ANNUAL ACTIVITY REPORT 2004

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					ASS O CIA TI O N DE LA JE UNE SSE P O UR        Y O U TH ASS O CIA TI O N FOR HU M AN
LA PROMOTION DES DROITS                      RIGHTS PROMOTION AND
DE L’HOMME ET LE DEVELOPPEMENT               DEVELOPMENT
(AJPRODHO-JIJUKIRWA) a.s. b.l                       (AJPRODHO - JIJUKIRWA)




            ANNUAL ACTIVITY REPORT 2004




                                                                  April 2005
 B.P. 6811 KIGALI-RWANDA                   Tel : ( 250) 515158
 E-mail : ajprodho_ jijukirwa@yahoo.fr     Tél. : (250) 08410075
                                           Compte B.K 050-0088064-05/RWF
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                                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS


TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................... I

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ..................................................................................................... III

PREFACE .................................................................................................................................... IV

I. INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................1

I.1. PRESENTATION OF THE ORGANISATION ....................................................................... 1
I.2. ACTIVITIES PLANNED TO BE UNDERTAKEN DURING THE YEAR 2004 .................. 2
I.3. BRIEF CONTEXT ANALYSIS .............................................................................................. 3

II. PRESENTATION OF ACTIVITIES REALISED DURING THE YEAR 2004 .................6

II.1. HUMAN RIGHTS PROMOTION .......................................................................................... 6
§ REINFORCING HUMAN RIGHTS CLUBS AND FOCAL POINTS IN BUTARE PROVINCE .......................... 6
§ TRAINING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND FOCAL POINTS IN THE DISTRICTS OF
        BUDAHA, GISUNZU AND RUTSIRO OF KIBUYE PROVINCE AS WELL AS HOSTING INTER–
        CLUB ARTISTIC COMPETITIONS FROM THE ABOVE MENTIONED DISTRICTS................................. 7
§ SENSITIZING YOUTH ON HUMAN RIGHTS THROUGH THE PROJECTION OF A FILM “ITEGEKO
        NTIRITERANYA” ................................................................................................................ 8
§ SENSITIZING YOUTH ON HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE PROVINCE OF UMUTARA, PHASE ONE. ................... 9
II.2. HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION ....................................................................................... 11
§ SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE COUNTRY. ..................................................... 11
§ INVESTIGATING PARTICULAR CASES OF HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS............................................ 12
II.3. DEVELOPMENT .................................................................................................................. 14
§ SENSITIZING YOUTH TO GROUP THEMSELVES INTO DEVELOPMENTAL ASSOCIATIONS.................... 14
§ ASSISTING YOUTH ASSOCIATIONS IN THE ELABORATION OF THEIR PROJECTS TO MEET CREDIT
        CRITERIA ............................................................................................................................... 14
§ PARTICIPATION IN THE ELABORATION OF THE NATIONAL POLICY ON YOUTH EMPLOYMENT. ...... 14
II.4. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ORGANISATION OF CIVIL SOCIETY................................ 15
§ PARTICIPATION IN VARIOUS CIVIL SOCIETY INITIATIVES AT THE NATIONAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS
        .............................................................................................................................................. 15
§ ORGANIZING A YOUTH CONFERENCE ON YOUTH PERSPECTIVES 10 YEARS AFTER THE GENOCIDE. 15
§ ORGANIZING A YOUTH CONFERENCE AIMED AT COLLECTING YOUTH VIEWS IN LINE WITH THE
        ICGLR.................................................................................................................................. 16
§ SPEARHEADING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NETWORK OF YOUTH ASSOCIATIONS......................... 18
II.5. INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING........................................................................ 18
§ TRAININGS AND CAPACITY BUILDING WORKSHOPS ....................................................................... 18
§ STATUTORY MODIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................ 20
§ VISITORS RECEIVED ..................................................................................................................... 20
II.6. CROSS CUTTING ISSUES .................................................................................................. 21
                                                                      ii
III. RESULTS ASSESSMENT....................................................................................................22

IV. PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED ...........................................................................................28

V. FUTURE PERSPECTIVES....................................................................................................29

VI. RECOMMENDATIONS.......................................................................................................30

VI.1. TO ALL RWANDAN YOUTH AND YOUTH ASSOCIATIONS: ...................................................... 30
VI.2. TO THE GOVERNMENT OF RWANDA ...................................................................................... 30
VI.3. TO THE RWANDAN CIVIL SOCIETY ........................................................................................ 31
VI..4. TO THE DONOR COMMUNITY ................................................................................................ 32

CONCLUSION .............................................................................................................................33

ANNEXES .....................................................................................................................................34
                                       iii

                        LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
ACIPA             : Action Citoyenne pour la Paix.
AJPRODHO          : Association de la Jeunesse pour la Promotion des Droits
                    de l’Homme et le Développement.
CHEBON          : Chemin du bonneur
CECI               : Centre Canadienne d’Etude et de la Coopération
                    Internationale.
CJEGADHO           : Club des Jeunes de Gasabo pour la Promotion des Droits
                    de l’Homme.
CLADHO             : Collectif des Associations des Droits de l’Homme aux
                    Rwanda.
DRC               : Democratic Republic of Congo
ET                 : Ecole Technique.
ES               : Ecole secondaire
EAV           : Ecole Agri-Verterinaire
S.S               : Secondary School
GS                 : Groupe Scolaire.
ICGLR            : International Conference on the Great Lakes Region
LDGL               : Ligue des Droits de la Personne dans la région des Grands Lacs.
NUR               : National University of Rwanda.
PRSP              : Poverty Reduction Strategic Paper
SDC               : Swiss Development Cooperation.
CC           : College Communal
NPA           : Norwegian People’s Aid
CRY-UGANDA   : Conflict Resolution by Youth –UGANDA
DED          : Deutscher Entwicklungsdienst (German service for Development)
ICRC          : International Committee of the Red Cross
11.11.11         : Coalition of the Flemish North-South Movement
LIPRODHOR     : Ligue Rwandaise pour la Promotion et la Défence des Droits de
                l’Homme
AGR            : Association des Guides du Rwanda
St           : Saint
UN                : United Nations
AU                : African Union
COMESA            : Common Market for Eastern and South Africa
NEPAD             : New Partnership for Africa Development
MDC’s             : More Developed Countries
ICT               : Information Communication Technology
CESTRAR           : Censtrale des syndicats des Travailleurs du Rwanda
MINALOC           : Ministry of Local Government, Community Development and Social
                  Affairs
MINIJUST          : Ministry of Justice
MIGEPROF          : Ministry of Gender and Women Promotion
MIJESPOC          : Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
                                                  iv
                                          PREFACE
The present activity report covers activities undertaken by the Association during the
calendar year 2004. Generally speaking, the year was a busy one in comparison to the
previous years. The Association was able to register more concrete activities in all her axes as
well as consolidating on those undertaken in the previous years.

However, we contend that building a culture of human rights respect in a post-Genocide
situation is a complex and a long-term process. It calls for systematic and focused innovative
approaches, which addresses the root causes of the deterioration of the human rights situation
as well as a participatory approach targeting a cross- section of the entire population and
leaders in various capacities. In particular, the role of youth in the equal participation of
males and females in the course of building a human rights culture need not be emphasized.
We greatly applaud the existing good political will in this effect and call upon all
stakeholders to work together to achieve this noble goal.

Further more, we would like to take this opportunity to thank once again all those who
contributed to the moral, material and financial support of the Association, which enabled her
to register the activities undertaken. The detailed list of partners has been annexed to the
present report as annex 1. In particular, we are grateful to CECI-ACIPA, SDC, and the
European      Union     in     collaboration       with   the   Government       of    Rwanda
(MINJUST&MINECOFIN), NPA, 11.11.11 and TROCAIRE for their financial support.
Also, great thanks goes to local partner organisations that we have worked with in synergy to
promote human rights as well as ameliorating the socio-economic welfare of the population.
In particular, we are grateful to LDGL, of which the Association is a member of, for their
relentless efforts to enable our staff and members benefit from a number of capacity building
trainings. We also cannot fail to acknowledge various State organs, Provincial authorities in
particular those of Kibuye, Butare and Umutara, Local Government structures and Public
Institutions for their moral and technical support. Last but not least we are grateful to the
devotion of the Association’s leadership, staff, and the entire members in the realization of
the activities mentioned in the present report.


                                      KAGABA Aflodis

                                           President.
                                                1

                                     I. INTRODUCTION

The activities covered have been presented in five axes as categorised in the Association’s
strategic plan namely, human rights promotion, human rights protection, development,
contributing to the building of Rwandan civil society as well as institutional capacity building.
Also the report has a section on cross- cutting activities undertaken.

I.1. PRESENTATION OF THE ORGANISATION

The Youth Association for Human Rights and Development (AJPRODHO-JIJUKIRWA) is
a local, non-profit making, Youth Organisation committed to promote human rights and
development.

The vision of the Association is “a peaceful society where there is youth participation for
social justice and descent living conditions for all.”

The mission of the Association is “to empower the youth for human rights respect and
advocate for socio-economic betterment.”

The Association has five objectives namely;
   (i)     To promote and protect human rights in line with national and international
           legislations;
   (ii)    To adopt an integrated approach for promoting human rights and Development;
   (iii)   To sensitize the youth about their rights and duties in society, awakening them
           about development as a prerequisite to attainment of one’s objectives as well as
           promoting a culture of hardworking among them;
   (iv)    To promote gender equality and social welfare;
   (v)     To sensitise youth on environment conservation and protection activities as a basis for
           full enjoyment of human rights.

Today, the Association has 100 members of whom 31% are females. The Association’s head
offices are located in KIGALI City in KACYIRU, Kamutwa Cellule just behind the National
Police Head Quarters. More so, the Association has branch offices in Butare, Kibuye and
Umutara Provinces.
                                               2
Concerning the structure, the Association has a General Assembly as its supreme organ. It has
an Administration Council composed of 9 members namely, the President, Vice-President,
Secretary-General, Treasurer, Commissioners in charge of Education and Mass Mobilisation,
Production, Gender and Social Affairs, Public Relations and Information as well as Legal
Affairs. The Administration Council is the administrative organ of the Association. Members
of the Administration Council have a mandate of two years. Besides, the Association also has
a Control and Evaluation Commission in-charge of the General Control and Evaluation of the
Association’s activities including the performance of the Administration Council. It presents
its reports to the General Assembly.

The association also has a Board of Advisors headed by the Association’s Patron. Today, the
Patron of the association is Prof. Silas MURERAMANZI, the National University of
Rwanda’s Vice-Rector for Academic Affairs. The Association has also an Electoral
Commission in-charge of organizing elections for various office bearers.

