additional offerings based on need

EDU 203 - PHONICS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of phonics as it applies to classroom instruction. Attention will be given to graphophonemic patterns. Classroom
application will be explored with specific emphasis on the role of phonics in a balanced literacy program. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - W; Additional offerings based on need

EDU 204 - FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course is designed to promote understanding of the development of literacy. The knowledge necessary to make and
apply appropriate programmatic and instructional decisions, including knowledge of the environments, will be the focus of
the course. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Sp; Additional offerings based on need

EDU 205 - UNDERSTANDING ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Participants will gain understanding and insight into behaviors and characteristics of children and adolescents with
ADD/ADHD, as well as the kind of assistance necessary for their success at home and school. Quarters Available: Day -
Su; Evening - Additional offerings based on need

EDU 210 - MOTIVATING CHILDREN
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The skill of motivating children involves the ability to develop self confidence, the ability to develop a sense of personal
worth, and the ability to believe in one’s own power. As a child, education can be overwhelming with studying coupled
with life responsibilities and pressures. The intention of this course is to identify “personal luggage” that triggers
self-doubt, lack of success, low self-esteem in children, and the motivational factors and success patterns which create
positive self-esteem in children in public schools. Quarters Available: Day - Offering based on need; Evening - F;
Additional offerings based on need

EDU 212 - MANAGING CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course is designed to introduce the social and emotional growth and needs of student with emotional, behavioral,
and/or learning differences. A positive approach which emphasizes a LRE, to build a network of intervention to help the
student successfully functino in schools. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W

EDU 215 - AUTISM
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will help the student develop an understanding of the developmental disability of autism. Autism is a disability
that envelops the student into the intrinsic works of the human mind. This course will objectively define autism to help the
student work with the autistic-like person. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on
need




                                                                  189
EDU 220 - HELPING SKILLS FOR CHILDREN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will explore a variety of helping strategies or techniques that are considered to be more effective in helping
people reduce personal stress and conflict and resolve problems more effectively. The course emphasizes both a
theoretical understanding, as well as practical application of various strategies or techniques. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

EDU 225 - OCCUPATIONAL, PHYSICAL, AND SPEECH THERAPIES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an introduction to basic activities the primary and secondary educational assistant may provide to students
in the classroom for continuity and maintenance level of occupational, physical, and speech therapy services. The course
will provide the educational assistant with understanding the history and purpose of educationally based occupational,
physical, and speech therapy. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

EDU 231 - PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum builds on the objectives in EDU 131 and contains an additional time emphasis. This practicum consists of
a minimum of 14 hours per week working in an approved educational setting under the supervision of a specifically
trained teacher. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU233, and EDU141 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU143 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 233 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it
serves as an opportunity to critique the experiences of the individual in the school. Secondly, each seminar will serve as
an opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge. In general, the seminar will focus on self-understanding,
understanding of the classroom students at the site school, and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU231, and EDU141 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU143 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 241 - PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum builds on the objectives in EDU 131 and contains an additional time emphasis. This practicum consists of
a minimum of 14 hours per week working in an approved educational setting under the supervision of a specifically
trained teacher. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU243, and EDU231 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU233 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 243 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it
serves as an opportunity to critique the experiences of the individual in the school. Secondly, each seminar will serve as
an opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge. In general, the seminar will focus on self-understanding,
understanding of the classroom students at the site school, and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU241, and EDU231 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU233 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 251 - PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum builds on the objectives in EDU 131 and contains an additional time emphasis. This practicum consists of
a minimum of 14 hours per week working in an approved educational setting under the supervision of a specifically
trained teacher. This practicum/practicum seminar is no longer required beginning with the 2005-06 curriculum. Please
contact your advisor and the Dean of Health Sciences before registering for this course in order to evaluate if it is a
graduation requirement. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU253, and EDU241 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU243 (minimum
grade of C- required)




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EDU 253 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it
serves as an opportunity to critique the experiences of the individual in the school. Secondly, each seminar will serve as
an opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge. In general, the seminar will focus on self-understanding,
understanding of the classroom students at the site school, and helping strategies. This practicum/practicum seminar is
no longer required beginning with the 2005-06 curriculum. Please contact your advisor and the Dean of Health Sciences
before registering for this course in order to evaluate if it is a graduation requirement. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W,
Sp
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU251, and EDU241 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU243 (minimum
grade of C- required)

EDU 261 - BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum is centered around the experience of behavior management working in an approved educational setting
under the supervision of a behavior management trained supervisor. The student will accomplish an application of higher
level behavior outcomes in a school setting for 14 hours per week. Together EDU261/EDU263 count as one technical
elective. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need.
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU263, and ECE203 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU131 (minimum
grade of C- required), and EDU133 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU141 (minimum grade of C- required), and
EDU143 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV113 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV114 (minimum grade of
C- required), and HSV222 (minimum grade of C- required)

EDU 263 - BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM SEM
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This practicum seminar is taken concurrently with the behavior management practicum, EDU261. The purpose of the
seminar is twofold. First, it serves as an opportunity to critique the experiences of the student in the practicum setting or
school. Secondly, each seminar session will serve as an opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge and
understanding. In general, the seminar will focus on working with behaviors, an understanding of the classroom students
at the site school, and behavior and helping strategies. Together EDU261/EDU263 count as one technical elective .
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with EDU261, and ECE203 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU131 (minimum
grade of C- required), and EDU133 (minimum grade of C- required), and EDU241 (minimum grade of C- required), and
EDU243 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV113 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV114 (minimum grade of
C- required), and HSV222 (minimum grade of C- required)

EDU 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION
5 credit hours; 1-5 class hours
This course presents a specific topic in education that is not normally covered in the curriculum. Credit hours and topic
will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered
based on need




                                                             191
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ELE 150 - TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course begins with Electrical Safety and an overview of troubleshooting techniques. This is followed by using
electronic instruments to gain information about electrical or electronic devices and circuits that are defective. Students
learn to measure Continuity, Resistance, AC/DC Voltage and Current using digital and analog multi-meters and to
measure Peak Voltages, Time Periods, Frequency and Phase Angle using a dual channel oscilloscope. Measurements
are made on defective circuits and components to teach troubleshooting technique and the interpretation of results so that
students can localize and identify defective circuits or devices. In addition to measurements the course will include wiring
electrical circuits, prototyping electronic circuits and soldering and de-soldering. The course is primarily hands on and
does not require a background in DC/AC circuits theory, however, the various lab projects ELE 150 will give practical
insight into DC/AC circuit theory and examples of where those theories are applied. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening
-F

ELE 151 - DC ELECTRICITY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
Elements of DC circuits is an introductory course in direct current circuit theory that includes the basic concepts of
voltage, current, resistance and power. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ELE150, and can be concurrent with MTH121 or MTH141

ELE 152 - AC ELECTRICITY
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
A course covering alternating current circuit theory including basic concepts of voltage, current, resistance, impedance,
inductance, capacitance, phase angle, and their relationships to each other in an AC circuit. Transformers, resonance and
use of AC instruments is also included. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ELE151, and can be concurrent with MTH122 or MTH142

ELE 153 - DIGITAL PRINCIPLES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of the binary number system, Boolean algebra, LOGIC and Logic circuits, flip flops, registers, counters, and their
interconnection in small systems. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ELE150

ELE 154 - LADDER DIAGRAMS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of the practical knowledge required to maintain and troubleshoot industrial control equipment properly by locating
and properly identifying the nature and magnitude of a fault or error. This involves the understanding of electrical
components, their symbols, and their relationships. Emphasis is placed on reading and understanding elementary ladder
logic circuit diagrams based upon electrical standards, and above all else, promoting safety. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W

ELE 155 - ELECTRICAL MOTORS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
A survey course of rotating electrical machinery including the following: electromagnetic energy conversion, DC motors
and generators, polyphase induction motors, synchronous motors and single-phase motors. Quarters Available: Day - Sp;
Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ELE151, and can be concurrent with ELE152

ELE 171 - INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Covers the application of automatic parts-handling and path-tracing equipment and robots, with emphasis on workplace
design and design for manufacturing. Includes survey of conveyors, parts feeders and positioners, both pick-and-place
and contouring robots. Hands-on-laboratory experiences will include layout of conveyors, gyrating bowl parts feeders, and
simple jigs and fixtures, and definition of robot needs. Training robots will be programmed by pendant control and
computer control, both off and on line. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp




                                                            192
ELE 210 - AC/DC DRIVES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course covers an overview of DC and AC motors used in motion control and electronic devices and circuits used in
DC and AC drives. Fixed output and phase controlled DC supplies needed for DC motor speed control and the pulse
width modulated (PWM) and variable frequency drive (VFD) inverters that provide AC motor speed control are also
covered. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ELE153

ELE 224 - PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS I
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will cover the basic principles behind the operation of programmable controllers, the relationship between
PC’s and relay ladder logic, programming of PC’s, and troubleshooting of programmable controller circuits. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ELE120 or ELE154, and ENR190 or ENR101

ELE 245 - ELECTRONICS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course explores the applied use of bipolar and unipolar transistor, Field Effect Transistors and power MOSFET
applications, operational amplifiers, feedback, oscillators, regulated power suppliers and the 555 timer. Topics will include
current gain, coupling and bypass capacitors, inverting and non-inverting op-amps, CMRR, voltage controlled voltage
sources, voltage controlled current sources, current controlled voltage sources, current controlled current sources,
impedances, summing amps, current boosters, comparators, oscillators, the 7800 family of voltage regulators, and
oscillators. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ELM101 or ELE151, and ELM110 or ELE152

ELE 254 - INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of electrical power and circuits, including wire gauge, DC motor-generator, 3-phase power, transformers, power
factor, AC motors (both 3-phase and single phase), electrical controls, and programmable controllers. An overview of
electronics is included. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): PHY113 or PHY253

ELE 257 - MICROCONTROLLERS I
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The first of a series of 2 courses studying the fascinating world of microcontrollers. This course will explore the Basic
Stamp II (BSII) microcontroller. The student will learn to program the controller using the PBASIC programming language
and interface the BSII to a variety of real-world applications. These applications will include discrete I/O operations, motor
and machine control, environment sensing and analog measurements. As a final project the student will design and build
an autonomously controlled vehicle that will navigate a maze of an unknown configuration. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ELE153

ELE 258 - MICROCONTROLLERS II
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The second of a series of 2 courses studying the fascinating world of microcontrollers. This course will explore the
MicroChip 16F84 and the 16F877 PIC microcontroller using a student build programmer and PicBasic Pro Compiler .
Starting with an overview of microcontroller technology the student will learn the basic architecture of the PIC, the
PICmicro instruction set, PICmicro hardware features, and hardware interfacing. Experiments will include program flow
control, handling data, subroutines, basic I/O interfacing, interfacing to an LCD display, I/O interrupts, A-to-D/D-to- A
converters, and controlling AC appliances. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ELE257

ELE 276 - ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course deals with complex instruments and instrumentation systems. Topics covered include: instrumentation
buses, waveform generation, waveform analysis, transducers, signal conditioning, analog multiplexors, sample and hold
circuits, A/D D/A convertors, micro-computer controlled data acquisition systems and process control theory. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ELE153




                                                             193
ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE
ELM 115 - ELECTRICAL CODES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of industrial and commercial code specifications. Students will learn selected electrical installation requirements
along with some hands-on experience. Chapter 1-4 and Chapter 9 of the NEC, with voltage below 600 volts, will be the
main focus of this course. This is an entry level course. Upon completion the student should work only under the
direction of a qualified electrician. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ELE152

ELM 130 - INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTATION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a study in instrumentation used in industry. Topics include b a s i c t e r m s a n d d e f i n i t i o n s u s e d i n
instrumentation, examining the operation, testing and maintenance of industrial instrumentation, instrumentation symbols
and diagrams, types of transducers, signal transmission, process variables and instrumentation electronics. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ELE245 or ELM135 or ELE143, and ELE245 or ELM135 or ELE144, and ELE245 or ELM135 or ELE244

ELM 225 - PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS II
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This class will introduce the student to Allen-Bradley's ControlLogix Platform of programmable logic controllers and to
Rockwell Software's RSLogix5000 programming software and RSLinx communication software. The student will learn to
configure, install, operate, maintain and troubleshoot ControlLogix hardware. Communication using a variety of network
connections will be practiced. Lecture will be closely followed by hands-on lab work stressing both human and equipment
safety. Additonal topics will include, program editing and documentation, instruction functionality, software tools
(searching, trends, forcing, etc.) memory usage and memory mapping, tags, arrays and aliases. Quarters Available: Day -
Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ELE224

ELM 230 - PROCESS CONTROLS
4 credit hours; 2 class hours; 3 lab hours
A study of industrial automated process control systems using programmable controllers.                      Emphasis will b e o n
programming, signal conditioning, and data transfer. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ELM224

ELM 244 - INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
Continuing where Semiconductor Devices left off, this course discusses an array of electronic topics as they apply to
industrial applications. Topics will include operational amplifiers, linear integrated circuits, triacs, SCRs, Diacs, UJTs,
programmable UJTs, phase control, zero-voltage switching, transducers, optoelectronics, and pulse modulation. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): ELM130




                                                                 194
ENGLISH
ENG 101 - BASIC COMPOSITION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Basic Composition is a course in writing effective, clearly organized essays. Emphasis is placed on sophisticated
patterns and variations in paragraphing, planning/writing/revision techniques for complete essays, and various ways to
make one’s writing as effective as possible. Most students must take the appropriate placement test before registering for
this course. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp,
Su
Prerequisite(s): RDG116, and WRT116

ENG 102 - BASIC COMPOSITION - HONORS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A course in writing eff e c t i v e , c l e a r l y o r g a n i z e d t h e m e s . E m p h a s i s o n s o p h i s t i c a t e d p a t t e r n s a n d v a r i a t i o n s i n
paragraphing, planning/writing/revision techniques for complicated themes, and various ways to make one’s writing as
effective as possible. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): COMPASS writing score of 90 or higher or ACT English sub-score of 22 or higher

ENG 113 - BASICS OF JOURNALISTIC WRITING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of the basic elements of writing for newspapers, magazines, and electronic media. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

ENG 114 - COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course involves the reading of selected examples of various literary genres, including poetry, short stories, novels,
and drama. Representative works are chosen to effectively demonstrate the qualities of a literary work. The course
places an emphasis on interpretive, analytical, and critical writing in response to literature. Quarters Available: Day - F, W,
Sp; Evening - W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

ENG 117 - COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE - AFRICAN AMERICAN
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course involves the reading of selected examples of various literary genres, including poetry, short stories, novels,
and drama. Representative works are chosen to effectively demonstrate the qualities of a literary work in general as well
as those themes, styles, and issues of concern to African American writers as a group. The course places an emphasis
on interpretive, analytical, and critical writing in response to literature. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

ENG 118 - COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE - WOMENS LITERATURE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course involves the reading of selected examples of various literary genres, including poetry, short stories, novels,
and drama, all of which were written by women. Representative works are chosen to effectively demonstrate the qualities
of a literary work in general as well as those themes, styles, and issues of concern to women writers as a group. The
course places an emphasis on interpretive, analytical, and critical writing in response to literature. Quarters Available: Day
- Sp
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

ENG 201 - ADVANCED COMPOSITION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course involves a study of literature, including poetry, the short story, and/or drama. Possible topics include the
nature of literature, literature in a technological society, guidelines for reading literature, and guidelines for evaluating and
analyzing literature. The course includes instruction in research techniques and a research paper. Quarters Available:
Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): ENG110 or ENG114 or ENG115




                                                                                     195
ENG 202 - RESEARCH WRITING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This writing course involves a study of the strategies for writing effective, researched reports. Stressed strategies include
selecting and narrowing topics, analyzing audience, using the library, taking notes, organizing material, composing,
documenting, revising, and presenting with an attractive layout. Computers are used throughout the process. Quarters
Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): ENG110 or ENG114 or ENG115

ENG 210 - TECHNICAL WRITING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed includes writing in various technical formats, instruction writing, reports and proposals, summary
writing, oral presenattions, and a formal academic research paper. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): ENG114

ENG 211 - BUSINESS AND RESEARCH COMMUNICATION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course includes basic business writing principles, various forms of electronic communication--letters/memos and
resumes/reports. It also includes research strategies for feasibility reports and proposals. Collaborative wriring and oral
presentation are also included. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, SP
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 (minimum grade of C- required) or ENG102 (minimum grade of C- required), and ENG114
(minimum grade of C- required)

ENG 215 - EDITING AND PUBLISHING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course provides students with instruction and experience in two related areas: 1) intensive experience in editing
documents for publication, including questions of audience and document design; and 2) experience with publishing
software, such as QuarkXPress or PageMaker. The course includes production of a newsletter, either real world or
fictional, and other business or organizational publications. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): ENG210




                                                            196
ENGINEERING
ENR 101 - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This is an introductory course for engineering technology students. Students will develop a deeper understanding and
appreciation of engineering, the problems engineers encounter and contributions made by engineers from various
disciplines. The ethics and responsibilities of the engineer will be discussed. Lab experience includes the following PC
applications: operating systems and hardware, word processors, spreadsheets, and engineering graphing. An
introduction to basic language programming is included at the end. Emphasis will be placed on using a PC to solve
engineering problems and produce results. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening - F, W, Sp

ENR 199 - ENGINEERING ELECTIVE
10 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

ENR 222 - INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A broad overview of the operations of an industrial organization emphasizing the relationship of basic functions and
principles essential to efficient and profitable operation of industrial enterprises. Course content covers such topics as
organizational structure, production planning, control, purchasing, sales, personnel administration, ownership and
financing, business ethics and compensation. Course content also includes the effect of globalization on the strategic
behavior of firms, the structure of markets, their interactions, and the impact on the professional development of
employees. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

ENR 280 - ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
An applications course for students in Mechanical Engineering Technology. Topics to be covered include atomic
structure, compounds, solutions, acids, bases, salts, chemical equilibrium, reactions, solvents, paints, plastics, corrosion,
and plating. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 or MTH141

ENR 293 - ENGINEERING RELATED STUDIES I
15 credit hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific engineering and maintenance careers and
generally classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Quarters Available:
Offered based on need

ENR 294 - ENGINEERING RELATED STUDIES II
15 credit hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific engineering and maintenance careers and
generally classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Quarters Available:
Offered based on need

ENR 295 - ENGINEERING RELATED STUDIES III
15 credit hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific engineering and maintenance careers and
generally classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Quarters Available:
Offered based on need

ENR 296 - MANUFACTURING STUDIES I
12 credit hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific manufacturing and skilled trade careers and
generally classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits. No more than 12
credits may be earned in Manufacturing Studies during any one quarter or equivalent 11-week period. Quarters Available:
Offered based on need




                                                                  197
ENR 297 - MANUFACTURING STUDIES II
12 credit hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific manufacturing and skilled trade careers and
generally classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits. No more than 12
credits may be earned in Manufacturing Studies during any one quarter or equivalent 11-week period. Quarters Available:
Offered based on need

ENR 298 - MANUFACTURING STUDIES III
12 credit hours
This credit is awarded for educational activities directly related to specific manufacturing and skilled trade careers and
generally classified in an approved area of concentration. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits. No more than 12
credits may be earned in Manufacturing Studies during any one quarter or equivalent 11-week period. Quarters Available:
Offered based on need

ENR 299 - ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING FIELD EXPERIENCE
12 credit hours
This course provides for supervised, off-campus work experience directly related to the student’s major program in the
Engineering Technology Division or supervised work experience as a result of enrollment in an approved apprenticeship
training program. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits. No more than three credits may be earned in Manufacturing
Field Experience during any one quarter or equivalent 11-week period. Quarters Available: Offered based on need




