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					OLD ARCHIVES 2006 AND 2005

                                    2006
      HISTORIC HARMONY INSTALLS INCUMBENT OFFICERS, DIRECTORS (12/12/06)

                    2007 HARMONY MUSEUM EVENTS (12/14/06)

  UNUSUAL MODEL BUILDINGS, RAILROAD DISPLAYED AT HARMONY MUSEUM (11/19/06)

                  NEW BOOK ABOUT OLD COUNTY MAP (09/12/06)

              HARMONY MUSEUM SETS HERB & GARDEN FAIR (6/10/06)

      HARMONY MUSEUM GIFT SHOP OPENS ONLINE SHOPPING WEB SITE (3/29/06)

        HARMONY MUSEUM CUTS FEES DURING RENOVATION PROJECT (3/12/06)

  HARMONY MUSEUM GERMAN DINNER - BENEFITS HISTORIC HARMONY OPERATIONS
                               (4/8/06)

       HARMONIEFEST DINNER - MAJOR BEQUEST - AWARDS PRESENTED (2/13/06

FLEA MARKET - AT STEWART HALL - BENEFITS HISTORIC HARMONY OPERATIONS (3/4/06)

    HARMONIEFEST DINNER - HISTORIC HARMONY'S ANNUAL FUNDRAISER (2/11/06)

FLEA MARKET - AT STEWART HALL - BENEFITS HISTORIC HARMONY OPERATIONS (2/4/06)


                                    2005
GERMAN CRAFTS, MUSIC, FOOD PART OF HARMONY MUSEUM CHRISTMAS MARKET (10/27/05)

  HARMONY MUSEUM CHRISTMAS MARKET REFLECTS TOWN'S GERMAN ROOTS (10/11/05)

    HISTORIC HARMONY RAISES $23,000 WITH MATCHING GIFT CHALLENGE (10/5/05)

       HARMONY MUSEUM PRESENTS OKTOBERFEST GERMAN BUFFET (10/5/05)

               QUILT SHOW RETURNS AT HARMONY MUSEUM (9/9/05)

        HARMONY, OLD ECONOMY TO HOST COMMUNAL CONFERENCE (9/9/05)

               HARMONY MUSEUM'S TWIN ANTIQUE SHOWS (8/1/2005)

HARMONY MUSEUM'S TRADITIONAL BUT AIR CONDITIONED GERMAN DINNER (7/26/2005)

             HARMONY MUSEUM 50TH ANNIVERSARY MARKED (6/9/2005)
               FLEA MARKETS BENEFIT HARMONY MUSEUM (5/2/2005)

           HARMONY MUSEUM SETS ANOTHER GERMAN DINNER (5/2/2005)

            HARMONY MUSEUM SETS JUNE PLANT EXCHANGE (5/2/2005)

   PAT KNOECHEL'S QUILTING PROGRAM RETURNS TO HARMONY MUSEUM(5/2/2005)

 PHMC EXPANDS NATIONAL REGISTER ELIGIBILITY FOR ZIEGLER-WISE FARM (3/24/2005)

  PHMC’S FRANCO SPEAKS, FIVE AWARDS SET AT HISTORIC HARMONY’S HARMONIEFEST

NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS

             HISTORIC HARMONY INSTALLS INCUMBENT
             OFFICERS, DIRECTORS

             HARMONY -- Officers and two additional directors, all
             incumbents, were installed during Historic Harmony's annual
             Christmas membership dinner (on Tuesday, Dec. 12) for new
             terms that begin Jan. 1. The nonprofit historical society and
             preservation advocate operates the nine-site Harmony
             Museum.

             Officers are members of Historic Harmony's 10-seat
             governing board. Unanimously reelected to two-year terms
             were President and Chief Executive Officer John S. Ruch,
             Jackson Township, retired PPG Industries manager of
             corporate public information; Vice President Cathryn Rape,
             Harmony, First Energy meter service and Harmony Borough
             mayor; Secretary Samuel F. Regal, Zelienople, retired
             Consolidated Natural Gas controller; and Treasurer Joseph
             White, Harmony, University of Pittsburgh associate professor
             of history.

             Non-officer directors reelected to serve three-year terms
             through 2009 were Tim Shaffer, Prospect, attorney with Dillon
             McCandless King Coulter & Graham and former state senator;
             and Eleanor M. Wise, Jackson Township, retired Seneca
             Valley School District fourth grade teacher.


             Continuing non-officer directors are Barbara Pabst, Evans
             City; co-owner of Pabst Blue Ribbon Farms and Pabst Blue
             Ribbon Antiques and retired Rockwell International executive
             secretary; Joan M. Szakelyhidi, Harmony, Butler Memorial
             Hospital microbiology supervisor; Barbara Vickerman,
             Zelienople, retired dairy farmer; and John L. Wise III, Center
Township, vice president and secretary, Butler Eagle.


Harmony, western Pennsylvania's first National Historic
Landmark District, ranks among the region's most significant
historic sites. George Washington visited a Indian village here
during his 1753 mission to New France’s Fort LeBoeuf that
sparked the French & Indian War; a "French Indian" fired the
war’s first shot at him nearby. Harmony originally
encompassed about 7,000 acres spanning today's Jackson and
Lancaster townships as the 1804 first American home of the
Harmony Society of pacifist German Lutheran Separatists that
gained international fame as 19th century America’s most
successful communal group. The society sold its Harmony in
1815 to Mennonite "second founder" Abraham Ziegler. All of
this, and other aspects of the area's rich history, are interpreted
at the Harmony Museum, one of the region's few history
museums that is open year-round.
Back to Top

2007 HARMONY MUSEUM EVENTS

Harmony Museum: Harmony is a National Historic
Landmark 30 minutes north of Pittsburgh’s Point that ranks as
one of the region’s most significant historic sites. It also offers
fun shopping at numerous antique, specialty and craft shops as
well as quality family dining. George Washington visited the
Lenni Lenape's (Delaware's) Murdering Town here during his
1753 mission to demand French withdrawal from the region,
sparking the French & Indian War; a "French Indian" fired the
war's first shot at him nearby. Pacifist German Lutheran
Separatists founded Harmony in 1804; their Harmony Society
became 19th century America’s most successful communal
group. After Abraham Ziegler bought the Harmony Society’s
7000 acres in 1815, his and other Mennonite families became
an important influence through much of the 1800s. Many of
their descendants remain in the area. Charles Flowers made
outstanding percussion hunting and target rifles here ca. 1850-
1890. The Harmony Museum, open all year in the center of
the National Landmark District, presents these and other
aspects of Harmony's rich history and, by appointment, offers
tours of additional sites. Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88.
Museum: Guided tours 1-4 p.m. except Mondays and
holidays; reservations suggested for weekends, required for
groups; phone 724-452-7341, toll free 888-821-4822, e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net. Web site www.harmonymuseum.org.
Hours for its Museum Shop vary, and it can be visited online
at www.harmonymuseumgiftshop.org.

At the Harmony Museum’s Stewart Hall unless noted.

February 10, Harmony Museum’s 41st annual Harmoniefest
fundraising dinner, 6 p.m., commemorates Harmony’s 1804
founding by German Lutheran Separatists and 1805 formal
creation of their communal Harmony Society. Program: "What
Did George Washington Really Look Like?: The First
Forensic Reconstruction of Our First President," presentation
by Jeffrey H. Schwartz, University of Pittsburgh, who led a
four-year project to reconstruct Washington as a youth,
middle-aged commander in chief during the Revolution, and
when inaugurated as president, resulting in the first "de-aging"
of an individual -- recognizable as Washington but different
from popular representations. Reservations required: 888-821-
4822, e-mail hmuseum@fyi.net; Web:
www.harmonymuseum.org.

April 14, Harmony Museum German dinner, menu of
traditional German foods. Diners may provide their own wine
or beer. 5-7 p.m. Reservations required: 888-821-4822, e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net; Web: www.harmonymuseum.org.

May 29, Harmony Museum’s annual "Quilt in a Day"
program, 10 a.m.-Noon, presented by Patricia Knoechel,
author and co-author of quilting books with sister and
internationally syndicated television quilter Eleanor Burns.
Reservations recommended: 888-821-4822, e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net; Web: www.harmonymuseum.org.

June 9, Harmony Museum Art Show/Plant Exchange, 10 a.m.-
4 p.m. Shop for works by area artists at the museum’s Stewart
Hall and grounds, visit the nearby historic 1805 barn to
exchange plants and buy from vendors of specialty roses and
other plants. Lunch available at Stewart Hall. 888-821-4822,
e-mail hmuseum@fyi.net; Web: www.harmonymuseum.org.

August 11, Harmony Museum’s annual Antique Gun Show in
Stewart Hall, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., presenting historic firearms
spanning Colonial era through late 19th century, including fine
longrifles by Harmony master gunsmith Charles Flowers. 888-
821-4822, e-mail hmuseum@fyi.net; Web:
www.harmonymuseum.org.
August 18, Harmony Museum German dinner, menu of
traditional German foods. Diners may provide their own wine
or beer. 5-7 p.m. Reservations required: 888-821-4822, e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net; Web: www.harmonymuseum.org.

October 13, Harmony Museum German dinner, menu of
traditional German foods. Diners may provide their own wine
or beer. 5-7 p.m. Reservations required. 888-821-4822, e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net; Web: www.harmonymuseum.org.

November 10-11, Harmony Museum’s annual
WeihnachtMarkt (German style Christmas Market) where
local and regional artisans and other vendors offer a taste of
German holiday season tradition with a memorable shopping
opportunity for quality artwork, crafted goods, toys and other
wares, including German imports. Related activities
throughout the historic 200-year-old town, a National Historic
Landmark with a number of antique, craft and specialty shops.
Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sunday Noon-5 p.m. 888-821-4822;
e-mail hmuseum@fyi.net; Web: www.harmonymuseum.org.

Dec. 1: Washington Mission Commemoration. Hike with
Virginia Maj. George Washington and guide Christopher Gist
to site of Lenni Lenape (Delaware) village Murdering Town,
hear about visit by Washington Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 1753, during
his mission to order French from British-claimed territory,
precipitating French & Indian War. A "French Indian's shot
nearby, the war's first, missed Washington. Two-mile hike
begins 1 p.m. at Harmony Museum's historic 1805 Mercer
Road barn. 888-821-4822 ; e-mail hmuseum@fyi.net; Web:
www.harmonymuseum.org.

December 9, Harmony Museum’s Candlelight Christmas
fundraiser. Tour Christmas-decorated museum buildings 4-8
p.m.; elegant dinner, 5-7 p.m., requires reservations and
includes tour admission. 200-year-old National Historic
Landmark town center glows with luminaries after sunset.
888-821-4822, e-mail hmuseum@fyi.net; Web:
www.harmonymuseum.org.
Back to Top



NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS

National Historic Landmark Significance:
In 1935, Congress gave the Department of the Interior
responsibility for designating nationally significant historic sites
and promoting their preservation...The National Historic
Landmarks program was established to identify and protect
places of exceptional value in illustrating the nation’s heritage.

National Historic Landmark status has been conferred on some
2,300 sites that "possess exceptional value or quality in
illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United
States...and...integrity of location, design, setting, materials,
workmanship, feeling and association." National Historic
Landmarks are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
All buildings within National Historic Landmark Districts are
considered to be on the National Register. "National Historic
Landmarks...are places where significant historical events
occurred... prominent Americans worked or lived...represent
ideas that shaped the nation...provide important information
about our past, or that are outstanding examples of design or
construction. [They] guide us in comprehending important
trends and patterns in American history...."

National Historic Landmarks comprise only three percent of
sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The
additional 73,700 Register-listed properties "are primarily of state
and local significance (whose)... impact is restricted to a smaller
geographic area."

Harmony National Historic Landmark District:

Designation in 1974 of the Harmony National Historic
Landmark District (Butler County) recognized the community’s
national heritage and culture significance as the founding home
(1804-1814) of the Harmony Society of immigrant German
Lutheran Separatists. America’s most successful 19th century
communal group went on to found New Harmony, Ind., in
1814, and Economy, Pa. (now Ambridge, Beaver County), in
1824. The Harmony NHL District comprises about eight blocks
containing more than 50 principal buildings in the town center,
and the noncontiguous Harmony Society cemetery at Edmond
Street and Pa. 68, at the borough’s edge in Jackson Township.
Historic Harmony, the local historical society and preservation
advocate that operates the nine-property Harmony Museum and
serves as NHL District steward, was founded in 1943 expressly
to take ownership of the Harmony Society cemetery.

Of Pennsylvania’s 152 National Historic Landmark sites (only
New York and Massachusetts have more), seven of which are
NHL Districts, only 22 are in the western tier: Allegheny County
has eight, Fayette five, Beaver and Washington three each, and
Butler, Venango and Westmoreland one each. Of Pennsylvania’s
seven NHL districts, three are in Philadelphia. Harmony’s was
the first designated outside Philadelphia, Ambridge’s Old
Economy NHL District was the second. The latter includes the
six-acre Old Economy Village historic site, administered by the
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, and more
than 80 privately owned original Harmonist structures. Other
NHL Districts are in Bedford and Chester counties.

New Harmony Ind., also boasts an NHL District. The Harmony
Society’s home 1814-1824, it was purchased by British social
reformer Robert Owen, whose agricultural-industrial cooperative
survived there only briefly.

Harmony’s Additional Historical Significance:

Harmony is unquestionably Butler County’s most significant
historical site, with a heritage far richer than just the Harmony
Society relationship that gained the town National Historic
Landmark status. Some highlights:

The region was never home to substantial numbers of Native
Americans, but in the mid-18th century a Lenni Lenape
(Delaware) village called Murdering Town was situated on the
north side of the Connoquenessing Creek near the future site of
Harmony. Virginia Maj. George Washington stayed and obtained
food there Nov. 30, 1753, during his mission that precipitated
the French & Indian War. Returning on Dec. 27, Washington
was shot at east of the village by an Indian that he and guide
Christopher Gist identified as allied with the French. That was in
effect the first shot of the French & Indian War, which began in
earnest the following spring and became The Seven Years’ War,
history’s first global war.

The road between Pittsburgh and Erie passed though Harmony
from the late 18th through early 20th centuries. On it was
transported some materials made in Pittsburgh for the ships with
which Oliver Hazard Perry defeated a British fleet on Lake Erie
in 1813, a critical American victory in the War of 1812.
Reinforcements for Perry’s small force marched the same road
and camped at Harmony, crossing the Connoquenessing on a
bridge built by the Harmony Society. What became known as the
Perry Highway, U.S. 19 was Harmony’s Main and Mercer streets
until a bridge was built in 1936 at the north edge of Zelienople.
In 1815 the Harmony Society sold their town and surrounding
land to Harmony’s Mennonite "second founder," Lehigh County
blacksmith Abraham Ziegler. His and other Mennonite families
resettled the area. The farmstead of Ziegler’s eldest son, David,
including the 1805 Harmony Society barn now owned by
Historic Harmony, the region’s oldest barn, has been designated
eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, as has the
nearby 1825 Mennonite meetinghouse, oldest west of the
Alleghenies, also owned by Historic Harmony.

Rev. Jacob Schnee of Pittsburgh's Smithfield Lutheran Church,
who had visited the Harmonists, agreed in 1816 to buy Harmony
and, backed by prominent western Pennsylvania businessmen, in
1817 founded a pioneering boarding schools for girls in the 1809
building on the diamond that is now the main Harmony
Museum facility. Upon Schnee's bankruptcy, Ziegler sold the
town in lots. Mennonites remained a community influence for
many years, but in 1902 the shrinking congregation closed its
church. Many of today’s area residents are descendants of the
19th century Mennonites. In the mid-1820s Schnee established
his own commune at New Harmony, Ind., after the Harmony
Society returned to western Pennsylvania to establish Economy,
now Ambridge, only 20 miles from the group’s first home.