In addition, the Association has an Executive Secretariat composed of senior permanent
personnel and supporting staff in-charge of the day-to-day execution of the Association’s
activities. The detailed organizational chart of the Association has been annexed to the present
report as annex 2.

I.2. ACTIVITIES PLANNED TO BE UNDERTAKEN DURING THE YEAR 2004

The Association had earmarked various activities to be undertaken during the year 2004. The
activities were set in line with the five axes. In line with the promotion of human rights, the
Association had set itself to continue undertaking activities in line with sensitizing people on
their rights and duties in society with specific emphasis on youth in Butare, Kibuye and
Umutara provinces.

In the axis of human rights protection, the Association had earmarked the following initiatives
in the zone of operation for the Association: Human rights monitoring and legal assistance,
monitoring closely major national events involving human rights violations, monitoring the
operation of Gacaca jurisdictions with special emphasis at youth participation and handling of
minors’ cases during Gacaca jurisdictions as well as monitoring and investigating cases of
sexual violence committed against children and women.
                                                3
Concerning with the axis of development, the Association had set itself the following
activities: training of youth in conception, formulation, management and follow-up of income
generating projects as well as orienting them to micro-finance institutions to access credit for
implementing their projects, advocating for youth employment in Rwanda as well as
monitoring the performance of development projects in relation to their impact on improving
the socio-economic welfare of the population and in particular youth.


In relation to the axis of institutional capacity building, the Association had set itself the
following activities: strengthening the permanent secretariat in terms of increasing the number
of personnel and equipment, increased capacity building of members and personnel of the
Association in terms of trainings as well as working on the Association’s Administrative and
financial manual of procedures.

In line with contributing to the building of civil society, the Association had earmarked the
following activities: organizing conferences bringing together youth organisations to debate
on topical issues in particular mobilizing youth perspectives 10 years after the Genocide and
involving the youth in collecting views in line with organizing the International Conference
on Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region, participating in various civil society
meetings and initiatives at the national and regional level in the country as well as
contributing to the establishment of a youth action network bringing together all youth
associations in the country.

I.3. BRIEF CONTEXT ANALYSIS

Before delving deep in the presentation and analysis of the activities undertaken, it is
imperative to highlight important elements of the political, economic and social environment
in relation to the human rights situation, which marked the year 2004 in the country.

Politically, during the year 2004, Rwanda commemorated 10 years after the Genocide as well
as the launching of the 3rd phase of Gacaca jurisdictions. However, 10 years after the
Genocide and with all the multi-facetted efforts from various stakeholders to foster unity and
reconciliation, it was manifested from various sources that the Genocide ideology is still fresh
to the extent that a cross-section of the Rwandan population has been “poisoned” by the
Genocide ideology including the youth in schools. Indicators of the Genocide ideology were
                                               4
manifested through systematic massacres in cold blood of Genocide survivors and those who
labored to expose the truth in Genocide cases. Massacres were rampant in Gikongoro, Butare
and Kigali-Ngali provinces. The Association calls upon the Government to accord more
security to the survivors of the Genocide and those willing to testify in Genocide cases.
Furthermore, the Government, through her duly competent judicial mechanisms respecting all
judicial guarantees, should punish heavily the perpetrators of the genocide ideology.

Also, the year saw the overhauling of the justice system coupled with sound reforms in
legislations rendering the judiciary to best guarantee the enjoyment of all human rights and
freedoms. The reform brings hope towards establishment of a state of rule of law in the
country. However, the Association notes with regret that the judicial structures and personnel
suffer from a dearth of material resources in order to render equitable and expedient justice.

Further more, the year was characterized by a wave of resignations of various district mayors
and sector coordinators arising from bad governance, an indication of democracy at work
through the decentralization process. However, given the gravity and extent of the charges
against the local authorities who resigned, it exposed that there are insufficient mechanisms of
rapid checks and balances in the decentralization system itself resulting from structural
bottlenecks as well as weak participation of the masses including the youth, in the decision
making processes.

Also, cases of rape and defilement continued to rise despite intensive mechanisms to combat
the problem. Youth and children continue to be most groups touched by the problem as
victims or perpetrators of the crime. However, one element observed in relation to the crime,
which needs special attention, was false accusations of some people to have committed the
crime due to selfish ends.

Economically, poverty in rural areas continues to be the leading cause of deprivation of basic
human rights despite various government policies aimed at poverty alleviation. It should be
highlighted that youth continue to be among the most affected group of the populace.
However, it should be highlighted at this point that poverty especially among the youth has
been aggravated in one way by government policies, which lack alternative solutions such as
the ban on brick making, transporting people on bicycles in towns, and vendors in towns. The
                                                 5
position of the Association is that such measures that directly affect the welfare of masses
should be adopted simultaneously with alternative measures.

Socially, the HIV/AIDS scourge continues to rise at alarming levels. The position of the
Association is that more coordination of activities against combating the HIV /AIDS is
required with special emphasis at addressing the root causes of unprotected sex such as
poverty, degeneration of morals, unbalanced power relations between men and women as well
as taking care of those infected with the HIV/AIDS and needy orphans of the epidemic.

Following the brief context analysis, one can strongly assert that the human rights situation in
Rwanda remain problematic. However, there is political will to change the situation hence
calling for unwavering activities with innovative strategies from various stakeholders
including the civil society to improve the situation to the better.
                                               6



    II. PRESENTATION OF ACTIVITIES REALISED DURING THE YEAR 2004

In conformity with the Association’s axes, the activities registered have been presented in line
with the five axes mentioned earlier.


II.1. HUMAN RIGHTS PROMOTION

§ Reinforcing Human rights Clubs and Focal Points in Butare Province

With the financial grant from CECI-ACIPA, the Association was able to undertake a
comprehensive set of activities aimed at reinforcing existing human rights clubs and
nominating youth focal points in the Province of Butare.
Under the project, the following activities were undertaken in line with reinforcing the
capacity of human rights clubs and youth focal points:
    Clubs were trained to elaborate their own statutes and internal rules guiding their
       operation as well as designing for them an action plan. In this regard, 31 clubs in
       secondary schools and 3 rural based clubs (see annex 3) were reinforced. Also in same
       line, clubs were sensitised on gender and the law regulating succession. In that line, 3
       human rights club’s representatives from each school underwent a two-days training
       on techniques of human rights monitoring and investigation of human rights
       violations. In addition, clubs were given documentation materials on human rights;

    Organising a round table conference for all actors working in the field of creating and
       reinforcing human rights clubs aimed at promoting synergy, avoiding duplication of
       activities and working out a coordinated program to reinforce the capacity of human
       rights clubs in Butare Province;

    Organising a round table conference bringing together all Directors of secondary
       schools with human rights clubs together with the Director in charge of Education in
       Butare Province aimed at winning the full support of school authorities to the activities
       of human rights clubs in their respective schools;

    Sensitising various actors towards the establishment of a National Policy supporting
       human rights clubs in all secondary schools in order to make the initiative sustainable.
                                               7
    Training of focal points on Gender, the law of succession as well as monitoring and
       investigating of human rights violations. In total 50 Focal Points in the Province of
       Butare were trained on mechanisms of monitoring, investigation and documentation of
       human rights violations, Gender and Development as well as the law regulating
       succession.

    Evaluation and follow-up of activities of human rights clubs and focal points. The
       activity enabled the Association to advise accordingly members of clubs and focal
       points on technical issues including how to handle various cases of human rights
       violations.

§ Training of representatives of Human rights and Focal Points in the Districts of
BUDAHA, GISUNZU and RUTSIRO of Kibuye Province as well as hosting inter–club
artistic competitions from the above mentioned districts.

The activities were part of a project funded by SDC entitled “Youth sensitization on human
rights and fundamental freedoms in Kibuye Province, phase two”. In relation to the activity,
the Association was able to train 18 representatives of each human rights clubs and 3 focal
points from each sector in the districts of all Budaha, Gisunzu and Rutsiro. The training
sessions were organized at the level of each district. In total 2 500 club’s representatives and
focal points were trained. Out of them 594 were females, representing 23.7 % of the
participants. Participants were trained on the following themes: introduction to human rights,
the relationship between human rights and justice as well as introduction to criminal
procedure, the law regulating matrimonial regimes, liberalities and succession, the role of
human rights in the promotion of a culture of peace, unity and national reconciliation,
situation analysis of human rights as well as techniques of investigating human rights and
advocacy skills.



Besides the training, inter–clubs artistic competitions on the theme “the role of educated
youth in promoting and protecting human rights” were organized, bringing together all
schools sensitized in the second phase the project (see table 1 below for the schools which
participated in the competitions). Clubs presented theatres, songs, poems and drawings on the
above-mentioned theme.
                                               8
The competitions were hosted at district levels. In line with the right to access to information,
the best performing clubs were awarded with radios of various sizes as prizes. The table
below shows the performance of the schools, which participated in the competitions:

Table 1: Schools that participated in the inter-clubs artistic competitions in Budaha,
Rutsiro and Gisunzu districts.
SITE                    SCHOOLS                    SCORE                  POSITION
NYANGE                  1.EAV KIVUMU               85 %                   1
                        2.ESP NYANGE               76.3 %                 2
                        3.IP KILINDA               65.8%                  3
                        4.ESI KILINDA              65%                    4
CONGO-NIL               5.ES MURUNDA               69.5                   1
                        6.GS BUMBA                 68.3                   2
                        7.CEP RUTSIRO              65.5 %                 3
                        8.ESB RUTSIRO              62.8%                  4
MABANZA                 9.COLLEGE                  69.5                   1
                        AMAHORO/KIZIBA
                        10.IPESAR                  68.3                   2
                        RUBENGERA
                        11.CC MABANZA              65.5%                  3




§ Sensitizing youth on human rights through the projection of a film “ITEGEKO
NTIRITERANYA”

The activity was in line with the project entitled “ Sensitizing the population on human
rights through the projection of a film ITEGEKO NTIRITERANYA” with the generous
grant from the European Union 8TH FED in collaboration with the Government of Rwanda
through the project “ Soutien à l’ Etat de droit et aux initiatives de promotion des droits
de la personne et la réconciliation nationale” under the Ministry of Justice and Institutional
Relations. After producing the film ”ITEGEKO NTIRITERANYA”, the Association
undertook extensive sensitization campaign in 55 secondary schools and all districts and the
town of Butare Province.
                                               9
Before, and after the projection of the film, the audience was engaged in open debates on
human rights running from general principles and rights to specific rights for children, women
and workers rights. Also, participants were sensitized on various avenues of having their
rights restored including recourse to the justice system. But above all, the audience was
sensitized on perceiving the judicial process as obligatory for maintaining a state which
respect the rule of law and after it has taken its course, the families or former parties to the
process should view it as the between former adversaries.

§ Sensitizing youth on human rights in the province of Umutara, phase one.