                                                           198
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
FIN 150 - INSTITUTIONS & FINANCIAL MARKETS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course presents the role of money in a financial system, financial institutions and their services, the Federal Reserve
system, interest rate concepts, the money market, and monetary policy. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F--odd
years only

FIN 187 - PERSONAL FINANCE I
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
This is a fundamental course in the use of personal finances. Specific topics for this course will include: consumer credit
and cost of credit alternatives (credit cards), major purchase/lease decisions (cars, furniture, and household appliances) ,
and lease/purchase of real estate. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

FIN 188 - PERSONAL FINANCE II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an overview of personal financial planning with an emphasis on financial record keeping, planning your
spending, tax planning, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting inventments, and retirement and estate
planning. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

FIN 220 - LENDING INSTITUTIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course describes the importance of credit in our economy and how credit impacts us individually. Students will learn
to assess credit risk and be able to describe the current regulation of the lending industry. Quarters Available: Day - F;
Evening - F--even years only

FIN 262 - UNDERSTANDING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
This basic course is designed to be a powerful hands-on workshop for non-financial students. There is a quick overview
of accounting jargon translated into layman's terms, then on to the finacial statemetns for intensive look at the financial
information used in today's annual reports. You will apply this information to operate a company more efficiently and
effectively. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp

FIN 290 - FINANCIAL SEMINAR
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This is a capstone course to review topics covered in the previous finance and tax courses. Objectives are to include all
required information for the Series 6 licensing exam. Other topics include in the exam, such as marketing, prospecting,
sales presentations, and servicing customer accounts will be covered. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp




                                                            199
DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION
FYE 101 - ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
This course provides an introduction to the nature of higher education and a general orientation to the function and
resources of the College. Designed to help first-year degree seeking students adjust to the College, develop a better
understanding of the learning process, become familiar with the College’s resources and services, and develop skills to
meet their educational objectives. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

FYE 161 - COLLEGE SURVIVAL SKILLS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
College Survival Skills is designed to increase the student’s success in college by assisting the student in obtaining the
knowledge and practical skills necessary to reach his/her educational objectives. Topics in the course include the
expectations of college, time utilization, test-taking, communication skills, study techniques, listening skills, library use,
use of College resources, and personal issues that face many college students. This course is mandatory for any student
whose reading and writing scores warrant it and available to any student who can benefit from it. Quarters Available: Day
- F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su




                                                             200
HISTORY
HST 121 - U.S. HISTORY TO 1815
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
An introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, art, and literature from its origins to
1815. The objective of the course is to help students understand how the American government and the U.S. legal
system were created by the Framers; how American art, literature, and philosophy developed their own independent
existence; and how American culture and politics were influenced by international events. Quarters Available: Day - F;
Evening - F

HST 122 - U.S. HISTORY FROM 1815 TO 1900
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
An introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, art, and literature from its origins 1815
to 1900. The objective of the course is to help students understand how, between 1815 and 1900, American law and
government developed; how the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Transcendentalism shaped the American
Renaissance; and how American politics, art, and literature were shaped by the shift from a rural to an urban culture .
Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W

HST 123 - U.S. HISTORY FROM 1900 TO PRESENT
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
An introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, art, and literature from its origins 1900
to the present. The objective of the course is to help students understand how, since 1900, the power and scope of
American law and government grew and developed, how modernism found expression in American art and literature, and
how American culture grew to become an international force. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp




                                                            201
HUMAN SERVICES
HSV 100 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will provide an introductory understanding of human needs, social values, ideologies, and institutional
structure which have shaped the evolution of social work values and responses in America. It will introduce students to
current professional roles and settings for practice. Quarters Available: Day - W, Sp; Evening - W, Su
Prerequisite(s): HSV107 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 102 - PROFESSIONALISM IN HUMAN SERVICES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will help the student understand the components of professionalism, the need for professionalism, the
challenges facing professionalism in the helping field, and the effects these challenges can have on one's personal and
professional relationships. Students will assess their personal standards and understanding of professionalism through
self-evaluation techniques. This course will also provide a practicum orientation to prepare students for the Human
Services Program practicums. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Su; Evening - F, Sp, Su

HSV 103 - EXPERIENCE IN SMALL GROUPS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course places an importance on understanding how groups work effectively and ineffectively and in understanding
how groups can be used as a change or growth opportunity. Not only is the focus on group process, but the student's
ability to increase their interpersonal effectiveness while working with human services clients. Quarters Available: Day - F,
W, SP; Evening - F, W
Prerequisite(s): HSV116 (minimum grade of C- required) or ECE200 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 107 - INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a study of both the intimate portrait and the big picture of individuals in the larger context of society. Topics
to be included are the role of human service workers, the system within which they work, the legal issues relevant to the
field, and strategies of intervention. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening - F, Sp

HSV 109 - SOCIAL PROBLEMS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will present an overview of generally recognized social problems by sociological measurement. Definitions of
social problems and an understanding of their impact on the quality of life and the social work field will be implemented .
Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - Sp

HSV 110 - INTRODUCTION TO CASE MANAGEMENT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course introduces the basic methods of controlling a case load, coordinating various components to community
social services, and ensuring continuity of services to clients. Topics covered include: information gatheri n g ,
record-keeping, monitoring treatment plan implementation, referral to other service providers, and the appropriate
utilization of a caseworker’s time. Basic mathematical competencies are developed and assessed by a “client financial
module” project. The case management policies of various community agencies will be examined. Quarters Available :
Day - W, Sp; Evening - W, Su

HSV 113 - BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will introduce the student to the field of behavior management. Particular emphasis will be given to
reinforcement schedules, environmental management, baselining, target behaviors, charting of behavior, writing
behavioral objectives and the legalities of modification vs. management. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - W,
Su

HSV 114 - BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
In this course the participant will learn about a number of behaviorally based procedures for working with appropriate
and/or inappropriate behaviors. The procedures are presented according to the Least Restrictive Treatment Model which
was developed to protect a human being’s civil liberties. The procedure of this course will flow from least restrictive
behavior intervention to most restrictive, as well as least restrictive techniques to most restrictive. Quarters Available: Day
- Sp; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): HSV113 (minimum grade of C- required)



                                                              202
HSV 115 - CHILD MANAGEMENT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will help the student understand basic management of child behavior. Students will experience parenting
techniques, early behavior management techniques, and the skill to observe child behavior from the eyes of the child .
Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - W

HSV 116 - INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The purpose of this course will be to present an overview of the various techniques of interviewing, types of interviews,
and issues relevant to interviewing, such as confidentiality, recording of interviews, and nonverbal communication. The
course will include practical exercises in the various techniques and methods of interviewing specifically used in the
human services field. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp;; Evening - F, W, Sp

HSV 121 - SURVEY OF HUMAN DISABILITIES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is an examination of family dynamics and functions and the effect of social forces on the same. Consideration
is given to families in which there is divorce, abuse, alcoholism, mental retardation/developmental disabilities/chronic
illness, and mental disordeers. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - W

HSV 124 - FAMILIES IN CRISIS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
An examination of family dynamics and functions and the effect of social forces on the same. Consideration is given to
families in which there is divorce, abuse, alcoholism, mental retardation/developmental disabilities/chronic illness, and
mental disorders. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - W, Su

HSV 140 - PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum experience is a “hands-on” reality experience providing on-the-job opportunities for individuals to learn and
practice skills and to learn more about themselves, client populations with whom they work, and the network of human
services. Each practicum experience provides a foundation for more advanced practicum experiences. Each person is
expected to progress in respect to knowledge and skill in the field of human services. The practicum will take place in a
facility that can provide learning experiences consistent with the person’s interests and needs. Individual preference,
whenever indicated and possible, will determine the practicum placement. This practicum consists of a minimum of
seven hours per week working in an approved facility. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV142, and HSV102 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV103 (minimum
grade of C- required) or HSV117 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV107 (minimum grade of C- required), and
HSV116 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 142 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. Persons registered for Practicums HSV 140, HSV
230, and HSV 240 must also register for Practicum Seminars HSV 142, HSV 232, and HSV 242 respectively. The
purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it serves as an opportunity to critique the experience of the individual in the
facility. To that end, individuals in mental health related facilities will meet as a group. Likewise, students in mental
retardation or learning disabilities related facilities will meet as a group. Secondly, each seminar will serve as an
opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge (e.g., case management techniques, suicidology, drugs, and human
behavior). In general, the seminars will focus on self-understanding, understanding of clients, human service agencies,
and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV140, and HSV102 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV103 (minimum
grade of C- required) or HSV117 (minimum grade of C- required), and HSV107 (minimum grade of C- required), and
HSV116 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 198 - CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This is a course where students learn to evaluate their life experience, determine what learning may meet the outcomes
of college courses for college credit, and prepare documentation to verify that these outcomes have been met. This
course counts as a basic elective in the Human Services Program. Enrollment in this course requires approval of the
Divisional Dean and successful completion of ENG101 or ENG102. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102




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HSV 199 - HUMAN SERVICES BASIC ELECTIVE
3 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

HSV 201 - BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS I
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will explore a variety of helping strategies or techniques that are considered to be effective in helping people
reduce personal stress and conflict and resovle problems more effectively. The course emphasizes both a theoretical
understanding, as well as practical application of various strategies or techniques. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp;
Evening - Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): MTH102

HSV 202 - BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS II
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This is a more in-depth coverage of some of the concepts and issues discussed in HSV201 Basic Counseling Skills I. In
addition, we will explore and practice a variety of models, such as, Gestalt, reality therapy, and behavioral approaches .
Depending on the desires of the students, we will focus our efforts toward children, adolescents, substance abusers,
domestic violence, suicide, elderly, grief, etc. It is expected that the student will have successfully completed Basic
Counseling Skills I or have comparable educational experience. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): HSV201 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 204 - SMALL GROUP FACILITATION
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This is a more in-depth exploration of the concepts and issues covered in HSV 103 Experience in Small Groups. In
addition, we will explore specific leadership issues that arise in groups with adolescents, substance abusers, domestic
violence, and the elderly. It is expected that the student will have some experience as a member of a group. Quarters
Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): HSV103 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 210 - TRANSITIONAL PROCESS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The student will exercise his/her awareness of the human skills needed to help another person be progressive. Emphasis
is on the basic skills which we all must have to survive,and the transitio n a l s k i l l s w h i c h a f f e c t h o w e a c h o f u s
survives.Human rights are identified in the areas of homelessness,aging,human sexuality and diagnostic
assessment.This course is a have to before graduating into the human services field. The underlying emphasis
throughout all the former areas will be preservation of the person's rights. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on
need; Evening - Offered based on need

HSV 212 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course provides a basic introduction to psychological testing. The intent of the course is to help the student develop
an understanding of the principles of test construction; uses and misuses of tests; tests available and used in clinical
practice; and the philosophical, theoretical, and ethical considerations applicable to testing. The course is also designed
to help the student acquire skill in administering selected tests designed to measure certain cognitive personality and
achievement functions. Tests will be used in and out of class to enhance learning objectives and understanding of one’ s
self. The psychological knowledge about the behavior being assessed also will be discussed. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

HSV 215 - PET FACILITATED THERAPY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The course is designed to provide a greater understanding of the therapeutic benefits and bonds between animals and
humans. The course will introduce the student to the history and development of pet-facilitated therapy in a variety of
helping programs. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need




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HSV 218 - GRANTWRITING
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will focus on the importance of grant writing to the nonprofit organization. Included in this course would be
topics related on how to determine the need for a grant, researching and determining the proper sources for a specific
grant request, and the steps to actually writing a successful grant. Emphasis would be given to hands-on work of
analyzing organizational needs, learning the various funding sources available, and writing grants. Quarters Available :
Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): ENG101 or ENG102

HSV 219 - DRUG ABUSE AND TREATMENT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course examines the biological,psychological and societal forces that encourages the use,misuse,abuse and
addiction to both licit and illicit drugs. Specific drug classifications and the effects of these drugs on the individuals
mind,body and emotions will be explored. Education and prevention strategies will be discussed. Theories and models of
addiction and treatment will be explored as will DSM-IV-TR criteria. The need for generalist training in the field of Human
Services will be emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - Sp

HSV 220 - ORIENTATION TO DEAFNESS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Students will learn about hard of hearing persons, their culture, language and history. Additionally, students will gain an
understanding about the implications of deafness as related to educational, social, mental health, and vocational
situations as requirements for equal access for Deaf/Hard of Hearing persons as described under The Disabilities Act and
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The student will also be provided an opportunity to learn a basic level of communication in
American Sign Language. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - Offered based on need

HSV 222 - THERAPEUTIC CRISIS MANAGEMENT
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The course will help the student develop an understanding of severe acting-out behaviors. Crisis is often a period for
reaction to another’s behavior with a “think about it later” attitude. This course is meant to reverse that procedure .
Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - Offered based on need

HSV 230 - PRACTICUM
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum experience is a “hands-on” reality experience providing on-the-job opportunities for individuals to learn and
practice skills and to learn more about themselves, client populations with whom they work, and the network of human
services. Each practicum experience provides a foundation for more advanced practicum experiences. Each person is
expected to progress in respect to knowledge and skill in the field of human services. The practicum will take place in a
facility that can provide learning experiences consistent with the person’s interests and needs. Individual preference,
whenever indicated and possible, will determine the practicum placement. This practicum consists of a minimum of
seven hours per week working in an approved facility. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102, and must be concurrent with HSV232, and HSV140
(minimum grade of C- required) or HSV130 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 232 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. Persons registered for Practicums HSV 140, HSV
230, and HSV 240 must also register for Practicum Seminars HSV 142, HSV 232, and HSV 242 respectively. The
purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it serves as an opportunity to critique the experience of the individual in the
facility. To that end, individuals in mental health related facilities will meet as a group. Likewise, students in mental
retardation or learning disabilities related facilities will meet as a group. Secondly, each seminar will serve as an
opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge (e.g., case management techniques, suicidology, drugs, and human
behavior). In general, the seminars will focus on self-understanding, understanding of clients, human service agencies,
and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102, and must be concurrent with HSV230, and HSV142
(minimum grade of C- required) or HSV132 (minimum grade of C- required)




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HSV 240 - PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum deals with the same objectives as the previous practicums, but contains an aditional time emphasis. This
practicum consists of a minimum of 14 hours per week working in an approoved facility. Quarters Available: Day - F, W,
Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): HSV230 (minimum grade of C- required), and must be concurrent with HSV242 (minimum grade of C-
required)

HSV 242 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. Persons registered for Practicums HSV 140, HSV
230, and HSV 240 must also register for Practicum Seminars HSV 142, HSV 232, and HSV 242 respectively. The
purpose of the seminar is twofold. Firstly, it serves as an opportunity to critique the experience of the individual in the
facility. To that end, individuals in mental health related facilities will meet as a group. Likewise, students in mental
retardation or learning disabilities related facilities will meet as a group. Secondly, each seminar will serve as an
opportunity for the acquisition of further knowledge (e.g., case management techniques, suicidology, drugs, and human
behavior). In general, the seminars will focus on self-understanding, understanding of clients, human service agencies,
and helping strategies. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): HSV232 (minimum grade of C- required), and must be concurrent with HSV240 (minimum grade of C-
required)

HSV 248 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR & THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course provides the students with knowledge and skills in the area of human development at the individual and
family level. The focus of the course is on the interrelatedness of the biological, psychological, social, cultural and
environmental factors in human development and behavior and its relevance to application in social work practice .
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

HSV 249 - POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Poverty In The United States is a course providing students with an understanding of the relationship between poverty,
discrimination and economics. Students will gain a perspective of the institutional forces that impact on the vulnerable
population of society. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - F

HSV 250 - DIRECTED PRACTICE
6 credit hours; 30 lab hours
Having completed 280 hours of practicum and seminars, the student will be prepared to enter Directed Practice. During
Directed Practice, students will function as staff members of cooperating facilities and will be expected to comply with
agency policies and to conduct themselves in a professional manner. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - F, W, Sp,
Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV252, and HSV240 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 252 - DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Directed Practice Seminar is a course arranged to allow directed practice students the opportunity to share their
experiences with other directed-practice students and their major professors. The experiences are attained through the
students’ 300-hour directed practice. It is also a time to “fill in the gaps” in one’s own learning process. Many different
learning experiences have been designed to accomplish that. The seminar allows for the exploration of new information,
as well as a continued exploration and application of the old. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV250, and HSV242 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 253 - DIRECTED PRACTICE I
3 credit hours; 15 lab hours
Having completed 280 hours of practicum and seminars, the student will be prepared to enter Directed Practice. During
Directed Practice, students will function as staff members of cooperating facilities and will be expected to comply with
agency policies and to conduct themselves in a professional manner. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV255, and HSV240 (minimum grade of C- required)




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HSV 254 - DIRECTED PRACTICE II
3 credit hours; 15 lab hours
Having completed 280 hours of practicum and seminars, the student will be prepared to enter Directed Practice. During
Directed Practice, students will function as staff members of cooperating facilities and will be expected to comply with
agency policies and to conduct themselves in a professional manner. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV256, and HSV253 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 255 - DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR I
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
Directed Practice Seminar is a course arranged to allow directed practice students the opportunity to share their
experiences with other directed-practice students and their major professors. The experiences are attained through the
students’ 300-hour directed practice. It is also a time to “fill in the gaps” in one’s own learning process. Many different
learning experiences have been designed to accomplish that. The seminar allows for the exploration of new information,
as well as a continued exploration and application of the old. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV253, and HSV242 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 256 - DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR II
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
Directed Practice Seminar is a course arranged to allow directed practice students the opportunity to share their
experiences with other directed-practice students and their major professors. The experiences are attained through the
students’ 300-hour directed practice. It is also a time to “fill in the gaps” in one’s own learning process. Many different
learning experiences have been designed to accomplish that. The seminar allows for the exploration of new information,
as well as a continued exploration and application of the old. Quarters Available: Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV254, and HSV255 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 271 - COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER TRAINING
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course presents an overview of the defined roles and responsibilities of a community health worker. It includes a
study of six major areas: health care, community resources, communication skills, individual & community advocacy,
health education, and skills and responsibilities. The course content meets curriculum requirements by the Ohio Board of
Nursing for professional certification as a community health worker. This course may be used to meet an elective
requirement in the Human Services Program. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with PSY130 (minimum grade of C- required)

HSV 275 - COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER PRACTICUM
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
The practicum provides opportunities for Community Health Worker students to apply principles of basic medical
assessment skills including vital sign assessment. Emphasis will be placed on communication skills, documentation and
reporting skills as related to basic health and social service issues. This course will substitute as a practicum in the
Human Services Program. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on
need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV276, and HSV271 (minimum grade of C- required), and PSY130 (minimum
grade of C- required)

HSV 276 - COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER SEMINAR
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
The practicum seminar provides opportunities for Community Health Worker students to share with others their skills and
points of view. The purpose of the seminar is to study and critique the experience of the student in the home visiting
setting. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the home visiting setting and client
behavior, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an effective Community Health Worker. This course
will substitute for a practicum seminar in the Human Services Program. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP).
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with HSV275, and HSV271 (minimum grade of C- required), and PSY130 (minimum
grade of C- required)

HSV 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN SERVICES
4 credit hours; 1-4 class hours
This course presents a specific topic in Human Services that is not normally covered in the curriculum. Credit hours and
topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening -
Offered based on need




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HUMANITIES
HUM 110 - INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an introduction to the humanities. The student will be given a broad overview of painting, literature, theatre
and film. The course focuses on the understanding of different critical theories as they apply to the fine arts. The
emphasis is on achieving maximum participation and involvement in appreciating any work of art as a means of enriching
the students value system and life-style. Field trips are required in this course. Quarters Available: Day - F, W. Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