Stephen Foster, then eight, and his mother and siblings lived in
Harmony for several months during 1832 after the future
composer’s family lost their home in Lawrenceville, now part of
Pittsburgh. Charles Flowers, a former coal miner, began making
fine percussion rifles in Harmony about 1850. One of the
region’s last masters of the classic Pennsylvania style, he
produced exceptional hunting and target longrifles during a
career that continued into the 1880s and perhaps 1890s.

Harmony Borough received the Pennsylvania State Association
of Boroughs’ 2004 Historic Preservation Award, established in
partnership with the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum
Commission to recognize comprehensive programs to preserve
built heritage with continued emphasis on economic and
community revitalization. A longtime collaborative partnership
of the municipal government and Historic Harmony was a core
element of Harmony’s award success.

Back to Top

UNUSUAL MODEL BUILDINGS, RAILROAD
DISPLAYED AT HARMONY MUSEUM

Harmony, Pa. -- An unusual model railroad platform that
delighted old and young alike when unveiled Nov. 11-12 at the
Harmony Museum's WeihnachtMarkt (Christmas Market) will
remain on view until early January.

The display was donated to Historic Harmony early this year by
the Ronald Eckstein Family, after being a Christmas fixture of
the Eckstein home for about 50 Christmas seasons.

Prominent on the layout are log buildings, a manger housing
Nativity figures, sleighs, wagons and boats handcrafted between
1936 and the early 1940s by the late William E. Yobp of New
Kensington for an expansive Christmas season living room
display. Ronald Eckstein, whose late first wife, Lyda Lee, was
William and Edith Yobp's daughter, built the model railroad
platform in the 1950s for his O-27 gauge Lionel train and trolley,
using some of Yobp's buildings for its village.

The display's log buildings are five meticulously constructed
houses, steepled church, mill, and a barn with sandstone block
foundation, all with interior illumination. According to Edith
Yobp, of Creighton, the barn, mill and church were the first
model structures her husband built. He worked on the projects
every evening from October until Christmas Eve -- except for
Thursday bowling nights. Her father, J.C. Tipton, provided
advice for making the barn and wagons. William Yobp, who died
in 1973, was head of his Alcoa heat-treating department.

The Lionel train is a model of The Western & Atlantic Railroad
train pulled by "The General" of Civil War "Great Locomotive
Chase" fame. The yellow trolley, operating on a separate track, is
a Lionel Model 60. Over the years, Eckstein, of near Renfrew,
added trees, a community Christmas tree, a rail fence, outhouses,
stacks of firewood and other items. Some figurines are German
imports from Yobp's original display.

The Yobp-Eckstein Christmas Display can be seen during
regular guided tours of the Harmony Museum, open 1-4 p.m.
daily except Mondays and holidays.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the
Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles south of I-80. Its recorded
history began with George Washington's visit to a local Indian
village during his 1753 mission that sparked the French & Indian
War. The communal Harmony Society of German Lutheran
Separatists founded Harmony in 1804. After they moved to
Indiana in 1814, resettlement was led by Mennonites. Museum
exhibits interpret this and much more area history.
####
11/20/2006
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator
724-452-7341 or hmuseum@fyi.net


NEW BOOK ABOUT OLD COUNTY MAP DISCUSSED
AT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- The public is invited to a presentation by
Violet Covert of Butler
about her recently published book, "Map of Butler County
1858," at the Harmony
Museum's Stewart Hall at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 12.
Admission is free, and the
book will be available for purchase.

In her program Covert also uses the chronicle recorded by Sally
Hastings about her
family's move to Western Pennsylvania to help the audience
understand the region ca.
1795-1800, when the first pioneering families began to settle in
Butler County. The
county was established in 1800.

Covert notes that the oldest known Butler County map -- its
large format intended
for wall display -- provides much valuable information for
researchers and anyone
with an interest in county history. With her book, the 1858 map
is available for
general public use for the first time, in a form that the author
notes can go along
"as a travel and research companion along the highways and
byways of Butler County."


Each of the county's 33 townships has its own chapter in
Covert's book. The old
map's section depicting each is opposite a modern map of the
same area. The author
also describes the county's formation and courthouses, school
districts and historic
sites, as well as the locations of 11 known surviving maps. The
book, printed by
Mechling Bookbindery of Chicora, also contains maps indicating
cemetery locations.

For more information about the Sept. 12 program or Harmony
Museum operations,
contact the museum office at 724-452-7341/888-821-4822 or
www.harmonymuseum.org.

Harmony, which has been attracting visitors for nearly 200 years,
is at I-79 exits
87-88, 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles
south of I-80. The
area's recorded history began with an Indian village visited by
George Washington
during a 1753 mission to the region sparking the French &
Indian War; a "French
Indian" fired it's first shot at him nearby. The communal
Harmony Society of German
Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804, left in 1814 and
were replaced by
Mennonites. Recognized for its historic preservation success,
Harmony became a
National Landmark in 1974.

####
CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341


HARMONY MUSEUM SETS HERB & GARDEN FAIR

HARMONY, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum’s second annual
Herb & Garden Fair expands to include a plant exchange and
sale, seminars and an art show on Saturday, June 10, from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. at four museum sites.

Gardeners may bring their own potted plants to trade for others,
and purchase plants from among varied offerings by specialty
garden and nursery vendors, at the Mercer Road barn museum
annex and in the garden of the Wagner House annex next to the
museum on Mercer Street. A series of seminars, between 10:15
a.m. and 2:15 p.m. at the Mercer Street log house museum
annex, will cover such topics as roses, herbs, landscaping and
pest control, and will include a presentation by gardener Trapper
John.

A show and sale at the museum’s Stewart Hall will present works
by some of the area’s most talented artisans, including paintings,
drawings, silhouettes and photographs. The technique of
painting on china will also be demonstrated.

Lunch will be available at Stewart Hall as well. Museum tours
will be offered 1-4 p.m., and the museum’s gift shop and
Harmony’s other delightful shops invite browsing throughout
the event.

Harmony, a National Historic Landmark in Butler County 30
minutes north of downtown Pittsburgh, is among Western
Pennsylvania’s most significant historic places. In the mid-1700s
it was the site of the Lenape Murdering Town, visited by George
Washington during his 1753 mission seeking French withdrawal
from the region that sparked the French & Indian War; a
"French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at Washington nearby.
Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804,
and their Harmony Society became 19th century America’s most
successful communal group. After Mennonite Abraham Ziegler
bought the society’s town and surrounding lands in 1815,
Mennonites remained an important area influence for decades.
During the second half of the 19th century, Harmony’s Charles
Flowers made fine black-powder hunting and target rifles, many
now viewed as works of art.

The Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other
elements of the area’s unusual history. The town, which has
attracted heritage tourism for nearly 200 years, retains an
architectural character much like that of the rural German
hometown villages of its founders. Harmony is at I-79 exits 87
and 88, about 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles
north of Pennsylvania Turnpike exit 28, and 30 miles south of I-
80.



HARMONY MUSEUM GIFT SHOP OPENS ONLINE
SHOPPING WEBSITE

HARMONY, Pa -- Folks who just can't get to the Museum Gift
Shop or have only an occasional opportunity to do so, especially
out-of-towners, may now support the Harmony Museum by
buying from the Museum Gift Shop through
www.harmonymuseumgiftshop.org . Put it into your favorites so
you can check in often! It is still in it's growing stages, so there's
lots to be added yet! It's a secure web site so you can shop with
confidence and ease! You can call us at 724-452-5509 with any
questions you may have. We have a great and growing selection
of items for your shopping pleasure. Our book selections include
Harmonist, Indians, George Washington, Arts & Culture,
Architecture, Eric Sloane, Pa History and Victorian Era. The
kids haven't been left out either! There's a assortment of Sticker
books, Paper Doll books, Coloring books and more! We also
have our line of Harmony items - including our ornaments,
Virgin Sophia plate, coasters, candles, etc. And there's also a
selection of limited quantity gift items for your home or to give
for any special occasion. If you're in town, stop by and see us,
but if you just can't get here, it's the next best thing!

HARMONY MUSEUM CUTS FEES DURING
RENOVATION PROJECT

HARMONY, Pa. -- Admission fees for the Harmony Museum
have been reduced temporarily while some exhibits are
unavailable to visitors during a renovation project. Guided tour
fees are $2 for adults and $1 for children until renovation of the
main museum building’s Mennonite Room is finished. Other
discounts are suspended while these special rates are in effect.

Volunteers have been refurbishing rooms and exhibits with little
disruption apparent. However, it was discovered on Saturday
(March 11) that the Mennonite Room floor required extensive
rehabilitation. It and two adjacent exhibit rooms will be closed
until the floor work is completed and exhibits reinstalled.

Four other main museum public rooms, as well as the nearby
Ziegler log house and Wagner House exhibits, remain open. The
museum’s gift shop and multipurpose Stewart Hall are also
unaffected.

The Harmony Museum, established in 1955, is open 1-4 p.m.
daily except Mondays and holidays. Regular fees for guided tours
are $5 for adults and $2 for children. The main museum
building, built in 1809 as a warehouse and granary with a massive
wine cellar, housed a school for girls 1817-1826. The ca. 1810
Wagner House was originally a two-family home. The ca. 1840
log house was relocated to from nearby Middle Lancaster in
1976.

The area’s recorded history began with Murdering Town, a
Delaware Indian village visited in 1753 by George Washington
during a mission to demand French withdrawal from British-
claimed territory that assured war between Britain and France.
Nearby, a "French Indian" fired the first shot of the French &
Indian War at Washington. German Lutheran Separatists
founded Harmony in 1804 as the first home of their communal
Harmony Society. After their 1814 departure, resettlement was
led by Mennonites whose congregation faded away early in the
20th century.

Additional aspects of local history interpreted by the Harmony
Museum include pioneer life, the early school for girls,
outstanding percussion rifles made by Charles Flowers, the oil
and gas boom of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and
medical practices of rural doctors.

Harmony, is at I-79 exits 87-88, just 10 miles north of the
Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of Pittsburgh’s Point and
30 miles south of I-80.


####
CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
3/12/2006

HARMONY MUSEUM GERMAN DINNER -
BENEFITS HISTORIC
HARMONY OPERATIONS.

HARMONY, Pa. -- Saturday, April 8: Welcome spring with a
Harmony Museum German dinner,
5-7 p.m., Stewart Hall, $12. Beef, pork, wurst, potato pancakes,
German potato salad, spaetzel, much more plus beverages,
desserts. Diners are welcome to bring a beverage. Reservations
recommended: 888-821-4822, www.harmonymuseum.org. Spend
the afternoon, tour museum, stroll historic district, browse
shops.

MAJOR BEQUEST, AWARDS PRESENTED
AT HISTORIC HARMONY’S HARMONIEFEST

HARMONY, Pa. -- The largest financial donation ever received
by Historic Harmony was announced during the historical
society’s annual Harmoniefest at the Harmony Museum’s
Stewart Hall on Saturday evening (Feb. 11). In addition, three
property owners received preservation awards, and the program
concluded with storyteller Alan Irvine describing 18th century
abductions of Pennsylvania settlers by Indians.

President John Ruch also noted that 2006 is the 40th anniversary
of the revival of the historical society, established in 1943 but
dormant since shortly after the end of World War II, and the
20th anniversary of Historic Harmony’s purchase of the museum
building and of the borough’s local historic zoning ordinance.

He announced that Historic Harmony had earlier in the week
received more than $66,000 as major beneficiary among several
nonprofit groups benefiting from a trust fund established by
member Charles G. Ziegler of Catonsville, Md., who died a year
ago. The veterinarian was a direct descendant of Harmony’s
Mennonite "second founder" Abraham Ziegler, who in 1815
bought the communal Harmony Society’s 7,000 acres in
Connoquenessing Township that became the borough and parts
of Jackson and Lancaster townships.

Ruch said that a substantial portion of the Ziegler bequest and a
recent Ayres Foundation grant will be used for improvements to
the museum’s multipurpose Stewart Hall and adjacent Wagner-
Bentle House annex, and for long-delayed work to complete the
reconstructed Mercer Street log house annex. The balance of the
trust bequest will be invested.

Heritage Awards were presented to Glade Run Lutheran
Services for preservation of Zelienople campus structures related
to the former Orphans Home and Farm School; St. John’s
Lutheran Stone Church for preservation of its 1829 Lancaster
Township church; and William and Ann Schlichtkrull for
preservation of their Jackson Township barn. Ruch said that of
79 properties honored since 1991 for preservation and
restoration, 30 were in Harmony, 20 in Zelienople, 12 in Jackson
Township, and 10 in Lancaster Township. "Perceptive owners
have come to recognize that economic benefits of preservation
and restoration go hand-in-hand with appreciation for heritage
and improving the entire community’s quality of life," he said.

Irvine’s "Stolen Away" presentation told of two abductions
during bloody 18th century Indian raids at opposite ends of the
commonwealth, and their opposite outcomes. Five-year-old
Frances Slocum was one of three children from different
families taken in a deadly raid at the Slocum home near Wilkes-
Barre in 1778. Her fate was unknown until, 59 years later, she
was discovered living in Indiana Territory. Now the widow of a
chief, she chose to remain there with her extended Miami family.
Massie Harbison and her year-old son were taken from their
family home near Freeport in 1792 by raiders who killed her two
older sons. Her son in her arms, she escaped two days later near
today’s Butler and got home after struggling through the forest
for two more days.
FLEA MARKET BENEFITS HARMONY MUSEUM
MARCH 4, 2006

HARMONY, Pa. -- A flea market to benefit Harmony Museum
operations will be held 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 4, at
the museum's Stewart Hall, on the diamond at the center of
Harmony's National Historic Landmark District. Food will be
available. Sellers may set up on Friday afternoon, March 3. For
information and table reservations, call 724-452-5860.

HARMONIEFEST DINNER - HISTORIC
HARMONY'S ANNUAL FUNDRAISER FEBRUARY 11,
2006

INDIAN ABDUCTIONS OF GIRL, WOMAN
TOLD AT HISTORIC HARMONY’S HARMONIEFEST

HARMONY, Pa. -- Late 18th century abductions by Indians of a
little girl and a young mother at opposite ends of Pennsylvania,
with incredibly different outcomes, will be brought to life by
well-known Pittsburgh storyteller Alan Irvine at Historic
Harmony’s Harmoniefest dinner on Saturday, Feb. 11. The
annual fundraiser, always well-attended, is open to the public.

The original Harmoniefest was an annual Harmony Society feast
celebrating the 19th century commune’s formal organization by
Harmony’s founders, pacifist German Lutheran Separatists who,
while anticipating the imminent return of Christ, came to the
United States seeking religious freedom grounded in separation
of church and state. Historic Harmony’s event, begun in 1967,
celebrates the area’s more than 250 years of recorded history,
and since 1991 has also been the occasion for presentation of
annual preservation awards.

Harmoniefest begins at the Harmony Museum’s Doc Stewart
Hall with a 5:30 p.m. reception, admission is $25 per person, and
reservations are required with a deadline of Friday, Feb. 3.
Dinner entree choices are stuffed chicken breast, roast beef or
vegetarian lasagna.

Irvine’s presentation, "Stolen Away," relates the taking of five
year-old Frances Slocum in 1778 near today’s Wilkes-Barre, the
horrific 1792 abduction of Massie Harbison at Freeport, and
how each incident concluded. This will be his third appearance
for a Harmony Museum program. Irvine has been a storyteller
for more than 20 years, performing at such venues as the
Whiskey Rebellion Bicentennial Festival, Old Bedford Village
and National Road Festival. The visiting professor of sociology
at the University of Pittsburgh has also published several articles.

This year’s Heritage Awards honor Glade Run Lutheran
Services, Zelienople, for preservation of the 1853 Rev. William
Passavant House, 1909 bell tower and other significant Beaver
Street campus structures related to what was originally the
Orphans Home and Farm School; St. John’s Lutheran Stone
Church, preservation of its 1829 sanctuary, Stone Church Rd.,
Lancaster Township; and William & Ann Schlichtkrull,
preservation of the barn at their Swain Hill Rd. home in Jackson
Township.