With the generous grant from NPA-RWANDA, the Association was able to undertake a
project entitled “Youth sensitization on Human rights in the Province of Umutara phase
1”. The project had the following activities: sensitizing students in 16 secondary schools on
human rights as well as launching human rights clubs in all those schools visited, sensitizing
non-schooling youth in four sectors in each district and Umutara town as well as electing
youth focal points on human rights in each sector sensitized.

Another activity of the project was to train representatives of human rights clubs and focal
points in order to equip them with the basic skills to have them fully engaged in human rights
promotion and protection activities.

Table 2: Secondary schools and sectors covered during the project execution.
DISTRICT/TOWN                  NAME OF SCHOOL                   SECTORS
1. UMUTARA                     1.NYAGATARE SS                   1. NSHEKE &BARIJA
                               2. UMUTARA                       2. RUTARAKA&NYAGATARE
                               POLYTECHNIC
                               3.NYAGATARE NURSING
                               SCHOOL
2. MUVUMBA                     4.SOPEM                          1. GASHENYI &RUKOMO
                               5. ETP NYARUREMA                 2. RWEBARE&MUKAMA
3.BUGARAGARA                   6.KAGITUMBA High                 1. MUSHERI &KIJOJO
                               School
                               7.GS GACUNDEZI                   2. CYENJONJO&RWEMPASHA
4.GABIRO                       8. GABIRO High School            1.RWEMBOGO & MUNINI
                                                10
                                9.KARANGAZI S.S                   2. KARANGAZI & NDAMA
5.KAHI                          10.NYAKAYAGA S.S                  1.KABAROLE & NYAKAYAGA
                                11.BIHINGA S.S                    2. MUKARANGE & GITOKE
6. KABARE                       12. MUSHERI SS                    1. MUSHERI &KIJOJO


                                                                  2. CYENJONJO&RWEMPASHA
7.MURAMBI                       13.APECOM                         1. GAKENKE & KIZIGURO
                                14.KIZIGURO                       2. NDATEMWA & GIKOMA
8. RUKARA                       15. RUKARA TTC                    1.MWIRI & NYAWERA
                                16.G.S GAHINI                     2.GAHINI & KIYENZI




Both schooling and non-schooling youth were sensitized on the following themes: definition,
origin, history and fundamental principles of human rights, fundamental human rights as
enshrined in international human rights conventions ratified by Rwanda as well as national
legislations, the rights of the child, the rights of a woman as well as introduction to the
concept of Gender.
In regard to non-schooling youth in districts, as a matter of methodology to attract as many as
youth as possible, a football match was organized between two sectors and before and after
the match, the audience was sensitized on human rights.

In relation to the training, two training sessions were held for representatives of human rights
clubs and focal points respectively. During the training, participants were trained on the
following themes:
1. General Introduction to human rights;
2. The law of Succession and, liberalities and matrimonial regimes;
3. Women’s rights, Gender and Development;
4. The rights of the child;
5. Mechanisms of protecting human rights;
6. Analysing the situation of human rights at the national and in the province of Umutara;
7. The role of Human rights clubs/ focal points in the promotion and protection of human
rights.
                                                11
II.2. HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION


§ Situational analysis of human rights in the country.
The human rights situation has progressively improved in the country in general. With the
judicial reform, the hopes are even higher that the judiciary is going to guarantee the
enjoyment of human rights in the country. Also hopes are further raised by increased
liberalization of the media in particular by allowing pluralistic radio stations despite the fact
that up to the present day they are not yet involved in critical debates concerning national
politics.


Nevertheless, the year was characterized by some incidences involving human rights
violations. We have judged it properly to mention the following:
     Systematic massacres of Genocide survivors and other people who have testified or
        ready to expose the truth surrounding Genocide. There were many such cases in the
        provinces of Gikongoro (Kaduha and Karaba districts), Butare (Nyamure, Nyakizu
        and Kibingo districts) as well as Kigali-Ngali Provinces (Bicumbi District). It is
        deplorable to note that some of the massacres were planned during broad day light but
        local authorities as well as security agents failed to prevent such massacres.

     Violation of the principle of presumption of innocence and denial of the right to self-
        defense before judgment is rendered. We strongly denounce the practice on part of the
        Government, judicial authorities and the populace for acting in a manner contrary to
        the fundamental human rights principle of presumption of innocence. In some cases,
        the guiding principle has been the contrary, presumption of guilt. The massive arrest
        of students and teachers on charges of the Genocide ideology including the decision to
        refuse them to sit for their exams before a complete dossier incriminating them was
        complete is an evident case to illustrate the violation referred hereto.

     The socio-economic welfare of the masses in rural areas continues to stagnate/and or
        deteriorates. Despite the existence of several development projects aimed at
        ameliorating the socio-economic welfare of the masses in rural areas, there have been
        no significant changes in the welfare of the masses. As a result, abject poverty
        continues to deprive many people the right to have decent living conditions. One of
                                               12
       the major reasons for this has been corruption and inefficiency on part of local leaders
       as well as Government and administrative policies which have banned some sources
       of income generating activities on part of the masses not yet offering alternative
       sources of earning income. The ban on         the use of trees to make bricks, charcoal,
       construction materials, vendors in towns as well as transport of people on bicycles in
       towns are clear cases in point.

    The right to participate in the decision-making processes is not yet entrenched among
       Rwandans especially the youth. Despite the political will, there is still the “natural
       fear of leaders” and indifference to decisions affecting their welfare. This is basically
       due to insufficient civic education of the masses on their rights and duties.


§ Investigating particular cases of human rights violations.

In this regard, the Association made a follow-up of cases reported to its offices or initiated on
its own. On average, the Association registered 15 cases every month. However, on average,
only 5 cases per month had their case files opened as cases involving violations of human
rights. The remaining cases were administrative issues, which had not yet been exhausted
hence oriented to local authorities for remedy. The association managed to obtain a
satisfactory settlement to over 76.9 % of all the cases received. The remaining cases remain
pending.

The approach used in obtaining solutions to such cases included: negotiations, arbitration,
accompanying victims to lodge legal suits with the prosecution department, courts, the police
and the Abunzi (mediators at the sector level elected to handle minor offences and civil suits),
advocacy as well as cooperation with other human rights Associations operating in our zone
of coverage and the National Human rights Commission. Most cases handled can be
categorised into 6 major categories as can be illustrated in the table below:
                                             13
Table3: Case files opened involving violations of human rights violations during the
   year 2004.
         Category              Number of cases         Cases solved        Cases pending
1.Workers               rights 8                  6                   2
including the right to
social security, terminal
benefits    and    arbitrary
expulsion from work
2.Succession      and    land 18                  12                  6
rights


3.VIOLENCE AGAINST             12                 10                  2
CHILDREN
INCLUDING           CHILD
DEFILEMENT CASES

4.Arbitrary detention          10                 7                   3
5.VIOLENCE AGAINST 6                              4                   2
WOMEN

6.EXECUTION               OF 7                    5                   2
JUDGMENTS

Total                          61                 44                  17
                                                 14

II.3. DEVELOPMENT
Under the axis of development, the following activities were undertaken:

§ Sensitizing youth to group themselves into developmental associations.

This has been always a special message passed over to youth especially non-schooling youth.
The same message has been given to human rights focal points operating at grass root level to
disseminate. As a matter of strategy, they have been asked to help youth form associations so
as to become easily accessible for sensitization on human rights and easy access for them to
credit.

§ Assisting youth Associations in the elaboration of their projects to meet credit criteria
The Association’s staff render technical assistance to youth Associations by assisting them to
write good project proposals as well as orienting them to potential sources of funding in
particular to micro-finance facilities operating in their respective districts.

§ Participation in the elaboration of the National policy on Youth Employment.
Under the patronage of the Ministry of Public Works, Skills Development and Labor, the
Association has actively contributed to the elaboration of a National Policy on Youth
Employment, which is pending approval by the Government.
                                                15
II.4. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ORGANISATION OF CIVIL SOCIETY

In this axis, the Association spearheaded various initiatives especially aimed at positioning
herself as an active civil society organisation at the national and regional levels as well as well
as mobilizing increased participation of youth in particular and youth associations in general
in national development. In this line with the above, the following activities were undertaken:

§ Participation in various civil society initiatives at the National and Regional levels
The Association has played a leading role in mobilizing the Rwandan civil society to
participate actively in the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR). The
Association is part of the Rwandan Civil Society follow-up Committee on the ICGLR.
Besides, the Association is also a member of the Regional follow -up committee on the
ICGLR composed of delegates from Rwanda, Burundi and the DRC. In respect to above, the
Association played a great role in the collection of views on part of the civil society to be
incorporated in the national cahier de charge. More so, the Association has taken part in
various civil society conferences and networks during the year.



§ Organizing a youth conference on Youth perspectives 10 years after the Genocide.

With the generous grant from 11.11.11, the Association organized a two-days conference
from 28th to 29th April 2004 at St-Paul conference center in Kigali. The conference brought
together 96 participants, of whom 32 % were women, from youth Associations all over the
country, students as well as Provincial representatives of the National Youth council
structures.
The objective of the conference was three fold:
 To reflect on the causes of the Genocide;
 To devise strategies through which Rwandan youth can prevent the re-occurrence of the
   Genocide in Rwanda, elsewhere in the region or the entire world;
 To implicate the youth in managing the post-genocide consequences.


The conference was officially opened by the Secretary General in the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture and was officially closed by the delegate of the President of the National
Youth Council.
During the conference, participants discussed the following themes:
                                              16
1. The causes of Genocide in Rwandan and assessment of the Genocide ideology today, by
Mr TOM NDAHIRO, Commissioner, National Human rights Commission;
2. The role of youth in the Rwandan Genocide and their role in making ‘never again’ to
Genocide become a reality, Hon. KABONEKA Francis, Youth Member of Parliament;
3. The course of Justice in Genocide cases: How far? Obstacles and the way forward, by Mr
MARTIN NGOGA, Rwanda’s Deputy Prosecutor General;
4. Preventing Genocide through building a culture of Human rights respect and the role of
youth in that struggle, by Mr MUDAKIKWA John, Executive Secretary, AJPRODHO-
JIJUKIRWA
5. To what extent has the reconciliation process taken root? By Senator MPAYIMANA Elie,
by then a Commissioner with the National Unity and Reconciliation Commission.

During the conference, participants came up with a specific message containing youth
perspectives to different stakeholders. For the detailed document containing youth
perspectives adopted during the conference see annex 4.

§ Organizing a youth conference aimed at collecting youth views in line with the ICGLR.

In line with the preparation of the International Conference on Peace and Security in the Great
Lakes Region hosted in November in Tanzania, the Association, in collaboration with the
National Youth Council organized a two -days conference bringing together Youths to give
their views to be incorporated in the Country’s cahier de charge. The conference was funded
principally by TROCAIRE.