HUM 150 - LEADERSHIP AND THE CLASSICS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to provide learners with a fundamental awareness of leadership and group dynamics theory and
to help individuals develop a personal philosophy of leadership and an understanding of the ethical responsibilities of a
leader. The course is an interdisciplinary study that explores the complex relationships that exist among philosophy,
drama, film, literature, and visual art as they reveal examples of and standard for leadership. Quarters Available: Day - F,

HUM 199 - HUMANITIES ELECTIVE
3 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

HUM 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES
4 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course enables faculty members in the Humanities department to present various topics of current interest to
students throughout the college on a one-time basis. The course may involve participation in required field trips. The
course meets the humanities elective requirements in most of NC State's degree programs. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need




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INDEPENDENT STUDIES
IND 200 - GENERAL TECHNICAL CREDIT
5 credit hours
This credit is awarded for various kinds of specialized technical education that are judged equivalent to college-level work .
The College applies a procedure involving administrators and faculty who are knowledgeable in the relevant subject area
in determining the amount of credit to be awarded for a particular activity. Credit applies to the Technical Studies and
Industrial Technology degrees only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

IND 290 - INDEPENDENT STUDY
4 credit hours
Independent study as a course is intended to meet the needs of a student who has in-depth interest in an area where no
traditional course exists, and who has the ability to independently plan and execute studies under the guidance of a
faculty member. Various restrictions apply. See the appropriate dean for details. Quarters Available: Offered based on
need

IND 299 - COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE
4 credit hours; 10-40 lab hours
This course allows a qualified student to obtain progressively responsible, paid, career-related work experience in his/her
field. The course is not a requirement for and does not count toward the completion of any associate degree program at
the College. One hour of credit is granted for each ten-hours-per-week of approved, college-supervised employment .
The course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Various restrictions apply. The course is graded pass (P )
or no pass (NP). Contact the appropriate dean or the Director of Counseling and Career Services for more details .
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need




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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
MEC 111 - MACHINING PROCESSES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course offers machine tool operation and provides the background needed to fit into a shop, read and interpret
drawings, and work with accuracy. Diligent attention is given to safety. Students will also develop and use shop
documents such as job plans and blueprints. Quarters Available: Day - F,W,Sp; Evening - F,W,Sp

MEC 115 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING DESIGN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
An introductory course to acquaint the student with the tools used to convey design concepts and product information in
the engineering area. 3D visualization using sketching, drawing solid modeling and computer aided drafting will be used .
The course will also introduce the main concepts in developing an engineering design project. Quarters Available: Day -
F; Evening - F, W

MEC 130 - WELDING AND WELDING EQUIPMENT
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
The study and experimentation with the various welding processes and equipment used in manufacturing. Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - F, W

MEC 175 - HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will be based on learning today's Fluid Control Concepts that are important die construction in the
manufacturing area. In addition to system design and layout, the student will gain experience through labs using
construction and operating systems. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - F, Sp
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 or MTH141

MEC 223 - ENGINEERING MATERIALS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
Physical metallurgy emphasizing commercial alloys, heat treatment, and surface treatment of the iron, steel, aluminum,
copper, and aerospace metals families. The laboratory covers basic metallographic techniques of specimen polishing,
etching, and examination. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F

MEC 233 - STATICS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A problem course dealing with bodies at rest; it lays the necessary groundwork for further study in the design and analysis
of structures and machines. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of the ability to draw free-body diagrams used in
solving problems. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MTH122 or MTH142, and PHY111

MEC 244 - STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of the effect of load in structures, frames, beams, columns, and mechanisms including stress and strain in
tension, compression, shear, and torsion; column buckling; torsional, axial, and lateral deflections; thermal stresses and
strains; and properties of materials. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): MEC233

MEC 245 - MACHINE DESIGN
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
Application of principles learned in Statics, Strength of Materials, and Engineering Materials to the design of machine
elements, such as shafts; bearings; belt, gear, and chain drives; clutches and brakes; flywheels; coil and leaf springs; and
welded and bolted joints. Fatigue factors of safety, work-energy relationships, and force and shrink fits are included .
Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): MEC244

MEC 264 - COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURING
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course deals with basic computer numerical control programming and machining. Basic Mill and Lathe programming,
including cutter compensation and sub-routines will be written by students and posted to fanuc. Students will complete
supporting documents such as tool drawings, lettered prints, set up sheets and code. Verification software is included with
the text. Quarters Available: Day - W, Sp; Evening - W, Sp
Prerequisite(s): MEC111


                                                            210
MEC 285 - ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A practical introduction to the economic analysis of capital investment. Course covers interest factors for present, annual,
and future worth; rates of return; depreciation; and increment and sunk costs. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 or MTH141

MEC 291 - MECHANICAL DESIGN PROJECT I
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
The first course in a two-course sequence that brings together most of the course work and learning experiences from the
mechanical engineering technology program. Students will participate in a mechanical design project to be completed
following the procedures presented. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): MEC175, and MEC244

MEC 292 - MECHANICAL DESIGN PROJECT II
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of MEC 291, Mechanical Design Project I. Students will continue with their design project
and complete the project as presented in the design procedures. A presentation will be made followed by a critique by a
review panel made up of mechanical engineering technology faculty and representatives from local industries. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MEC291




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MATH
MTH 100 - INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 2 lab hours
A course designed to provide a review of mathematical skills for students with a limited background in mathematics or for
students who have been away from classroom mathematics for awhile. The course consists of the following: basic
operations involving whole numbers, common and decimal fractions; ratio and proportion; percentage; measurement
including American and metric; perimeters, areas, and volumes of geometric figures; square root; and statistics. Credit
does not apply to any associate degree program. Mandatory Placement. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening
- F, W, Sp, Su

MTH 102 - PREALGEBRA
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 2 lab hours
A transition course designed to bridge the gap between basic mathematics and algebra. The course consists of addition,
subtraction, multiplication, and division of signed whole numbers, fractions, and decimals, as well as solving basic
equations, polynomials, and percents. Credit does not apply to any associate degree. Successful completion in MTH 100
or Compass numerical score between 41-60. Mandatory math placement required. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp,
Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): MTH100 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 103 - INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 2 lab hours
A course for students who need some basic mathematics development in the fundamentals of algebra before taking MTH
121 (Technical Math I), MTH 130 (College Algebra), or CHE 100 (Introductory Chemistry). The course consists of a brief
review of arithmetic concepts, signed numbers, equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions
and equations, coordinate graphing, systems of equations, and simplification of radicals. Successful completion in
MTH102, or a Compass numerical score of 61 or higher. Credit does not apply to any associate degree program .
Mandatory math placement required. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): MTH102 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 110 - BUSINESS MATHEMATICS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course begins with basic algebra in solving typical business word problems. Other major topics include the
calculation of trade discounts, markup and markdown of perishable merchandise, simple and compound interest, future
and present value of cash flow, discounting promissory notes, and calculating annuities. The course ends with an
overview of the mathematics of stock and bond transactions, as well as business applications for elementary statistics .
Successful completion of MTH 102 or Compass numerical score of 61 or higher. Mandatory Math Placement required .
Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): MTH102 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 119 - CIS MATH
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A variety of math topics and related computer programming applications. The course begins with a review of intermediate
algebra and a study of various number bases (binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal). Other topics include set theory
and Venn diagrams, decision and truth tables, logic constructs, matrix methods, Boolean algebra, and descriptive
statistics. Some programming experience would be helpful. Successful completion in MTH 121 or completion of a higher
mathematics course, or a COMPASS score of AR 70 or higher. Mandatory math placement required. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp; Evening - Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 121 - TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of the basic computational techniques and selected problems using a hand-held calculator/computer, significant
digits, unit conversions, roots, radicals, basic algebraic operations, equations solving, formula rearrangement, stated
problems, graphical solutions of equations, solutions of simultaneous linear equations, geometry definitions and formulas,
linear interpolation, algebraic factoring, and combining fractional algebraic expressions. Sucessful completion in MTH103
or a Compass algebra score of AR 31 or higher. Mandatory math placement required. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp,
Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): MTH103 (minimum grade of C- required)




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MTH 122 - TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of basic trigonometric functions; solutions of right triangles and stated trig. problems; vector addition using
graphical, component, and oblique triangle techniques; applications of radian measure; applications of trig. graphs to
show simple harmonic motion; alternating current and voltage; the j operator; complex numbers; applications of complex
numbers to an RLC-AC series circuit; common and natural logarithms; log equations; and log graphs. Successful
completion of MTH 121 required. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W, other quarters on demand
Prerequisite(s): MTH121

MTH 123 - TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS III
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of statistics, straight line and curve fitting, quadratic equations, ratio, proportion, variation, the binomial theorem,
differential calculus, related rates, maxima-minima, integral calculus, the definite and indefinite integral, area under a
curve, and volumes by integration. Sucessful completion of MTH 122 is required. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening -
Sp, other quarters on demand
Prerequisite(s): MTH122 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 130 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of algebraic operations and applications including: i) polynomial operations, rational expressions, exponents,
radicals; ii) linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, absolute value applications; iii) graphs of elementary functions
and non-functions including inverse functions, combining functions, translating and transforming functions; iv) study of
polynomial functions, including The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, zeros of polynomials, rational functions, partial
fractions; v) exponential and logarithmic functions including graphs and applications; vi) Gauss-Jordan elimination and
Cramer's Rule. Successful completion in MTH 121 or a Compass algebra score of 70 or higher. Mandatory math
placement required. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 131 - COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRIC AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of trigonometric functions, their graphs, and inverse functions; trigonometric identities; and conics. Successful
completion in MTH 130. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH130 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 132 - ANALYTIC AND PRE-CALCULUS TOPICS
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of determinate, vectors, complex numbers, DeMoivre's Theorem, inductions, and sequences. Successful
complete in MTH 131 required. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH131 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 141 - CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of limits, continuity, derivatives, basic differentiation rules and rates of change, product and quotient rules and
higher-order derivatives, the chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, extrema, Roll's Theorem and the Mean Value
Theorem, curve sketching, differentiation of trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, logarithmic functions,
and exponential functions. Sucessful completion of MTH123, or a Compass algebra score of 70 or above. Mandatory
math placement required. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH123 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 142 - CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of areas, The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, integration of substitution, numerical integration, integration of
logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, inverse trigonometric functions, volumes, arc length
and surfaces of revolution, work, centers of mass, fluid pressure, trigonometric substitution, parametric equations, polar
coordinates, and integration by parts. Successful completion in MTH 141 required. Quarters Available: Day - Offered
based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH141 (minimum grade of C- required)




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MTH 143 - CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
A study of differential equations, partial factions, integration by tables, indeterminate form and L'Hopital's Rule,
sequences, improper integrals, infinite series and convergence, Taylor and Maclaurin Series, vectors in the plane,
vectors, curves and surfaces in space, parametric curves, dot product, and cross product, partial derivatives, differentials,
and differential equations. Successful completion in MTH 142 is required. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on
need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH142 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 144 - MULTIPLE INTEGRATIONS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A study of vector-valued functions, acceleration, tangent vectors and normal vectors, arc lengths, curvature, partial
derivatives, differentials, chain rules for functions of several variables, directional derivatives and gradients, tangent
planes, and normal lines. Successful completion in MTH 143 is required. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on
need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH143 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 145 - DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A study of basic techniques for solving Ordinary Differential Equations and an introduction to theoretical topics including
existence and uniqueness of solutions, linear systems, stability of solution, and phase plane analysis. Quarters Available:
Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH122 or MTH130

MTH 194 - APPLIED GEOMETRY & TRIGONOMETRY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of basic geometry with application of geometric concepts to the solution of practical problems. An introduction to
trigonometry with emphasis on analysis of industrial problems utilizing trigonometric solutions by scientific calculator .
Successful completion in MTH 121, or a higher level math course, is required. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required)

MTH 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS
6 credit hours; 1-6 class hours
The course presents a specific topic in mathematics that are not normally covered in the current Mathematics curriculum .
Credit hours and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on
need; Evening - Offered based on need




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PHILOSOPHY
PHI 120 - GREAT IDEAS IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The course examines the great ideas that have shaped the development of Western Civilization. These ideas may
include the existence of God, the nature of evil, the social contract, the existence of free will, the evolution of the Universe,
the role of religion, and the rise and fall of various political systems. Each topic involves a look at several of the principal
thinkers of Western Civilization, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Voltaire, Hobbes, Locke, Darwin,
Hegel, Marx, Engels, Nietzche and Sartre, among others. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, Sp

PHI 140 - CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course involves an examination of several ethical theories, including ethical relativism, moral absolutism, social
contract ethics, utilitarianism, and a discussion of the most important moral issues of contemporary society. Subjects
covered may include the ethics of nuclear war, the ethics of suicide, ethical issues in abortion, the ethics of euthanasia,
ethical issues in genetic engineering, sexual ethics, racism and sexism, capital punishment, ethics and the environment,
and so on. Quarters Available: Day - F, W; Evening - Offered based on need; Weekend - Offered based on need

PHI 160 - LEGAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Health Care is a course in the various legal and ethical issues which the health care
specialist will face on the job. The course involves the application of ethical theories, such as classical ethics,
consequentialism, deontology, and social contract ethics to health care issues. Emphasis is also placed on issues of
legal liability and the standard of care for which the specialist is responsible. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening -
Sp

PHI 170 - SCIENCE, ART, AND LITERATURE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an interdisciplinary study that explores the complex interactions among the disciplines of science, art, and
literature. At the heart of the course is the observation that certain disciplines manifest common ideas, and the
coexistence of those common ideas cannot be explained in terms of cause and effect. The course first explores each
discipline individually and then investigates the similarities that exist among those disciplines, as well as the cultural
influences that may have helped shape those similarities. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - Offered based on
need

PHI 180 - THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The course introduces the student to the wonders of modern science and technology in a non-threatening way. The
objectives of the course are to help the lay person understand the impact of science and technology on everyday life and
to introduce the lay person to the philosophical, ethical, and theological implications of the major scientific theories of the
modern age. Topics include: the big bang theory, quantum theory, parallel universes, the theory of relativity, space
travel, time travel, the origin of life, the creation of artificial life, the nature of human consciousness, the development of
artificial intelligence, the theory of evolution, genetic engineering, and life on other planets. Quarters Available: Day - F,
W, Sp; Evening - Offered based on need

PHI 190 - THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The History of the Future involves a study of a variety of present trends which may lead to the development of alternative
future histories, as well as an examination of those alternative future histories. The course begins with an examination of
the basic problems of the present. Following this basic introduction, the course explores the socioeconomic and the
political capabilities of solving these problems and building a future for the planet Earth. The course culminates in a
discussion of the characteristics of alternative future societies. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Offered based on
need

PHI 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY
3 credit hours; 3-4 class hours
A particular topic or combination of topics in philosophy will be covered when there is sufficient student interest. Students
will be expected to contribute to discussions on the basis of readings in the area(s) of philosophy selected. This course
may be repeated. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need




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PHYSICS
PHY 111 - COLLEGE PHYSICS I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
A study of mechanical physics with emphasis placed on measurement systems, dimensional analysis, vectors and
scalars, linear, circular and rotational motion, forces in equilibrium and acceleration, work, and energy all considered to be
general Newtonian classical mechanics. Successful completion in MTH 122 or can be concurrent. Quarters Available:
Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with MTH122 (minimum grade of C- required)

PHY 112 - COLLEGE PHYSICS II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
A study of simple harmonic motion, mechanical, material properties such as density, elasticity, ultimate strengths,
coefficients of expansion and heat capacity, and hydraulic principles (both static and kinetic). Heat to include calorimetry,
expansion, conductivity, phase change, kinetic theory, and gas laws will also be covered. Sound to include its nature,
transmission, energy and various sources and light to include its nature and basic laws of reflection, refraction, and
straight line transmission qualities will be discussed. Successful completion in both MTH 122 and PHY 111 required .
Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MTH122 (minimum grade of C- required), and PHY111 (minimum grade of C- required)

PHY 113 - COLLEGE PHYSICS III
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
A study of electricity and magnetism including electrical charges at rest, potentials, capacitance and dielectrics, current,
resistance and voltage, alternating circuits theory of frequency, reactance, impedance, power and resonance, magnetic
field definition, and effects on moving charges and conductors. Successful completion in PHY 112 required. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): PHY112 (minimum grade of C- required)

PHY 114 - GENERAL PHYSICS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course will provide students with a general understanding, knowledge, and awareness of the physical world around
them. Topics will introduce the concepts of mechanical, electrical, and atomic physics with discussions, lectures, and
laboratory experiences related to the principles of mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and atomic
structure. Successful completion in MTH 103 or MTH 121 required. Quarters Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH103 (minimum grade of C- required)

PHY 120 - RADIOLOGIC PHYSICS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course presents a physics background for many subsequent radiologic courses. Physics principles are developed
which deal with matter, space, energy, and time, specifically Newtonian Physics, wave motion, electromagnetic radiation,
atomic theory, DC and AC electricity, electrical transformation, rectification, and electromagnetics. Quarters Available :
Day - F; Evening - N/A.
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required)

PHY 251 - ENGINEERING PHYSICS I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
A calculus based study of mechanical physics with emphasis placed on kinematics, vectors, linear momentum, rotational
motion, work and energies, force and Newtonian classical mechanics. Successful completion (C- or higher) in MTH 141
required. Quarters Available: Day - F
Prerequisite(s): MTH141

PHY 252 - ENGINEERING PHYSICS II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
A calculus based study of simple harmonic motion, material properties. Heat; to include kinetic theory and gas laws .
Sound to include its nature, transmission, energy and various sources. Light to include its nature and basic laws of
reflection, refraction and straight line transmission qualities. Successful completion (in both MTH 142 and PHY 251
required. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): MTH142 (minimum grade of C- required), and PHY251 (minimum grade of C- required)




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PHY 253 - ENGINEERING PHYSICS III
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
A calculus based study of electricity and magnetism including electric charges at rest, potentials, capacitance and
dielectrics, current, resistance, and voltage, alternating circuit theory of frequency, reactance, impedance, power and
resonance, magnetic field definition and effects on moving charges and conductors. Successful completion in PHY 252 is
required. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): PHY252 (minimum grade of C- required)




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PARALEGAL
PLG 110 - INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGAL STUDIES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course presents the history, development, and use of paralegals in today's legal world. The course provides an
overview of the legal system and its use of paralegals. Interviewing skills are also emphasized. Quarters Available: Day -
F

PLG 120 - TORT LAW
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course defines the history and use of tort law. It presents intentional, negligent, and strict liability torts. The use of
arguments sufficient to prove and defend torts is emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG132

PLG 122 - CRIMINAL LAW
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course presents basic concepts of criminal law including arrest, search and seizure, bail, grand jury, petit jury,
indictment, pleas, criminal proceedings, misdemeanors versus felonies, and right of appeal. This course will also include
criminal statutes and elements of offenses for the State of Ohio. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): CRJ145

PLG 131 - LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
In this course students research the law in order to prepare background and precedent information for legal briefs,
opinions, etc. The primary and secondary sources of law are presented, as well as a step-by-step approach to their use .
Computerized legal research is introduced. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): PLG110

PLG 132 - LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A continuation of the precepts of PLG 131. Emphasis is placed on thorough and efficient research and upon preparing
briefs based on research. Computerized legal research is utilized. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): PLG131

PLG 135 - LEGAL ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course consists of an overview of the ethical and professional responsibilities which exist today for a paralegal
practicing in the legal profession. Students will learn the significant areas where ethical problems may occur, including
specialized fields, such as domestic relations and criminal law. Emphasis will be on the rules and ethical considerations
of topics including confidentiality, conflict of interest, and unauthorized practice of law. Quarters Available: Day - F

PLG 143 - LITIGATION
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course studies the paralegal's role in the discovery procedure and trial practice as it relates to civil and criminal law .
It examines the role fo the attorney in trial process including case preparation and organization of materials. Quarters
Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG132