Harmony is among western Pennsylvania’s most significant
historic sites. The Harmony National Historic Landmark District
comprises about 10 blocks in the borough that was separated
from Connoquenessing Township and incorporated in 1840, as
well as the noncontiguous Harmony Society cemetery at the edge
of town in Jackson Township, formed from part of
Connoquenessing Township 14 years later.

Separatists from the German Duchy of Wurttemberg began
developing the area they called Harmonie late in 1804 as their
first American home, organizing as the communal Harmony
Society in February 1805. The Harmonist community, by then
numbering about 850, moved to southwest Indiana in 1814 to
build a new Harmony, returning to Beaver County in 1824 to
establish Economy (now Ambridge), where the celibate society
was dissolved in 1905 and is commemorated by the state-owned
Old Economy Village.

In the mid-1700s a small Lenni Lenape (Delaware) village called
Murderingtown was on the north side of the Connoquenessing
Creek near the future site of Harmony. It was visited by young
George Washington when he traveled to Fort LeBoeuf at today’s
Waterford with a British ultimatum that the French withdraw
from the region, assuring war between the two nations. Not
surprisingly, the French declined, demanding instead that the
British stay out of New France. Days later, the first shot of the
French & Indian War missed Washington east of
Murderingtown, fired on Dec. 27, 1753, by what he called a
"French Indian."

Pacifist Mennonites led by Abraham Ziegler, Harmony’s "second
founder" who bought the departed Harmony Society’s extensive
property in 1815, resettled the Harmony area, and Ziegler
ultimately sold the town lot by lot. Although their congregation
faded away early in the 20th century as the Harmony Society met
a similar fate just 20 miles away, many descendants of the 19th
century Mennonites reside throughout the area.

Exhibits at the Harmony Museum, which has nine properties,
present these and many other elements of the area’s history.

Additional information about Harmoniefest may be obtained
from the Harmony Museum, 724-452-7341 (toll-free, 888-821-
4822) or e-mail at hmuseum@fyi.net

FLEA MARKET -

HARMONY, Pa. -- Held at the Harmony Museum in Stewart
Hall Saturday February 4 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefits Historic
Harmony Operations. Breakfast Sandwiches and Coffee will be
for sale in the morning and for lunch there will be Chipped Ham
Sandwiches, Hot Dogs, Potato Soup, Chili and assorted
beverages available to purchase. Sellers may set up on Friday
afternoon, February 3rd. Call Suzie Rape, 724-452-5860, for
table reservations.


GERMAN CRAFTS, MUSIC, FOOD PART OF
HARMONY MUSEUM CHRISTMAS MARKET

HARMONY, Pa. -- Holiday and Appalachian folk music, craft
demonstrations in an historic log house and classes on making
decorative bows are part of the Harmony Museum's eighth
annual Weihnachten Platz (Christmas Place), presented Saturday
and Sunday, Nov. 12-13, in the tradition of holiday markets so
popular in Germany.

The market, at the museum's Stewart Hall in the town center,
presents memorable shopping for quality artwork and goods
ranging from Pennsylvania German fraktur (decorative folk art),
German Belsnickles (Santas) and redware pottery, to wood
carvings, treenware and ornaments, all by regional artisans. A
mini-store offers German imports such as nutcrackers, toys,
dolls and holiday decorations. Holiday baked goods are available
as well, and there will be raffle drawings Sunday for holiday gift
baskets.

Periodic spinning, weaving and candle dipping demonstrations
can be viewed at the museum's nearby 1819 Ziegler log house
annex. Classes there on decorative bow-making begin at 1 p.m.
and 3 p.m. each day; a $4 fee includes materials.

Wha-Kewe-nn, a West Virginia music group dedicated to
preserving Appalachian heritage, performs with hammer
dulcimer and other folk instruments at 12:30 and 2 p.m.
Saturday. Guitarist Shelley McPharlin of Harmony's McPharlin
Guitar & Violin studio, performs holiday selections Sunday
afternoon.

Weihnachten Platz admission is $1 per person, free for children
16 and younger accompanied by adults. Admissions for hourly
museum tours, 11-4 p.m. Saturday, Noon-4 p.m. Sunday, are
lowered for this event, to $3 for adults, $1 for children 6-12, free
for younger children.

Refreshments available both days include bratwurst with kraut,
apple strudel and mulled cider. Outside Stewart Hall, apple
butter simmers on an open fire.

The adjacent Harmony Museum shop has been restocked for the
holiday gift season, and other shops in Harmony expand the
market experience. Family dining is available at several nearby
restaurants.

Harmony, a National Historic Landmark, is at I-79 exits 87-88,
less than a mile east of Zelienople, 10 miles north of the
Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles north of Pittsburgh's Point,
30 miles south of I-80. Its recorded history began with an Indian
village visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission to
demand France's withdrawal from the region, sparking the
French & Indian War. Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists
settled the area in 1804 as the communal Harmony Society. They
left in 1814, when resettlement was led by eastern Pennsylvania
Mennonites.

CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
hmuseum@fyi.net
10/26/05




HARMONY MUSEUM CHRISTMAS MARKET
REFLECTS TOWN'S GERMAN ROOTS

HARMONY, Pa. -- Nationally known Pennsylvania German
fraktur artist Marta Urban of Westmoreland County and crafted
goods importer Little Germany of Berks County headline
artisans and other vendors preparing to bring a bit of German
holiday season tradition to Harmony next month for the
Harmony Museum's eighth annual Weihnachten Platz
(Christmas Place).

While Germany's famed Christmas markets crowd town squares
with booths for more than a month, the museum's version
presents a one-weekend opportunity to find quality artwork,
crafted goods, toys and other wares in an historical setting on
Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 12-13.

The market's emphasis is on the work of regional artisans and
quality German wares, assuring shoppers of find items that will
make memorable holiday gifts. Among them will be treenware,
one of a kind German Belsnickles (Santas), woodcarvings,
redware pottery, holiday ornaments, handmade soaps, Christmas
cookies and gingerbreads, and much more.

Refreshments and live entertainment are part of the
Weihnachten Platz experience. Bratwurst mit kraut und apfel
strudel and mulled cider will be among goodies available to
shoppers. Outside, apple butter will be simmering over an open
fire. Museum tours will also be available.

The museum shop, the town's other antiques and crafts shops,
and area restaurants that offer family dining with unique
atmosphere add to the Harmony visitor's market eexperience.

Local artisans may still be considered for this year's Weihnachten
Platz by contacting the museum office immediately at 724-452-
7341, toll-free 888-821-4822, or hmuseum@fyi.net.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, only 10 miles north of the
Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of Pittsburgh's Point and
30 miles south of I-80. Its recorded history began with an Indian
village visited by George Washington during a 1753 mission to
the French near Lake Erie that sparked the French & Indian
War. Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists settled the area in
1804 and organized the internationally famous communal
Harmony Society. When they left in 1814, area resettlement was
led by Mennonites from eastern Pennsylvania whose
congregation faded away at the dawn of the 20th century. Many
of their descendants still reside in the region.

CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
hmuseum@fyi.net
10/11/05




HISTORIC HARMONY RAISES $23,000 WITH
MATCHING GIFT CHALLENGE

HARMONY, Pa. -- Historic Harmony's special two-month fund
raising campaign that ended Sept. 30 raised nearly $23,000,
spurred by a $5,000 matching grant from a funder that has
requested anonymity.

Gifts from members and friends of the volunteer historical
society and preservation advocate that operates the Harmony
Museum reached $17,941. The $5,000 match produced a grand
total of $22,941, enabling the organization to complete several
important projects. One, exterior painting of the main museum
building on Harmony's diamond, began on Oct. 3.

"We are grateful to everyone who contributed to the outstanding
success of this campaign," said President John Ruch. "Especially
after the Gulf Coast hurricane tragedies, I was concerned that we
might fall short of being able to claim all of the offered $5,000
match. But as in the past, many people responded to Historic
Harmony's need, contributions continued to climb throughout
September and the total at month's end was more than three
times greater than what we needed for the full match.

"The result is some much-needed fiscal breathing room with
three months left of what has proved to be a year of unusual
challenges," Ruch added. "Our donors once again have endorsed
the importance of Historic Harmony's work to the community
and region. This is a wonderful achievement during the
museum's 50th anniversary."

Nonprofit Historic Harmony, founded in 1943, is self-
supporting and receives no federal, state or county operational
funding. Its mission is to preserve and promote knowledge of
the Harmony area's history and heritage through its collections
and outreach activities, foster tourism, and encourage
preservation of historical resources in support of educational,
quality of life, economic development and associated objectives.

The Harmony area was the location of an Indian village visited
by George Washington during his 1753 mission demanding
French withdrawal from the region, sparking the French &
Indian War; a "French Indian" fired the war's first shot at him
nearby. The Harmony founded in 1804 by the communal
Harmony Society of German immigrants occupied today's town
of Harmony as well as large areas of Jackson and Lancaster
townships. When the Harmonists moved to Indiana in 1814, the
area's resettlement was led by Mennonites. Their congregation
faded away a century ago, but hundreds of descendants reside in
the region.

CONTACT:
John Ruch 724-316-6002
Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
10/4/2005




HARMONY MUSEUM PRESENTS OKTOBERFEST
GERMAN BUFFET

HARMONY, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum celebrates the fall
season and its colorful splash of beautify across western
Pennsylvania's Germany-like hills with an Oktoberfest buffet
dinner, 5-7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15, at the museum's Stewart
Hall.

Museum volunteers will serve up a spread including beef
sauerbraten, roast pork, bratwurst, potato pancakes, German
potato salad, spaetzel (German pasta), sauerkraut, red cabbage,
vegetables, cucumber salad, apple sauce, breads, and a choice of
beverages and desserts. Diners are welcome to supply their own
German beverage.

Cost is $12 per person, with proceeds benefiting museum
operations. Reservations are recommended and may be made
with the museum office at 724-452-7341 or, toll-free, 888-821-
4822.

Diners are urged to spend the afternoon strolling historic
Harmony, a National Historic Landmark. The museum, on the
town diamond, will be open 1-4 p.m. for guided tours. Local
shops offer antiques, collectibles, and other quality items such as
the works of local artisans. The landmark district is worth a
leisurely stroll as well.

Honored during its bicentennial last year for its historic
preservation efforts, Harmony has been a heritage tourism
destination for nearly 200 years. The village is at I-79 exits 87-88,
only 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles
north of Pittsburgh's Point and 30 miles south of I-80.

The area's recorded history began with an Indian village visited
by George Washington during his 1753 mission to the French at
Fort LeBoeuf near Lake Erie that sparked the French & Indian
War; a "French Indian" fired its first shot at Washington nearby.
German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 and
their communal Harmony Society soon gained international
renown. When they left in 1814, resettlement was led by
Mennonites whose many descendants still reside in the area.

Other aspects of local history represented in Harmony Museum
exhibits and facilities include pioneer life, a 19th century girls'
boarding school, percussion rifles made by Charles Flowers
during the 19th century, the oil and gas boom of the late 1800s-
early 1900s, and rural medical doctors.

CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
9/28/05




QUILT SHOW RETURNS AT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- Quilters, quilt collectors and the Harmony
Museum will display dozens of antique and contemporary quilts
in a special show Friday evening, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 16-
18, in which area residents are encouraged to participate with
quilts of their own.

The popularity of a week long show during Harmony's
bicentennial last September persuaded Historic Harmony's
auxiliary to organize the new presentation, which will include
quilts from the museum's collection displayed within permanent
exhibits as well as sale of some quilt items. The auxiliary also
invites area residents to loan old or unusual quilts to the show
and encourages Harmony residents to hang quilts from windows
or porches or on clotheslines Saturday and Sunday, weather
permitting, to lend eye-catching interest and color across the
historic community.

The museum is at the center of Harmony's National Historic
Landmark District, on the diamond at Main and Mercer streets.
Hours are 5-7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 17; and 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18. Admission is $3,
including one raffle ticket for Sunday afternoon's drawing for a
hand-sewn quilt. A salad lunch will be available on Saturday.

Visitors will see quilts from private collections, heritage quilts
kept by families of museum members and friends, as well as
contemporary quilts hand made by the museum auxiliary and
others. The quilt to be given away, full-sized with an eight-point
star pattern in navy blue and white, was made by members.

To loan quilts to the show, or obtain more information about it,
contact the Harmony Museum at 724-452-7341 or toll-free 888-
821-4822, or by e-mail at hmuseum@fyi.net.

Honored during its 2004 bicentennial by the state boroughs
association for its longtime focus on historic preservation,
Harmony is in western Butler County at I-79 exits 87-88, an easy
10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of
Pittsburgh's Point and 30 miles south of I-80.

The area's recorded history began with a Delaware Indian village
visited by George Washington during his late 1753 mission to
French officers that helped sparked the French & Indian War; a
"French Indian" fired the war's first shot at Washington nearby.
German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 and
their communal Harmony Society soon gained international
renown. When they left in 1814, the area's resettlement was led
by Mennonites whose congregation faded away early in the 20th
century.

Other aspects of local history represented in Harmony Museum
exhibits and facilities include pioneer life, a 19th century girls'
boarding school, percussion rifles made in Harmony during the
19th century by Charles Flowers, the oil and gas boom more
than a century ago, and rural medical practices from the region's
first physician in 1805 into the late 20th century.

CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
8/16/05
EDITORS: Photos of museum collection quilts may be
arranged.




HARMONY, OLD ECONOMY TO HOST COMMUNAL
CONFERENCE

Harmony, Pa. - The 32nd annual Communal Studies Association
conference will be held Sept. 29-Oct. 1 at Harmony and
Ambridge, the first and final homes of the Harmony Society of
German Lutheran Separatists that became 19th century
America's most successful communal group.

Hosts are Historic Harmony, the volunteer historical society that
operates the nine-property Harmony Museum, and Pennsylvania
Historical and Museum Commission's Old Economy Village.
Extensive National Historic Landmark Districts reflecting their
communities' exceptional importance in the development of
American heritage; there are only seven NHL districts in all of
Pennsylvania.

The conference is an international gathering of scholars, historic
site personnel, members of present-day communes and others
interested in historic and contemporary communal life. Its theme
is, appropriately, "Festivals, Anniversaries, Rituals and
Celebrations in Community." As 2005 marks the 200th
anniversary of the formal organization of the Harmony Society
at Harmony as well as the centennial of its dissolution at
Economy, the conference will focus special attention on the
Harmonists.

In 1804 the immigrants from southwest Germany began building
their first American home at Harmony, 30 miles north of
Pittsburgh in Butler County. The Harmony Society, by then
counting nearly 900 members, moved to southwest Indiana in
1814 to build New Harmony, returning in 1824 to settle
Economy (now Ambridge) along the Ohio River in Beaver
County, only 20 miles from Harmony.

On Thursday evening, Sept. 29, attendees will be welcomed at a
reception at the Harmony Museum's Stewart Hall, then cross the
diamond for CSA's traditional conference opening dinner at
Grace Church, the Harmony Society's meetinghouse 1809-1814
and Butler County's oldest church in continuous use. The
conference convenes Friday at Old Economy Village and on
Saturday at Harmony's Grace Church.

Friday's program opens at Old Economy Village with a plenary
presentation on the history of the Harmony Society's final home
by retired site historian and former site director Raymond
Shepherd. It concludes with an evening concert of Harmonist
music, including pieces not heard since the 19th century.
Saturday's sessions at Harmony begin with a plenary
presentation describing the Harmony Society's German roots by
religious scholar Hermann Ehmer of Stuttgart's Landeskirche
Archiv. The conference concludes Saturday evening with an
awards banquet and membership meeting at the Pittsburgh
North Marriott Hotel in Cranberry Township.