The conference took place at Rwanda Red Cross premises in Kacyiru, from 20th up to 21st
August 2004. In total, 94 delegates representing 47 Youth Associations all over the country
attended the conference. 27.26 % of the participants were females.

The conference was opened officially by Honourable RENZAHO Giovani, Youth Member
of Parliament and was closed officially by Ambassador MUTABOBA Joseph the Secretary
General of the Ministry for Internal Affairs and at the same time the head of thematic group
on Peace and Security at the National Preparatory Committee (NPC) on the ICGLR.
                                             17
The global objective of the Youth conference was to implicate youth in the ICGLR by
collecting their views on the four themes of the ICGLR. The specific objectives of the Youth
conference were:
    To share information about the ICGLR,
    To collect youth perspectives as regards ICGLR;
    To sensitise youth about the transmission of information to the whole population about
       the due conference on the Great Lakes region.

During the conference, participants discussed the following themes:
   1. The background of the International Conference on Peace and Security, Good
       Governance and Democracy, Economic Development and Regional Integration Social
       Affairs, Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs, (ICGLR) as well as highlighting on
       how far the preparations have gone, presented by Ambassador SEZIBERA Richard,
       Special Envoy of the President of the Republic of Rwanda to the Great Lakes Region
       and at the same time head of the National Preparatory Committee (NPC) on the
       ICGLR.
   2. The role of the Rwandan Civil Society in the ICGLR and highlighting how far the
       Rwandan Civil Society has gone in collecting views to constitute the Rwandan civil
       society document, presented by Madam INGABIRE Immaculée, the Executive
       Secretary of the Rwandan Civil Society follow-up Committee of the ICGLR.
   3. The role of the youth in the ICGLR and highlighting how far the Rwandan Youth has
       gone in collecting views to constitute the Rwandan document containing Youth views,
       presented by Mr. RWAGITARE Claude, the Permanent Secretary of the National
       Youth Council.

After the presentation, participants were grouped into five working groups. The first group
worked on the thematic group on Peace and Security. The second group worked on
Democracy and Good Governance. The third group worked on Economic Development and
Regional Integration and the fourth group worked on Humanitarian Issues, Human Rights and
Social Affairs. The fifth group was assigned with drafting a Declaration condemning the
Gatumba massacres, which had been perpetrated shortly before the tenure of the conference.
The detailed recommendations of the youth in relation to the ICGLR and a detailed
                                                18
declaration on the Gatumba massacres have been annexed to the present report as annexes 5
and 6 respectively.

§ Spearheading the establishment of a network of youth Associations.
In line with implementing one of the recommendations of the Rwanda Youth Summit (RYS)
organized by the Association in 2002 calling for the establishment of a Youth Network
bringing together youth Associations and in particular assigning the Association to spearhead
that process, the Association has undertaken concrete consultations with lead organisations to
see how the Network can be formed. We are optimistic that by the end of the year 2005, the
network shall be operational.

II.5. INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING

In relation to capacity building activities, the Association registered the following activities:

§ Trainings and capacity building workshops

The Association’s members including members of the Council of Administration as well as
personnel benefited from various trainings as can be summarized in the table below:

Table 4. Various Trainings and Capacity building workshops undertaken during the
year
Conference/Training                Attendant             Organisers             Place
attended
1.Organisational reinforcement     The Executive         LDGL in                KIBUYE
                                   Secretary             collaboration with
                                                         MDF Training
                                                         and Consultancy,
                                                         Eastern and
                                                         Southern Africa.
2.Training of members of the 45 members                  AJPRODHO with          BUTARE
Association on gender and the                            financial grant
law of succession                                        from CECI-
                                                         ACIPA
3.Training on special              The Executive         LDGL in                KIBUYE
Procedures in line with human      Secretary             collaboration with
                                             19
rights protection                                   the Geneva based
                                                    International
                                                    Service for
                                                    Human rights.
4.Training in Documentation    The Executive        LDGL in              GISENYI
and Monitoring of Human        Secretary            collaboration with
rights violations                                   Amnesty
                                                    International
5. Training on elementary      The head of          LDGL                 KIGALI
elements on writing            Umutara branch
journalistic articles          office
5.Training in training         The Head of          LDGL in              GISENYI
techniques                     Kibuye branch        collaboration with
                               office               MDF
6.Regional Civil Society       The Secretary        CECI-ACIPA           GOMA(DRC)
conference on ICGLR            General and
                               NYIRASANGWA
                               Violet (member)
7.Regional Youth Conference    The President and    Regional Youth       KAMPALA
                                                                         (UGANDA)
on the ICGLR                   Commissioner for     Link in
                               Information and      collaboration with
                               Public relations     the UN
8.Regional Youth Camp on       4 members            Burundi’s Scouts     GITEGA
reconciliation                                      Movement             (BURUNDI)
9. Great Lakes Inter-University The                 NGOZI                NGOZI
Forum on peace                 Commissioner for     University           (BURUNDI)
                               Gender
10.Youth Conference on         The vice President   ALTERNATIVES NIAMEY
Peace, citizenship and Human                                             (NIGER) and
Rights from Francophone                                                  ABDIJAN
countries                                                                (IVORY
                                                                         COST)
                                              20
11.Regional Peace Camp on         Two members           CRY- UGANDA          KUMI
Conflict Resolution                                                          (UGANDA)
12.Regional conference on         One member            East African         NAIROBI
Environment protection                                  Environment          (KENYA)
                                                        Network
13. Training on gender based      The                   MIGEPROF             KIGALI
legislation                       Commissioner in
                                  charge of Gender
                                  and BAGABO
                                  Georges (member)
13. Training on Cineduc (using    4 members             DED                  BUTARE
cinema as an education tool)                                                 Town




§ Statutory modifications

The year 2004 saw amendments to the Association’s Statute in order to revitalize the
Association’s operation as well as conforming it to the National legislations regulating the
operation of non-profit making organisations. The amendments were unanimously approved
by the General Assembly held on 11th December 2004 at St-Paul Conference Hall. One of the
major amendments was the relocation of the Association’s headquarters from Butare town to
Kigali city. Also the Board of Advisors was restructured to render the organ more efficient in
fulfilling its duties. In this line the Board was enlarged from 5 to 9 members.

§ Visitors received

The Association shared experience and received support from various visitors through out the
year. Notable of these visits have been summarized in the table below:
                                             21
Table 5: Visitors received during the year 2004.
      VISITORS                 ORGANISATION                     AREA OF DISCUSSION
Mr Johan Cottenie &        11.11.11                      Association’s activities and plan of
Madame Geerts                                            partnership.
The Parliamentary          Rwandan Parliament,           The Association’s perspective on the
Commission probing         (chamber of Deputies)         Genocide ideology in Rwanda
the existence of the
Genocide ideology in
Rwanda
Madame Alison Des          Human rights watch            Associations analysis of the human
Forges and Sarah Wellis                                  rights situation and possible fields of
                                                         partnership
Mr. Pascal Jecquier,       ICRC                          Possible collaboration with ICRC in
                                                         establishing a summer course on human
                                                         rights and Humanitarian Law
The Rector of the          The National University of    Strengthening the existing relationship
National University of     Rwanda                        between the National University of
Rwanda, Dr Emile                                         Rwanda and the Association
RWAMASIRABO




II.6. CROSS CUTTING ISSUES

In all activities undertaken, HIV/AIDS awareness campaign, gender promotion and
sensitization of youth on environmental conservation were made cross-cutting issues. In all
activities, participation of female youth up to at least 30% was targeted. During all
sensitization and training sessions, youth were sensitized on fighting against the HIV/AIDS
virus and were asked to play an active role in environment conservation.
                                             22



                              III. RESULTS ASSESSMENT

As a matter of evaluation of all the activities undertaken, one can be proud to assert that
tangible results were registered. For a matter of clarity they are presented in line with each
axis.

Table 6: Results achieved and their indicators per axis
           AXIS                     RESULTS ACHIEVED                      INDICATORS

1.Human rights promotion            Over 45,000 youth               -Sensitized youth
                                       sensitized of whom 40%        continue to educate their
                                       were females know and         peers on their rights;
                                       claim their basic rights in   -There is gradual
                                       the provinces of Umutara, reduction of youth
                                       Kibuye and Butare;            involved in acts of human
                                                                     rights violations;
                                                                     - The level of vigilantism
                                                                     for individual rights
                                                                     among the sensitized
                                                                     Youth is increasing;
                                                                     -Sensitized   students
                                                                     respect the rights of their
                                                                     colleagues at school
                                                                     exemplified in their
                                                                     peaceful co-existence at
                                                                     school.




                                                                     -Participation of youth
                                    Youth know and fulfill
                                                                     (including both boys and
                                       their duties in society
                                                                     girls), in local meetings
         23
                               which takes decisions,
                               community work, as well
                               as other Government
                               programs has increased
                               among sensitized youth
                               on human rights;




 16 new born human rights -Increase of discipline
   clubs in secondary          among students;
   schools in Umutara          -Sensitized youth are
   Province, the existing 31   exemplary in respecting
   human rights clubs in       other people’s rights;
   Butare Province and 25      - Human rights clubs in
   human rights clubs in       Butare Province have
   Kibuye Province are         systematic plan of actions
   actively involved in        they follow in human
   human rights promotion      rights education to their
   in their respective         fellow students;
   schools.


                               - Focal points in Butare
 82 Human rights youth        and Umutara Provinces
   focal points of whom 35     have sensitized on their
   % of them are females,      own over 10 000 youth in
   were recruited, trained     their respective zones of
   and are actively involved   operation;
   in human rights
   promotion activities in
   the provinces of Umutara
   and Butare;
                                        24


2. Human rights protection
                              Increase of the capacity        -   76.9 % of all the cases
                                 of the Association to         followed up the rights of
                                 monitor, investigate and      the victims were restored;
                                 find settlement of cases of
                                 human rights violations;

                                                               - Over 65% of the cases
                                Sensitized youth
                                                               of the cases investigated
                                 especially focal points
                                                               by the Association were
                                 and members of human
                                                               reported by focal points
                                 rights clubs claim,
                                                               and human rights clubs;
                                 administer, defend their
                                                               -Human rights clubs and
                                 rights and give legal aid
                                                               focal points have
                                 to victims of human
                                                               contributed to the solving
                                 rights as well as to local
                                                               of over 50 cases of
                                 authorities in particular
                                                               human rights violations in
                                 ABUNZI.
                                                               their respective areas
                                                               through orientation,
                                                               accompaniment or legal
                                                               aid;




                                                               -Gradual increase in the
                              Sensitized youth on             number of cases
                                 human rights are              involving human rights
                                 becoming the vanguards        violations denounced by
                                 of local communities          youth including both
                                 which secures rights for      schooling and non-
                                 all;                          schooling youth.
                                            25


3.Development                    Youth are more                    -   Increase of youth
                                   committed to work                development associations
                                   together in order to fight       and cooperatives with full
                                   against poverty and              participation of both
                                   participate actively in the      males and females in
                                   development process;             Butare, Kibuye and
                                                                    Umutara Provinces;



                                                                    - A draft national policy

                                 A national policy on              on youth employment

                                   Youth employment is              been elaborated

                                   underway for adoption;


4.Contribution to the            The        Association        has -The Association has a
organisation of civil society      obtained real recognition seat at the National and
                                   as a potential civil society Regional              Follow-up
                                   actor     at     the   National Committee of the ICGLR
                                   level.                           -The Association is
                                                                    regularly invited to take
                                                                    part in various civil
                                                                    society conferences and
                                                                    workshops.