PLG 199 - PARALEGAL ELECTIVE
4 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

PLG 210 - PROBATE ADMINISTRATION
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course presents the law and terminology of wills, estates, estate administration and taxation, law, law of descent,
and distribution and guardianship. Proper estate planning is emphasized throughout the course. Quarters Available: Day
-F
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG132




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PLG 220 - FAMILY LAW
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course presents law concerning domestic relations, divorce, legal separation, parental rights and responsibilities,
and child support. Quarters Available: Day - F
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG132

PLG 225 - REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course presents the basic laws and terminology governing real estate. Real estate documents and their proper
filings are emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - W
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG132

PLG 230 - DEBTOR-CREDITOR RELATIONS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course examines debtor-creditor laws including liens and various forms of bankruptcy. The representation of typical
clients is stressed along with the paralegal's role in gathering evidence and client research. Students will prepare a
Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition. Quarters Available: Day - F
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG132

PLG 240 - PARALEGAL INTERNSHIP
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This course requires students to work 14 hours per week in a legal environment. All internship sites must be approved by
the Program Director. Supervision of the student will be a joint effort by the Program Director as well as the site
supervisor. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): PLG110, and PLG122, and PLG132, and PLG135, and PLG143, and PLG210, and PLG220, and
PLG225, and PLG230, and can be concurrent with PLG120, and can be concurrent with PLG250, and must be
concurrent with PLG241

PLG 241 - PARALEGAL SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course must be taken concurrently with PLG 240. Students will be presented with the functions and procedures of a
law office. Internship experiences will be used as a basis for discussion. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS121, and can be concurrent with PLG240

PLG 250 - LAW OFFICE PROCEDURES AND MANAGEMENT
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The organization and management of a law office are presented. Various management structures are discussed. Normal
operating procedures are emphasized along with the paralegal's role in the firm. Quarters Available: Day - Sp
Prerequisite(s): CIS121, and PLG110, and PLG132

PLG 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PARALEGAL
6 credit hours; 2-6 class hours
This course presents a specific topic in Paralegal Studies that is not normally covered in the current Paralegal Studies
curriculum. Credit hours and topics will be preapproved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): PLG110




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PRACTICAL NURSING
PNR 142 - PHARMACOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course provides an introduction to the study of drugs. Content also includes classifications of drugs, dosage
calculations, legal aspects of drug administration, and preparation and administration of drugs. Uses, actions, and side
effects of selected drugs will be studied. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO101, and BIO121 or BIO146, and PNR151, and can be concurrent with BIO122 or BIO147, and can
be concurrent with BIO155, and can be concurrent with PNR152

PNR 144 - TRENDS IN PRACTICAL NURSING
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is a study of nursing past, present, and future. Legal, ethical, and political responsibilities and issues are
included. The role of governing boards and nursing organizations as they relate to practical nursing is covered .
Strategies for coping with conflict and stress as a new graduate will be explored. Changes in the health care system and
roles and responsibilities of the practical nurse are discussed. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PNR153, and PSY130, and can be concurrent with PNR154

PNR 151 - PRACTICAL NURSING
8 credit hours; 5 class hours; 9 lab hours
This introductory course begins the study of the nursing process as it relates to meeting basic human needs of individuals
in all age groups. Emphasis is placed upon principles of nursing care, performance of safe nursing measures,
development of observational skills, and recording. Communication methods and nurse-patient relationships, health and
health care organizations, and the role of the practical nurse as a member of the health care team are explored. Quarters
Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with BIO101, and can be concurrent with BIO121 or BIO146, and can be concurrent
with ENG101

PNR 152 - PRACTICAL NURSING
9 credit hours; 4 class hours; 15 lab hours
This course provides a continuation of the study of the nursing process as it relates to meeting the basic human needs of
individuals of all age groups. Emphasis is placed upon increasingly complex principles of nursing care and performance
of safe nursing measures. Clinical experiences are planned at area hospitals. Evening clinical hours may occur during
the clinical rotations. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO101, and PNR151, and can be concurrent with BIO122 or BIO147, and can be concurrent with
BIO155, and can be concurrent with PNR142

PNR 153 - PRACTICAL NURSING
12 credit hours; 6 class hours; 18 lab hours
This course is part of the sequence of the program in Practical Nursing designed to prepare a student to care for
individuals of all ages. Emphasis is placed upon content relating to interferences with meeting basic human needs of :
oxygenation, safety and protection, nutrition and elimination, and sensory perception throughout the life cycle. Focus will
be upon utilization of the nursing process. Content includes presentation and study of drug categories that are related to
common health problems. The role of the Practical Nurse in drug administration is emphasized. Principles of therapeutic
nutrition are integrated. Clinical experiences and practice in administration of medication are planned at local health care
agencies to meet the objectives of the course. Evening clinical hours may occur during the clinical rotation. Quarters
Available: Day - F, Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO122 or BIO147, and BIO155, and PNR142, and PNR152, and can be concurrent with PSY130

PNR 154 - PRACTICAL NURSING
11 credit hours; 6 class hours; 15 lab hours
This course is a continuation of content begun in PNR 153. Emphasis is placed upon content relating to interferences
with meeting basic human needs of safety and protection, nutrition and elimination, sexuality, and oxygenation throughout
the life cycle. Focus will be upon utilization of the nursing process. Content includes presentation and study of drug
categories that are related to common health problems. The role of the Practical Nurse in drug administration is
emphasized. Principles of therapeutic nutrition are integrated. Clinical experiences are planned in local nursing homes
and extended care facilities where medication administration will occur. Clinical experience is also planned in an
obstetrics department of a local hospital to meet the objectives of the course. Evening clinical hours may occur during the
clinical rotation. A preceptorship is offered the last segment of the clinical rotation. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PNR153, and PSY130, and can be concurrent with PNR144



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221
POLITICS
POL 101 - AMERICAN POLITICS AND ISSUES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A study of governmental leaders, institutions, and processes in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on
controversial issues related to American government and its leadership. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening -
Offered based on need




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PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 100 - STRESS/LIFE MANAGEMENT
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
Stress has been called the disease of modern civilization. We will examine causes of stress, the effects of stress, and
learn techniques and approaches for more effective management of stress. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on
need; Evening - Offered based on need

PSY 105 - PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a course on improving self-esteem, enhancing communication skills, and becoming more aware of human
behavior. The course offers learners the chance to gain an appreciation of individual differences, learn about the
influence of significant life events and situations, and develop coping skills for everyday problems. Quarters Available :
Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

PSY 110 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an introductory level course and is a study of the basic principles of psychology. Among the topics
surveyed are an overview of the field, perception, consciousness, learning, personality, psychological disorders, and
memory. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on developing an understanding of psychology as the science of
human thought and behavior and to critically evaluate ôcommon senseö knowledge about how people function. Quarters
Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

PSY 111 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This is the second of a two-quarter sequence in which students will continue to explore human behavior and mental
processes. Topics this quarter will include biological aspects of behavior, thought and language, mental abilities, emotion
and motivation, human development, stress, personality, psychological therapies, and social cognition. Throughout the
course, there will be an emphasis on developing and understanding of psychology as the science of human thought and
behavior and to critically evaluate ôcommon senseö knowledge about how people function. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): PSY110

PSY 115 - INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an introductory course to familiarize learners with some major questions, themes, and issues in the study
of women. This course will focus on the institutions, social practices, and historical perspectives that have shaped and
continue to shape women's lives as well as how women have resisted and continue to resist these very institutions,
practices and representations. Topics discussed will include sexuality, gender development, sexism, women's multiple
roles and relationships and violence against women. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening - F, W, Sp

PSY 130 - HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course presents an overview of the total life span of human growth and development from conception through old
age. It begins with a study of the major theories of human development and includes an examination of the dynamics of
human growth in four areas: physical, intellectual, personality, and social. The developmental tasks and behavioral
characteristics of eight stages of human growth are examined, ending with a brief treatment of death and dying. Quarters
Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

PSY 134 - PSYCHOLOGY OF ADULTHOOD
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Concluding the span-of-life approach to human development, this course examines the developmental tasks and
behavioral characteristics of late adolescence through senescence. As in PSY 132 and PSY 133, the five areas of
development are considered for each of the remaining stages. A brief treatment of dying and death is also included .
Interviews will be required as a part of the learning experience. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening
- Offered based on need




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PSY 135 - AGING IN AMERICA
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
A study of America's elderly as they progress through late adulthoo d , a g e 6 0 t o d e a t h . F o c u s w i l l b e o n t h e i r
physiological, psychological, and sexual changes, as well as the psychosocial conflicts endemic to this age group. An
interview with an older American will be required as part of the learning experience. Quarters Available: Day - Offered
based on need; Evening - W

PSY 150 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This is a course about human behavior from both a perspective of what is "normal" and what is "not normal." The course
covers "abnormal" behavior or psychopathology utilizing a variety of models. Specifically, the focus is on cues,
categories, etiological factors, and treatment issues relevant to an introductory level understanding of "abnormal "
behavior. Quarters Available: Day - Sp, Su; Evening - Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): PSY110 or HSV100 or HSV107 or HSV113 or HSV201 or HSV219

PSY 160 - HUMAN SEXUALITY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a survey of the current thinki n g i n t h e f i e l d a n d i n c l u d e s a n e x a m i n a t i o n o f t h e d e v e l o p m e n t o f
contemporary attitudes about, as well as the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality .
Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): HSV219 or PSY110 or PSY130 or SOC101 or HSV107 or HSV110 or HSV113 or HSV201

PSY 170 - DEATH, GRIEF AND RECOVERY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will focus on why and how people experience death and grief. We will investigate the ideas of Kubler-Ross
and expand our exploration to include the Eastern spiritual and Christian perspectives. In addition, we will consider a
variety of causes of grief (death, divorce, birth of a handicapped child, life-threatening illnesses, etc.) and how people
react to such grief. Finally, we will examine a variety of approaches utilized in resolving grief. Quarters Available: Day -
Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

PSY 238 - Child Psychology
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
Study of the biological, social, affective and cognitive aspects of the development of children from conception to
adolescence. The implications of this development for present and future behaviors are presented. The research,
principles, concepts and theories of child psychology are emphasized. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need

PSY 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3-6 class hours
A particular topic or combination of topics in psychology will be covered when there is sufficient student interest. Students
will be expected to contribute to discussions on the basis of readings in the area(s) of psychology selected. This course
may be repeated. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need




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PHYSICAL THERAPY
PTA 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course consists of educating the physical therapy student as to the field of physical therapy and their role in the
physical therapy setting. Other topics included are health care organizations, health care professionals in relationship to
physical therapy, and legal and ethical accountability for the physical therapist assistant. Quarters Available: Day - Su;
Evening - N/A

PTA 110 - PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
The first of three sequential procedure courses. This course will present the clinical application of physical agents to be
administered by the physical therapist assistant. Included will be presentations of basic physiology and theory of vital
signs, patient positioning, body mechanics, wound care, heat, cold, hydrotherapy, massage, ultraviolet, and pneumatic
compressions. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA100 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO145 (minimum grade of C-
required) or BIO149 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PHY114 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 111 - PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
The second of three sequential procedure courses. This course will present the physiology and theory on the modalities
of infrared, ultraviolet, ultrasound, phonophoresis, shortwave diathermy, traction, and biofeedback, plus posture and
surface anatomy. Laboratory application of these modalities by the physical therapist assistant student will be included .
Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO145 (minimum grade of C- required), and PHY114 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA110
(minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO146 (minimum grade of C- required) or BIO149 (minimum
grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA150 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 112 - PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES III
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
The last of three sequential procedure courses. This course will present the clinical application of electrotherapy .
Included will be presentations of the basic physiology and theory of electrotherapy related to functional electrical
stimulation, iontophoresis, interferential current, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and microelectrical nerve
stimulation, plus chest physical therapy. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO146 (minimum grade of C- required) or BIO149 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA111
(minimum grade of C- required), and PTA150 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO147
(minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 150 - KINESIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS FOR PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANTS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
A course involving a study of human movement, principles of mechanics, musculoskeletal anatomy, and neuromuscular
physiology as it relates to the development of physical therapy exercise and those forces creating human activity. The
time, space, and mass aspects of human motion is also presented. Laboratory activities include palpation of muscles .
Students will be required to wear appropriate gym or sportswear for some of the lab activities. PTA students must take
PTA150 concurrent with PTA111. Quarters Available: Day - W, Su; Evening - Sp, Su, (Su & F Flex)
Prerequisite(s): BIO145 (minimum grade of C- required) or BIO149 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 200 - THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES I
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course consists of the principles and techniques for the administration of goniometric measurements, strength
testing, transfers, gait training/analysis, prosthetic gait training, functional activities of daily living and wheelchair fitting,
modifications, propelling, and maintenance. The course will be covered in both lecture and lab. Quarters Available: Day -
Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with PTA235, and BIO147 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA112 (minimum
grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with
PTA260 (minimum grade of C- required)




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PTA 201 - THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES II
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course consists of the principles and techniques for the administration of therapeutic exercise, isotonics, isokinetics,
plyometric, mobilization, coordination, closed and open kinetic chain, aerobic and cardiac rehab, posture, balance, and
aquatics. Exercise program development using specialized techniques for neuromuscular relaxation, facilitation or
inhibition, and developmental activity training is also covered. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA235, and can be concurrent with PTA245, and can be concurrent with PTA247, and PTA200
(minimum grade of C- required), and PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA260 (minimum grade of C-
required), and can be concurrent with PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 210 - CLINICAL CONDITIONS I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will deal with diagnoses that the physical therapist assistant will encounter during practice. These diagnoses
will be presented in terms of their relationship to physical therapy. These areas will include, but not be limited to,
orthopedics and musculoskeletal dysfunction. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with PTA235, and BIO147 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA112 (minimum
grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA200 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with
PTA260 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 211 - CLINICAL CONDITIONS II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will deal with diagnoses that the physical therapist assistant will encounter during practice. These diagnoses
will be presented in terms of their relationship to physical therapy. These areas will include, but not be limited to,
neurology, cardiovascular, and respiratory disorders. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA235, and can be concurrent with PTA245, and can be concurrent with PTA247, and PTA200
(minimum grade of C- required), and PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA260 (minimum grade of C-
required), and can be concurrent with PTA201 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 212 - CLINICAL CONDITIONS III
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course will deal with diagnoses that the physical therapist assistant will encounter during practice. These diagnoses
will be presented in terms of their relationship to physical therapy. These areas will include, but not be limited to, pediatric
and geriatric disorders. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA245, and PTA247, and can be concurrent with PTA255, and can be concurrent with PTA257, and
PTA201 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with
PTA280 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 235 - PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICUM I
1 credit hours; 7 lab hours
The practicum experience is a "hands-on" reality experience providing on-the-job opportunities by acquiring further
knowledge and learning and practicing skills. The practicum will take place in a facility that can provide learning
experiences consistent with the student's interest and learning desires and meets approval of the instructor. Each
practicum consists of working 35 hours per week for two weeks in an approved facility. Students will be supervised by a
licensed physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters
Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA112 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA200 (minimum grade of C-
required), and can be concurrent with PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA260
(minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 245 - PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICUM II
2 credit hours; 14 lab hours
This practicum deals with the same objectives as the previous practicums but contains an additional time emphasis and
includes: 1) specific characteristics inherent to each student's exceptionality, 2) programming considerations that must be
understood to deal with the student's exceptionality. This practicum consists of working a minimum of 14 hours per week
in an approved facility. Students will be supervised by a licensed physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. This
course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA235, and must be concurrent with PTA247, and PTA200 (minimum grade of C- required), and
PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA260 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with
PTA201 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required)




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PTA 247 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR I & II
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on self-understanding, understanding of the
work setting and client behavior helping strategies, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to being an
effective helper. The initiation of a research project with abstract is required. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass
(NP). Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA235, and must be concurrent with PTA245, and PTA200 (minimum grade of C- required), and
PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA260 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with
PTA201 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 255 - PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICUM III
3 credit hours; 21 lab hours
This practicum deals with the same objectives as the previous practicums but contains an additional time emphasis and
includes: 1) specific characteristics inherent to each student's exceptionality, 2) programming considerations that must be
understood to deal with the student's exceptionality. This practicum consists of working a minimum of 21 hours per week
in an approved facility. Students will be supervised by a licensed physical therapist or physical therapist assistant. This
course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA245, and PTA247, and must be concurrent with PTA257, and PTA201 (minimum grade of C-
required), and PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA212 (minimum grade of C-
required), and can be concurrent with PTA280 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 257 - PRACTICUM SEMINAR III
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
The practicum seminar is offered concurrently with the practicum itself. The seminar will allow time to critique the
experiences of the student in the facility. The focus of the seminar is completion of a research project with class
presentation. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA245, and PTA247, and must be concurrent with PTA255, and PTA201 (minimum grade of C-
required), and PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA212 (minimum grade of C-
required), and can be concurrent with PTA280 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 260 - TRENDS AND MANAGEMENT
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course discusses issues relevant to the physical therapy profession and patient populations, time and stress
management, as well as styles of management and communication. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with PTA235, and PTA112 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent
with PTA200 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with PTA210 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 265 - PHYSICAL THERAPY DIRECTED PRACTICE
6 credit hours; 30 lab hours
Having completed three practicums/practicum seminars, the student will be prepared to enter Directed Practice in the
eighth quarter. During Directed Practice, students will function as staff members of cooperating facilities and will be
expected to comply with agency policies and to conduct themselves in a professional manner. This Directed Practice
consists of working a minimum of 35 hours per week for eight weeks. Students will be supervised by a licensed physical
therapist or physical therapist assistant. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Sp;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA255, and PTA257, and can be concurrent with PTA270, and must be concurrent with PTA267, and
PTA212 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA280 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 267 - DIRECTED PRACTICE SEMINAR
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
Students will be scheduled on campus in order to discuss, evaluate, and reinforce the 30 hour directed practice. This
course is graded a pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA255, and PTA257, and can be concurrent with PTA270, and must be concurrent with PTA265, and
PTA212 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA280 (minimum grade of C- required)




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PTA 270 - PHYSICAL THERAPY SEMINAR
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This seminar is designed to review material discussed in previous physical therapist assistant courses. The review is
designed to assist students in preparation for the National Licensing Examination. This class is graded pass (P), or no
pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA255, and PTA257, and can be concurrent with PTA265, and can be concurrent with PTA267, and
PTA212 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA280 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 280 - PHYSICAL THERAPY TREATMENT APPROACH
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is designed to provide more detailed and in-depth intervention approaches for specific diagnosis in the
specialty areas of pediatric and orthopedic patients. As a result, the physical therapist assistant will develop a greater
understanding of these intervention programs. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PTA245, and PTA247, and can be concurrent with PTA255, and can be concurrent with PTA257, and
PTA201 (minimum grade of C- required), and PTA211 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with
PTA212 (minimum grade of C- required)

PTA 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY
3 credit hours
This course presents a specific topic in physical therapy that is not normally covered in the curriculum. Credit hours and
topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening -
Offered based on need




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RADIOLOGY
RAD 110 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
This course introduces orientation to the radiology departments at the various clinical sites, office procedures,
radiographic processing, radiographic film evaluation, and patient care in the clinical area. Clinical will include 16 hours
per week for eight weeks and then 40 hours during a ninth week period with supervised sessions emphasizing practical
applications. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A

RAD 111 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
The course continues with film evaluation and supervised practical applications in radiologic technology. Students will
rotate through fluoroscopy, IVU's, surgery, and general radiography. Clinical will include 16 hours per week. This course
is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD110

RAD 112 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
This course includes supervised sessions emphasizing practical application and film evaluation. Orientation to specialty
areas will begin. These areas include nuclear medicine, ultrasonography, angiography, heart catherization lab and
radiation oncology. Clinical will include 16 hours per week. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD111