Some 50 papers and discussion panels presented at the
conference will further explore the Harmonists and address
many other communal subjects, among them pietists and
pacifists, New York's Oneida Community, Shakers, Hutterites,
Japan's Imperial Buddhist nunneries, contemporary communal
groups, Vermont's 1984 child-seizing raid on a community,
Mormon polygamy, 19th century Scottish social reformer Robert
Owen's New Lanark community, and celebrations centered
around food, communal seekers and community sense of place.

In addition to host-site tours, conferees can observe a silk-
winding demonstration at Old Economy and explore the heart
of Harmony's landmark district.

Local conference organizers are Walter Brumm, Washington,
Pa., recently retired California University of Pennsylvania
professor; Mary Ann Landis, Old Economy Village site director;
and John Ruch, Historic Harmony president. Conference
program chair is Susan Love Brown, Florida Atlantic University,
Boca Raton, Fla.

Thursday evening's Harmony Museum reception is sponsored by
the Butler County Tourism & Convention Bureau. Friday's lunch
and dinner at the Harmonists' Economy meetinghouse, now St.
John's Lutheran Church, are sponsored by the Beaver County
Recreation & Tourism Department. Saturday night's Pittsburgh
North Marriott banquet is sponsored by the Butler Eagle and the
family of its late Editor John L. Wise Jr., a descendant of one of
the Mennonite families that resettled the Harmony area in 1815.
A grant by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum
Commission will enable CSA to publish conference proceedings
in a special issue of its scholarly journal, Communal Studies.

The Communal Studies Association, founded in 1974, is
headquartered in Amana, Ia., and meets each fall at an historic
communal site. Additional information about the 2005
conference program and registration is available at the CSA Web
site, www.communalstudies.org, or by telephone from Gina
Walker, CSA Treasurer, 812-464-1693.
Contacts:
Walter Brumm, Washington, Pa., Conference Chair, 724-
222-7665
John Ruch, President Historic Harmony, 724-316-6002
Mary Ann Landis, Old Economy Village, 724-266-4500 Ext.
213
Gina Walker, CSA, 812-464-1896.
9/8/2005


HARMONY MUSEUM'S TWIN ANTIQUE SHOWS

HARMONY, Pa. -- Collectors of all stripes will find something
of interest at twin Harmony Museum "Made in Western
Pennsylvania" shows in late August. One presents antique
firearms -- including those of the French & Indian War and
longrifles by Harmony's 19th century master gunsmith Charles
Flowers. The other offers general antiques. A preview session
offers attendees first choice among quality items available for
purchase.

The complementary, themed events will be held 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on
Saturday, Aug. 27, and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 28. A
preview 7-9 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 26, will offer wine and cheese
refreshments and music by McPharlin Guitar & Violin of
Harmony. The Harmony area has been an antiques shopping
destination for years, and during the 1800s Charles Flowers
became the region's last master maker of hunting and target
longrifles in the classic Pennsylvania style, many decorated richly
with inlays, brass and carvings.

Antique civilian and military flintlock and percussion long arms
and handguns, related accouterments, as well as high-quality
reproductions, will be presented by Pennsylvania, Ohio and
West Virginia collectors, dealers and artisans in the museum's
Stewart Hall on the diamond in the center of Harmony's
National Historic Landmark District. This show is managed by
Richard Rosenberger, an authority on 18th and 19th century
firearms and co-author of "The Longrifles of Western
Pennsylvania - Allegheny and Westmoreland Counties."

Antiques dealers and collectors, largely from the region, will
offer quality general antiques and vintage collectibles, especially
glass, pottery, folk art and primitives, as well as carriages and
other conveyances, just five blocks away at the museum's
restored 1805 barn on Mercer Road. Dealer-collector Brenda
Benek is show chair.

A $5 entry fee on Saturday and Sunday provides admission to
both shows and the museum, where exhibits include the
outstanding Ball Collection of Flowers rifles and diverse
antiques. Friday evening's shows-only preview is $10 per person.
All proceeds benefit museum operations.

Additional information may be obtained from the Harmony
Museum, 724-452-7341 or toll-free 888-821-4822, or e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net.

Harmony, which marked its bicentennial last year and retains the
character of a German village (it received the 2004 Pennsylvania
State Association of Boroughs historic preservation award), is at
I-79 exits 87-88, 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30
miles north of Pittsburgh's Point and 30 miles south of I-80.

The area's recorded history began with an Indian village visited
by George Washington during his 1753 mission demanding
French withdrawal from the region, sparking the French &
Indian War; a "French Indian" fired the war's first shot at him
nearby. German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804
and their communal Harmony Society soon gained international
renown. They left in 1814 and the area's resettlement was led by
Mennonites whose congregation faded away early in the 20th
century. Additional aspects of local history interpreted by
Harmony Museum exhibits include pioneer life and an early
boarding school for girls. Harmony has been a heritage tourism
destination for nearly 200 years.

NOTE TO EDITORS: Photos of a representative Flowers rifle
and example of Western Pa. glass are available on request.

CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
8/1/2005


HARMONY MUSEUM'S TRADITIONAL BUT AIR
CONDITIONED GERMAN DINNER

HARMONY, Pa. -- Can't afford a trip to Germany this summer?
Sick of the sweltering heat that's keeping you close to your home
air conditioner? Then imagine yourself visiting a German village
by taking a short trip to Harmony to enjoy a traditional German
meal in air conditioned comfort on Saturday, Aug. 20, when the
Harmony Museum presents another of its popular German
dinners at its Stewart Hall.

>From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., museum volunteers will serve up
huhnchen brust in stopfen (stuffed chicken breast) or schweine
braten gefullt (stuffed pork roast) with spaetzel (pasta) or
German potato salad, sauerkraut or red cabbage, garden salad,
bread, beverages and desserts.

Cost is $12 per person, and reservations (recommended but not
required) may be made with the museum office, 724-452-7341 or
toll-free 888-821-4822. Diners are welcome to bring their
favorite beverages.

They're also encouraged to arrive early to tour the museum,
open 1-4 p.m., absorb the Germanic atmosphere of Harmony's
remarkable National Historic Landmark District, and browse
interesting shops for antiques, collectibles, quality gift items and
works in various media by local artisans.

Can't make it this month? The museum will have another
German dinner on Oct. 15, when perhaps cooler weather will
prevail.

Honored for its historic preservation efforts during its 2004
bicentennial by the state boroughs association, Harmony is in
western Butler County at I-79 exits 87-88, a speedy 10 miles
north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of
Pittsburgh's Point and 30 miles south of I-80.

The area's recorded history began with a Delaware Indian village
visited by George Washington during his late 1753 mission to
French officers that helped sparked the French & Indian War; a
"French Indian" fired the war's first shot at Washington nearby.
German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 and
their communal Harmony Society soon gained international
renown. When they left in 1814, the area's resettlement was led
by Mennonites whose congregation faded away early in the 20th
century, although many present residents are their descendants.

Other aspects of local history represented in Harmony Museum
exhibits and facilities include pioneer life, a 19th century girls'
boarding school, percussion rifles made in Harmony during the
19th century by Charles Flowers, the oil and gas boom more
than a century ago, and rural medical practice from the region's
first physician in 1805 into the late 20th century.

CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
7/26/05

HARMONY MUSEUM
50TH ANNIVERSARY MARKED

HARMONY, Pa. -- The 50th anniversary of the Harmony
Museum, Butler County's oldest museum, will be observed on
Saturday, June 25, with a 1 p.m. ceremony and refreshments in
the facility's Stewart Hall followed by free admissions until 4
p.m.

The museum's creation by the Harmony Volunteer Fire
Company was a significant regional event a half-century ago. The
golden anniversary celebration will include reminiscences about
the museum's founding and presentation of a plaque
commemorating fire company members' foresight in preserving
area heritage.

The Harmonist Historic and Memorial Association (a volunteer
group renamed Historic Harmony in 1991), was organized in
1943 to accept title to the cemetery of the communal Harmony
Society that settled Harmony in 1804. It was reorganized in 1966
as an historical society, assumed responsibility for museum
operation the following year and orchestrated designation of
Harmony's National Historic Landmark District in 1974.

Historic Harmony later purchased the museum building and
adjacent Wagner House museum annex from the fire company,
operates the museum year-round, and now owns nine historic
properties in Harmony and Jackson Township.

Two beloved residents were especially instrumental in the
museum's founding, and the local history they co-authored was
released at the institution's opening. The late Dr. Arthur I.
Stewart, for whom the museum's Stewart Hall was named,
practiced medicine in the community for more than 60 years and
was a fire company member. The museum's Veith Library
honors the late Rev. Loran Veith, pastor of Grace Church and
fire company chaplain, and his late wife, Ruth.

During the June 25 anniversary celebration, Ruth Werner,
Historic Harmony president from 1970 through 1972 and in
1982, will share recollections of "Doc" Stewart. Esther Veith
Ziegler, daughter of Rev. and Ruth Veith and a museum
volunteer as a teenager, will speak about her father. Historic
Harmony President John Ruch will present a commemorative
plaque to representatives of the fire company, including
President Gary Campbell and members active in 1955. Harmony
Borough Council President Jeff Smith will also speak.

The museum opening, on Saturday, June 25, 1955, was a well-
attended event that also launched the town's week-long
sesquicentennial celebration. At a presentation in the portion of
Grace Church that was the original Harmony Society church,
Lawrence Thurman, then senior curator of the state's Old
Economy Village in Ambridge, spoke about the Harmonists and
Harmony's early history. The Harmonists, who relocated to
southwestern Indiana in 1814, founded Economy in Beaver
County, now Ambridge, as their final home in 1824; the
communal group was disbanded there in 1905.

Harmony, which retains the architectural character of a German
village, is 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles
north of Pittsburgh's Point and 30 miles south of I-80, at I-79
exits 87-88.

The area's recorded history began with a Delaware Indian village
visited by George Washington during a 1753 mission to demand
French withdrawal from British-claimed territory, sparking the
French & Indian War; nearby, on Dec. 27, 1753, a "French
Indian" fired the war's first shot at Washington. German
Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 and their
communal Harmony Society early the following year, soon
gaining international renown. When they left in 1814, the area's
resettlement was led by Mennonites. Their congregation faded
away early in the 20th century, but many present residents are
their descendants.

Additional aspects of local history interpreted by the Harmony
Museum include pioneer life, an early 19th century boarding
school for girls, outstanding percussion rifles made by miner-
turned- gunsmith Charles Flowers, the oil and gas boom of the
late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the medical practices of
rural doctors.

CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
6/9/2005




FLEA MARKETS BENEFIT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- A series of Saturday flea markets between
spring and fall will benefit Harmony Museum operations.

The markets will be held 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. More information:
724-452-5860.

-- May 7, at the museum's historic 1805 barn, 303 Mercer Road,
just north of the Mercer Street bridge over the Connoquenessing
Creek.


-- Sept. 10, at Stewart Hall in the main museum building, Mercer
Street at the diamond.

-- Oct. 8, at Stewart Hall.

-- Nov. 5, also at Stewart Hall.



HARMONY MUSEUM SETS ANOTHER GERMAN
DINNER

HARMONY, Pa. -- On Saturday, June 18, Historic Harmony
will present another in its popular series of German dinners at
the Harmony Museum's Stewart Hall to benefit museum
operations.

Dinner is served from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On the menu are beef
sauerbraten or pork schnitzel with potato pancakes or potato
salad, spaetzel (German pasta), red cabbage, cucumber and
onion salad with sour cream, apple sauce, beverages, and
desserts. Diners are welcome to bring along their own wine or
beer.

Cost is $12 per person. Reservations are recommended and
may be made by phoning the museum office, 724-452-7341.
Diners are encouraged to tour the museum, which is open 1-4
p.m., explore the National Historic Landmark District and
browse Harmony's unusual shops, including the museum's.

Additional German dinners are scheduled for Aug. 20 and Oct.
15.

Harmony, which celebrated its bicentennial last year and
retains the architectural character of a German village, is 10
miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of
Pittsburgh's Point and 30 miles south of I-80, at I-79 exits 87-
88.

The area's recorded history began with a Delaware Indian
village visited by George Washington during his late 1753
mission to demand the French leave the territory, sparking the
French & Indian War; nearby, on Dec. 27, 1753, a "French
Indian" fired the war's first shot at Washington. German
Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 and their
communal Harmony Society early the following year, soon
gaining international renown. When they left in 1814, the
area's resettlement was led by Mennonites; their congregation
faded away early in the 20th century, but many present
residents are descendants of those early Mennonites.

Additional aspects of local history interpreted by Harmony
Museum exhibits include pioneer life in a log house, an early
19th century boarding school for girls, outstanding percussion
rifles made in Harmony during the second half of the 19th
century by Charles Flowers, a late 1800s-early 1900s oil and
gas boom, and the practices of several country doctors.

CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
5/2/2005




HARMONY MUSEUM SETS JUNE PLANT
EXCHANGE

HARMONY, Pa. -- If you're looking to spiff up the front yard
or landscaping around the house, or just brighten and
individualize an apartment, you may want to take in the
Harmony Museum's plant exchange and sale, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. on
Saturday, June 11.

Bring your own extra plants to the museum's historic 1805
barn to trade for others. The barn is just north of the
Connoquenessing Creek bridge at 303 Mercer Road, adjacent
to the first land cleared 200 years ago by the communal
Harmony Society for agricultural and community purposes.

None to trade, but want to buy? A number of vendors will
offer specialty roses and other plants just a few blocks away at
Stewart Hall, in the museum on Mercer Street at the diamond.
Lunch will also be available at Stewart Hall, and the museum
will be open for tours 1-4 p.m.

Contact the museum office for more information: 724-4532-
7341.

Harmony, a National Historic Landmark in Butler County 30
minutes north of downtown Pittsburgh, is among Western
Pennsylvania's most significant historic places. In the mid-
1700s it was the site of the Leni Lenape Murdering Town
visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission
seeking French withdrawal from the region, sparking the
French & Indian War; a "French Indian" fired the war's first
shot at Washington nearby. Pacifist German Separatists
founded Harmony in 1804, their Harmony Society becoming
19th century America's most successful communal group. In
1815 Mennonite Abraham Ziegler bought the society's town
and thousands of acres surrounding it, and Mennonites would
remain an important influence through much of the 19th
century.

The Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other
elements of the area's unusual history, and the town retains the
architectural character of a rural German village.

5/2/05
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
(toll free) 888-821-4822




PAT KNOECHEL'S QUILTING PROGRAM RETURNS
TO HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- Patricia Knoechel returns to the Harmony
Museum's Stewart Hall with her latest Quilt in a Day
presentations, "Egg Money Quilts and Irish Chain in a Day," at
10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 31.

She has written or co-written a number of books with her sister,
Eleanor Burns, founder of Quilt in a Day of San Marcos, Calif.,
which has published more than 70 books on quilting. Burns'
television programs are broadcast by Public Broadcasting System
stations and RFD Network and internationally as well. The
sisters are natives of the Zelienople-Harmony area whose
designs often reflect their local roots.

The Egg Money Quilts segment of the May 31 program is based
on Burns' newest book, "Egg Money Quilts, a 1930s Vintage
Sampler." Knoechel says Irish Chain is a timelessly popular
design, with single chains appealing to beginners and double
chain color variations to more experienced quilters.

Quilts will be displayed, and Quilt in a Day books and supplies
will be available for purchase. The Harmony Museum will be
open for guided tours following the program. Additional
information and reservations are available from the museum
office, 724-452-7341.

Admission is $5 per person, and since Knoechel's previous
presentations have attracted capacity audiences, reservations are
recommended. Proceeds benefit museum operations. Additional
information and reservations are available from the Harmony
Museum office, 724-452-7341 or, toll-free, 888-821-4822.

Harmony, a National Historic Landmark 30 minutes north of
downtown Pittsburgh, is among Western Pennsylvania's most
significant historic places. In the mid-1700s it was the site of the
Leni Lenape Murdering Town visited by George Washington
during his 1753 mission seeking French withdrawal from the
region, sparking the French & Indian War; a "French Indian"
fired the war's first shot at Washington nearby. Pacifist German
Separatists founded Harmony in 1804, their Harmony Society
becoming 19th century America's most successful communal
group. In 1815 Mennonite Abraham Ziegler bought the society's
town and thousands of acres surrounding it, and Mennonites
would remain an important influence through much of the 19th
century.

The Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other
elements of the area's unusual history, and the town retains the
architectural character of a rural German village.
Harmony is at I-79 exits 87 and 88, about 30 miles north of
downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of Pennsylvania Turnpike
exit 28, and 30 miles south of I-80.

5/2/05
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
(toll free) 888-821-4822
PHMC EXPANDS NATIONAL REGISTER ELIGIBILITY
FOR ZIEGLER-WISE FARM



HARMONY, Pa. -- The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum
Commission has more than doubled, to 56 acres, the portion of
the Ziegler-Wise Farm designated eligible for addition to the
National Register of Historic Places, the nation’s official list
of resources worthy of preservation.



Construction of a huge townhouse and apartment complex is
planned for much of the site, in Harmony Borough and
Jackson Township, despite its historic significance. It is
bounded by the Connoquenessing Creek, Mercer Road, Wise
Road and a wooded ridge.



PHMC’s Bureau for Historic Preservation expanded the
eligibility designation at the request of Historic Harmony,
which operates the Harmony Museum and advocates historic
preservation, economic development and tourism. Completing
a comprehensive nomination process of PHMC and the
National Park Service is required to place a site on the
Register. "The expanded eligibility is an important gateway
for formal nomination to the Register when time for that
comes," said Historic Harmony President John Ruch. "It also
encourages persistence in the broad community support for
preserving the site’s historic open space and buildings."



PHMC’s earlier National Register eligibility designation, in
1994, applied to about 25 acres of what was then identified as
the David Ziegler Farm. Included were Ziegler’s 1869
farmhouse, which perhaps replaced a Harmony Society
structure there, the adjacent 1805 Harmony Society-built barn,
both on Mercer Road, and part of what had been Ziegler’s
farm westward along the creek from those buildings. David
was a son of Mennonite Abraham Ziegler, Harmony’s "second
founder" who in 1815 purchased the communal Harmony
Society’s town and thousands of surrounding acres.



The revision extends eligibility to 31 more acres: the rest of
the field as well as a parcel at Mercer and Wise roads whose
buildings include the mid-1830s Drovers Inn and stone barn of
Aaron Shontz and his wife, Elizabeth, David Ziegler’s sister.
Mennonites Jacob and Sarah Wise acquired the Shontz farm in
the 1870s. Descendant John Wise and his wife, Stella, added
the Ziegler farm to their holdings after World War II. The
properties containing the Ziegler house and Shontz/Wise
house and barn are still owned by Wise descendants. The
Harmonist barn is owned by Historic Harmony and is being
restored.



About 47 acres of the Ziegler-Wise Farm now eligible for
National Register listing is the vacant field and wooded ridge
where nearly 450 apartments and townhouses are to be
constructed. Although PHMC last year called for an
archeological study because of the site’s mid-18th century
association with Native Americans, none has been done.
Historic Harmony advocates keeping the land vacant to
preserve an important historic resource as well as
recreationally inviting green space in the fast-developing area.



According to Ruch, the Ziegler-Wise Farm was probably the
site of the Lenni Lenape (Delaware) village called Murdering
Town, visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission
to Fort LeBoeuf that launched the French & Indian War. In
1805 it became the first nonresidential land cleared by the
Harmony Society of German Lutheran Separatists. They
farmed part of it, created a spiritual labyrinth and medicinal
herb garden there, and erected the barn to shelter sheep. The
original Pittsburgh-Mercer-Erie Road ran through it just west
of the barn and today’s Mercer Road, crossing the creek on a
Harmonist-built bridge. In 1813, materials for construction of
Oliver Hazard Perry’s War of 1812 American fleet traveled
that road to Erie, as in early 1814 did troops who stopped at
Harmony on their way to help defend Erie from threatened
British attack.



The Harmony area is Butler County’s most important historic
place. The town center, immediately south of the Ziegler-Wise
Farm, is a National Historic Landmark, a rare designation
signifying the community’s exceptional contribution to
national heritage. "Given its history," Ruch said, "it is not
inconceivable that the Ziegler-Wise Farm could become an
addition to the National Landmark District." The National
Register-eligible Harmony Mennonite meetinghouse and
cemetery, at the northwest corner of the site on Wise Road, is
owned by Historic Harmony.



"The earlier National Register eligibility designation for the
Ziegler-Wise Farm resulted from a consultant’s 1993 work
related to planning for the Mercer Street bridge replacement
completed in 2000," said Ruch. "Unfortunately, Historic
Harmony was not a party to that particular review, and errors
were made. Only recently did we become aware of the extent
of deficiencies, and when we did, we had a responsibility to
correct the record.



"The consultant’s greatest error was failure to fully recognize
the extent of the Harmonist-rooted Ziegler-Wise Farm and
scope of its extraordinary history. After completing our
review, including a title trace back to the Harmony Society
that began settling here in 1804, we explained the situation to
officials at the Bureau for Historic Preservation. We’re
gratified by their timely and positive response, which we hope
will contribute to finding a way for the proposed apartment-
townhouse project to go away in a manner that satisfies all
parties."



Ruch emphasized that the site’s more than 250 years of
recorded history links Native Americans, the Harmony
Society, the Mennonite resettlers, including the Zieglers and
Wises, and today’s community that values its wonderful
heritage. The public interest is best served by recognizing this
site for what it is, an important historic landscape with
important historic structures worthy of preservation."



CONTACT: John Ruch, 724-316-6002 or 724-452-8834

3/24/2005




PHMC’S FRANCO SPEAKS, FIVE AWARDS SET

AT HISTORIC HARMONY’S HARMONIEFEST



HARMONY, Pa. -- Barbara Franco, executive director of the
Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission (PHMC),
speaks about "The Value of Community: Remembering the
Harmony Society" at the annual Harmoniefest dinner on
Saturday, Feb. 12. This year’s event, at the Harmony
Museum’s Stewart Hall, commemorates the 200th anniversary
of the formal creation of the commune that founded the town
and began developing several thousand surrounding acres.



Historic Harmony, the historical society operating the
museum’s nine sites in Harmony and Jackson Township, also
presents five Heritage Awards for preserving historic
structures and efforts that support appreciation for area
history.



Tickets, $22 per person, must be reserved by Friday, Feb. 4.
Dinner choices are stuffed chicken breast, sirloin tip roast or
vegetarian lasagna, and the event begins with a 5:30 p.m.
reception. Harmoniefest is named for the Harmony Society’s
annual observance of its founding but celebrates all 250 years
of recorded area history.



Involved with museums and historical organizations since
1966, Franco became PHMC executive director in February
2004. She previously was president and chief executive of The
Historical Society of Washington, D.C., where she headed
creation of the City Museum that opened in 2003. Franco was
Minnesota Historical Society assistant director of museums
1990-1995, and earlier was curator, coordinator of exhibits,
then assistant director of The Museum of Our National
Heritage, Lexington, Mass.



Presentation of Heritage Awards has been part of
Harmoniefest since 1991. This year, Historic Harmony honors
John Axtel and Diana Ames, Pittsburgh, for preserving the ca.
1840 Daniel Stauffer House, Main Street, Zelienople;
Harmony Council and its Bicentennial Committee, for the
borough’s 2004 bicentennial observance; Indian Brave
Campground, in Jackson Township adjacent to Harmony on
the Connoquenessing Creek, for restoring a 1923 log cabin
from the site’s former Emma Farm Camp of Pittsburgh’s
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies; Judge Martin J. O’Brien,
Butler, for assuring commemoration of the 1753 mission of
George Washington that precipitated the French & Indian
War; and Edna Scheidemantle, Lancaster Township, for her
efforts to preserve township history.



Harmony is among western Pennsylvania’s most significant
historic sites. Harmony National Historic Landmark District
comprises about 10 blocks in the borough, incorporated in
1840 when separated from Connoquenessing Township, as
well as the noncontiguous Harmony Society cemetery in
Jackson Township, separated from Connoquenessing
Township 14 years later.
Pacifist Lutheran Separatists who fled the German Duchy of
Wurttemberg seeking religious freedom began developing the
town and thousands of acres around it late in 1804 as their first
American home. They organized as the communal Harmony
Society with articles of association dated Feb., 15, 1805, and
became 19th century America’s most successful communal
group. In 1814 the Harmonists, then numbering about 850,
moved to southwestern Indiana to build New Harmony. They
returned to Beaver County in 1824 to establish Economy (now
Ambridge) as their final home, where the celibate society was
dissolved in 1905 and is commemorated at PHMC’s Old
Economy Village.



A half-century before the Harmonists, the Harmony area was
the site of a Lenni Lenape (Delaware) village visited by
Washington during his mission seeking French withdrawal
from the region, resulting in a demand that the British stay out
of New France and sparking the first global war.



Pacifist Mennonites led by Abraham Ziegler, who personally
bought the Harmony Society’s property, including the town,
resettled the area in 1815. Their congregation faded away
early in the 20th century as the Harmony Society was meeting
a similar fate just 20 miles away in Ambridge. Many
descendants of Mennonite families remain in the area, and
Harmony retains an architectural character much like that of
typical farming villages in Germany.



Additional information about Harmoniefest is available from
the Harmony Museum, 724-452-7341 (toll-free, 888-821-
4822) or by e-mail at hmuseum@fyi.net



Contact: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341

1/18/05
BUTLER COUNTY’S HARMONY RECEIVES PSAB
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARD

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, DECEMBER 1753: WHAT
IF WASHINGTON HAD BEEN KILLED

MENNONITE BISHOP’S 1816 HOUSE A GIFT TO
HISTORIC HARMONY

HISTORIC HARMONY FINISHES BARN RESTORATION
PROJECT

FRENCH & INDIAN WAR’S WESTERN PA. ROOTS
ADDRESSED AT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY MUSEUM SETS ANOTHER GERMAN
DINNER - 6/19/04

COMMUNITY CELEBRATED, AWARDS PRESENTED
DURING HARMONY MUSEUM HARMONIEFEST

HARMONY MUSEUM HOSTS MAY 15 LOCAL ARTISTS
SHOW

CANDLELIGHT, TROMBONES ON ICE MARK
HARMONY’S HOLIDAY SEASON

HARMONY’S CHRISTMAS MARKET OFFERS TASTE
OF GERMAN CHRISTMAS

NEW HARMONY MUSEUM EXHIBIT TELLS
HARMONY LINE HISTORY

"FOREST RAN RED" TO BE SHOWN AT HARMONY
MUSEUM

CRAFTS, MUD STOMP, CONCERTS: HARMONY’S
DANKFEST & BICENTENNIAL HARMONY
HARMONY BOROUGH                             HISTORIC
HARMONY INC.

Municipal Building 218                        Mercer St., P.O.
Box 524

217 Mercer Street, P.O. Box 945              Harmony, PA
16037

Harmony, PA 16037                            724-452-7341

724-452-6780
www.harmonymuseum.org

www.Harmony-PA.gov



BUTLER COUNTY’S HARMONY RECEIVES

PSAB HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARD



   CHAMPION, Pa., June 7 -- Harmony Borough, one of
western Pennsylvania’s few National Historic Landmarks and
celebrating its bicentennial this year, today received the
Pennsylvania State Association of Boroughs’ Historic
Preservation Award for its comprehensive commitment to
preserving heritage resources while emphasizing economic
and community revitalization. With a population of about
1,000, it is nestled in a valley next to I-79 about 30 miles north
of Pittsburgh in Butler County.

  Council President Jeffrey Smith and Vice President Charles
Beighey accepted the award during PSAB's 93rd Annual
Conference at Seven Springs Mountain Resort. The
association created the award last year in partnership with the
Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission. Gettysburg
was the inaugural recipient.

  "This award belongs to all residents of Harmony, who have
long been interested in their heritage and since the 1980s have
applied it with increasing effectiveness in pursuit of economic
benefit," Smith said. "In the process, Harmony has become
synonymous with important history and preservation
leadership in Butler County and our region, and this award
extends that reputation statewide and beyond.

   "To be in the same preservationist company as Gettysburg,
the site of one of the most significant events in American
history, is truly a great honor for Harmony. While I recognize
that our heritage and historic assets are really quite
extraordinary, I hope our success encourages other boroughs,
no matter their size or tradition, to work hard to preserve their
own history."

   Municipal government’s longtime and productive
partnership with Historic Harmony, the area’s volunteer,
nonprofit historical society and preservation advocate, has
been a significant factor in Harmony’s preservation efforts,
with Council providing legislative and political access and the
society providing historical expertise. Smith said benefits of
this relationship are reinforced by contributions of the
borough’s Historic Architectural Review Board and
enthusiastic involvement of businesses and residents.

   Harmony’s formal preservation efforts took root in 1969
when the importance of historic preservation was described in
its comprehensive plan, which recommended creation of an
historic district. In 1974, eight blocks at Harmony’s center and
the noncontiguous Harmony Society cemetery about five
blocks away in Jackson Township were designated a National
Historic Landmark District, the first in Pennsylvania outside
Philadelphia. After Historic Harmony completed an historic
sites inventory, in 1986 Council established a local historic
district identical to the National Landmark District. In the
1990s the local district was expanded substantially at the
request of property owners.

   John Ruch, president of Historic Harmony, described the
PSAB award as "important for the recognition it shines on
borough government, property owners, residents and others
for all they have accomplished together. Harmony represents
many important pieces of American history, beginning with
Native Americans and the French & Indian War. This award is
wonderful encouragement for everyone to redouble their
efforts to realize full economic advantages of the community’s
historic resources, from restoration investment to expanded
heritage tourism."

   Harmony’s National Historic Landmark District designation
recognized its national heritage and culture significance as the
founding home (1804-1814) of the Harmony Society of
immigrant German religious Separatists, probably America’s
most successful 19th century communal group. National
Historic Landmarks, according to the National Park Service,
possess exceptional value in interpreting U.S. heritage and
"are places where significant historical events occurred...
prominent Americans worked or lived...represent ideas that
shaped the nation...provide important information about our
past, or that are outstanding examples of design or
construction." Landmarks comprise only about 2,300 (three
percent) of sites listed on the National Register of Historic
Places. The other 73,700 Register properties are of primarily
state or local significance.

   Of Pennsylvania’s 152 National Historic Landmark sites,
including seven NHL Districts, only 22 are in the western tier
and Harmony’s district was the first in the commonwealth
outside Philadelphia, which has three.

   Ruch said Harmony is Butler County’s most significant
historical site and among the most important in the region,
with a heritage far richer than just the Harmony Society
relationship that gained the town National Historic Landmark
status. Some highlights:



* In the mid-18th century a Lenni Lenape (Delaware) village
called Murdering Town was situated on the north side of the
Connoquenessing Creek near the future site of Harmony.
Virginia Maj. George Washington and his party stayed there in
November 1753 during his mission that precipitated the
French & Indian War. A month later, Washington was shot at
a few miles from Murdering Town by an Indian that he and
guide Christopher Gist identified as allied with the French.
Some historians consider it the first shot of the French &
Indian War.



* The road linking Pittsburgh and Erie passed though
Harmony in the early 19th century. On it was transported
some of the materiel for the ships with which Oliver Hazard
Perry defeated a British fleet on Lake Erie in September 1813,
a critical American victory in the War of 1812. Volunteers
who reinforced Perry’s small force marched what is now
called Perry Highway (today’s U.S. 19) to Erie and camped at
Harmony, where they crossed the Connoquenessing on a
bridge constructed by the Harmony Society.



* In 1815 the Harmony Society sold the town and surrounding
land to Lehigh County blacksmith Abraham Ziegler, a
Mennonite who became Harmony's second founder. His and
other Mennonite families resettled the area. The farmstead of
Ziegler’s eldest son, David, including an 1805 Harmony
Society barn now owned by Historic Harmony, the region’s
oldest barn, have been designated eligible for the National
Register of Historic Places, as is the nearby 1825 Mennonite
meetinghouse, oldest west of the Alleghenies, also owned by
the historical society.