                                                                    -Increased participation
                                 The Association has been of youth Associations in
                                   able to mobilise various civil society workshops
                                   youth         associations    as and conferences;
                                   potential members of the
                                   Rwandan civil society;
                               26
                                                           -98% of the invited youth
                    Various                        youth Associations participated
                      organisations are more actively during the two
                      active        in       discussing youth conferences
                      national       and      regional organized during the
                      issues;                              year.
                                                            -Participants during the
                                                           ICGLR conference
                                                           unanimously drew a
                                                           declaration condemning
                                                           in the strongest terms
                                                           possible the Gatumba
                                                           massacres.


                    The process to form a - Consultative meetings
                      youth network has taken to define the structure of
                      off.                                 the network have started.



5. Institutional    The Association                       -The Association extends
reinforcement         increased her capacity in            her expertise on human
                      terms of human resource              rights to various
                      development;                         Associations;


                    The        visibility     of     the -Invitation of the
                      Association                    was Association to take part
                      increased at the local, in various regional,
                      national       and      regional national and local events;
                      level;
                                                           -The Association started
                    The Association further operating in a third
                      extended                       and Province, namely the
                                      27
                               consolidated her services Province of Umutara, as
                               in provinces.                  planned in the
                                                              Association’s Strategic
                                                              plans 2003-2005.


                                                              - Easy acquisition of
                                                              working permits at the
                             The Association enjoys          National and the
                               excellent collaboration        Provincial levels;
                               with local, provincial and     -The Association enjoys
                               National authorities,          long lasting relations with
                               Donors and other civil         her donors.
                               society actors.




6.Cross-cutting issues       There has been a positive - Students in sensitized
(Combating the HIV/AIDS        shift in relation to role schools have reduced
scourge, Promoting Gender      assignments based on sex assigning specific roles to
equality and Environment       among       the   sensitised girls and boys in schools;
conservation)                  youth;
                             The Association is more -In all activities organized
                               gender sensitive in terms by the Association, the
                               of youth participation in participation of females
                               all her activities;            has averagely been 35%;
                             The       Association      has -The Ministry in charge
                               earned recognition as one of Gender and PRO-
                               of the active partners in FEMMES regularly
                               Gender promotion;              invite the Association in
                                                              various Gender
                                                              conference and
                                                              workshops.
                                              28


                                    Sensitised youth are more
                                       committed to combat the - Integration of the fight
                                       HIV/AIDS scourge;             against HIV/AIDS in the
                                                                     objectives of cropping up
                                                                     youth Associations;


                                    There is more implication
                                                                     -   Integration of
                                       of     the    youth      in
                                                                     environment conservation
                                       Environment     protection
                                                                     in the objectives of
                                       activities;
                                                                     cropping- up youth
                                                                     Associations;




IV. PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED
Numerous problems or difficulties were encountered and consequently hindered the
successful accomplishment of our targeted activities. Notable of these are:

    Budget constraints. This has been the major limitation in the Association’s road map
       to achieve her objectives and mission. This has led to negative consequences including
       the failure to manage an independent project on monitoring and investigation of
       human rights violations in our zone of intervention with sufficient materiel and human
       personnel, failure to recruit enough personnel and acquiring enough equipment to
       undertake the Association’s activities, as well as inability to undertake constant
       follow-up of activities undertaken by the Association.
    Another problem faced by the Association is the existence of local leaders in some
       districts who are involved in violation of human rights. However, thanks to the
       reshuffle among district and sector leaders, which saw many of them, sacked.
       Nevertheless, the problem persists. In particular the Local Defense Forces (LDF), in
       partnership with local leaders, continue to be the principal authors of human rights
                                              29
     violations. More so, some district leaders frustrate efforts by focal points in their
     respective districts and sectors by not being cooperative to crack down on human
     rights violations.
   Another problem encountered is general poverty among the youth. Some youth are in
     a state of hopelessness and are so demoralized to the extent that they no longer have
     the courage to participate in sensitization sessions.
   Also most initiatives by youth to form youth development Associations have been
     frustrated by unavailability of funds to support their projects. Most of their projects are
     long-term projects especially agriculture based initiatives; which can yield returns at
     least after one year or beyond including agricultural projects including. Such projects
     are not entertained by existing micro- finance institutions. In practice, they only
     extend credit to projects, which are capable of servicing the debt in a period not
     exceeding a period of one year. Furthermore, the interest rate is very high to the extent
     that it threatens youth to go for their credit.
   There also exists ignorance among the youth in matters related to project formulation,
     implementation and marketing and are accustomed to receiving aid than credit.
   Ignorance, mis-interpretation of some legal provisions and corruption on part of local
     leaders and ABUNZI on regularly utilized laws especially the law regulating
     succession.

V. FUTURE PERSPECTIVES
  1. To promote youth participation in all socio-political processes including the
     participation of youth in the democratic process, Gender Promotion, the success of
     Gacaca jurisdictions as well as combating sexual violence;
  2. Intensify the Association’s capacity in collaboration with human rights clubs and focal
     points to rapidly monitor, investigate and give legal aid to victims of human rights
     violations in our areas of operation especially involving youth as perpetrators or
     victims. In particular, the Association plans to run a comprehensive program on
     monitoring and documentation of human rights violations in her zone of operation;
  3. To continue contributing to the building of the Rwandan Civil Society. In particular,
     to actively contribute to the campaign of positioning youth associations in the
     Rwandan civil society as active players;
                                                   30
   4. To undertake research and advocacy on policies that can lead to improvement of the
          socio-economic welfare of the youth in particular, as well as the entire populace;
   5. Institutional reinforcement of the Association in terms of personnel and equipment;
   6. To continue the fight against the HIV/AIDS virus, Gender promotion and sensitization
          of    Youth to get involved in environment conservation activities as cross cutting
          activities.



VI. RECOMMENDATIONS
We would like to take the opportunity to recommend the following to various stakeholders for
action:

VI.1. To all Rwandan Youth and Youth Associations:

   1.     Youth including males and females equitably should participate in decision-making
          processes affecting their lives and together strive to develop a society that secures
          political, civil, economic, social, cultural, and democratic rights for all;
   2. Youth Association’s should network to promote and defend common interests;
   3. Youth should be hard working to fight against poverty and should actively be
          implicated in development activities of their respective areas and the nation as a
          whole;
   4. Youth should protect themselves from the HIV/AIDS scourge;
   5. Youth should fight and stay away from negative ideologies including that of
          Genocide, manipulations by egocentric politicians for their selfish ends and handle
          conflicts among them peacefully. In particular, they should actively participate in
          Gacaca and spearhead the unity and reconciliation process in the country.

    VI.2. To the Government of Rwanda

   1. The Government should ratify pending key human rights conventions on human rights
          including the convention prohibiting torture as well as the Statute establishing the
          International Criminal Court;
   2.     The Government should double efforts if it wants Vision 2020 to become a reality
          rather than a mere political slogan. In particular, concrete programs of poverty
          alleviation especially in rural areas targeting especially youth and women should be
                                               31
       increased and systematically monitored to measure indicators and regularly update
       strategies before valuable resources are eroded with no results and impact.
   3. The judicial reform should be backed up by necessary means to enable the judicial
       personnel efficiently guarantee human rights;
   4. The Government should continue to distance herself from local leaders, judicial
       personnel and top Government officials who are corrupt, non- performing, those
       proved guilty beyond reasonable doubt by courts of Law as well as those accustomed
       to violating human rights;
   5. The Government should be more committed to liberalize the media and protect
       journalists from being persecuted for their views;
   6. The Government should intensify the security of Genocide survivors and all those
       ready and/or who have been able to reveal the factual truth surrounding Genocide;
       The Government should stick to fundamental human rights and democratic principles
       including the presumption of innocence, separation of powers, the right to self
   defense
       and the right to be tried without delay.
   7. The Government should re-visit the law regulating decentralization structures to
       ensure the core principle of separation of powers in the decentralization structures. In
       particular, the Mayor or Sector coordinator should be relieved of the power to head the
       Consultative Council of the district/town or sector respectively. As such, the
       Consultative Council should be more independent to control the actions of the
       Executive Committees of the Districts/towns and sectors;
   8. The Government should intensify the campaign on civic education at grassroots level
       to build the necessary confidence among the citizens to enable them asking their
       leaders to render account to them.


VI.3. To the Rwandan Civil Society

   1. To be more pro-active in finding lasting solutions to national problems including the
       fight against the Genocide ideology, supporting the operation of GACACA
       jurisdiction, and contributing to the alleviation of poverty;
                                              32
   2. To work in synergy and cooperate especially at times when some of her members are
        in danger including assisting them to overcome problems facing them. In this line,
        civil society organisations need to operate in transparency and openness;
   3. To actively serve as the voice for the voiceless and continue to sensitize the masses to
        be more involved in national reconstruction;
   4. To intensify the campaign to advocate for policies that can lead to the amelioration of
        the welfare of the masses and monitor the performance of various development
        projects.

VI..4. To the Donor Community

   1. We request the donor community to increase its funding directly towards the civil
        society in Rwanda to ensure its empowerment; In particular, we request donors to
        recognize youth associations as a special component of the civil society and hence
        empower them in a special way.
   2.   Donors should help the Government of Rwanda in her poverty reduction programs and
        vision 2020. In particular, donors in collaboration with the Government and the
        private sector, to invest heavily in the youth through putting in place easy and direct
        channels to provide them with long-term loans with low interest rates in order to start
        up small scale projects;
                                                33
                                         CONCLUSION

All in all, in the activity year 2004, the Association was able to register numerous activities
with a sound impact not only on the direct beneficiaries of the Association (youth) but also to
the entire populace in our provinces of operation namely Butare, Kibuye and Umutara.
Nevertheless, the achieved activities undertaken had far reaching positive direct results as
well as multiplier effects at the National and Regional level.