RAD 113 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
This course includes supervised sessions emphasizing practical application and film evaluation. Orientation to specialty
areas will be continued. Clinical will include 16 hours per week. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD112

RAD 118 - RADIOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a continuation of PHY 120 Radiologic Physics. Production and properties of all forms of radiation are
explored, along with radiation interactions with matter. Radiographic tube construction, radiographic circuitry, and
radiographic emission spectrums are also studied. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PHY120 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 123 - RADIATION PROTECTION
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
This course evaluates the need for radiation protection for both patient and personnel. Methods of protection from
unwanted radiation will be discussed. Federal and State law pertaining to radiation will also be discussed. A brief
introduction to basic radiation interaction is included. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A

RAD 125 - RADIOLOGIC EXPOSURE/FILM EVALUATION I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course focuses on the technical factors involved in producing a good diagnostic radiograph. Students will also learn
how to evaluate a completed radiograph for correct technical appearance. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD123 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 126 - RADIOLOGIC EXPOSURE/FILM EVALUATION II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a continuation of RAD 125 and focuses on technical factors that influence radiographic quality. Students
also learn how to correct non-diagnostic radiographs by changing technical factors. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening
- N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD125 (minimum grade of C- required)




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RAD 127 - SPECIAL PROCEDURES/PHARMACOLOGY
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course provides an introduction to other imaging sciences including nuclear medicine, ultrasound, mammography,
bone densitometry and interventional studies. In addition, the course will present pharmacologic principles and practices
in patient care as related to the imaging sciences. Students also receive instruction on venipuncture techniques. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD126 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 131 - PATIENT CARE
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course focuses on the care of the patient and the use of contrast media for various examinations. Students also are
given CPR instruction and become certified. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A

RAD 141 - RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES I
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course provides content designed to provide a knowledge base necessary to perform standard radiographic
procedures of the abdomen, chest, upper and lower limb. An energized labratory is used to compliment the didactic
portion of the class. Radiation protection is emphasized. Medical terminology is correlated with anatomy. Quarters
Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH130 (minimum grade of C-
required) or MTH131 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH141 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 142 - RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II
2 credit hours; 1 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course is a continuation of RAD 141 and provides content designed to provide a knowledge base necessary to
perform standard radiographic procedures of the urinary system, gastrointestinal system, shoulder girdle and pelvic girdle .
An energized laboratory is used to complement the didactic portion of the class. Emphasis on radiation protection is
continued. Medical terminology is continued. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD141 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO145 (minimum grade of C-
required)

RAD 143 - RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES III
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of RAD 142 and provides content designed to provide a knowledge base necessary to
perform standard radiographic procedures of anterior neck, spine, bony thorax and the biliary system. An energized
laboratory is used to complement the didactic portion of the class. Emphasis on radiation protection is continued .
Medical terminology is continued. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO145 (minimum grade of C- required), and RAD142 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be
concurrent with BIO146 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 144 - RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES IV
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course is a continuation of RAD 143 and provides content designed to provide a knowledge base necessary to
perform standard radiographic procedures of the sinuses, skull, facial bones, trauma radiography, mobile radiography,
pediatric and geriatric radiography. An energized laboratory is used to complement the didactic portion of the class .
Emphasis on radiation protection is continued. Medical terminology is continued. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening -
N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO146 (minimum grade of C- required), and RAD143 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be
concurrent with BIO147 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 160 - RADIOLOGY CONCEPTS
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Basic knowledge in
radiographic equipment requirements and design is explored. The content includes the basic principles of the energies
that affect the field of radiology. Quarters Available: Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with RAD111, and MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH130 (minimum
grade of C- required) or MTH131 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH141 (minimum grade of C- required), and
RAD110 (minimum grade of C- required)




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RAD 161 - RADIOLOGY CONCEPTS II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a continuation of Radiology Concepts I. The course is designed to explore the characteristics of ionizing
radiation, x-ray production and the fundamentals of photon interactions with matter. Radiographic tube construction,
circuitry and emission spectrums are also studied. Quarters Available: Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): RAD160 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 214 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 18 lab hours
This course has supervised sessions emphasizing practical application, film evaluation, and rotations into special areas
including surgery. Clinical will include 24 hours per week for eight weeks including one week of afternoons. This course
is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD113, and BIO147 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 215 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 24 lab hours
This course offers supervised sessions emphasizing practical application, film evaluation, and continuation of rotation into
special areas including a pediatric rotation at a children's hospital. The student is also introduced to other modalities
including CT and MRI. Clinical will include 24 hours per week with one week of afternoons. This course is graded pass
(P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD214

RAD 216 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 24 lab hours
This course offers supervised sessions emphasizing practical application, film evaluation, and rotations into special areas .
The student will complete all mandatory competencies along with a minimum number of elective competencies. Clinical
will include 24 hours per week with one week of afternoons. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD215

RAD 217 - CLINICAL EDUCATION
3 credit hours; 24 lab hours
This course has supervised sessions emphasizing practical application, film evaluation, and rotations into special areas .
The student will demonstrate retention of skills by performing various final competencies. Clinical will include 24 hours
per week with one week of afternoons. This course is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). Quarters Available: Day - Sp;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD216

RAD 227 - SPECIALS I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course investigates current imaging modalities used in the specialized areas of radiology, such as CT and MRI .
Digital radiography is discussed and compared to film radiography. Radiographs will be evaluated to determine
diagnostic quality. The use of computers in radiology will also be discussed. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD127 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 228 - SPECIALS II
3 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course provides the principles related to computed tomography. Basic principles of venipuncture and administration
of pharmaceuticals as related to diagnostic imaging are discussed. An introduction to magnetic resonance imaging is
provided and the role it plays in diagnostic imaging. Quarters Available: Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): RAD227

RAD 229 - QUALITY CONTROL IN IMAGING SCIENCES
3 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course will provide a basic knowledge of quality control within the imaging sciences. Factors that govern and
influence the production and recording of images will also be emphasized. Each student (or group) will design an exhibit
following the criteria for the Exhibit Competition on the O.S.R.T. website. Some exhibits may be selected for competition .
Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD227 (minimum grade of C- required)




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RAD 234 - RADIATION BIOLOGY
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is designed to provide an overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation with living systems .
Radiation effects on molecules, cells, tissues and the body as a whole are discussed. Factors affecting biological
response are presented, including acute and chronic effects of radiation. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD236 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 236 - PATHOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
Content is designed to introduce the student to various diseases and their causes that compromise healthy body systems .
Also, the appearance of various diseases on radiographs will be presented and discussed. Students will learn how to
adjust various technical factors to compensate for these diseases. Students will be required to write a research paper
focusing on a specific aspect of the radiographic field and its contribution to the detection of diseases in the human body .
Students will also design a radiographic case study for presentation during the course. Quarters Available: Day - F;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO147 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 251 - RADIOLOGIC SEMINAR
5 credit hours; 5 class hours
This course is designed to review all radiological courses in preparation for the American Registry Examination. Quarters
Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RAD216, and can be concurrent with RAD217, and RAD229 (minimum grade of C- required), and
RAD234 (minimum grade of C- required)

RAD 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
3 credit hours
This course presents a specific topic in radiological sciences that is not normally covered in the curriculum. Credit hours
and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need




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DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES
RDG 110 - READING LAB
1 credit hours; 2 lab hours
This course is designed to help students develop strategies to read and retain textbook material and to acquire reading
habits that support efficient reading. RDG 110 is a lab-based tutorial course. This course is graded on a Pass/No Pass
system. RDG 110 is a required course for students whose COMPASS reading score indicates the need for reading
instruction. It is part of a two-course reading requirement and must be taken concurrently with RDG 116. A passing grade
in RDG 110 is dependent upon the successful completion of RDG 116. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening -
F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with RDG116

RDG 115 - COLLEGE READING I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to help students develop strategies to read and retain textbook material and to acquire reading
habits that support efficient reading. RDG 115 also requires a lab component. This course is graded on a letter-grade
system. RDG 115 is a required course for students whose COMPASS reading score indicates the need for reading
instruction. It is part of a two-quarter sequence that includes RDG 116 and must be completed with a C- or better before
taking RDG 116. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

RDG 116 - COLLEGE READING II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
In addition to helping students develop strategies to read and retain textbook material and to acquire reading habits, this
course is designed to encourage the development of different reading rates for different material and to improve the ability
to read critically. The course is graded on a letter-grade system and must be completed with a C- or better in order to
fulfill the mandatory placement requirement. RDG 116 is a required course for students whose COMPASS reading score
indicates the need for reading instruction. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with RDG110




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REAL ESTATE
REA 201 - REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a study of principles and practices pertinent to real estate salespersons and brokers. It is an introduction to
provide students with a basic working vocabulary of real estate terms and concepts to function in an environment in which
real estate brokers and salespersons work changes on a continuous basis. Concepts such as buyer agency, seller
mandatory property disclosure forms, and the Internet exemplify these changes. Quarters Available: Evening - F, Sp

REA 202 - REAL ESTATE LAW
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a study of law pertinent to real estate salespersons and brokers. Emphasis is on Ohio's license law, the
canons of ethics, fair housing, contracts, and agency, wills and estates, forms of ownership, deeds, civic rights,
landlord-tenant relationships, condominiums, legal aspects of real estate financing, closing the sale and evidence of title
will be discussed. Quarters Available: Evening - F, Sp

REA 203 - REAL ESTATE FINANCE
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
A course designed to explore the financial aspects of real estate with primary consideration given to the fundamentals of
mortgage banking, sources of funds for mortgage lending, loan applications procedures and processing, inspection and
appraisal of collateral, attracting new business, investing and the effects of governmental monetary policy. Quarters
Available: Evening - W, Su

REA 204 - REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is a study of real estate appraisal pertinent to real estate salespersons and brokers. Included in the course
work are definitions and terminology of real estate appraising and the market analysis; including the sales comparison
approach, the cost approach to value, and the income capitalization approach to value. Quarters Available: Evening - W,
Su




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RESPIRATORY THERAPY
RES 101 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY AND INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY THERAPY
1 credit hours; 1 class hours
This course consists of basic medical terminology with an emphasis on the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Word
roots, suffixes, and prefixes for most medical terms are discussed. Pulmonary terms and symbols are emphasized in
preparation for later course work. A discussion about the history of the field, agencies that affect the profession,
credentialing and licensing, and roles and responsibilities of the respiratory care therapist are reviewed. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A

RES 103 - CARDIOPULMONARY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a study of the anatomy of the lungs and heart, the development of these structures in the embryo and
fetus, the mechanics of ventilation and pulmonary circulation, airway resistance, hemodynamics, lung compliance, and
the nonuniform distribution of ventilation and perfusion. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO122 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 104 - CARDIOPULMONARY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a continuation of RES 103 and is a study of gas diffusion, transport and acid base balance, the control of
ventilation, respiration under stress, and fluid/electrolyte imbalance. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES103 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 130 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES I
6 credit hours; 4 class hours; 4 lab hours
In this course, students will learn about assessment, record keeping, communication, medical gas supply systems, patient
oxygenation, special gas therapy, humidity and aerosol therapy, oxygen analysis, oximetry, blenders, body mechanics,
lung expansion therapy, and sterilization/infection control procedures. Must be admitted to program. Quarters Available:
Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with ENG101 or ENG102, and can be concurrent with BIO121 (minimum grade of C-
required), and can be concurrent with MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH130 (minimum grade of C-
required) or MTH131 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH141 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent
with RES101 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 131 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES II
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 3 lab hours
In this course, students will learn about assessment of airway patency, oral/nasal airways, intubation techniques,
tracheotomy care, cuff inflation techniques, suctioning, manual resuscitators, use of chest tubes, basic pulmonary function
testing, bronchopulmonary hygiene techniques, bilevel CPAP, capnography, coughing techniques, and arterial blood gas
analysis. An introduction to patient death, dying, and quality of life issues is included. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES130 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES140 (minimum grade of C-
required)

RES 132 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES III
5 credit hours; 4 class hours; 3 lab hours
In this course, students will learn about adult mechanical ventilation to include classification of ventilators, indications,
hazards, initial setup, modes, monitoring, troubleshooting and weaning. An introduction to deadspace and shunt
measures is included. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES131 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES140 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be
concurrent with PHY114 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES141 (minimum grade of C-
required)




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RES 133 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES IV
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 3 lab hours
This course has instruction and laboratory application in adult critical care procedures such as hemodynamic monitoring,
high frequency ventilation, and nitric oxide administration as a continuation of RES132. The course blends the adult
critical care experience to the neonatal and pediatric clinical settings focusing on infant and pediatric mechanical
ventilation techniques and equipment. The student will be introduced to Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) ,
Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP), neonatal and pediatric diseases, and common basic therapies utilized in the
pediatric hospital. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): PHY114 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES103 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES132
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES141 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with CHE110
(minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES142 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 140 - CLINICAL EDUCATION I
1 credit hours; 6 lab hours
This course is an introduction to the clinical setting for the respiratory therapy student to include familiarization with the
roles of other health care providers. The student will utilize lab skills attained in RES 130 to evaluate the patient medical
record, assess the patient, and practice assessment/administration of medical gas therapy, humidity/aerosol therapy,
performing oxygen analysis, oximetry, and sterilization/infection control procedures. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening
- N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO121 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES130 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be
concurrent with RES131 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES207 (minimum grade of C-
required)

RES 141 - CLINICAL EDUCATION II
2 credit hours; 12 lab hours
This course covers practical application in the clinical setting of procedures includ i n g : o x y g e n a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ,
humidity/aerosol therapy, oxygen analysis, airway management, bronchopulmonary hygiene, lung expansion therapy, and
dispensing respiratory pharmacological agents. Student involvement in emergency procedures (cardiopulmonary
resuscitation and the use of manual resuscitators) is included. Continued practice with procedures from the previous
quarter is also included. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO122 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES131 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES140
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES207 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES132
(minimum grade of C- required)

RES 142 - CLINICAL EDUCATION III
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
This course is held in the critical care clinical setting focusing on the practical application of mechanical ventilation of the
adult critical care patient. During the course of this clinical rotation the student will perform the following procedures
including: assessment and treatment of critically ill patients utilizing skills learned in previous quarters; mechanical
ventilation (assessments, initiation, monitoring, mode selection, circuit changes, extubation, troubleshooting, and
adjustment techniques); arterial blood gases (punctures and analysis); observation of diagnostic testing; and continued
practice of procedures learned from previous quarters. Quarters Available: Day - Su; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES103 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES132 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES141
(minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES133 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 151 - PHYSICIANS SEMINAR I
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course involves a physician and students to present pertinent medical topics and/or issues for discussion that may
include, but not limited to patient assessment, evaluation of chest and airways, radiologic interpretation, special
procedures, mechanical ventilation, diagnostic tools, ethical-legal issues, pathologic conditions, pharmacologic therapy,
and related material presented in that same quarter. The case presentation format is emphasized. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with RES141, and RES140 (minimum grade of C- required)




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RES 152 - PHYSICIANS SEMINAR II
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course involves a physician and students to present pertinent medical topics and/or issues for discussion that may
include, but are not limited to, patient assessment, evaluation of chest and upper airways, radiologic interpretation,
special procedures, mechanical ventilation, diagnostic tools, ethical-legal issues, pathologic conditions, pharmacologic
therapy, and related material presented in that same quarter. The case presentation format is emphasized. Quarters
Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with RES243 or RES244, and CHE110 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES142
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES151 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO155
(minimum grade of C- required)

RES 207 - PHARMACOLOGY
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course is a study of those drugs directly and indirectly affecting therapeutic management of cardiopulmonary patients
and includes pharmacologic principles, administration of drugs, drug mixing calculations, and major cardiopulmonary drug
therapy used by the respiratory therapy technician and therapist. Additional systemically administered drugs are
discussed in reference to their affect on the cardiopulmonary system. In order to successfully complete the course the
student will be required to pass a written exam on Respiratory Care pharmacologic agents. Quarters Available: Day - W;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO121 (minimum grade of C- required), and MTH121 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH130
(minimum grade of C- required) or MTH131 (minimum grade of C- required) or MTH141 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 210 - PATHOLOGY I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
In this course, respiratory disorders are explored as to etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis,
therapeutics, prognosis, and respiratory therapy involvement. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES104 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES142 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 211 - PATHOLOGY II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
In this course respiratory disorders, cardiovascular disorders, neuromuscular and central nervous system disorders, and
disorders of the kidney are explored as to etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, therapy,
prognosis, and respiratory therapy involvement. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES210 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 222 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY ADMINISTRATION
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is a study of the responsibilities of the respiratory therapy supervisor/administrator to include staffing,
scheduling, maintenance of equipment and supplies, budget preparation, department planning and organization, quality
assurance monitoring of patient care, accreditation regulations, Ohio Respiratory Care law, and dealing with outside
systems (HMO, DRG, etc.). Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES142 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 225 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY REVIEW
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a review of respiratory therapy in preparation for the National Board for Respiratory Care, (NCRB) Entry
Level Examination, Written Registry Examination, and the Clinical Simulation Examination. The student will become
familiar with the NBRC Examination Matrix and testing format for each of the national examinations. In order to
successfully complete the course requirements, the student will be required to successfully complete, (based upon the
minimum passing limit, MLP), and Entry Level Staff Assessment Examination produced by the NBRC. Quarters Available:
Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): can be concurrent with RES245 (minimum grade of C- required)




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RES 234 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES V
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 3 lab hours
In this course, students will learn about advanced pulmonary function testing techniques and equipment,
electrocardiograms, breathing exercises, pulmonary and cardiac exercise testing, bronchoscopy, polysomnography,
indirect calorimetry, pulmonary rehabilitation, and home care. Prerequisite(s): BIO155 (minumum grade of C- required) ,
RES104 (minimum grade of C- required), RES133 (minimum grad e o f C - r e q u i r e d ) , R E S 1 4 2 ( m i n i m u m g r a d e o f
C-required), minimum grade of C- in either RES243 or RES244, and enrolled in either RES243 or RES244 (unless have
minimum C- grade in both RES234 and RES244). Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): BIO155 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES104 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES133
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES142 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES243 (minimum grade of C-
required) or RES244 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 243 - CLINICAL EDUCATION IV
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
This course is held in the critical care clinical setting focusing on the understanding of pathophysiology of the critical care
patient as it applies to mechanical ventilation and critical care procedures. The student will learn to assess and
troubleshoot mechanical ventilators, assess, analyze and apply mechanical ventilator techniques to adapt to the patient's
pathophysiological needs. As a part of this clinical experience the student will perform an intubation rotation in a surgical
environment under the supervision of an anesthesiologist. The student will continue to practice procedures from previous
quarters. Quarters Available: Day - F, W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): CHE110 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES104 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES133
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES142 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO155
(minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES210 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 244 - CLINICAL EDUCATION V (PEDIATRICS)
2 credit hours; 16 lab hours
This course covers practical application of clinical procedures as they relate to the pediatric patient including assessment,
oxygen therapy, humidity/aerosol therapy, airway management, oximetry, transcutaneous monitoring, apnea monitoring,
mechanical ventilation, CPAP, weaning procedures, bagging, and capillary blood gases. Quarters Available: Day - F, W;
Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): CHE110 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES104 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES133
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES142 (minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with BIO155
(minimum grade of C- required), and can be concurrent with RES210 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 245 - CLINICAL EDUCATION VI (ADVANCED PROCEDURES)
4 credit hours; 24 lab hours
This course covers practical application and/or observation of clinical procedures in advanced pulmonary function testing,
home care, cardiovascular diagnostics, pulmonary rehabilitation, extended care, and advanced cardiac life support
(ACLS). The student will have a clinical experience in the hospital setting assigned to a respiratory care department to
function as a Respiratory Therapist. Also, in association with this course, the student will complete a required community
service project. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): RES211 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES234 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES243
(minimum grade of C- required), and RES244 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 253 - PHYSICIANS SEMINAR III
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course offers a physician and students to present pertinent medical topics and/or issues for discussion that may
include, but are not limited to, patient assessment, evaluation of chest and upper airways, radiologic interpretation,
special procedures, mechanical ventilation, diagnostic tools, ethical-legal issues, pathologic conditions, pharmacologic
therapy, and related material presented in that same quarter. The case presentation format is emphasized. Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - N/A
Prerequisite(s): must be concurrent with RES243 or RES244, and RES152 (minimum grade of C- required), and RES243
(minimum grade of C- required) or RES244 (minimum grade of C- required)