* Lutheran Rev. Jacob Schnee of Pittsburgh agreed in 1816 to
buy the town and, backed by prominent businessmen founded
a pioneering boarding schools for girls in the Harmonist
building on the diamond that is now the main Harmony
Museum facility. Upon Schnee's personal bankruptcy, Ziegler
sold the town in lots; the Harmony Institute for Young Ladies
lasted until the mid-1820s. The Mennonite congregation faded
away early in the 20th century, but many area residents are
their descendants.



* Stephen Foster, then a child of eight, and his mother and
siblings lived in a former Harmony Society house for several
months during 1832 after the future composer’s family lost
their home in Lawrenceville, now part of Pittsburgh. The
much-altered building survives.



* The area was part of western Pennsylvania’s oil and gas
boom of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; in the 1870s
Pennsylvania produced nearly all of the world’s oil, with
Butler County accounting for about 75 percent of the total.



* Charles Flowers, a former coal miner, made fine percussion
rifles in Harmony ca.1850-1890 and was one of the region’s
last masters of the classic Pennsylvania style of hunting and
target rifles.



6/7/04

CONTACTS:

Harmony Borough: Jeff Smith, 724-452-6780 or
harmonyborough@zoominternet.net

Historic Harmony: John Ruch, 724-316-6002 or
hmuseum@fyi.net

PSAB: Nicole Faraguna, 717.236.9526, Ext. 44 or
nfaraguna@boroughs.org




HARMONY MUSEUM SETS ANOTHER GERMAN
DINNER



HARMONY -- The Harmony Museum has canceled a house
and garden tour scheduled for Saturday, June 19, replacing it
with another of its popular homemade German dinners to be
served from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. that same day at its Stewart Hall..
Proceeds benefit museum operations.

   The dinner menu will offer German style beef or pork
served with red cabbage, potatoes and other vegetables,
spatzle (German pasta) and a dessert. The cost is $10 per
person, and reservations are recommended. The museum’s
previous dinners have been sellouts.
  For additional information and reservations, contact the
Harmony Museum, 724-452-7341 or, toll free, 888-821-4822.

  The museum is operated by Historic Harmony, a volunteer
nonprofit historical society. It has nine historic properties in
Harmony and adjacent Jackson Township.

   Celebrating its bicentennial this year, Harmony was
founded in 1804 on lands in what was then Connoquenessing
Township, as the first home of the communal Harmony
Society of pacifist German Christian Separatists. A National
Historic Landmark, Harmony is at the site of an Indian village
visited by young George Washington during a 1753 mission
that precipitated the French & Indian War. Nearby, a "French
Indian" fired at Washington in what some historians consider
the war’s first shot.

   When the Harmonists left in 1814, the area’s resettlement
was led by Mennonites. Their congregation faded away early
in the 20th century, although many descendants reside in the
area. A pioneering school for young women opened in 1817 in
what is now the main museum building on the town diamond.
Harmony and adjacent Zelienople became boroughs in 1840.
Jackson and Lancaster townships, in which most Harmonist-
Mennonite lands were located, were created in 1854, so this
year also marks their sesquicentennials.

  Harmony’s successful preservation efforts, coupled with
economic and community revitalization, won it the
Pennsylvania State Association of Boroughs’ 2004 Historic
Preservation Award.



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
FRENCH & INDIAN WAR’S WESTERN PA. ROOTS

ADDRESSED AT HARMONY MUSEUM



HARMONY, Pa. -- Slippery Rock University professor and
historian David Dixon will describe Western Pennsylvania
roots of the French & Indian, which became the global Seven
Years’ War, at the Harmony Museum’s Stewart Hall on
Tuesday, May 11. Admission is free for the 7:30 p.m.
program, another in a series of events that also mark this
year’s Harmony’s bicentennial. Refreshments will be served.



This spring marks the beginning of the nation’s six-year 250th
anniversary commemoration of the French & Indian War.
Conflict was assured when, in late 1753, George Washington,
just 21, delivered Virginia Royal Gov. Robert Dinwiddie’s
demand that French forces leave British territory. France
considered the "Ohio country" part of New France, and
refused.



Dixon participated late last year in 250th anniversary
commemorations of the 1753 mission, which twice took
Washington through what became Butler County. Traveling to
meet French officers south of Lake Erie, he stayed with
Delawares (Lenni Lenape) at their Murdering Town, which
became the site of Harmony. Returning a month later, a
"French Indian" shot at him nearby. Some historians argue it
was the war’s first shot.



In spring 1754, troops and Indian allies led by Washington
came back to the region to reinforce Virginians building a
stockade at the Forks of the Ohio, but the French had expelled
them and built Fort Duquesne. That May 28, at Great
Meadows (southeast of Pittsburgh), Washington ambushed the
party of Ensign Joseph Coulon de Villiers de Jumonville,
dispatched to warn the British out of New France. Jumonville
and a third of his men were killed. Then, on July 4, a large
force under Coulon’s brother, Capt. Louis Coulon de Villiers,
forced a humiliating surrender on Washington at his hastily
erected Ft. Necessity in the same area.



These events were the first skirmishes of what would be called
the French & Indian War, the beginning of what in 1756
became history’s first global conflict, the Seven Years’ War,
pitting Great Britain, Prussia and Hanover against France,
Austria, Russia, Saxony, Sweden and Spain. The North
American fighting ended in 1760; the 1763 Treaty of Paris
also brought peace to Europe and India, and ended France’s
North American ambitions.



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
888-821-4822

4/23/04




HARMONY MUSEUM HOSTS MAY 15 LOCAL ARTISTS
SHOW



HARMONY, Pa, -- More than a dozen artists and artisans who
contribute to the area’s growing reputation as an arts
community will showcase their work at the Harmony
Museum’s Stewart Hall on Saturday, May 15. The show and
sale, sponsored by the Harmony Business Association, will be
open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and admission is free.



Works on display will represent a variety of media, including
paintings in oils, acrylics and watercolors, drawings in inks,
pencil and charcoal, and ceramics and pottery. Most will be
for sale, and the artists, many of whom also work on
commission, will be available to discuss their work.



Among those participating are Joan Bobchak, Marge Gardner,
Jan and Paul Jay, Daniel Jimick, Nita McCreery, Jan
Piciernicki, Clay Purviance, Bruce Shakely, Diane Smith,
Dorothy Shumsky and Ray Zielinski.



A National Historic Landmark rich in history, Harmony is
celebrating its bicentennial during 2004. The area’s written
history began with an Indian village that was visited in 1753
by 21-year- old Virginia officer George Washington during his
mission to demand the French get out of British territory,
setting the stage for the French & Indian War. A "French
Indian" shot at him nearby.



Permanent settlement of Harmony and its immediate area was
begun in 1804 by the pacifist communal Harmony Society of
religious German Separatists. They left in 1814, with
resettlement led by Mennonites whose congregation expired
early in the 20th century. With many area homes and other
buildings restored or refurbished, the community’s
architectural character remains reminiscent of rural Germany.



Guided museum tours will be available during the show.
Exhibits include Native Americans, Washington’s 1753
mission, the communal Harmony Society, Mennonite
resettlement, 19th century Charles Flowers longrifles,
Victoriana and the area’s oil eras, and more.

Harmony is in western Butler County at exits 87-88 of I-79,
about 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh and 10 miles
north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, and 30 miles south of I-
80.



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
888-821-4822

4/23/04




COMMUNITY CELEBRATED, AWARDS PRESENTED

DURING HARMONY MUSEUM HARMONIEFEST



HARMONY, Pa., Feb. 15 -- Historic Harmony, which
operates the Harmony Museum, presented Heritage Awards
for preservation and restoration during Saturday evening’s
annual Harmoniefest dinner and historical program, which was
also the first of many anticipated community celebrations
during 2004 to mark Harmony’s bicentennial and
sesquicentennials of Jackson and Lancaster townships.



Heritage Awards were presented to:



* Erich and Karen Huy, Jackson Township, preservation and
facade restoration of a 1920 Arts and Crafts house at 211 S.
Pittsburgh St., Harmony.



* Thomas and Helen Oliverio, preservation of their late 19th
century Victorian home at 100 S. High Street, Zelienople. In
1966 the Zelienople mayor and his wife were cited for
preserving the Rapp-Stewart House in Harmony.



* St. Gregory Roman Catholic Church, preservation and
restoration of its 1911 St. Gregory School, 115 Pine St.,
Zelienople, oldest area school building still used for that
purpose, which was updated while restoring its original
architectural character.



President John Ruch noted that Historic Harmony has
presented 84 Heritage Awards since 1991 "because more and
more property owners recognize that preservation and
restoration and adaptive use have economic as well as
aesthetic value. In addition, many are demonstrating that they
care about the architectural face of community history and can
excite others about it as well. This year’s honorees represent
all of these progressive virtues, and we congratulate them for
jobs well done."



Historic Harmony also made Zelienople Attorney Philip P.
Lope an honorary member and presented him a plaque in
recognition of his longtime generous service as legal counsel
to Historic Harmony.



A full house audience, including several public officials, filled
the museum’s Stewart Hall. The program concluded with a
concert by a chamber group of the Old Economy 1830
Orchestra and Singers, which reprise musical groups of the
communal Harmony Society that founded Harmony in 1804.
Their performance of music from the archives at Old
Economy Village in Ambridge, founded in 1824 as the
Harmony Society’s final home, included compositions by
Christoph Muller, Harmony Society "renaissance man" whose
Harmony home still stands a half-block from the museum.



Ruch told the audience that architect Roger A. Weaver, whose
office occupies the Muller House, was absent because he was
in southwestern Indiana to represent Historic Harmony at the
Harmoniefest held Friday evening in New Harmony, where
the Harmony Society resided 1814-1824. Weaver gave a
presentation there on "200 years of Harmony, Pa."



Jackson and Lancaster were among 20 Butler County
townships created on March 29, 1854. Jackson, cut from
Cranberry and Connoquenessing townships, was named for
President Andrew Jackson. Lancaster was also formed from
part of Connoquenessing Township. There is no record of how
it was named; but the origin appears to have been its principal
village, Middle Lancaster, founded in 1835 by black preacher
Thomas Baldwin.



Half a century earlier, in the fall of 1804, Georg Rapp and the
first of his Pacifist German Separatist followers began
building Harmony and developing farms and mills on
thousands of surrounding acres. The Harmony Society moved
west to build New Harmony, then came back to western
Pennsylvania to establish Economy, now Ambridge, where the
celibate commune faded away as the 20th century began.



In 1815 the society sold its Butler County property, including
Harmony, to Mennonite Abraham Ziegler, and several
Mennonite families settled on area farms while Ziegler
occupied a Harmonist house on Harmony’s diamond. While
the Mennonites also faded away a century ago, Harmony and
its neighboring townships have continued as a living
community with a unique history of national importance, and
many of their descendants reside in the area.
Each year the Harmony Society marked the commune’s
anniversary with a celebration they called Harmoniefest.
Historic Harmony’s annual Harmoniefest celebrates the
community’s entire heritage and history.



Contact: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341

2/15/04



Back to Top




HISTORIC HARMONY FINISHES

BARN RESTORATION PROJECT

HARMONY -- Restoration of western Pennsylvania’s oldest
barn advanced substantially when installation of replacement
siding and related repairs were completed last week.



The barn, on Mercer Road in Jackson Township, was built in
1805 by the communal Harmony Society of German
Separatists that founded Harmony 200 years ago. It has been
owned since 1999 by Historic Harmony, which operates the
Harmony Museum.



It was re-sided with vertical hemlock boards. Wood
representing Pennsylvania’s state tree was also used in
replacement doors. The siding work began in January, but was
interrupted by a delay in delivery of all the boards needed. In
addition, a cracked post and two small areas of deterioration in
still beams, revealed when old siding was removed, were
repaired.



"We were not replacing original siding from 1805,:" said
Historic Harmony President John Ruch. "That was obvious
anyway, but our architectural consultant, Roger Weaver,
concluded that this is at least the second time the siding has
been replaced."



Major structural repairs, critical to the building’s restoration,
were completed a year ago. Extensive slate roof repair was
done previously.



"Because the structural work last year was completed at less
cost than anticipated," Ruch said, "we decided we needed to
move up siding replacement. Gaps between boards allowed
rain and snow inside. It took a while to get the new material,
but now the building is weather tight and much more secure
overall."



Barn specialist Seth Byler of Volant performed the structural
work last February as well as the siding project. All of the
work was funded with a $15,000 Department of Community
and Economic Development grant, sponsored by State Rep.
Dick Stevenson, and contributions. Last fall, electrical service
was also installed.



According to Ruch, the next project will be to install two-inch-
thick floor planks in three bays from which inadequate 20th
century flooring was removed last year. He said the historical
society is buying floor planks from a smaller old barn in
eastern Butler County, but is looking for more. Most planking
in two center bays appears to be original or old replacement.



Historic Harmony purchased the barn to assure its
preservation. It was built to shelter sheep by the communal
Harmony Society, which left the area in 1814, and is the only
Harmonist-built barn remaining among the three communities
the society founded during the first quarter of the 19th century:
Harmony, New Harmony, Ind., and Ambridge, Pa.



Harmony and extensive lands around it were purchased in
1815 by Mennonite Abraham Ziegler. Many Mennonite farm
families settled on former Harmonist land that became parts of
Jackson and Lancaster townships. The barn was on the farm of
Ziegler’s son, David, who modified it in the 1850s, perhaps in
repairing tornado damage.



Contact: Kathy Luek, Administrator 724-452-7341



2/19/04




MENNONITE BISHOP’S 1816 HOUSE

A GIFT TO HISTORIC HARMONY



HARMONY, Pa. -- The Bishop John Boyer House in Jackson
Township, built in 1816 by the first pastor of Harmony’s 19th
century Mennonite congregation, has become the ninth
historic property of the volunteer, nonprofit organization that
operates the Harmony Museum.



Lillian Frankenstein of Zelienople donated the Boyer house to
Historic Harmony, and the deed transfer was recorded this
week. The 2 1/2 story cut stone building is on 1.2 acres at 295
Perry Highway (U.S. 19), at the north end of Mercer Road. A
large spring house is in the hillside behind the house.



"We are grateful that Mrs. Frankenstein valued the
significance of this property to the area’s and Butler County’s
heritage, for her desire to preserve it for the benefit of future
generations, and for her confidence in Historic Harmony to
provide that protection," said John S. Ruch, Historic Harmony
president.



"We are pleased to accept one of the most important structures
involving the Mennonites who had a major influence in the
area during the 19th century. Many descendants continue to do
so," he added. "Most surviving Mennonite structures are
outside of Harmony’s National Historic Landmark District,
which relates largely to the communal Harmony Society that
founded the town.



"We have made no decisions regarding the long term future of
the Bishop Boyer House," Ruch said. "It is a private residence,
will likely remain one for some time, and therefore stays on
the tax rolls."



Boyer, also a farmer, supervised construction in 1825 of the
Mennonite’s meetinghouse, or church, on Wise Road about a
half-mile south of his home, where the congregation had
established its cemetery 10 years earlier. He may have
patterned the church on the 1755 Hereford meetinghouse in
Berks County from which he came to Harmony. He died in
1828. The meetinghouse and cemetery have been an Historic
Harmony property since 1977.



Harmony, which celebrates its bicentennial in 2004, was
founded in 1804 by German religious Separatists led by Georg
Rapp who organized as the Harmony Society, 19th century
America’s most successful communal group. Nearly all of its
members lived in Harmony, including those who worked the
commune’s outlying farmlands. The Harmonists moved in
1814 to southwestern Indiana, returned in 1824 to build
Economy (now Ambridge) in Beaver County, and dissolved in
1905.