However, it should be highlighted that the target, set at the beginning of the year, was not
met. It is in this regard that we call upon our partners in particular donors, to continue
supporting the Association’s initiatives in the year 2005 and beyond, in order to enable the
Association doubling her initiatives. We are optimistic that with the commitment and zeal of
the Association’s leadership, personnel and members, nothing other than financial means can
stop the Association from achieving her noble mission. In the same vein, we take the
opportunity to call upon continued collaboration from the Government of Rwanda and other
civil society actors for sustainable results.
   34




ANNEXES
                                            35
ANNEX 1: LIST OF PARTNERS AND DONORS DURING THE YEAR 2004


A. International Development Agencies and Organisations
CECI-ACIPA
SDC
The European union
11.11.11
TROCAIRE
NPA
DED

B. Public institutions
The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
Ministry of Local Government, General Development and Social Affairs
Ministry of Gender and Family Promotion
Ministry of Justice
The National Human Rights Commission
The National University of Rwanda
The National Youth Council
The province of Butare
The province of Kibuye
The Province of Umutara

C. Local NGOs and Associations
LDGL
CLADHO
PRO-FEMMES/TWESE HAMWE
HAGURUKA
LIPRODHOR
AGR
CESTRAR
RESEAU DE FEMMES
                             36


           ANNEX 2: ASSOCIATION’S ORGANIGRAMME




                  GENERAL ASSEMBLY




                                        CONTROL AND
…..               ……………………………………..       EVALUATION
  BOARD OF ADVISORS                      COMMISSION




               COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION




                  EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT




                      BRANCH OFFICES
                                      37


ANNEX 3: LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH HUMAN RIGHTS CLUBS CREATED AND
             REINFORCED IN BUTARE PROVINCE


A. Clubs based in Secondary schools

   1. ECOLE AUTONOME
   2. EAV KABUTARE
   3. PETIT SEMINAIRE BAPTISTE
   4. ECOLE SECONDAIRE DE GATAGARA
   5. GROUPE SCOLAIRE DES PARENTS DE BUTARE
   6. PETIT SEMINAIRE KARUBANDA
   7. ECOLE NOTRE DAME DE LA PROVIDENCE KARUBANDA
   8. GROUPE SCLOLAIRE OFFICIEL DE BUTARE
   9. ECOLE SECONDAIRE NTYAZO
   10. APAME MUGOMBWA
   11. GROUPE SCOLAIRE KANSI
   12. GROUPE SCOLAIRE GISAGARA
   13. ECOLE SECONDAIRE GIKONKO
   14. ECOLE SECONDAIRE KIRUHURA
   15. LYCEE DE RUSATIRA
   16. ECOLE SECONDAIRE GARRY SCHEER
   17. COLLEGE IMENA
   18. ECOLE SECONDAIRE ISIMBI
   19. ECOLE TECHNIQUE DE NYANTANGA
   20. GROUPE SCOLAIRE CYAHINDA
   21. APADEM BUSORO
   22. EAV MAYAGA
   23. ECOLE TECHNIQUE DE NYANZA
   24. COLLEGE ST EMMANUEL DE HANIKA
   25. COLLEGE MARANATHA
   26. ESPANYA
   27. ECOLE TECHNIQUE DE GIHOZO
                                    38
   28. ECOLE SANTA MATER DEI
   29. ECOLE DE SCIENCE DE NYANZA
   30. ST ESPRIT DE NYANZA
   31. COLLEGE CHRIST ROI


B. Rural based human rights Clubs
  1. CHEBON
  2. CJEGADHO
  3. Club INDATWA Z’URUMURI
                                                   39


   ANNEX 4: YOUTH SPECIAL MESSAGE IN LINE WITH COMMEMORATING
                 THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 1994 GENOCIDE.


We, the youth from different youth organizations, representatives of the National Youth
structures, representatives of students’ bodies from higher institutions of learning and
universities, convening in Kigali at Centre Pastorale St Paul, out of the initiative of the Youth
Association for Human rights Promotion and Development (AJPRODHO-JIJUKIRWA), in
line with the commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the Genocide which befell our
country    as well as the need to express our perspectives as youth after 10 years , we are
delivering the following special message to the entire Rwandan population, the UN and the
ICTR and in particular as well as the international community:



                                TO THE RWANDAN YOUTH
Rwandan youth let us;
-Strive to build a culture of human rights respect;
-Resist any form of political manipulations;
-Stand to fight against the Genocide ideology;
-Strive to eradicate illiteracy among ourselves and access to information;
-Accept that there is strength in our diversity;
-Strive for promoting the unity of Rwandans;
-Strive for our freedom of expression;
-Strive to eradicate poverty since it has been a root cause of manipulations;
-Stand to protect our values;
-Strive for patriotism;
-Participate in maintaining national security.



                          TO THE GORVENMENT OF RWANDA


We request the following:
-To strongly protect human dignity;
                                                40
-To be exemplary in fighting the genocide ideology and prosecute all Genocide suspects with
out consideration to political interests;
-To speed up the judicial reform in order to fight injustice;
-To sign as soon as possible extradition treaties with countries harbouring genocide suspects;
-To closely monitor the operation of the Genocide fund for the needy victims FARG; as well
as other funds for needy groups.



                            TO THE RWANDAN CIVIL SOCIETY
We request the following:
-To fight the Genocide ideology in its daily activities.



                               TO RWANDANS IN GENERAL


-Remembering Genocide should be a collective duty;
-To fully participate in Gacaca jurisdictions as well as telling the whole truth;
-To respect human rights;
-To strive for our unity.



                     TO THE UN AND THE ICTR IN PARTICULAR
We request the following;
-To put in place a special program to assist RWANDA to address her post- genocide
consequences;
-To help Rwanda in making countries admit their responsibility in perpetrating the Genocide;
-To ensure that never again becomes reality. In particular, the UN should avoid imbalances
among peoples and countries as it was manifested;
-The ICTR should re-double its efforts in arresting and trying genocide suspects wherever
they are in the world;
-The UN should increase the mandate of the ICTR.
                                               41
TO THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY.


We request the following from the entire international community:
-All countries implicated in the Rwandan Genocide should admit their role and apologize;
-Countries that admitted their role in the Rwandan Genocide should help Rwanda in a special
way in her reconstruction programs;
-The International community should assist Rwanda by arresting and trying genocide
suspects;
-To avoid indifference in case of Genocide taking place anywhere in the world as was the
case in Rwanda.


Done at Kigali, ST Paul, on 29th April 2004.
                                             42


ANNEX 5: RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CONSULTATIVE YOUTH
  CONFERENCE ON THE ICGLR, KIGALI, (RWANDA RED CROSS),
                           and 20TH –21ST AUGUST 2004.


PREAMBLE:
We, the delegates of 47 youth Associations, gathered here at Rwanda Red Cross Premises in
Kigali city in a two -days consultative Youth Conference on Peace, Security and development
on 20th up to 21st August 2004, upon the invitation of the Youth Association for Human rights
Promotion and Development         (AJPRODHO-JIJUKIRWA) in collaboration with the
National Youth Council (NYC),


Believing that Peace and Security, Democracy and Good Governance, Economic
Development and Regional integration as well as Human rights, Humanitarian issues and
Social welfare are fundamental issues not only for Rwanda but also for the whole Great Lakes
Region;


Inspired by the forthcoming Regional Heads of State Peace Conference on the Great Lakes
Region due to take place in November 2004 in Dar- es- Salaam, Tanzania and subsequent
meetings thereafter;


Convinced of our role as youth towards the genuine achievement of peace and security,
Democracy and Good Governance, Economic development and regional integration as well as
Human rights, Humanitarian issues and social welfare, not only in our Country but also in the
Great Lakes Region at large;


Given the fact that at the core of our views, we the youth want to emphasize the need for a
shift in consciousness that realizes the interconnectedness that exists between actions out of
synergy by different actors ranging from Governments, the civil society, the International
community but above all involving youth at the forefront of each program for sustainability;
                                               43
We hereby recommend, in relation to each thematic group, to the Government of Rwanda,
Regional Governments, the civil society (in Rwanda and various countries of the region), the
UN, the AU and the International Community as well as the Rwandan youth the following:


THEMATIC GROUP ONE: PEACE AND SECURITY.


No development, sustainable or otherwise can take place in absence of peace and security.
We strongly assert that peace does not mean mere absence of war but rather we view it from
various perspectives including the individual, political, social affairs and the economic
perspective. At the individual level, we talk of peace when some one has a settled mind. From
the political perspective, there is peace is when all citizens have freedom of expression and
when they are free from any kind of oppression. From the social affairs perspective, peace
refers to a situation where citizens co-exist in harmony. And from the economic perspective,
peace is achieved when all citizens have basic necessities of life notably food, shelter and
clothing.
We also view the term security at both the individual and country level. At the individual
level, security is attained when some one has descent living conditions and is assured of
protection by security organs from any sort of attack. At the country level, security refers to
liberty of every citizen and absence of war and conflicts as well as natural disasters. It is also
important to redefine security in terms of human and ecological needs in addition to the
national sovereignty and national boarders.


Redirecting funding from armaments to human security and sustainable development will
establish new social order which ensures the equal participation of marginalized groups,
including youth, restricting the use of military force, and moving towards regional security.
Governments should rather opt for ‘soft power’ paths, utilising negotiation, dialogue,
coalition building and new diplomacy methods of settling disputes. We ask for the
establishment of universal norms making war unnecessary and impossible.


We strongly uphold that there is peace and security in Rwanda and applaud the efforts by the
Rwandan Government in restoring peace and security after the Genocide and subsequent acts
of infiltration. However, we assert that such peace is not durable given the regional context.
                                                 44
We note with regret that the Great Lakes region is plagued with preventable wars, conflicts
and even Genocide, the victims mainly being children, youth and women. In a great many
cases, the region’s Governments have manifestly failed to fulfil their responsibilities of
preventing conflicts, protecting civilians and ending wars as well as creating permanent
conditions of peace. Furthermore, the region is still engulfed in abject poverty, pandemic
diseases and ignorance on part of the populations.


In order to ensure durable peace and security in Rwanda and the Great Lakes region as a
whole, the following should be the priorities;
      To fight against poverty;
      To uproot the genocide ideology;
       To fight against illiteracy;
      To fight pandemic diseases such as the HIV/ AIDS scourge;
      Preventing conflicts through active non –violence;
      Replacing authoritarian forms of government by democratic governance;
      Increasing the role of civil society in peace building;
      Promotion of civic participation aimed at peace building;
      Developing national and supranational institutions to serve as the guarantors of peace.


We ask the following actors to :

1. The Government of Rwanda
 Put in place policies aimed at improving the social welfare of the citizens and ensure the
   close follow-up of such policies as to ensure sustainable and durable peace;
 Continue safeguarding the prevailing peace and security in the country.