RES 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN RESPIRATORY THERAPY
3 credit hours
This course presents a specific topic in respiratory therapy that is not normally covered in the curriculum. Credit hours
and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need




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SCIENCE
SCI 115 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course is designed to develop a working knowledge of medical terminology. Focus will be upon building medical
words using word roots, combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes. This course is also available as a video course .
Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp




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SOCIOLOGY
SOC 101 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is a study of various aspects of our social system which affect individuals and organizations. Emphasis is
placed on a process of value clarification whereby the student can better understand his or her relationship to this society
and the specific types of organizations that comprise it. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su; Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

SOC 110 - HUMAN RELATIONS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course applies contemporary knowledge of behavioral science toward the improvement of student's ability to think
critically, communicate effectively both verbally and in writing, and work efficiently in teams in a diversified work place. A
hands-on approach is used to assist the student in practicing and enhancing these skills. Teamwork, oral and written
reports, and an interview with a director of Human Resources will be required. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

SOC 120 - CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND RACISM
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is an overview of the development of the beliefs and practices which constitute the conflicts between the
white majority and the several minority groups of which our society is comprised. Specifically examined are the
relationships between the white majority and Native-Americans, Black Americans, Hispanics, and Asian-Americans. The
period covered is from 1590 to the present. Quarters Available: Day - Su, Sp; Evening - W

SOC 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3-5 class hours
A particular topic or combination of topics in sociology will be covered when there is sufficient student interest. Students
will be expected to contribute to discussions on the basis of readings in the area(s) of sociology selected. This course
may be repeated. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need




                                                             240
SPEECH
SPE 101 - SPEECH
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course involves instruction and practical experience in public speaking. The content of the course includes
communication theory, the informative speech, the persuasive speech, the demonstration speech, the personal
experience speech, delivery techniques, audience analysis, audio-visual aids, and handling questions. Speeches of
introduction, oral reading, and impromptu speeches may also be included. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

SPE 105 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This speech course involves instruction and practical experience in one-to-one and small group communication. The
content of the course includes communication theory, one-to-one communication, information interviews, job interviews,
informal group discussion, committee work, panels, symposiums, and listening. Quarters Available: Day - F, W, Sp, Su;
Evening - F, W, Sp, Su

SPE 210 - TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS
2 credit hours; 2 class hours
This course will integrate the skills from SPE 101 and CIS 125 to enhance the presentation skills of the student. Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): SPE101, and can be concurrent with CIS125




                                                           241
SOCIAL SCIENCES
SSC 199 - SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE
5 credit hours
This course is used for transfer credit purposes only. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

SSC 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course enables faculty members in the Social Sciences department to present various topics of current relevance or
interest to students throughout the college on a one-time-only basis. The course meets the Social Science elective
requirement in most of NC State's degree programs. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered
based on need




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STATISTICS
STA 110 - PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
A study of basic concepts of probability and statistics. The course includes descriptive statistics, probability, statistical
distributions, sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Other topics include chi-square, goodness-of-fit, correlation
and regression, and nonparametric statistics. Statistical software for microcomputers is utilized. Hand-held calculators
are required. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): MTH121 or MTH130

STA 115 - STATISTICAL METHODS IN BUSINESS
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
A study of basic concepts and practices of statistics as they relate to business. The course includes descriptive statistics,
probability, statistical distributions, sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Other topics introduced include index
numbers, time series analysis, correlation, and regression. Statistical software for microcomputers may be utilized .
Hand-held calculators are required. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W, Su
Prerequisite(s): ACC112, and MTH103




                                                             243
THERAPEUTIC RECREATION
THR 100 - INTRODUCTION TO RECREATION
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course introduces the student to definitions, history, philosophies, and theories of play recreation and leisure .
Students will develop an understanding of 1) the nature of the recreational experience and its importance to the individual
and 2) the influence of leisure on society. The course will also look at numerous opportunities and settings involved in the
field of recreation. In regards to therapeutic recreation, the student will understand how its foundations are based on play,
recreation, leisure, health, and well-being. Students will also be exposed to basic definitions and philosophies of
therapeutic recreation as well as its purpose and major goals. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening
- Offered based on need

THR 102 - THERAPEUTIC RECREATION
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course deals with the significance of recreation service in the lives of the ill and disabled. Emphasis is placed on the
Therapeutic Recreation Service Model. Also emphasized will be the identification of major benefits that can result from
the recreation experience and the application of the therapeutic recreation process in the lives of the ill and disabled .
Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need; Evening - Offered based on need

THR 106 - THERAPEUTIC RECREATION METHODS
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
The content of this course will provide the participants with a therapeutic perspective to the provisional activities that will
facilitate the muscular and leisure time development of the disabled. Quarters Available: Day - Offered based on need;
Evening - Offered based on need




                                                              244
TOOL AND DIE
TND 101 - TOOL AND DIE DESIGN
4 credit hours; 3 class hours; 2 lab hours
Tool design is the process of designing and developing the tools, methods, and technique necessary to improve
manufacturing efficiency and productivity. Tool design is an ever-changing, growing process of creative problem solving
which addresses quality and economy to produce a competitive product to solve manufacturing situations. Quarters
Available: Day - W; Evening - W

TND 110 - ADVANCED MACHINING WITH SUPERABRASIVES
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course builds on the basic machining skills learned in MEC111. Special attention will be given to quality applications
such as GDT. Students will also learn basic grinding skills for various surface grinder applications. Carbide tooling will be
introduced and projects will be more complex requiring some assembly considerations. Quarters Available: Day - Sp;
Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MEC111

TND 206 - CNC PROGRAMMING OPERATIONS II W-CAM
3 credit hours; 2 class hours; 2 lab hours
This course will give a brief review of CNC mill and lathe programming. It will also cover Computer Aided Manufacturing
with applications software so students can create tool path generation. Students will follow accepted standard operating
procedure and safety considerations for machine operators. Quarters Available: Day - W; Evening - W
Prerequisite(s): MEC264

TND 225 - INTRODUCTION TO PRESS TECHNOLOGY
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to give the student knowledge in press operations. It covers principles of construction, selection,
replacement or rebuilding, costs, noise, and repair. Attention will also be given to advances in technology and current
events in the industry. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp
Prerequisite(s): MEC111 (minimum grade of C- required)

TND 235 - METAL STAMPING DIES
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course covers fundamentals and real world practices of metal stamping die design. Material is introduced through
calculations and engineering drawings. Area manufacturers host field trips so students can view operations of presses
and various types of dies. Class project includes design and fabrication of simple coining die used with a small hand
press. Quarters Available: Day - F; Evening - F
Prerequisite(s): MEC111 (minimum grade of C- required), and TND101 (minimum grade of C- required)

TND 290 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN TOOL AND DIE
6 credit hours
This course presents a specific topic in Tool & Die Technology that is normally not covered in the current Tool & Die
Technology. Credit hours (1-6) and topics will be pre-approved by the academic administration. Quarters Available: Day -
F; Evening - F

TND 291 - TOOL AND DIE TECHNOLOGY PROJECT
4 credit hours; 4 class hours
This course brings together the course work and learning experiences from the Tool and Die Technology program .
Students will individually select and develop a tool and die design project to be completed following the procedures
presented. Quarters Available: Day - Sp; Evening - Sp




                                                             245
DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES
WRT 115 - INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING I
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to help students build a strong foundation for basic college writing. Emphasis is on developing
facility with sentence structure, rules of grammar, mechanics (including spelling, diction, and punctuation), and paragraph
structure. WRT 115 is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). It is required for students whose COMPASS writing score
indicates a need for it. It is the first part of a two-course sequence and must be successfully completed before enrolling in
WRT 116, Introduction to College Writing II. Quarters Available: Offered based on need

WRT 116 - INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING II
3 credit hours; 3 class hours
This course is designed to help students build a strong foundation for basic college composition. Emphasis is on
developing facility with paragraph and essay structure; spelling, diction, mechanics, sentence structure, and punctuation
will also be covered. WRT 116 is graded pass (P) or no pass (NP). If a student does not pass this course, he or she
must repeat and pass it before attempting ENG 101. It is required for students whose COMPASS writing score indicates
a need for it. Successful completion of WRT 115, Introduction to College Writing I; an appropriate score on the writing
component of the COMPASS placement test; or instructor approval. Quarters Available: Offered based on need
Prerequisite(s): WRT115




                                                             246
DIRECTORY




    247
                                             DIRECTORY
                                      North Central State College
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
OMAR F.S. GUIMARAES, M.D., Shelby, 2004
  Physician

E. PAT HIGHTOWER, Th.D., Mansfield, 2006
   Mansfield City Council

*EDITH B. HUMPHREY, R.N., Mansfield, 1991
   Retired

LINDA L. KAFER, Ph.D., Mansfield, 1998
   Vice President, Quality Assurance, Rehabilitation Service of North Central Ohio, Inc.

M. M. RESSALLAT, M.D., Galion, 1976
   Physician

MATTHEW P. SMITH, Mansfield, 2003
  Chairman of the Board, PECO II

NATHAN D. UJVARI, Galion, 2004
  Founder/CEO, The Ole Cracked Barn, Inc.

*ADAM “BUD” VETTER, Mansfield, 2005
   Attorney, Brown, Bemiller, Murray, McIntyre, Vetter & Heck PLL

*RONALD A. WALKER, Ed.D, Ashland, 2005
   Professor of Education, Ashland University
*Appointed by the Governor.

PRESIDENTS EMERITUS
  Henry R. Fallerius
     B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology
     L.L.D., Ashland University

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
  DR. RONALD E. ABRAMS, President
     B.S., Bowling Green State University
     M.A., Bowling Green State University
     Ed.D., University of Cincinnati
  STEPHEN R. WILLIAMS, Executive Administrative Assistant
     A.S., Northern Virginia Community College
     B.S., University of Maryland
     M.B.A., Ashland University
  DONALD L. PLOTTS, Assistant to the President for Community & Government Relations
     B.S., Bowling Green State University
     M.E., University of Toledo
  VACANT, Director of North Central State College Foundation
  TERESA GREENE, Administrative Specialist
     A.A.S., North Central State College
                                                            248
ACADEMIC SERVICES
  DR. THERESE BUSHNER, Interim Vice President for Learning
     B.S., Duquesne University
     M.A., Bowling Green State University
     Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
  DR. BRUCE M. SLINEY, Assistant Vice President for Learning
     B.S. in Ed., Kent State University
     M.S. in Ed., Southern Illinois University
     Ed. D., University of Akron
  DIANE HIPSHER, Coordinator for Academic Services and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Advisor
     B.S.B.A., Ashland University
  ROBERTA ROTH MOORE, Senior Administrative Assistant
     A.A.B., North Central Technical College

  Business and Education Division
    TERRY COLEMAN, Dean of Business and Education
       B.A., The Ohio State University
       M.A., Akron University
    KIMBERLY LYBARGER, Administrative Assistant
       A.A.B., North Central Technical College
    CATHY RATLIFF, Administrative Associate
    Dr. MICHAEL S. ALLEN, Professor, English and Humanities Department Chair
       B.A., The College of Wooster
       M.A., Indiana University
       Ph.D., Indiana University
    JAY JACQUET, Assistant Professor, Business Administration and Business Department Chair
       B.B.A., University of Toledo
       B.B.Ed., University of Toledo
       M.B.A., University of Toledo
    TERI KOFOD, Associate Professor, Early Childhood Education and Education Department Chair
       A.A.S., North Central Technical College
       B.S., Ashland University
       M.Ed., Mt. Vernon Nazarene University
    JENNIFER ADKINS, Associate Professor of Accounting
       A.A.B., North Central Technical College
       B.S.B.A., Ashland University
       M.B.A., Ashland University
    RICHARD BIRK, Associate Professor, Developmental Education
       B.A. Cleveland State University
       M.Ed., Ashland University
    DON DICKE, CPA, Associate Professor, Accounting
       B.S., Capital University
       M.S., Ohio University
       B.S.B.A., University of Albuquerque
    DIANE ENAMA, Early Language and Literacy Specialist, Early Childhood Education
       B.S., Kent State University
       M.Ed., Kent State University
    BETH FRANZ, Associate Professor, English
       B.A. Villa Maria College
       M.A., University of Nebraska Omaha



                                                      249
VASANTHA HARINATH, Associate Professor, English
  B.S., Brennen College
  M.A., St. Mary’s College
PATRICIA A. HERB, Associate Professor, English
  B.S., Bowling Green State University
  M.A., Bowling Green State University
BRAD HAYS, Associate Professor, Business Administration
  B.S., West Virginia Institute of Technology
  M.S., Central Michigan University
MARILYN HUMESTON, Associate Professor, Administrative Information Technology
  B.S., Ashland University
  M.Ed., Ashland University
DEBORAH HYSELL, Lecturer, English
  B.A., The Ohio State University
  M.A., The Ohio State University
  M.L.S., Kent State University
ROSS JUSTICE, Associate Professor, Business Administration
  A.A.S., Ohio Technical College
  B.S., Miami University
  M.B.A., Miami University
ROBERT H. LEWIS, Associate Professor, Social Sciences
  B.S., Murray State University
  M.A., Murray State University
  S.C.T., Murray State University
PHILIP MARTIN, Associate Professor, Speech
  B.A., Ohio Northern University
  M.A., Ohio University
WILLIAM C. MILLER, JR., Associate Professor, Accounting
  B.S., Ashland University
  M.B.A., Ashland University
MARGARET PUCKETT, Associate Professor, First Year Experience
  B.S., University of Pittsburgh
  M.Ed., Ashland University
PAUL A. SUKYS, Professor, Humanities/Law
  B.A., John Carroll University
  M.A., John Carroll University
  J.D., Cleveland State University
DAVID D. TAYLOR, CPA, Assistant Professor, Accounting
  B.A., Capital University

Health & Public Service
JAMES L. HULL, Dean of Health & Public Service
  B.S., The Ohio State University
  M.B.A., Ashland University
BETTY HAGER, Administrative Assistant
  A.A.S., Columbus State Community College
KATHY EMMER, Administrative Specialist
  L.P.N., North Central Technical College
  A.A.B., North Central Technical College
  A.A.B., North Central Technical College
  B.B.A., Mount Vernon Nazarene College

                                                 250
LINDA NICOL, Administrative Associate
   B.M., Bowling Green State University
JANET BOECKMAN, R.N., M.S.N., C.P.N.P., Professor and Director of Nursing Programs
   Diploma, St. Rita’s School of Nursing
   B.S.N., Ashland University
   M.S.N., Akron University
ROBERT A. SLABODNICK, R.R.T., N.P.S., R.C.P. Associate Professor Respiratory Care and
   Program Director and Allied Health Department Chair
   A.A.S., Columbus Technical Institute
   B.S., The Ohio State University
   M.Ed., Ashland University
ANNE VINSON, Associate Professor, Police Academy Commander and
   Public Service Department Chair
   A.A.S. North Central Technical College
   B.S., Ashland University
   M.S., Capella University
ERICA BOYD, RN., Assistant Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
   B.S.N., Medical College of Ohio
   M.S., Ball State University
KAREN D. DANIELSON, R.N., Associate Professor, Practical Nursing
   Diploma, Mansfield General Hospital School of Nursing
   B.S.N., Ashland University
   M.S.N., Capital University
CAROL CARIGLIO WOLFE, P.T., Instructor, Physical Therapist Assistant
    B.S., Cleveland State University
DORIE FORD, R.T., (R), (M), Assistant Professor and Clinical Coordinator Radiological Sciences
   A.A.S., North Central Technical College
   B.S.P.A., St. Joseph College of Maine
CYNTHIA FREEMAN, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
   B.S.N., Case Western Reserve University
   M.S., The Ohio State University
KELLY GRAY, R.N., CNE, Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
   Diploma, Mansfield General Hospital School of Nursing
   B.S.N., The Ohio State University
   M.S., The Ohio State University
DENISE HENDERSHOTT, Assistant Professor, Human Services
   A.A.S., North Central Technical College
   B.S., Ashland University
MOLLY HOCKENBERRY, L.I.S.W., Associate Professor, Human Services
   B.S., The Ohio State University
   M.S., The Ohio State University
LOU ELLEN HUFF, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
   B.S.N., University of Phoenix
   M.A., University of Phoenix
JOYCE HUNT, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
   B.S.N., Mercy College of Detroit
   M.S.N., University of Akron
ELLEN JOHNSON, R.T., (R), Assistant Professor and Program Director, Radiological Sciences
   A.A.S., North Central Technical College
   B.S., Ashland University



                                                    251
 JEAN K. JONES, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
    Diploma, Trumball Memorial Hospital
    B.S., Youngstown State University
    M.S.N., University of Akron
 PEARL KEIB, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
    B.S.N., University of Alberta
    M.S., The Ohio State University
 BETHANY KING, R.R.T., R.N., Associate Professor, Respiratory Care
    M.S.N., Medical University of Ohio
    B.S., University of Toledo
    A.A.S., University of Toledo
 JENNIFER LYNN, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
    Diploma, Altoona Hospital School of Nursing
    B.S.N., Ohio University
    M.S.N., University of Akron
 LEWIS M. MILNER, Professor, Biology
 B.S., University of Dayton
    M.S., University of Dayton
 ESTHER MOORE, P.T.A., Instructor, Physical Therapist Assistant
    A.A.S., North Central Technical College
 LISA K. MUSIC, R.N., Associate Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
    Diploma, Mansfield General Hospital School of Nursing
    B.S.N., The Ohio State University
    M.S.N., University of Akron
KATHERINE E. PERESIE, R.R.T., R.C.P., Associate Professor and Clinical Coordinator, Respiratory Care
    Assessment Coordinator
    B.S., The Ohio State University
    M. Ed., Ashland University
 SHARON PERRY, R.N., Assistant Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
    B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College
    A.A.S., Columbus Technical Institute
    B.S., The Ohio State University
    M.Ed., Ashland University
 PENNY SNYDER, R.N., Assistant Professor, Practical Nursing
    Diploma, Mansfield General School of Nursing
    B.S.N., Ashland University
JUDITH STURGILL, Professor and Program Director, Paralegal Studies
    A.A., Polk Community College
    B.S., Kent State University
    J.D., University of Akron
JEFFREY A. TAYLOR, Associate Professor, Biology
    B.S., Ashland University
    M.S., University of Notre Dame
 TERESA A. VANDORN, Associate Professor, Human Services
    B.S., Kent State University
    M.S., Cappella University
 SAM E. WADE, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice and Police Academy Commander
    A.A., The Ohio State University
    B.S., The Ohio State University
 DARLYN D. WEIKEL, R.N., Associate Professor, Practical Nursing
    B.S., University of St. Francis
    M.S., Pennsylvania State University
                                                   252
     REBECCA WAGNER, R.N., Assistant Professor, Associate Degree Nursing
       B.S.N., University of Delaware
     AMY C. WELSH, R.N., Assistant Professor, Practical Nursing
       A.A.S., North Central State College
       B.S.N., Ashland University
       M.S.N., Otterbein University