When the Harmonists left, they sold about 7,000 acres,
including the town, to blacksmith Abraham Ziegler, a Lehigh
County Mennonite considered Harmony's second founder. The
Zieglers were accompanied in settling the area by several
other large Mennonite families, principally the Boyers,
Moyers, Rices and Wises. Many were farmers who, unlike the
Harmonists, built homes on their farms in what became
Jackson and Lancaster townships, which celebrate their
sesquicentennials in 2004.



After failing to sell the town to a Pittsburgh pastor who
founded a girls’ boarding school in a Harmony Society
warehouse on the town diamond (now the Harmony Museum),
Ziegler sold it in lots containing Harmonist-built houses, mills
and commercial buildings.



Mennonites had a significant presence through much of the
19th century, but the congregation had dwindled to an aged
handful of members when it closed the meetinghouse in 1902.
An Amish Mennonite Brethren congregation recently became
the first group in a century to worship there regularly.



Historic Harmony was founded in 1943 to preserve and
promote the area’s unique history, encourage preservation of
historic sites and foster tourism in support of community
quality of life, economic development and related objectives.
Its Harmony properties are the museum, the adjacent Mercer
Street Harmonist Wagner House and nearby Harmonist-era
log house museum annexes, Main Street’s Mennonite-era
Henry Denis Ziegler log house museum annex, and the part of
the Harmonists’ Vineyard Hill containing Rapp’s Seat, the
Harmonist leader’s meditation site above the
Connoquenessing Creek. Historic Harmony’s other Jackson
Township properties are the Mennonite meetinghouse and
cemetery, Harmony Society cemetery on Pa. 68, and 1805
Harmony Society barn on Mercer Road.




CONTACT: Historic Harmony President John Ruch, 724-316-
6002 or 724-452-8834, or Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-
452-7341 or 888-821-4822.



12/30/03




Back to Top




WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, DECEMBER 1753:

WHAT IF WASHINGTON HAD BEEN KILLED

HARMONY, Pa. -- Suppose young Virginia militia Maj.
George Washington had been killed 250 years ago this month
in either of two incidents in western Pennsylvania wilderness:
On Dec. 27, 1753, a "French Indian" shot at him several miles
from Harmony (then the site of an Indian village called
Murdering Town). Two days later, he tumbled from a raft into
the ice-choked Allegheny River.



Would someone else have led the Continental Army to victory
in the American Revolution? Who would have been the new
nation’s first president? Could the United States have formed
without him?



Answers to these and other "what if" questions can never be
known. The Native American’s musket shot, perhaps the first
of the French & Indian War, missed its mark in wintery
wilderness somewhere northeast of today’s Evans City, Butler
County, about 40 miles north of Pittsburgh. And when he fell
into the river, Washington somehow got back onto the raft and
warded off hypothermia at an island campfire.



American history unfolded as it did because Washington
cheated death twice within about 48 hours while returning
from meetings at a French fort near Lake Erie that precipitated
the French & Indian War, during which he would survive
more close calls.



The 250th anniversary of the dramatic but little-known
shooting that could have changed the course of history will be
commemorated on Saturday, Dec. 27, with events organized
jointly by Historic Harmony, which operates the Harmony
Museum, and Evans City Historical Society.



The observance begins at noon north of Evans City with a hike
on a trail near Pa. 528 much like that traveled by Washington,
guide Christopher Gist of Cumberland (then Wills Creek),
Md., and the treacherous native. The Indian, apparently a
French ally, offered to show major and guide a quick path to
the Forks of the Ohio but led them away from the future site of
Pittsburgh. Reenactors Jason Cherry of Butler as Washington,
Ken Cherry of Butler as Gist, and Todd Johnson of
McKeesport as the Huron Ghost in the Head, will join the
hikers. [A shuttle will pick up hikers at trail end, so anyone
wishing to participate must register with the Harmony
Museum, 724-452-7341, by Friday, Dec. 19.]



At 2 p.m., two miles east of Evans City at a Daughters of the
American Revolution monument marking the 1753 incident,
the Cherrys and Johnson will reenact the shooting, then
describe Washington’s journey. Author and Slippery Rock
University history professor David D. Dixon will explore
consequences for American history had the young Washington
died that December 250 years ago.



In October 1753 Washington, only 21, had no military
experience. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, he was
appointed a major in the militia by Virginia’s royal governor,
Robert Dinwiddie, and set off from Williamsburg to deliver
Dinwiddie’s ultimatum that the French leave British territory.
In mid-December he reached Ft. LeBoeuf (Waterford, Pa.),
where French officers rejected Dinwiddie’s demand. Traveling
in difficult winter conditions, Washington made it back to
Williamsburg in mid-January to tell Dinwiddie the bad news.
When Washington left Ft. LeBoeuf, the French moved quickly
to strengthen their regional presence, evicting Virginians
erecting a fort at the Forks of the Ohio and building Ft.
Duquesne there.



On May 28, 1754, several miles northwest of Great Meadows
(near Uniontown, southeast of Pittsburgh), troops and Indian
allies led by Lt. Col. Washington ambushed a small French
party headed by Ensign Joseph Coulon de Villiers de
Jumonville, who had been dispatched to warn the British out
of New France. Jumonville and one-third of his men died. On
July 4 a large French force under Coulon’s brother, Capt.
Louis Coulon de Villiers, forced a humiliating surrender on
Washington at the hastily erected Ft. Necessity at Great
Meadows.

These were the first skirmishes of the French & Indian War
(1754-1760), which would help trigger history’s first global
conflict, the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) that pitted Great
Britain, Prussia and Hanover against France, Austria, Russia,
Saxony, Sweden and Spain. The 1763 Treaty of Paris brought
peace to North America, Europe and India, and ended
France’s North American ambitions.



Back to Top




HARMONY, Pa.: Historic Harmony, the historical
organization that operates eight Harmony Museum sites in and
near Harmony, a National Historic Landmark in Butler County
celebrating its bicentennial during 2004, announced its
calendar of major events. Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, 30
miles north of Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania
Turnpike and 30 miles south of I-80. For more information
phone 724-452-7341 or, toll free, 888-821-4822, or e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net.



2004 Harmony Museum events:



Saturday, Feb. 14, 2004 -- Annual Harmoniefest dinner and
regional history program at Harmony Museum’s Stewart Hall,
5:30 p.m., reservations required by Feb. 10. Members of Old
Economy Village’s recreated 19th century Harmony Society
orchestra will perform Harmonist, Mennonite, other music.
First event of yearlong celebration of Harmony’s 2004
bicentennial and sesquicentennials of neighboring Jackson and
Lancaster townships. Harmoniefest commemorates February
1805 founding at Harmony of the communal Harmony Society
by German Separatists who established the town in late 1804.



Saturday, June 19, 2004 -- Annual Historic House & Garden
Tour and Lunch, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Self-guided tour of
historically and architecturally significant buildings and
inviting gardens begins at the Harmony Museum’s Stewart
Hall. Includes some museum properties.



* Saturday, June 19: 5-8 p.m., Harmony Museum German
Dinner, Stewart Hall



* Thursday, July 1: 8 p.m., Harmony Business Association
concert, Allegheny Brass Band & Zambelli fireworks,
Harmony Inn



* Thursday, July 15: 7:30 p.m., HBA concert, Dixie Doc,
Harmony Inn



* Thursday-Saturday July 15-17: Zelienople-Harmony Area
Chamber of Commerce Horse Trading Days, Zelienople &
Harmony.



* Saturday, July 17: 10 a.m-4 p.m., HBA Local Artists Show
& Sale, Stewart Hall; time TBA, Anything That Rolls Race,
Mercer Street



* Thursday, July 29: 7:30 p.m., HBA concert, Hewlett,
Anderson & Waslousky, Harmony Inn



* Thursday, Aug. 12: 7:30 p.m., HBA concert, Vanilla Soul,
Harmony Inn



Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 28-29, 2004 -- Annual Dankfest
pioneer crafts festival in and around National Historic
Landmark District. Costumed artisans demonstrate authentic
crafts that were part of 18th-19th century pioneer and rural
life. Museum and landmark district tours, German and other
foods, entertainment, antiques and crafts shopping throughout
quaint village. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday, Noon - 6 p.m.
Sunday.



* Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 28-29: 11 a.m.-6 p.m./Noon-6 p.m.,
34th annual Harmony Museum Dankfest; 5 p.m. Saturday,
fiddle contest, Museum Barn



Harmony Bicentennial Week, Saturday, Aug. 28-Saturday,
Sept. 4



* Saturday, Aug. 28: 11 a.m., Parade, Spring St. to Museum
Barn; 7 p.m., HBA concert, Kim Thomas & Diamonds in the
Rough, Museum Barn



* Monday, Aug. 30: 7 p.m., "Iptingen, Germany," illustrated
presentation on George Rapp’s home town by John Ruch,
Stewart Hall; 8 p.m., Eugene & the Nightcrawlers, Museum
Barn



* Tuesday, Aug. 31: 7 p.m., "Harmony, The Movie," debut
showing of Harmony video, Stewart Hall; 8 p.m., Sweet
Adelines, Museum Barn



* Wednesday, Sept. 1: 8 p.m., Whimsy and the Lots, Museum
Barn



* Thursday, Sept. 2: 7 p.m., "The Harmony Line," illustrated
presentation about 1908-1931 Pittsburgh, Harmony, Butler &
New Castle Railroad interurban by John Makar, Stewart Hall;
8 p.m., Seneca Valley High Barbershop & Beautyshop
concert, Museum Barn



* Friday, Sept. 3: 8 p.m., John Burgh Band Square Dance,
Museum Barn



* Saturday, Sept. 4: Noon-4 p.m., Doc Stewart Babies
Reunion, Stewart Hall, and Emma Kaufmann Farm Camp
Reunion, Borough Building; 8 p.m., Grand Finale, Old
Economy Orchestra Concert & Zambelli fireworks, Museum
Barn



Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 13-14, 2004 -- Annual Weihnachten
Platz (Christmas Place) crafts market at museum’s Stewart
Hall and other historic buildings. Festive holiday shopping for
quality handcrafted items by dozens of artisans in an historical
setting like that of internationally popular Christmas markets
in German towns and villages, with demonstrations,
entertainment, food, refreshments, museum and National
Historic Landmark District tours. Additional shopping for
antiques and specialty items at village shops. Saturday 10
a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday noon-5 p.m.



Sunday, Dec. 12, 2004 -- Annual Candlelight Christmas, with
rooms of museum buildings decorated for the holiday season,
illuminated with candles and oil lamps. Walking tours of
National Historic Landmark District, lined with luminaries,
are available. Entertainment, refreshments, shopping at
museum’s and other inviting antiques and crafts shops
throughout Harmony’s old town section. 2-8 p.m.



(CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Harmony Museum Administrator,
724-452-7341
6/8/04



CANDLELIGHT, TROMBONES ON ICE MARK
HARMONY’S HOLIDAY SEASON

HARMONY, Pa. --Holiday decorations, a Trombones on Ice
concert on the diamond, a crafts market and special displays
highlight the Harmony Museum’s annual Candlelight
Christmas, 2-8 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 12. The old-town center,
a National Historic Landmark District, takes on a special glow
from luminaries after sunset.



Rooms in the main museum building and Wagner House
annex, as well as the nearby Ziegler log house, are decorated
by designers and museum volunteers. Crafts, wine tastings and
refreshments are offered, and the cozy museum store is
another gift-shopping opportunity. A $1 donation per adult is
requested for admission to the museum’s Candlelight
Christmas, and a 3 p.m. walking tour of the Landmark District
is available for a small fee.



This is Harmony’s fourth holiday season with a free
Trombones on Ice concert, created by Bruce Lazier of Lazier’s
Harmony Music Studios and now established solidly as part of
the historic town’s Christmas tradition. Brass players from
throughout western Pennsylvania are invited to join in,
students who play in school bands or their own groups as well
as adult amateur and professional musicians. Lazier says he
won’t be surprised if 80 or more musicians join this year’s
spontaneous band for the concert that begins at 2 p.m. on the
steps of Grace Church of Harmony.



At the museum, visitors can also enjoy toy displays --
including model train layouts complementing the museum’s
newly installed rail lines exhibit. And Harmony’s bicentennial
-- settlement began at the debut of winter 1804 -- gets a final
tribute with a borough-prepared display of old postcard views.
Harmony, which retains the quaint architectural character of
an old German village, is 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania
Turnpike, 30 miles north of Pittsburgh’s Point and 30 miles
south of I-80 at I-79 exits 87-88. The area’s recorded history
began with a Delaware Indian village, called Murdering Town,
that was visited by young Virginia Maj. George Washington
during his late 1753 mission to demand French withdrawal
from British territory, sparking the French & Indian War. The
war’s first shot was fired at Washington in nearby woods by a
native allied with the French.



Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in
1804, and their communal Harmony Society soon gained
international renown. After they left in 1814, resettlement of
the area was led by Mennonites, whose congregation faded
away early in the 20th century. Additional aspects of local
history interpreted by the Harmony Museum include pioneer
life in a log house, an early 19th century boarding school for
girls, the outstanding Pennsylvania-style percussion rifles of
gunsmith Charles Flowers, the oil and gas boom of a century
ago, and the medical practice of country doctors.



11/23/04



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
888-821-4822




HARMONY’S CHRISTMAS MARKET OFFERS TASTE
OF GERMAN CHRISTMAS
HARMONY, Pa. -- Artisans, craft vendors and Butler
County’s only winery offer a taste of the Christmas season in
Germany at the seventh annual Harmony Museum
Weihnachten Platz. The holiday marketplace features
shopping, food, drink and live entertainment 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on
Saturday and noon-5 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 13-14.



Weihnachten Platz (Christmas Place) provides festive holiday
shopping for quality handcrafted items in an historical setting,
adapted from Germany’s popular Christmas markets.



Vendors will sell and demonstrate in the museum’s Stewart
Hall and adjacent grounds at Main and Mercer streets in the
heart of Harmony’s National Landmark District, as well as at
the adjacent Wagner House annex and two nearby log houses.
Goods include Santas, decorative redware, imported
handmade German articles, stained glass, woodenware,
candles, rustic country items, jewelry, fiber arts, bath products,
dried herbs and flowers, and holiday ornamentations.



In addition, Historic Harmony Auxiliary quilters sell their
handmade works, and members of Ellwood City’s Fiber Arts
Guild demonstrates spinning and weaving. The Wine Kradel
of Sarver offers private label wines in the museum’s
cavernous 195-year-old wine cellar. The museum shop in the
Wagner House is another venue for shoppers seeking special
items for holiday giving.



Each vendor contribute articles for a silent auction that ends at
5 p.m. on Sunday. Food, beverages and baked goods are
available. Entertainment is by instrumental groups, including
dulcimer players.



A $2 admission donation is requested for adults. Museum
tours (1-4 p.m.) are available for a small additional fee. All
proceeds benefit Historic Harmony, the nonprofit volunteer
group that operates the nine-property Harmony Museum.
More information is available from the museum at 724-452-
7341 or, toll-free, 888-821-4822.



Harmony, with the quaint architectural character of an old
German village, is at I-79 exits 87-88, just 10 miles north of
the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of Pittsburgh’s
Point, 30 miles south of I-80. Its recorded history began with
an Indian village visited by Virginia Maj. George Washington
during a 1753 mission to the French near Lake Erie that
sparked the French & Indian War. Pacifist German Lutheran
Separatists settled the area in 1804, organizing as the
communal Harmony Society that gained international renown.
After they left in 1814, resettlement of the town and
surrounding countryside was led by Mennonites whose
congregation faded away at the start of the 20th century.



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
hmuseum@fyi.net

11/1/04




NEW HARMONY MUSEUM EXHIBIT TELLS
HARMONY LINE HISTORY



HARMONY, Pa. -- "Pardon me, boys, is that the Harmony
Line?"