2. Regional Governments
 Elimination of ethnic, tribal and regional intolerance. Ethnic, tribal, and regional
   intolerance as well as nationality conflicts are among the principal sources of extended
   violence in the Great Lakes Region. As youth, we are calling for;
   •   Doubled efforts to eliminate the political manipulation based on ethnic, tribal and
       regional intolerance for political and economic interests;
                                               45
   •   Adoption of and /or strict implementation of national legislations punishing all forms
       of racial, ethnic, tribal or regional        discrimination as well as the International
       Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination;
   •   The inclusion of hate crimes in the Region’s judicial systems;
   •   Enactment of laws regulating the question of nationality as well as respecting such
       laws in force.
 Put in place a forum of security organs (including the police and the Army) for the Great
   Lakes region. The forum should act as an avenue to crack down trans- border criminals as
   well as exchange of information on maintaining regional security.
 To ratify as soon as possible and / or fully support the International Criminal Court (ICC).
 Demilitarise the regional economy by reducing military budgets and shifting expenditures
   on the military to civilian programs that safeguard human security. Demilitarisation will
   require transforming the military economy to a peace economy by allocating resources for
   programs that ensure the well being of the region’s citizens that provide for the human
   necessities of food, shelter, education, work, health, security and peace.
 Proclaim Active non-violence as an effective way to achieve social change. As such we
   call for;
   •   Replacing the glorification of militarism with models of active non- violence;
   •   A campaign to eliminate, or at least reduce, violence in the media and in every day
       language;
   •   Promote local peace initiatives including peace and solidarity camps and conflict
       resolution trainings;
 Prevent Proliferation and use of conventional weapons, including light weapons, small
   arms and Guns and safeguard personal security since they pose a big threat to human
   security.
 To demilitarise militias in the region.
 Empowering the Youth to actively participate in peace building. The role of youth in
    perpetrating wars is enormous. Their experience, fresh perspectives and new ideas must
    be heard, integrated and acted upon at all levels of society in peace building. As such, we
    call upon Regional Governments to recognise the role of children and youth as
    peacemakers by including them in peace building processes.
                                                46
 Educate for peace and non-violence. In order to combat the culture of violence that
    pervades our region, our generation and the coming one demand a radically different
    education –one that does not glorify war but rather that educates for peace, respect of
    human dignity and non-violence. In particular, we request the following;
   •   Peace education be introduced and emphasised at all levels of education system;
   •   All actors, namely governments, the civil society and development assistance agencies
       work closely to ensure that peace education initiatives are implemented at all levels.




3. The UN, AU and the International Community


 The AU should strengthen her capacity to maintain peace. Today, the AU constitutes the
   best hope for achieving regional peace and stability .In that regard, we call upon for the
   immediate composition of an African Peace Keeping force with enough             facilities to
   undertake peace missions wherever it is required with a defined mission to ensure that it
   effectively halts violent conflicts, mass violations of human rights, Genocide, as well as
   protecting the lives of persons in danger;
 The UN should disarm the Interahamwe and EX-FAR militias in the DRC as soon as
   possible;
 The UN should redefine her peacekeeping mission by             prioritising the protection of
   human life in their mandate and this should be done without any kind of discrimination
   whatsoever.


4. The civil society (At the National and Regional level)
 To harness effectiveness by creating networks and working in synergy;
 To play an active role in peace education to the populace of the Great Lakes Region;
 To act as a model in guaranteeing peace.


5. Youth in the region and the Rwandan Youth in Particular.


 To resist any form of political manipulations and develop a culture of analytical thinking;
                                               47
 To overcome traditional prejudices but rather embrace our unity in diversity. In particular,
    let us all share our vision, open mindedness, solidarity and willingness to learn in a truly
    intergenerational exchange based on mutual respect and responsibility;
 To engage in meaningful reconciliation and peace building processes.

THEMATIC GROUP TWO: DEMOCRACY AND GOOD GOVERNENCE



The promotion of democracy at all levels of society is a prerequisite for replacing the rule of
force with the rule of law. Establishing more representative and democratic decision making
structures is a cornerstone to achieving limited and accountable national and regional
governance with binding, enforceable and equitable legislative mechanisms.


We strongly insist that no human or socio - economic development can be sustainable without
genuine consideration for good governance and democracy. We take the opportunity to
applaud the democratic process Rwanda is pursuing including the conduction of regular
elections from the local to the national level with full participation of youth. We are also
grateful to the establishment of various organs charged with ensuring accountability of
holders of public offices including the establishment of the office of the Ombudsman and the
Auditor’s General’s Office. Besides, we applaud the on going decentralisation process.
However, there remains a lot to be done in order to ensure full democratisation and good
governance.


In line with promoting Democracy and Good Governance, we endorse the following as
priorities:
   Conducting regular, free and fair elections;
   Working in transparency;
   Accountability;
   Guaranteeing the liberty of expression;
   Justice and equality before the law;
   Civic participation;
                                                 48


We ask the following to:


1. The Government of Rwanda
 Reinforce the on going decentralisation process by availing sufficient facilities including
   funds to the decentralised structures;
 Consult the populace at all times while designing major policies affecting their welfare;
 Guarantee the independence of the judicial system;
 Fight against all forms of injustice by empowering national institutions charged with
   exposing and punishing the perpetrators of injustice in society.



2. Regional Governments

 Establish and /or strengthen institutions guaranteeing good governance and Democracy. In
   particular, the African Peer Review mechanism should be adhered to and/ or supported by
   all regional countries.
 Ensure that security organs solely protect national security and sovereignty with no
   political alignment;
 Put in place, promote and nurture National Youth structures, youth forums and networks
   with consultative status and incorporating our ideas into national development plans;
 Establish a comprehensive plan for youth development with clearly set priorities for the
   full and effective participation of youth in the decision- making process. We call upon
   Regional Governments to recognise that youth are a resource not a problem.


3. The UN, AU and the International Community.


 Support democratic processes being implemented by Regional States.


4. The civil society (At the National and Regional level)
 Actively get involved in the democratic process and intensify the campaign of civic
   education among the populace;
 Safeguard its objectivity in its activities.
                                               49
5. The Regional Youth and Rwandan Youth in particular
 Participate actively in decision making processes affecting their welfare;
 Participate in maintaining national security;
 Develop a sense of patriotism.


THEMATIC GROUP THREE: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND REGIONAL
INTERGRATION
We perceive economic development as the qualitative and quantitative improvement in the
welfare of the country’s populace. Genuine economic development indicators include
improving the living conditions of the masses notably access to basic necessities of life
namely; food, primary health care and shelter. We view economic development as one of the
central pillars to sustainable peace. As the world moves to globalisation, it is naïve to think of
fast and stable economic development without Regional integration. As such, we strongly
support the on going process towards regional integration. However we lament on the low
economic development of the region. Nevertheless, we are proud of the development process
initiated by the Government of Rwanda including the PRSP and Vision 2020. In particular,
the ICT development is very promising.


   However, in order to boost economic development as well as regional integration, we
   endorse the following as priorities;
          Fighting against poverty
          Promote skills-based education
          Promoting ICT
          Supporting industries
          Human resource development
          Establishing free trade zones
          Promoting industry based economies
          Improving health and social welfare
          Infrastructure development
          Enhancing regional economic groupings
          Modernising Agriculture
          Population control
                                                50
           Environmental protection
           Integrating youth in all development strategies
           Gender equality


We ask the following to:

The Government of Rwanda
 Devote a portion of its annual budget to projects designed, managed and implemented by
    the youth. This can effectively be done through setting up a youth development fund at
    each district in the country charged with funding directly youth projects as well as acting
    as a security for youth initiated projects to access funds from financial institutions.
    Besides, in order to ensure access of funds to youth initiated projects, we endorse the
    leasing of public land to youth associations and cooperatives with viable projects to act as
    collateral security.


 Establish a comprehensive national strategy on youth employment to curb the alarming
    youth unemployment rate in the country.


 Reinforce the private sector by putting in place more incentives for viable projects, which
    are in position of improving many people’s welfare. In particular, rural –based projects
    should benefit first;


 The Government should increase its budget allocations to the modernisation of
    Agriculture. In particular, appropriate technology should be developed and made
    accessible to the rural farmers;


    The PRSP, Vision 2020 as well as such other mega development plans need to be closely
    monitored with periodical evaluations based on clear indicators to assess their progress
    and impact on economic development so as to adopt new strategies for their successful
    implementation. Besides, more sensitisation is needed to actively involve the masses in
    particular the energetic youth to ensure their positive results.
                                               51
 ICT     development should be done simultaneously with a vigorous campaign to fight
   against adult illiteracy. Besides, efforts should be intensified to make it accessible to the
   remotest places and at the least price possible to enable accessibility;


 Reform the education system to render quality education with view to enable job creation
   as opposed to job seeking;


 Avail the necessary training to youth on entrepreneurship, conception, elaboration,
   management and follow-up of micro income generating projects;


 Undertake measures to reduce population growth, which threaten poverty reduction and
   place an alarming strain on the limited national resources. In particular, we endorse:
              Availing sexual education especially to the youth
              Sensitisation on mechanisms aimed at family planning including the youth


Regional Governments.
 Strengthen Regional and sub -regional Capacities for economic development. Existing
   economic regional groupings such as COMESA and sub-regional ones such as CEPGL
   and the East African Community (EAC) should be strengthened to undertake joint
   economic development initiatives.
 Effectively use grants and loans acquired from donors and lenders to the maximum
   achievement of economic growth and development of their respective governments.
 Establish sustainable development action schemes to fund youth –led projects in their
   respective countries.
 Promote education. Both basic literacy and skills based education, is a pivotal strategy in
   poverty reduction, as knowledge empowers people. In this spirit, we deem it necessary to
   extend free education for girls and boys at all levels. Education is essential in reducing
   world poverty and fostering a more equitable, peaceful and sustainable future. We
   strongly believe that quality and relevant education and knowledge are important
   foundations from which to combat unemployment, corruption, lack of transparency,
   environment degradation, and poor communication.
                                             52
 Fight against corruption in all its forms. Regional Governments have to replace the deeply
   ingrained culture of corruption with a culture of transparency and punish those who
   resort to corrupt practices


3. The civil society (at National and Regional level)
 Join their respective governments in advocating for debt reduction and cancellation
 Actively promote economic development through advocacy, undertaking economic
   development-oriented projects and mobilising the masses to participate in economic
   development activities.
 Monitor closely the usage of public funds.