Technology Division
     BEN ROUNTREE, Dean Technology & Workforce Development
        B.A.., American University
        M.P.A.., Auburn University
        D.P.A., University of Georgia
     RANDY STORMS, Assistant Professor, Electronic Engineering Technology, Technology Department Chair
        A.A.S., Terra Technical College
        B.S., Franklin University
     TERRY MILLER, Administrative Assistant
        A.A., The Ohio State University – Mansfield
        A.A.B. North Central State College
        B.B.A., Mount Vernon Nazarene College
        M.B.A., Franklin University
     CINDY KUELLING, Administrative Associate
        A.A.B. North Central State College
     JOSEPH R. BADAMY, Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems
        B.A., Georgetown University
        M.B.A., American University
     MATTHEW CUPACH, Associate Professor, Digital Media Technology
        B.A., Cleveland State University
        M.A., University of Akron
     LYNN DAMBERGER, Associate Professor, Digital Media Technology
        B.F.A., Bowling Green State University
        M.F.A., Ashland University
     LENNY EAKEN, Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems
        B.S., University of Akron
        M.Ed., Ashland University
     KENNETH EKEGREN, P.E., Assistant Professor, Mechanical/Metal Engineering Technology
        B.S.M.E., The Ohio State University
     JOHN E. FALLS, Associate Professor, Mathematics
        B.S., University of Akron
        M.S., University of Akron
     RICHARD KARSMIZKI, Instructor, Electronics
     JOYCE KARBULA, Instructor, Developmental Math
        B.S. Southwest State University
        B.A. Southwest State University
     PATRICK KENT, Lecturer, Math
        B.S., The Ohio State University
        M.A., The Ohio State University
        Ph.D., The Ohio State University
     DOUG KRANCH, Professor, Computer Information Systems
        B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology
        M.A., Ambassador University
        M.A., University of Iowa
        M.S. University of Texas at Tyler
                                                      253
     CARMEN MORRISON, Assistant Professor, Computer Information Systems
       A.S., DeVry Institute of Technology
       B.S., DeVry Institute of Technology
     THOMAS NICHOLS, Associate Professor, Mathematics
       B.S., Ohio Northern University
       M.A., Ashland University
     GARY C. WOOD, Associate Professor, Physics
       B.S., University of South Florida
       M.S., University of South Florida

LEARNING SUPPORT AND RETENTION
  MARGARET MOIR, Vice President, Learning Support and Retention
    B.A., Heidelberg College
    M.A., Bowling Green State University
  TRACI LYKINS, Senior Administrative Assistant

  Campus Recreation Center
    TYLER HACK, Coordinator of Recreation and Intramural Sports
      B.A., The Ohio State University
    JENNIFER RACER, Office Associate
      B.A., The Ohio State University

  Campus Life
    BETH KREINBIHL, Interim Campus Life Associate
      B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University
      M.S., University of Cincinnati
    TAMARA SMITH, Office Associate
      A.S., University of Akron

  Student Records Office
     MARK MONNES, Registrar
       B.A., Kent State University
       M.A., Bowling Green State University
     GWEN ALEXANDER, Records Specialist
     CARLA NEWMAN, Records Specialist
       A.A.B., North Central Technical College
     CHANA ROBINSON, Records Specialist
       A.T.S., North Central State College

  Student Success Center
     BEVERLY WALKER, Director of Retention Services
       B.S. Ed., Ohio University
       M.A., West Virginia University
     PAM BARRETT, Administrative Specialist
     GEORGANN FRIETCHEN, Academic Advisor
       B.S., The Ohio State University
       M.Ed., Ashland University
     ERIC GROVE, Academic Advisor
       B.S., Ashland University
     ROSE HUGHES, Academic Advisor
       B.S., Miami University
       M.S., Blufton College
                                                      254
   KAY LEITENBERGER, Academic Advisor
     B.A., Edgecliff College JAMES MUDRA, Academic Advisor
     B.S., Ohio University

Office of Specialized Support Services
   SANDRA LUCKIE, Coordinator
      B.S. Wilmington College
      M.S. University of Wisconsin, Stout
   JULIE KORBAS, Disabilities Services Assistant
      B.S., Wright State University
      A.A., North Central Technical College

Assessment and Career Exploration
  TROY SHUTLER, Coordinator
     B.A., Capital University
  CATHY CRAIG, Assessment Assistant and Lab Technician
     A.A.B., North Central State College
     B.S., Franklin University

Child Development Center
  BETH PRICE, Director
      B.A., University of Kentucky
  KIM GERMAN, Early Childhood Coordinator
      A.A.S., North Central State College
  BROOKE HENWOOD, L.S.W., Family and Community Partnership Coordinator
      B.S., Bowling Green State University
  JENNIFER BACHE, Early Childhood Specialist
      Child Development Associate Credential
  JENNIFER COOK, Early Childhood Specialist
      A.A.S., North Central State College
  TAMMY DANNER, L.P.N., Child Health Specialist
      L.P.N., North Central Technical College
  LYNN DECH, Early Childhood Specialist
      A.A., North Central State College
      Child Development Associate Credential
  MONICA DURHAM, Family Support/Parent Involvement Specialist
      B.S., Ohio University
  BETH EBELING, Early Childhood Specialist
      A.A.S., North Central State College
  DENISE FUNK, Early Childhood Specialist
      Child Development Associate Credential
  TRUDY HAMILTON, Kitchen Assistant
  SUSAN HOUSEHOLDER, Early Childhood Specialist
      A.A.S., North Central State College
  SHANNON MALEC, Early Childhood Specialist
      Child Development Associate Credential
  RITA MOORE, Family Support Specialist
      A.A.S., North Central State College
  ROBIN OWENS, Early Childhood Specialist
      Child Development Associate Credential
  MELISSA O’CONNELL, Early Childhood Specialist
      A.A.S., Stark State College
                                                   255
     THERESA QUAIL, Early Childhood Specialist
       A.A.S., Jefferson Community College
     MELANIE REYNOLDS, Early Childhood Specialist
       A.A.S., North Central Technical College
       B.S., The Ohio State University
     TERESA SHAFER, Early Childhood Specialist
       B.S., The Ohio State University
     DEBORAH SMITH, Cook
     AMANDA STEPHENS, Child Care Specialist
       Child Development Associate Credential
     JULIE TINSMAN, Early Childhood Specialist
       B.S., The Ohio State University
     JULIANA WEBER, Child Development Specialist
       A.A.S., North Central Technical College
     MELODY WELTER, Child Care Specialist
       A.S., Muskingum Area Technical College
     APRIL WILSON, Early Childhood Specialist
       B.S., The Ohio State University

BUSINESS SERVICES
  J. BRAD MCCORMACK, Vice President, Business and Administrative Services
      A.A.S., University of Akron
      B.S., University of Akron
      M.B.A., Tiffin University
  JUDY FRIEND, Senior Administrative Assistant
      A.A.B., North Central Technical College
      B.B.A., Mt. Vernon Nazarene College

  Information Technology
     TED F. MECURIO, Director of Information Services
        A.A.B., North Central State College
     BRIAN BALDRIDGE, Instrumentation Technician
        A.A.S., North Central State College
     ERIC DESPAIN, PC/Audio Visual Technician
        A.A.B., North Central State College
     PAUL GARVER, Computer Technician
        A.A.S., North Central State College
     VICKIE J. KISSEL, IT Help Desk Specialist
        A.T.S., North Central State College
     REBECCA MATNEY, Programmer
        B.B.A., Ohio University
     BOB L. MATNEY, Programmer/Analyst
        B.S.B.A., The Ohio State University
        M.B.A., Mississippi State University
     MICHAEL RENOCK-WELKER, Instructional Technologist
        B.F.A., Bowling Green State University
     D. JAMES TURNER, Network Administrator
        A.A.B., North Central State College

  Bookstore
    CARLA BUTDORFF, Campus Bookstore Manager
       A.A.B., North Central Technical College
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Controller’s Office
  LORI MCKEE, Controller
     A.A.B., Bradford College
     B.B.A., Mount Vernon Nazarene College
     M.S.M., Mount Vernon Nazarene College
  MICHELE BARBER, Accounting Manager
     B.A., Ashland University
  RENEE NUSSBAUM, Purchasing
  LISA REIP, Cashier
  WENDY VOGEL, Student Accounts Specialist
     B.B.A., Eastern Michigan University

Institutional Services
   MARK COLLINS, Executive Director of Kehoe Center
       B.S., West Liberty State College
       M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
   STEVI BOWLER, Administrative Specialist

Facilities
   DEAN SCHAAD, Facilities Manager/Maintenance Coordinator
   BOB SHAMBAUGH, Administrative Specialist
   SCOTT BENDLE, Building Coordinator
   BILL BOGOLIS, Maintenance Assistant
       A.A.S., North Central Technical College
   MICHAEL COLE, Custodian
   DON HART, Mailroom/Duplicating Clerk
       A.A.B., North Central State College
       B.B.A., Mount Vernon Nazarene University
   BILL HIPSHER, Maintenance Assistant
   BURNARD LITTLETON, Custodian
   WILL MILLER, Grounds Technician
       A.A.S., The Ohio State University
   KAREN MINNEAR, Custodian
   MICHAEL MOORE, Custodian
   MICHAEL NIESE, Grounds Coordinator
   DAVE PISEL, Lead Custodian/Shelby
   RONALD RODRIQUEZ, Custodian
   JAMES SCHERPENISSE, Custodian
   TERRY SEXTON, Maintenance Assistant
   SCOTT SHEPHERD, Custodian
   BECKY STALLARD, Mailroom/Receiving Clerk
   GARY L. STEVENS, Lead Custodian/Main Campus
   BILL SWEENEY, Custodian
   TONY WOODARD, Duplicating Operator Technician

Financial Aid
   DORIS SMITH, Assistant Dean for Financial Aid
     B.A., Emporia State University
     M.S., Emporia State University
   JOYCE BISHOP, Administrative Assistant

                                                      257
     SUE DONAHUE, Financial Aid Specialist
       A.A.B., North Central State College
     AMANDA KALTENBAUGH, Financial Aid Technician
       A.S., Monroe County Community College
       B.A., University of Toledo
     JAMES PHINNEY, Financial Aid Specialist
       B.S.Ed., Ohio University
       M.A., Michigan State University

  Human Resources Office
    R. DOUGLAS HANUSCIN, Director of Human Resources
       B.S., University of Akron
    KAREN CLARK, Payroll and Benefits Specialist
    SUSAN ELLIOTT, Human Resource Assistant
       A.A.B., Columbus State Community College
       B.S., Ashland University

INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT
   BETTY WELLS, Vice President for Institutional Advancement
      B.A., Colorado State University
   TOM PRENDERGAST, Director of Institutional Research & Grants
      B.A., Miami University
      M.A., University of Illinois - Springfield
   SHEILA CAMPBELL, Senior Administrative Assistant
         A.A.B., North Central State College
   MARY J. RODRIGUEZ, Coordinator of Alumni and Employer Relations
      A.A.B., North Central Technical College
   KEITH STONER, Graphic Designer
      B.F.A., Ringling School of Art & Design
   GALE WAGNER, Coordinator Donor Relations/Foundation Special Events
   NICOLE WORKMAN, College Relations Representative/Marketing Coordinator
      B.A., The Ohio State University

  Admissions
    NIKIA FLETCHER, Director of Admissions/Enrollment Services
       B.A., University of Akron
    CAROL ALLEN, Administrative Specialist
       B.S., Ashland University
    ROBERT GOSSOM, Admissions Recruiting Representative
       B.B.A., Mount Vernon Nazarene University
    ANNETTE GRIFFON, Admissions Recruiting Representative
       B.S., Queensland University of Technology
    STEPHANIE HALL, Admissions Recruiting Representative
       B.Ed., University of Toledo
    JANET HEPNER, P/T Evening/Weekend Switchboard
    DEBRA HUGUENIN, Student Services Specialist
    JAMIE ROBERTS, Admissions Recruiting Representative
       B.A., The Ohio State University
    DEANNA STRAUSS, Administrative Specialist
       A.A.B., University of Akron



                                                     258
WORKFORCE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
  College Now
    ROBERT CYDERS, Director of College NOW/Coordinator of Instruction, Math and Science Department Chair
        B.A., College of Wooster
        M.A., Marshall University
        M.Ed., Ashland University
        Ph.D., Ohio University
    ROBERT BRONSON, Facilitator
        B.S., Ashland University
        B.S., Ashland University
    DARCY CARNS, Facilitator
        B.S., The Ohio State University
        M.Ed., Mount Vernon Nazarene University

  Workforce Development
    CHRISTINA BARKER, Instructor, Tool & Die
    BARBARA ENGLAND, Instructor/Tutor
       A.A.B., North Central Technical College
       B.S., Wright State University
    JERRY FRANCL, Assistant Professor, Electronic Engineering Technology
       B.S.E.E., Purdue University
    ROBERT GREEN, Integrated System Technology Instructor
       A.A.S., Community College of the Air Force
    KATHY HAMILTON, Project Administrator, Training Workers in Advanced Manufacturing Grant
       B.S., The Ohio State University
       M.S., Capella University
    SIEGFRIED W. HARRISON, Assistant Professor, Drafting & Design
       A.A.S., North Central Technical College
       B.S., Southwest University
       B.B.A., Nazarene College
       M.S., Southwest University
    GINA KAMWITHI, Community Education Director
       B.A., The Ohio State University
       M.A., Ashland University
    SHARON MILLER, Corporate Training Consultant
       B.S., Youngstown University
    THOMAS PEYTON, Instructor, Tool & Die
    CHARLES WINGER, Corporate Training Consultant
       B.S., The Ohio State University

LIBRARY
   ELIZABETH BURNS, Library Director
      B.A., The Ohio State University
      M.A., Kent State University
      M.L.S., Kent State University

NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE TECH PREP CONSORTIUM
  TOM KLUDING, Director of Tech Prep
    A.A.B., North Central Technical College
    B.Ed., Bowling Green State University
    B.S.B.A., Ashland College
    M.Ed., Ashland University
                                                      259
LINDA HART, Administrative Specialist
CRYSTAL ESCALERA, College Tech Prep Recruiter
   A.A.S., North Central State College
   B.S., University of Cincinnati
   M.A., Heidelberg College




                                                260
ADJUNCT FACULTY
The quality of North Central State’s programs is attributable in part to the dedicated persons who serve as adjunct faculty
and complement full-time personnel. The following individuals are regular, adjunct faculty:

   CURTIS ALLEN, English
   TRISA ALLEN, Developmental Education
   VELMA ANDERSON, Early Childhood Education
   MARCIA BAER, CPR/First Aid
   CHRIS BAKER, Respiratory Care
   BRIAN BALDRIDGE, Engineering
   PAULA BAPKA, Philosophy
   SUSAN BATEMAN, Human Services
   JAMES BECK, Computer Information Systems, Physics, Administrative Information Technology
   BRENDA BEER, Radiological Sciences
   MICHAEL BENNETT, Police Academy
   JUSTIN BILLOTTE, Psychology
   TERRY BOTDORF, Police Academy
   MICHELLE BOWEN, Business Management
   MIKE BOYD, Developmental Education
   PATRICIA BREWSTER, Developmental Education
   PHILLIP BRILEY, Business Management
   CYNTHIA BUSHMAN, Respiratory Care
   BRUCE CAMPBELL, Social Sciences
   CARRIE CARMACK, Accounting, Financial Management
   CAROL CARPENTER, Sociology
   ARNOLD CLAWSON, Digital Media Technology
   PAULA COHEN, Speech
   JOHN COLEMAN, Criminal Justice
   MAUREEN COLEMAN, History
   KATHY CONN, Associate Degree Nursing
   BRIAN CONSTANCE, Developmental Education
   BRAD COPELAND, Police Academy
   DIANNA COPP, Police Academy
   HARRY COPPER, Mathematics
   CATHY CRAIG, Developmental Education
   RAY CURATTI, Manufacturing Engineering
   NANCY DARBY, Psychology
   CAROLYN DAUGHERTY, Computer Information Systems
   JOSEPH DAUGHERTY, Criminal Justice
   DENNIS A. DAVIS, Accounting
   KRISTINA DENNISON, Psychology
   MICHELLE DENNY, Associate Degree Nursing
   DANIEL DESANTIS, Politics
   BETTY DEVORE, Developmental Education
   DAN DICKMAN, Early Childhood Education
   CARL DORSEY, Police Academy
   TONYA DRUM, Radiological Sciences
   MINDY DUFFNER, English
   MICHAEL DURHAM, Human Services
   TRACY DZUGAN, Nursing
   HEIDEN EICHORN, Human Services, Educational Assisting, Early Childhood Education
   DIANE ENAMA, Early Childhood Education
                                                             261
CRYSTAL ESCALERA, Developmental Education
GORDON EYSTER, Business Management
RANDY FAGAN, Mathematics
WILLIAM FARRIS, Business Management
JILL FENNER, Educational Assisting
LORRAINE FERRE, Human Services
HELEN FISHER, Human Services
KAREN FISHER, Sociology
MICHELLE FLAHERTY, Criminal Justice
WILLIAM FLOOD, Business Management
DENISE FREDRITZ, Radiological Sciences
JANICE FRIES, Administrative Information Technology
GEORGANN FRIETCHEN, Developmental Education
JOHN GARLOUGH, Sociology
PAUL GASE, Psychology
TAMI GASTINEAU, Respiratory Care
SANDRA GONZALEZ-ZEGER, Educational Assisting
KELLY GOUGE, Radiological Sciences
JUDY GREGG, Associate Degree Nursing
CAROL GROFF, Administrative Information Technology
ERIC GROVE, Developmental Education, Early Childhood Education
TRACY GUNN, Educational Assisting
SCOTT GURNEY, Mathematics
NANCY HALL, Developmental Education
THOMAS HALL, Human Services
PETER HARING, Real Estate
JAMES HARMAN, Psychology
DORIANN HARTZLER, Radiological Sciences
JULIE HARTZLER, Human Services
SARAH HAYES, Respiratory Care
MICHAEL HIGGINS, Police Academy
HENRY HEINZMANN, Respiratory Care
CONNIE HOEHN, English
ANDREA HOPKINS, Digital Media Technology
LU ANN HOWARD, Human Services
ROSE HUGHES, Business Management
ANGELA HUNSINGER, Criminal Justice
RON HYDE, Sociology
LARISA ISRAILOVA, Developmental Education
MICHELLE JACKSON, Practical Nursing
RICHARD JACOX, Physics
SARAH JAMESON, English, Business Management
ROBERT JANCA, Psychology
ILONA JOHNSON, Early Childhood Education
KIMBERLY JOHNSON, Educational Assisting
REGINA KAMWITHI, Social Sciences
ABBEY KANZIG, English
JOYCE KARBULA, Mathematics
CATHY KINNEY, Educational Assisting
MARK KOEHLER, Early Childhood Education
BETH KOHNE, Developmental Education
STEPHANIE KREISHER, Social Sciences
                                                   262
AMY KURTZ-NAGEL, Human Services
ANN LEANO, Respiratory Care
ERIC LEHNHART, Criminal Justice, Police Academy
MICHELLE LILLO, English
CATHY LINTON, Practical Nursing
ROBERT LULL, Biology
PHYLLIS LYBARGER, Practical Nursing
DAVID MACK, Police Academy
MYRON MAGLOTT, Mathematics
JUDI MALEC-DIGIOIA, Economics
JOHN MAXEY, Police Academy
MARK MAXWELL, Police Academy
RACHEL MCKINNESS, Human Services
ROBERT MCMAHON, Engineering
CLIFF MEARS, Speech
DAVISON MILES, Respiratory Care
DOUGLAS MILLER, Computer Information Systems
LISA MOORE, Psychology
BRYAN MULLINS, Manufacturing Engineering
JAMES MURPHY, Business Management
CYNTHIA MURRAY, Biology
MIRIAM MYERS, Accounting
PAULA NEUTZLING, Biology
CATHERINE NICHOLS, English, Developmental Education
HOLLY NIELSEN, Economics
DAVE NIRODE, Police Academy
MARGARET OPATKEN, Developmental Education
RON PAGANO, Sociology
CHARLOTTE PATTERSON, Biology
BRETT PAULEY, Police Academy
JENNIFER PHENICIE, Early Childhood Education
WALTER POFFENBAUGH, Police Academy
GARY PROIETTI, Psychology
RICH RADER, Speech
DONAS RAMSEY, Educational Assisting, English
DOUGLAS RAMSEY, Educational Assisting, Math
GARY RATLIFF, Respiratory Care
SARAH REDDING, Human Services
CRAIG REDMOND, Business Management
MICHAEL RENOCK-WELKER, History
SUSAN ROBERTS, Early Childhood Education
MELINDA ROBERTSON, Associate Degree Nursing
LANA ROBINSON, Human Services
PATRICK RUFENER, Psychology
MICHAEL SCHLUPP, Manufacturing Engineering
RICHARD SCHULLER, Criminal Justice
ANNE SEIFERT, Human Services, Social Sciences
DINO SGAMBELLONE, Criminal Justice
THOMAS SHIELDS, English
PAUL SILINSKY, Engineering, Electrical Maintenance
JAMES SIMMERING, Engineering
SCOTT SMART, Police Academy
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RODNEY SMITH, Police Academy
TAMMY SOUHRADA, Early Childhood Education
KRISTA SOWERS, Respiratory Care
SOPHIA SPEELMAN, Early Childhood Education
CRAIG SPRANG, Police Academy
TONYA STANGER, Practical Nursing
JOHN STEWART, Economics
VALERIE STONE, Massage Therapy
JOY STORTZ, Police Academy
MIKEL SUTTER, Chemistry
GEORGE SWANWICH, Radiological Sciences
STACY SWANK, Educational Assisting and Early Childhood Education
TINA SWARTZ, Human Services
GARY J. SWIATEK, Mechanical Engineering
JOHN SWIGER, English
TERRI SWITZER, Nursing
MERRILL TAWSE, Biology
SUSAN TAYLOR, English
HOLLY TETLOW, Early Childhood Education
DOUG THEAKER, Politics
JULIE TINNERMEIER, Developmental Education
CAROL TRUNZO, Developmental Education
D. JAMES TURNER, Computer Information Systems
AMY TYREE, Biology
AMY ULLMAN, Radiological Sciences
WILLIAM URBAN, Chemistry
HOWARD VAN ROMER, Social Sciences
MICHAEL VIARS, Police Academy
KELLY VOGT, Associate Degree Nursing
LAURA WADE, Criminal Justice
SALLY WALLACE, Associate Degree Nursing
MARK WARD, Chemistry
HEIDI WELLER, Digital Media Technology
ERIC WILLIAMS, Humanities, English
JEN WILLIAMS, Humanities, English
MICHAEL WILLIAMS, Psychology
KRISTI WOLFE, CPR/First Aid
KATHLEEN WUKELA, Early Childhood Education
JENNIFER WHITE, Radiological Sciences