Had the Glenn Miller Orchestra starred in "Sun Valley
Serenade" in 1931 instead of 1941, might it have occurred to
songwriter Harry Warren to make a Pittsburgh-based
interurban railway famous instead of choosing Cincinnati’s
old "Chattanooga Choo Choo"? Well, probably not. The
electricity-powered Pittsburgh, Harmony, Butler & New
Castle Railway, the Harmony Line for short, just doesn’t grab
the ear the way "Chattanooga" and steam-ey "choo choo"
does.



But the 1908-1931 Harmony Line does enjoy popularity more
than seven decades after it closed down, largely in recognition
of the lost convenience of zipping comfortably between city
and country insulated blissfully from today’s perils of
congested highways and road rage.



A new Harmony Museum exhibit presents the history of the
interurban line, as well as that of the freight railroad still
serving the area. Operated today by CSX Transportation, it
previously was part of the Baltimore & Ohio and originally
was the Pittsburgh & Western. Artifacts include a section of
rail, spikes and spike plates, a whistle similar to those on
Harmony Line cars, a Harmony Line catenary electrical
insulator, photographs and other items.



The semi-permanent display was assembled by intern Vincent
Stefanos, who will receive a history degree from Slippery
Rock University next month.



Harmony is one of western Pennsylvania’s few National
Historic Landmarks. Its history began with a Delaware village
visited in 1753 by George Washington during his mission to
France’s Fort LeBoeuf that sparked the French & Indian War.
Nearby, a "French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at
Washington. The town was founded in 1804 by the communal
Harmony Society of pacifist German Lutheran Separatists.
After they left in 1814, the area was resettled by Mennonites,
also pacifists, whose many descendants still live here.



Harmony is at Interstate 79 exits 87-88, about 30 miles north
of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of Pennsylvania
Turnpike exit 28, and 30 miles south of Interstate 80. The
museum, on the town diamond, is open 1-4 p.m. daily except
Mondays and holidays. Reservations are suggested for
weekends and required for groups.



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
toll-free 888-821-4822

11/11/04




"FOREST RAN RED" TO BE SHOWN AT HARMONY
MUSEUM



HARMONY -- The public is invited to a free showing at the
Harmony Museum on Sept. 14 of the award-winning French &
Indian War documentary, "When the Forest Ran Red:
Washington, Braddock and a Doomed Army."



The 68-minute documentary presents the story of the summer
1755 defeat in southwestern Pennsylvania of a British force
led by Gen. Edward Braddock that was advancing on the
Forks of the Ohio and France’s Fort Duquesne there.



Historic Harmony will present the film at 7:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Sept. 14, in the Harmony Museum’s Stewart Hall.
Light refreshments will be served. The Museum is at the
center of the National Historic Landmark District in Harmony,
which is celebrating its bicentennial.
"When the Forest Ran Red" describes events that led to
Braddock’s mission, which collapsed in an ambush by French
soldiers and their Native American allies. Braddock was
mortally wounded. The young George Washington, whose
mission through the region -- including what would become
Butler County -- during 1753 and 1754 helped spark the war,
was one the few British officers not killed or wounded in
Braddock’s disaster. Hundreds of re-enactors appear in the
documentary. Several historians, including "Crucible of War"
author Fred Anderson, provide commentary, and works by
well known area artists Robert Griffing and John Buxton help
illustrate the story.



Harmony’s recorded history began with a Lenni Lenape
(Delaware) village visited by Washington during his 1753
mission to the French at Ft. LeBoeuf. Nearby, a "French
Indian" fired what may have been the French & Indian War’s
first shot at Washington. Harmony was founded in 1804 by the
communal Harmony Society of religious German Lutheran
Separatists who built the town, farmed thousands of
neighboring acres and operates several mills in the area. After
they left in 1814, the area was resettled by Mennonites whose
congregation faded away by the early 1900s, although many of
their descendants remain. Harmony became a separate
borough in 1840.



With many buildings restored or refurbished, Harmony retains
the architectural character of a rural German village. One of
only 22 National Landmarks in western Pennsylvania, it
received the Pennsylvania State Association of Boroughs’
2004 Historic Preservation Award for its comprehensive
commitment to preserving heritage resources while
emphasizing economic and community revitalization.



CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or
888-821-4822

8/31/04
CRAFTS, MUD STOMP, CONCERTS: HARMONY’S
DANKFEST & BICENTENNIAL HARMONY, Pa. -- A
celebratory parade to kick things off. Pioneer crafts, even a
"mud stomp" for kids. This National Historic Landmark’s
incredible history. Concerts, country and blues to 19th century
sectarian and patriotic. Special displays, reunions, and A
wacky Anything That Rolls race. Finally, a bang-up Grande
Finale.



All of this and more are offered in Harmony from Saturday,
Aug. 28, through Saturday, Sept. 4, as the town that began
with the sprawling communal Harmony Society of nearly 900
German immigrants observes its bicentennial. The celebration
starts with the Harmony Museum’s 34th annual Dankfest,
continues with daily programs and concerts, and concludes
with a orchestral performance and a Zambelli Internationale
fireworks show. A new book about Harmony and bicentennial
mementos will also be available.



The parade at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 28, gets things
started, going west on German Street, north on Main, east onto
Mercer Street at the diamond, ending at the barn built in 1805
by the German pioneers. Re-enactors portraying soldiers and
Native Americans at an Old Stone House French & Indian
War encampment will linger after the parade. Two Dankfest
encampments will lend added atmosphere, with LegionVille
Historical Society’s site including a diorama of the Army’s
first (1792-93) training camp, 20 miles west in Beaver County,
and Union Army reenactors representing the Civil War era.



Dankfest opens as the parade concludes, presenting pioneer
crafts, historical exhibits and tours. Children can help mix log
house daubing mud with their feet. Antiques and collectibles
will be sold at the barn. Tours of the Harmony Museum,
landmark district and the Harmony Society’s 1809 church
building are offered, and visitors enjoy browsing a farmers’
market and local shops. Quilts, from local collectors or locally
made, will fill the 1825 Mennonite meetinghouse on Wise
Road during Dankfest and throughout Bicentennial Week.



Also on Saturday, antique cars will be displayed at the barn
and classic sports cars and motorcycles in the diamond. A 5
p.m. fiddle contest is followed at 7 p.m. by a Harmony
Business Association concert by Kim Thomas & Diamonds in
the Rough. Sunday, Aug. 29, will be Mennonite Day at
Dankfest, for which descendants of local 19th century
Mennonites are invited to the museum’s Stewart Hall.



The borough’s Bicentennial Week continues through Sept. 4,
with free concerts on the lawn at the museum’s Mercer Road
barn each evening except Thursday. Programs in the
museum’s Stewart Hall, all at 7 p.m., are a presentation on
Monday, Aug. 30, about the German home town of Harmony
and Harmony Society founder George Rapp; the debut on
Tuesday, Aug. 31, of "Harmony, The Movie," and a choral
performance and a presentation on Thursday, Sept. 2, about
the Harmony Line interurban railway.



As the celebration wraps up on Saturday, Sept. 4, two reunions
are set for Stewart Hall. Dr. Arthur I. Stewart delivered some
1,400 babies while serving the community for more than six
decades, and they are invited to bring photos and recollections
of "Doc." Also, people who as children of Pittsburgh families
attended Harmony’s Emma Farm Camp between the 1930s
and 1970s will enjoy a special exhibit and share recollections.
A block west on Mercer Street, gravity-powered vehicles will
compete in an Anything That Rolls Race, postponed from
mid-July.



That evening, Old Economy Orchestra, from the Harmony
Society's final home in Beaver County, an historic site
administered by the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum
Commission, will perform at the Mercer Road barn. Capping
the bicentennial celebration will be a Zambelli Internationale
Fireworks show.



Harmony’s history began with a Delaware village visited by
George Washington during his 1753 mission to the French Ft.
LeBoeuf, sparking the French & Indian War. Near here, a
"French Indian" fired what some consider the war’s first shot
at Washington. Harmony was founded in 1804 by George
Rapp’s communal Harmony Society of German Lutheran
Separatists. After they left in 1814, the area was resettled by
Mennonites whose congregation faded away in the early
1900s. Stephen Foster lived here briefly as a child, Charles
Flowers made fine percussion rifles, and the area participated
in an oil and gas boom a century ago.



Dankfest parking and admission is free, with modest fees for
tours and the quilt show. Hours both days are noon to 5 p.m.
Most Bicentennial Week events are at 7 p.m. or 8 p.m., and
the quilt show will be open daily except Monday 1-4 p.m.
Harmony is at Interstate 79 exits 87-88, about 30 miles north
of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania
Turnpike, and 30 miles south of Interstate 80. Follow Historic
District and Dankfest signs.



CONTACTS:

Historic Harmony: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
or toll-free 888-821-4822

Harmony Borough: Jeff Smith, Council President, 724-452-
6780
BICENTENNIAL, DANKFEST, CONCERTS, MORE:

HARMONY’S A HAPPENING PLACE AUG. 28-SEPT. 4

Click here to see the schedule of events.



HARMONY, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum’s 34th annual
Dankfest pioneer craft festival on the last weekend of August
is extra-special this year. On Saturday, Aug. 28, a parade
precedes the festival’s opening and formally begins the
National Historic Landmark borough’s week-long bicentennial
celebration that includes free evening presentations, concerts
and a fireworks show.



Participants in Saturday’s 11 a.m. parade will include the
Seneca Valley High School marching band; antique autos and
sports cars; historical military groups; public officials; local
organizations; and fire fighting vehicles. The parade will
proceed from Spring and German streets to Main Street,
through the diamond and then along Mercer Street to the
museum’s 1805 barn.



Dankfest presents authentic pioneer crafts, historical exhibits
and tours. Most artisans will demonstrate their skills near log
houses on Mercer Street, while others will be at the museum’s
Stewart Hall. They show a public that has always known the
ease of modern life the technologies that sustained pioneers.
Antiques and collectibles will be sold at the barn. The
museum’s 1825 Mennonite meetinghouse on Wise Road will
be filled with quilts, a display that continues through
Bicentennial Week. Museum and National Historic Landmark
District tours are offered, and visitors enjoy browsing the
Dankfest farmers’ market and Harmony’s shops.



A LegionVille Historical Society encampment will show a
diorama of the first U.S. military training camp where Maj.
Gen. Anthony Wayne readied the Legion of the United States
(later the Army) in 1792-93. Union Army reenactors will
present a Civil War camp. Soldiers and Native Americans,
participating in a weekend French & Indian War encampment
at the historic Old Stone House north of Moraine State Park,
will stroll Dankfest for a time on Saturday after marching in
the parade.



On Saturday, antique cars will be displayed at the barn and
classic sports cars in the diamond. Sunday, Aug. 29, will be
Mennonite Day, with descendants of local 19th century
Mennonites invited to bring along genealogical information
and old photos of family and area sites and to sign a guest
book at Stewart Hall.



Dankfest is also known for good food and refreshments with a
German touch, including sausages, chicken, roast beef, potato
pancakes and homemade root beer.



On Saturday at the museum’s barn, a late-afternoon fiddle
contest is followed at 7 p.m. by the Harmony Business
Association’s final free summer concert, a performance by
Kim Thomas & Diamonds in the Rough.



Dankfest concludes late Sunday, but Bicentennial Week
continues Monday, Aug. 30, through Saturday, Sept. 4, with
free concerts at 8 p.m. daily on the lawn at the museum’s
Mercer Road barn. Programs at 7 p.m. in the museum’s
Stewart Hall, are Monday’s presentation about the German
home town of Harmony and Harmony Society founder George
Rapp, Tuesday’s debut of "Harmony, The Movie," and
Thursday’s presentation on the early 20th century Harmony
Line interurban railway.



Reunions are part of the celebration’s final day. Dr. Arthur
Stewart, a physician who served Harmony for more than six
decades and was a founder of Historic Harmony, the historical
society that operates the Harmony Museum, delivered some
1,400 babies. They are invited to Stewart Hall with photos and
recollections of "Doc" Stewart. A block away at the Borough
Building, people who as Pittsburgh children attended the
Emma Farm Camp here between the 1930s and early 1970s
are invited to view a camp photo exhibit and share
recollections.



That evening brings the grand finale of Harmony’s
Bicentennial Week, an Old Economy Orchestra concert at the
barn followed by a Zambelli Internationale Fireworks show.



A new book about Harmony and bicentennial mementos will
be available during the celebration.



Harmony’s recorded history began with a Lenni Lenape
(Delaware) village visited by George Washington during a
1753 mission to the French at Ft. LeBoeuf, sparking the
French & Indian War. Nearby, a "French Indian" fired at
Washington what may have been the war’s first shot.
Harmony was founded in 1804 by the communal Harmony
Society of religious German Separatists. After they left in
1814, the area was resettled by Mennonites whose
congregation faded away by the early 1900s, although many of
their descendants remain. Stephen Foster lived here briefly as
a child, Charles Flowers made fine percussion rifles, and the
area participated in the region’s oil and gas boom of a century
ago.



With many buildings restored or refurbished, Harmony retains
the architectural character of a rural German village. One of
only 22 National Historic Landmarks in all of western
Pennsylvania, this year it received the Pennsylvania State
Association of Boroughs’ Historic Preservation Award for its
comprehensive commitment to preserving heritage resources
while emphasizing economic and community revitalization.
Dankfest parking and admission is free, with modest fees for
tours and the quilt show. Hours both days are noon to to 5 p.m.
Harmony is at Interstate 79 exits 87-88, about 30 miles north
of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of Pennsylvania
Turnpike exit 28, and 30 miles south of Interstate 80. Follow
Historic District and Dankfest signs.



CONTACTS:

Historic Harmony: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
or toll-free 888-821-4822

Harmony Borough: Jeff Smith, Council President, 724-452-
6780

7/26/04



HARMONY BICENTENNIAL WEEK

Schedule of Events



Saturday, Aug. 28

11 a.m., Parade, Spring St. to Museum’s Mercer Road Barn

Noon-5 p.m., Dankfest, Harmony Museum pioneer crafts
festival

5 p.m., fiddle contest, Mercer Road barn, presented by Butler
Eagle

7 p.m.: Harmony Business Association concert, Kim Thomas
& Diamonds in the Rough, Museum Barn, presented by Butler
Eagle & Harmony Museum
Sunday, Aug. 29

Noon-5 p.m., Dankfest



Monday, Aug. 30

7 p.m., "Iptingen, Germany," illustrated presentation on
hometown of Georg Rapp, founder of Harmony and
communal Harmony Society, by John Ruch, Stewart Hall

8 p.m.: Eugene & the Nightcrawlers, Museum Barn, presented
by Dambach Lumber



Tuesday, Aug. 31

1-4 p.m., Quilt Show, Mennonite meetinghouse, Wise Road

7 p.m., "Harmony, The Movie," debut showing of Harmony
video, Stewart Hall, presented by Armstrong

8 p.m., Sweet Adelines, Museum Barn, presented by VEKA



Wednesday, Sept. 1

1-4 p.m., Quilt Show, Mennonite meetinghouse, Wise Road

8 p.m., Ace Brown and his Hell Divers, Museum Barn




Thursday, Sept. 2

1-4 p.m., Quilt Show, Mennonite meetinghouse, Wise Road

7 p.m., "The Harmony Line," illustrated presentation about
1908-1931 Pittsburgh, Harmony, Butler & New Castle
Railroad interurban, by John Makar, Stewart Hall
8 p.m., Seneca Valley High School Barbershop Quartet and
Beautyshop Quartet, Museum Barn




Friday, Sept. 3

1-4 p.m., Quilt Show, Mennonite meetinghouse, Wise Road

8 p.m., John Burgh Band, Museum Barn, presented by
JADCO



Saturday, Sept. 4

1-4 p.m., Quilt Show, Mennonite meetinghouse, Wise Road

Noon-4 p.m., Doc Stewart Babies Reunion, Stewart Hall

Noon -4 p.m., Emma Farm Camp Reunion, Borough Building,
Mercer Street

8 p.m., Grand Finale: Old Economy Orchestra Concert,
Zambelli Internationale Fireworks show, Museum Barn
presented by Armstrong

				
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