4. AU, UN and International Community.
 International financial institutions as well as individual countries should cancel with no
   condition the Rwandan foreign debt .We call upon the UN and the AU to get actively
   involved in this advocacy;
 The donor community should give special consideration to Rwanda in terms of Aid
   allocation following the consequences of the 1994 Genocide.
 To revisit the foreign debt servicing terms for Regional countries by adopting favourable
   servicing terms.
 To support regional and the continent’s initiatives for economic development, NEPAD, in
   particular.
 To reduce the dependency syndrome of the region’s countries in particular and Africa as a
   whole on MDC’s through favourable trade initiatives. In particular, we applaud the
   AGOA initiative and call upon other MDC’s to follow suit.




5. The Regional youth and the Rwandan youth in particular.


 Develop a culture of hard working through embracing entrepreneurship;
 Play an important role in resisting and combating corruption at every level of society;
 Help our countries in      to end their dependency, and to help    them take advantage of
   normal investment and business developments.
                                                  53


THEMATIC GROUP FOUR: HUMANITARIAN ISSUES, SOCIAL WELFARE
                                     AND HUMAN RIGHTS



We view humanitarian affair as an act consisting of rescuing persons in danger, comforting them,
sacrifice to people in danger with a possibility of loosing your life, as well as showing full
solidarity with persons in danger.

Besides, we view human rights as fundamental pillar for ensuring peace and prosperity. The
violation of human rights is one of the root causes of war. These violations include the denial of
economic, social and cultural rights, as well as political and civil rights. The artificial distinction
between these two sets of rights can no longer be tolerated .We affirm the universality and
indivisibility of human rights and call for stronger mechanisms to implement and enforce human
rights treaties and to afford redress to victims for the violations of their rights.

We view social welfare as a set of prerequisites needed to ensure full                 development of
individuals as well as the entire society. These include basic necessities of life notably food,
shelter and clothing.


Although our Country has moved a long way to restore the human rights respect after a
period characterised by gross human rights violations culminating into the 1994 Genocide, it
is our position that building a culture of human rights, ensuring humanitarian intervention as
well as guaranteeing descent social welfare is a task which remains to be addressed not only
by Rwanda but also all countries of great Lakes Region. As such we endorse the following
as priorities:
   Human rights awareness among the populace
   To fight against the HIV/AIDS scourge
   To protect human dignity
   To ensure the rule of law
   To promote gender equality
   To put in place social welfare mechanisms aimed at improving the well-being of citizens,
    with special consideration to vulnerable groups.
   Strengthening mechanisms for humanitarian intervention
                                              54
We ask the following to:

1. The government of Rwanda


 Strongly protect human dignity;
 Continue fighting the genocide ideology by punishing          all Genocide suspects without
   consideration of political interests
 Speed up the judicial reform in order to fight injustice
 Speed up trials of Genocide suspects
 Intensify the fight against the HIV/ AIDS scourge
 Closely monitor the operation of the Genocide fund for the needy victims (FARG) as well
   as other funds for needy groups.
 Put in place a national policy to cater for various vulnerable groups including the needy
   aged, and orphans.
 Put in place sustainable strategies to fight the problem of street children. All children and
   youth are entitled to a stable living environment. Children living in the street should be
   seen off, receive rehabilitation according to personal needs, and professional assistance in
   their reintroduction into society.

2. Regional Governments


 Emergency humanitarian supplies must be made available to all whenever need arises
   especially in case of flood, drought, internal or external displacement, famine or natural
   disaster.
 Establish combined disaster preparedness schemes to ensure rapid intervention in case of
   disaster.
 Protect and respect children and youth. Children and youth continue to be exploited and
   victimised, particularly in violent conflict situations where harming children has become
   not only a consequence, but frequently a strategy of war. Besides, youth have become the
   bulldozers to sustain wars. In line with the above, we request to ensure the strict respect of
   the rights of the child as enshrined in the International Convention of the rights of the
   child as well as various national legislations in force pertaining to the rights of the child
   including the elimination of use of child soldiers.
                                              55
 Ensure the respect of human rights in their respective countries by putting in place or
   reinforcing and guaranteeing the independence of national human rights institutions as
   well as smooth collaboration with the civil society in building a culture of human rights
   respect
 Protect human rights defenders and humanitarian workers from national, regional or
   international organisations by putting in place mechanisms by which violations of these
   individual’s rights may be monitored and lessened.
 Promotion of gender equality. Recognising that gender refers to both male and female, we
   strongly believe that a lot has to be done to empower women to guarantee such equality
   and we remain convinced that giving women more economic opportunities like business
   and access to micro credit, is one of the fastest ways to economic growth and population
   stabilisation. In that line, we call upon Regional Governments to ;
   •   Sensitise all women and men on gender equality;
   •   Create a society where women have respect, dignity and an equal legal status, where
       they have venues to seek redress in case they face aggression and domestic violence;
Allow Women to enjoy their full rights as human beings including the right to inherit land
and other property, participation in the decision-making processes.



3. The AU, UN and the International Community


 To put in place a special program to assist RWANDA to address her post- genocide
   consequences;
 The UN and AU should strengthen mechanisms for Humanitarian intervention to protect
   the lives of people in danger in case of Genocide or gross human rights abuses;
 The UN should avoid indifferences in taking up humanitarian interventions to halt
   Genocide or other gross human rights violations as was the case in Rwanda;
 The UN and the International community should increase funding for projects aimed at
   improving the social welfare of the masses in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the
   funds for the fight against the AIDS scourge including free accessibility to anti –retroviral
   drugs should be increased.
                                               56
4. Civil society (at National and Regional level)


 Actively get involved in human rights awareness
 Closely monitor the observance of human rights in their respective countries
 Fight the Genocide ideology in its daily activities.


5. The Youth in the Region and Rwandan Youth in particular.


 Strive for their rights and being exemplary in respecting other people’s rights;
 Resist any form of political manipulations;
 Stand to fight against the Genocide ideology;
 Strive for our freedom of expression.
                                             57


 ANNEX 6: A DECLARATION CONDEMNING THE MASSACRES OF
THE BANYAMULENGE REFUGGES IN GATUMBA REFUGEE CAMP
              IN BURUNDI ON 13TH AUGUST 2004
We, representing Rwandan Youth Associations convening in a consultative conference on
Peace and Security, Democracy and Good Governance, Development and Regional
Integration as well as Humanitarian Affairs, Social affairs and Human Rights, organized by
the Youth Association for Human Rights Promotion and Development (AJPRODHO-
JIJUKIRWA) in collaboration with the National Youth Council, assembled here at Rwanda
Red Cross premises, Kigali this 21st August 2004,

CONCERNED of the systematic massacres committed against the Congolese refugees of the
Banyamulenge ethnic group in Gatumba refugee camp in Burundi on the 13th of August 2004
leaving 163 innocent people dead and many injured;

CONVINCED that the massacres are a clear manifestation of the Genocide ideology
continuing to be perpetuated targeting the Tutsi in the Great Lakes Region;

We denounce in the strongest terms possible the massacres. We extend our sincere
condolences to the families who lost their beloved ones in those massacres.

We request the leaders of the countries of the Great Lakes Region to protect to the highest
peak possible, the fundamental human rights and more specifically, the right to life. We
request them to maintain to the highest peak possible the security of their citizens. In
particular, this goes to the leaders of the countries of BURUNDI and the DRC.

We request them to uproot the Genocide ideology and all forms of discrimination in their

respective countries.

We urge them to implement various peace-agreements in force, with no reservations
whatsoever.

We request the African Union (AU) and the United Nations to put in place an investigation
commission to establish the truth on the massacres and establish those responsible with a view
to holding accountable the perpetrators.
                                                 58


We request that the United Nations give an explicit mandate to MONUC including the use of
military force to protect innocent civilians.

We request the Youth in the Great Lakes Region to guard themselves against the Genocide
ideology and all its architects as well as spearheading the struggle to build a culture of peace.


We call upon all the citizens of the Great Lakes Region and in particular the Congolese to
strive for their unity and all forms of evils.


Done at Kigali in the Rwanda Red Cross conference room on this Saturday, the 21st of
August 2004.


On behalf of Youth Organizations present at the Conference,

KAGABA Aflodis,
(sé)

President, AJPRODHO-JIJUKIRWA


On behalf of the National Youth Council,


MBANGUTSE JAMALI
(Sé)

President, National Youth Council.
                                  59
ANNEX 7 : LIST OF ASSOCIATIONS PRESENT AT THE CONFERENCE AND
                   PARTY TO THE DECLARATION

1. NATIONAL YOUTH COUNCI

2. AJPRODHO-JIJUKIRWA

3. ASSOCIATION DES GUIDES DU RWANDA (AGR )

4. AGEUNR

5. KISTAS

6. JEUNESSE OUVRIERE CHRETIENNE (JOC/F)

7. AERG/KIE

8. AGEULK

9. KHI STUDENT’S ASSOCIATION

10. ASSIST ASBL

11. SAKIE

12. DUHARANIRE KUBAHO

13. GREAT LAKES YOUTH LINK

14. YWCA

15. SCUR-ISAE

16. RWANDA VILLAGE CONCEPT PROJECT (RVCP)

17. ASSOCIATION DES ETUDIANTS DES ELEVES RESCAPES DU GENOCIDE
    AU NIVEAUX NATIONALE (AERG-NATIONALE)

18. ASSOCIATION GENERALE DES ETUDIANTS DE L’UNIVERSITE D’AFRIQUE
    CENTRALE (AGEUAAC-MUDENDE)

19. CROISADE CONTRE LE SIDA/ULK

20. ASSETAMORWA

21. AMITIE

22. GROUPE UNIVERSITAIRE POUR LA NON- VIOLENCE ACTIVE(GUNVA)

23. RWANDA GREEN FOUNDATION

24. UNITED AFRICAN YOUTH ASSOCIATION (UAYA)
                                   60

25. JEUNESSE VOLONTAIRE DU RWANDA (JVR)

26. ROTARACT CLUB/KIST

27. NON-VIOLENCE –UNR

28. AMUR

29. SCUR-KIE

30. APROFER

31. FONDATION POUR L’AVENIR DE LA JEUNESSE (FAJ) –KIGALI

32. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS (NASW)

33. ASSOCIATION TUZAMURANE

34. FONDATION SPORT POUR LA PAIX

35. PEACE VOICE

36. AJEDEDHOR

37. SCUR-UNR

38. FAGER

39. MEDICAL STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION OF THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF
    RWANDA (MEDSA)

40. NEVER AGAIN INTERNATIONAL- RWANDA CHAPTER

41. LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION

42. RWANDA UNITED NATIONS ASSOCIATION (RUNA-UNR)

43. PAN AFRICAN MOVEMENT-NUR

44. AERG-UNR

45. INTER CHURCH YOUTH FOUNDATION.

46. ASSOCIATION RWANDAISE TWITABIRE “INKIKO GACACA” (ARTG)

47. KANGURIRWA HUMAN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION

48. RWANDA WILD LIFE CLUBS

				
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