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FACULTY EMERITUS
  HAROLD E. AMSBAUGH, Business Administration
  LUCY AMSBAUGH, R.N., Associate Degree Nursing
     Diploma, Mansfield General Hospital School of Nursing
  PATRICIA A. NOLD, R.N., Practical Nursing
     B.S.N., Ohio Dominican College
  BEN F. OSWALD, Associate Professor, Social Sciences
     B.S., Allegheny College
     M.Div., Methodist Theological School in Ohio
  L. DAN RICHARDS, V.P. Academic Services
     M.A., University of Akron
  JOAN K. ROBERTSON, English
     B.A., College of Wooster
     M.A., Ohio University
  PAUL E. ROBINSON, Professor, Human Services
     B.S., Ohio University
     M.A., Bowling Green State University
     Ph.D., Ohio University
  JOSEPH S. THOMPSON, Mechanical Engineering Technology
     B.S., Case Institute of Technology
  MICHAEL R. WILLIAMS, Professor, Social Sciences
     B.A., Union College
     M. Div., Methodist Theological School
     D. Min., United Theological Seminary
     M.P.A., The Ohio State University




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ADVISORY COMMITTEES

ACCOUNTING
Wendy Beekman ....................................................................... First Citizen’s Bank
Christina Butts ............................................... Ashland/West Holmes Career Center
Denny Davis ................................................... Riester, Lump, & Burton, CPA’s, Inc.
Pat Dropsey........................................................................Richland County Auditor
Cindy Funk .................................................................... Ashland County Treasurer
Charlene Goracke......................................................Executive Business Specialist
Bill Harvey ....................................................................................Whitcomb & Hess
Christine Mitchell ........................................................... Mansfield Plumbing Supply
Angie Morehead ................................................................ Gorman Rupp Company
Mary Perman .................................................................... Central Ohio Energy, Inc.
Darwin Sampsel.............................................................................................Retired
Linda Schumacher......................................Pioneer Career and Technology Center
Margie Travis..........................................................Hillsdale High School Treasurer
Rita Wiening ...............................................Pioneer Career and Technology Center

ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Pam Bell ....................................................Pioneer Career and Technology Center
Judy Bishop ........................................................................................Kelly Services
Darienne Box.......................................................................... Mid-Ohio Heart Clinic
Sharon Freeman................................................................................ Richland Bank
Kathleen Friend ............................................................. MedCentral Health System
Carolyn Long .................................................................................... Rable Machine
Kim Miller................................................................................ Madison High School
Elaine Davis............................................................................ Madison High School

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Phillip Briley ........................................................................ Sears Roebuck and Co.
William Farris.......................................................................... Marketing Consultant
Andrea Hartman .................................................................................Therm-O-Disc
Jennifer Graham..................................................................... Marketing Consultant
Charleen McKay ............................................................... Mansfield Bag and Paper
Dave McQuown .............................................................................................Retired
Reneé Mott ................................................................................Mayor of Perrysville
Chris Oehler ..................................................................Automotive Mfg., Tier 1 & 2
Craig Redmond...................................................................................Gorman Rupp
Tom Thomas ............................................................................... Warren Rupp, Inc.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER – POLICY COUNCIL
Cindy Baker ......................................................Mansfield Community Development
Kristina Bardney ............................................................................................ Parent
Emily Carsey ..............................................................................................Educator
Raymond Duncan .......................................................................................... Parent
Jamie Graska ................................................................................................ Parent
Tara Hall ........................................................................................................ Parent
Lisa Hamilton................................................................................................. Parent




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Julie Litt ...................................................................................... Richland Newhope
Angela Phillips ............................................................................................... Parent
Amber Skaggs ............................................................................................... Parent
Debbie Sweet .................................................................................... Richland Bank
Faith Troche .................................................................................................. Parent

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER – EARLY CARE & EDUCATION
Dale Au.............................................................................................. Help Me Grow
Joan Borgelt ................................................................... Ohio Heartland Head Start
Melissa Conley ........................................................ Ohio Heartland and Head Start
Shirley Fort ....................................................................Early Childhood Consultant
Denise Funk ............................................North Central State College/OSU-M CDC
Yvette Givand ..........................................................Madison Early Learning Center
Nancy Hultz ...................................................................Early Childhood Consultant
Lynn Johnson .................................................................. The Ohio State University
Terri Kofod.......................................................Faculty, North Central State College
Michelle Moore .......................................................................... Child Care Choices
Debbie Schuster ...................................................... Ohio Heartland and Head Start
Karrie Starr .............................................................. Ohio Heartland and Head Start
Jennifer Villard......................................................... Ohio Heartland and Head Start
Karie Worley ............................... Parent, North Central State College/OSU-M CDC

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER – HEALTH ADVISORY
Theresa Arnett..................................................Third Street Family Health Services
Kristina Bardney ............................................................................................ Parent
Janet Boeckman........................................................... North Central State College
Laura Burrer ...........................................................Shelby Home and Public Health
Cindy Cornell ...............................................................................The Rehab Center
Judy Culler.......................... Mansfield/Ontario/Richland County Health Department
Diane Jackson ...................................................................... Family Life Counseling
Rachel Merrit ................................................................................................. Parent
Tina Picman....................................................................................................... WIC
Dolly Weikel.................................................................. North Central State College
Sharonda Wilson ............................................................ Ohio Heartland Head Start
Kathy Wukela ....................................................Richland County Children Services

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Glenn Baker..............................................................................RR Donnelly & Sons
Michael Mistretta.................................................................... MedCentral Mansfield
Dan Cannon .......................................................... MT Business Technologies, Inc.
Bill Danuloff ....................................................................... Gorman Rupp Company
Michael Hill .............................................................................. JDA Software Group
Rob Heyde................................................................................ Safelite Glass Corp.
John Luedy ............................................................ MT Business Technologies, Inc.
Robert Mellas ..................................................................................................Sprint
Rob Musick........................................................................... Cumberland Insurance
Jim Rathburn .......................................................................................Cott Systems
Philip Richardson................................................ Ohio Heartland Community Action




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Marianne Ritchie............................................ Pioneer Career & Technology Center
Dan Rosich ......................................................................................................Sprint
Doug Rothhaar ...................................................................................Therm-O-Disc
Chuck Stickleman.................................................................................... Consulting
Douglas Turman ......................................................................Newman Technology

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Michael Bennett...............................................................Shelby Police Department
Steven Brenneman................................................................Morrow County Sheriff
John Coleman ................................................ North Central Correctional Institution
Charles Doan...............................................................Plymouth Police Department
Tom Fultz.........................................................Mansfield Municipal Court Probation
Stan Henry..................................................... Ashland West Holmes Career Center
Herbert Homan ............................................................... Ohio State Highway Patrol
Paul Johnson............................................................. MedCentral Hospital Systems
Mark Maxwell................................................Ohio Division of Parks and Recreation
Phil Messer................................................................. Mansfield Police Department
Carl Richert II........................................................................Ashland County Sheriff
Bill Schmidt.................................................................................... Schmidt Security
Ronny Shawber .................................................................. Crawford County Sheriff
Steve Sheldon .....................................................................Richland County Sheriff

DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY
Mike Greene .................................................................................................REDeC
James Holmes............................................................... WMFD-TV & WVNO Radio
Jack Motta .................................................................................... Premier Graphics

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Dale Au................................................... Richland County Youth & Family Services
Cheryl Boyles ................................................................Lucas Elementary Principal
Shirley Fort .......................................................Adjunct North Central State College
Lynn Johnson .................................................................. The Ohio State University
Kim German ......................................................CDC – North Central State College
Michelle McCracken ........................................Richland Co. Cooperative Preschool
Mary Ann Mellor....................................................................MedCentral Child Care
Susan Miller..................................................................................................SERRC
Jennifer Phenicie ..............................................Ajunct, North Central State College
Hazel Taft ...................................................... Knohoko Headstart Glenmont Center
Joyce Turner......................................................................... Mansfield City Schools
Linda Billman .............................................................................. Ashland University
Kathy Wukela ............................................................................ Children’s Services

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING
Jill Fenner .................................................................................................. Graduate
Pam Jones............................................................. Clear Fork Valley Local Schools
Ken Kinley .....................................................................................................Retired
Cathy Kinney .................................................................... Clear Fork Middle School
Jim Klenk .................................................................. Clear Fork Board of Education
Jane McKeon................................................................................... First Merit Bank
Sherri Mitchell........................................................................... Shelby City Schools
Sandy Overholt.....................................................................Brinkerhoff Elementary
Marti Rambo .............................................................Knox County Newhope School
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George Scheff ...............................................................................................Retired
Steve Willeke........................................................................Crestview Board Office
Julie Wilson ........................................................................... Springmill Elementary
Minnie Zeger.................................................................. Mid Ohio Education Center

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES
Nick Costein .................................................. Pioneer Career & Technology Center
Martin Dzugan ............................................... Pioneer Career & Technology Center
Jeff Gray ...................................................................................... Guild International
Lanny Hawkins
Mark Hess ....................................................................................... Hess Industries
Sam Hillman ..........................................................................Hillman Precision, Inc.
Carl Neutzling ..................................................................................................IBEW
Dan Phillips............................................................................................Retiree, GM
Craig Redman ............................................................ The Gorman Rupp Company
Norm Shoemaker................................................................... Phillips Manufacturing
Bob Stimpert.............. Ashland University, Manufacturing Competitveness Initiative
Ben Williams............................................................................Rockwell Automation
Jeremy Wolford.............................................................................Hill Precision, Inc.
Michael Yakir ........................................................................................ Adena Corp.

HUMAN SERVICES
Steve Nelson .................................................................. Richland Newhope Center
Jim Berman .................................................... Richland County Children’s Services
Bob Demoise .................................................................................................Retired
Ruthie Derr .........................................................................................Rehab Center
Mary Hackworth.............................................................Mansfield Memorial Homes
Tom Hall ..........................................................................St. Peter Catholic Schools
Donna Herr*......................................................................................H & R Services
Ron Hyde* .....................................................Mansfield Living and Learning Center
Lillie Kirsch* ......................................................................Marion Technical College
Dick Metcalf*................................................Center for Individual & Family Services
Sherri Mitchell*.......................................................................... Shelby City Schools
Paul Neja .......................................................................................................Retired
Marty Rambo ............................................................Knox County Newhope School
Steve Stone .................................................. Mental Health and Recovery Services
*denotes NC State Graduate

NURSING (R.N.)
Sandra Beidelschies, R.N................................................ Knox Community Hospital
Pam Crawford, R.N., Ph.D............... MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital
Noelle DeVault R.N.…… ……………………… Galion Community Hospital, NCOHS
Lorain Frank-Lightfoot…………………..……………….Wooster Community Hospital
Connie Geissman, R.N. .................................. Galion Community Hospital, NCOHS
Bert Maglott, R.N. .................................. Home Care Matters Home Health Hospice
Cathy Mazzei, R.N.*………… ……………………………..MedCentral Health System
Denise Naugle ............................................................ Shelby Public Health League
Joyce Pagano, R.N………..…………………………………………Samaritan Hospital




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Karin Schwan, R.N………………………………..………………….Samaritan Hospital
Dann Simmons, R.N. *…………………………………..Brethren Care Nursing Home
Cherie Spragg, R.N. ..................................................... Fisher-Titus Medical Center
Barb Workman, R.N………………………………………………….Samaritan Hospital
Rose Wurm, R.N...................................................................Mercy Hospital, Willard
* denotes NC State Graduate

PARALEGAL STUDIES
David Carto.........................................................................Weldon, Huston, Keyser
Sarah Davis .................................................................... Richland County Recorder
Jack Donaldson ...............................................................................Attorney-at-Law
Wilbur Flippin...................................................................................Attorney-at-Law
Judge James Henson ..........................................Richland County & Criminal Court

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
Christopher Clark, PT…………………………………..Mohican Sports Med & Rehab
Brian Finger, PT……………………………………………........ Mid-Ohio Orthopedics
Cathy Finnegan, PTA……........................................Woodlawn Healthcare & Rehab
Deb Gibson, PTA………………………………………….…….Mercy Hospital, Willard
Sarah Gilmore ................................................................................ Bellvue Hospital
David Hoffstetter, PT ......................................................................Summit Therapy
Carey Holbrook, PTA............................................... House Rehabilitation Solutions
Bekah Hooper, PTA……………………………………………..…Altercare of Bucyrus
Tasha Kelso, PTA                                                                     Mercy Hospital, Willard
Jeff Lapp, PT ............................................................................................................
Sandra Petras, PT ................................................ Woodlawn Health Care & Rehab
Renee Robinson, PTA ................................................................. P.T. Services, Inc.
Lisa Sheppard, PTA.................................................... Lexington Court Care Center
Sara Stelzer, PTA....................................................................... Mifflin Care Center
Ashley Stuckey, PTA……………………………………………..PT Services, Bucyrus
Truly Moore, PT.......................................................................... Mifflin Care Center

PRACTICAL NURSING
Meg Barnes, R.N. .......................................................Brethren Care Nursing Home
Wanda Bowser, R.N………………………………………..Galion Community Hospital
Shirley Crawford, L.P.N. .................. MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital
Pat Donihue, R.N..................................MedCentral Health System/Shelby Hospital
Barbara Driscoll, R.N .....................................Shelby Public Health League - retired
Shirley Fitz, R.N…………………………………………… Galion Community Hospital
Andrea Glasener, L.P.N……………………………………MedCentral Health System
Mary Ann Jacobs, L.P.N. .......................................................... Mansfield Pediatrics
Laverna Kerestes, L.P.N............................................................. Mifflin Care Center
Cathy Mollica, R.N.................................................................... Kingston of Ashland
Kayla Roby, L.P.N. .....................................................Wooster Community Hospital
Dorothy Walton, L.P.N ................................................... MedCentral Health System

RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Terry Baker, R.T. (R) ....................... MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital
Brenda Beer, R.T. (R) (CT)…………….MedCentral Health System/Shelby Hospital
Roger Bevelhymer, R.T (R). ..........................................Galion Community Hospital
Paul Buehrer, M.D. .......................... MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital
Tonya Drum, R.T., (R) .........................Samaritan Regional Health System/Hospital

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Denise Fredritz, R.T. (R)....................................................Mercy Hospital of Willard
Kelly Gouge, R.T. (R)(CT) .............................................Galion Community Hospital
Glade Hart, R.T. (R)...........................................................Mercy Hospital of Willard
Doriann Hartzler, R.T. (R)...........................................Wooster Community Hospital
Chris Hunt, R.T. (R).............................Samaritan Regional Health System/Hospital
Connie Noble, R.T. (R) (M)……….…MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital
Amy Ullman, R.T. (R).................................................................................. Alumnus
George Swanwich, R.T. (R)…………….MedCentral Health System/Shelby Hospital
Gloria Price…………..…………………………………………………………….Student
Dan Grabowski ...........................................................Wooster Community Hospital
Jennifer White................................. MedCentral Health System, Mansfield Hospital
Lori Holzworth................................. MedCentral Health System, Mansfield Hospital

RESPIRATORY CARE
Muriel Baith, RRT/RCP....................................................... Past Program Graduate
Chris Baker, RRT/RCP ...............................................Wooster Community Hospital
Mike Pierce...................................................................................................Student
Serena Fenton……………………………………………………………………..Student
Randy Cole, RRT/RCP ................................................................Integrated Medical
Pam Couch, RRT/RCP ........................Samaritan Regional Health System/Hospital
Robert Denton, M.D......................... MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital
Gary Englehart, RRT/RCP............................................ Fisher-Titus Medical Center
Eric Gallion, RRT/RCP .........................MedCentral Health System/Shelby Hospital
Lynn Long RRT/RCP .............................................. Marion Community Med Center
Henry Heinzmann, M.D. ...................................................Program Medical Director
Tom Preston, RRT/RCP ............................................ Columbus Children's Hospital
Sharon Connley, RRT/RCP ............. MedCentral Health System/Mansfield Hospital




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Law enforcement officers authorized to carry concealed weapons or dangerous ordnance
and acting within the scope of their duties must do the following:

   •   Prior to the start of class, a student shall present a letter from their commanding
       officer to the Registrar indicating they are required to carry a weapon, even
       when not on duty, as part of their overall duties as a peace officer.
   •   Prior to employment, an employee shall present a letter from their commanding
       officer to the Director of Human Resources indicating they are required to carry a
       weapon, even when not on duty, as part of their overall duties as a peace
       officer.
   •   Notify their instructor, supervisor, etc. that they are peace officers required to
       carry a weapon.

				
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