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The Uncorked Cellar

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					The Uncorked Cellar
A comprehensive wine information guide in a program to manage your home cellar.

    Introduction
    Getting Started
    What's New
    Tips & Tricks
    How do I...
    The Sample Cellar
    Barcode Wizard
    Rack Wizard
    Tag Wizard

    Information in The Uncorked Cellar
    Changing The Uncorked Cellar Operating Mode
    Reference information about a wine
    Adding a wine to your cellar
    Uncorking a bottle from your cellar...
    Customized Report Templates
    Customized Labels or Wine Tags
    Rules, Rules, Rules
    Why Cellar Wine
    When is a wine at its best
    The most common wine storage problems
    Serving Temperature
    Decanting
    The Right Glasses
    Australian Wine Regions
    Wine Judging
    Glossary of Wine Terms
    System Requirements
    Legal Bits
    Acknowledgments
    Contact Uncork
    History
Introduction to The Uncorked Cellar
The Uncorked Cellar is a comprehensive Cellar management program and wine guide.

It provides winery details, wine ratings, value guide, winemaker's notes, cellaring guide, etc. and includes
many wines from wineries around the world.

For a quick introduction to The Uncorked Cellar see Getting Started

Some of the features provided in The The Uncorked Cellar are
•         Create and manage wine in multiple Cellars.
•         Multi user access with read-only password protection.
•         Sort your cellar by Name, Variety, Value, Location etc
•         Tabular printed reports you can customize
•         Visual rack wizard
•         Barcode wizard to quickly and easily add or uncork your wine using a barcode reader
•         Transaction log for each wine and your overall cellar
•         Automated backup of your cellar, or export to a file, or import a previously exported file.
•         Display label image files of wines in your cellar.
•         User named fields, and custom page layout.
•         Many graphs ... for example, showing how many bottles, wines, value or total value of your cellar -
all by either vintage year or peak year.
•         Lots and lots of wine information.


You can use The Uncorked Cellar to manage the contents of your wine collection which is presented in
table form, and save or modify the provided tasting notes. Matching wine information is automatically
displayed as you start to type the details. Picklists and radio buttons also speed adding or modifying wine
information. Just click on the wine of interest and the details are instantly displayed.

See also
        Getting Started
Getting Started
The Uncorked Cellar is an extremely comprehensive Cellar management program and wine guide. It
provides winery details, wine ratings, value guide, winemaker's notes, cellaring guide, etc. and includes
many wines from wineries around the world.

Despite its advanced capabilities, basic operations are very simple and easy to use. The most important
concepts to understand are how to add a wine, and how to modify a wine.

When you installed The Uncorked Cellar, a sample cellar was created to help you quickly evaluate the
program. I suggest you get familiar with the basic concepts and features by using the Sample Cellar, then
create a new cellar before you add your own wines.

For help on how do get the best from the more advanced features in The Uncorked Cellar, see How do I...


1. Adding a wine
To add a wine to your cellar, or to look up information about a wine in the supplied wine guide....
•        Go to the Add Wine Page.
•        In FULL mode this page is the second tab from the left.
•        For speed of operation and ease of selection, only the first 500 matching wines are displayed.
•        If you want to see wines from another country, select that country.
•        Press the Clear button in the top toolbar to remove information from any previous wine that you
have displayed.
•        Enter a few letters in one of the fields in the top half of the screen describing (say) the winery name.
•        The table on the lower half of the screen will display a matching list of wines, and the most recent
vintage.
•        Select the wine of interest by clicking on the wine displayed in the table.
•        The fields in the top half of the screen will show the details of that wine.
•        To see other vintages of the selected wine, click the down arrow on the vintage field (in the top half
of the screen).
•        If the wine you are looking for is not in the database, just enter all of the details manually.
•        Add details such as quantity, price paid, etc.
•        To keep your inventory accurate, we recommend you fit a wine tag to each bottle as you add it to
your collection.
•        Press the Add Wine button.
•        The Rack Wizard will show where to locate your wine. While you are getting used to the program's
capabilities, just press OK

2. Modifying a wine
To modify details about a wine, or to uncork a bottle...
•       Go to the Cellar Page.
•       This is identified by the name of the open cellar and can be selected using the tab to the far left of
the screen.
•       When you first ran The Uncorked Cellar, it created a sample cellar. In this case, click on the tab
marked Sample Cellar.
•       Enter a few letters in one of the fields in the top half of the screen describing (say) the winery name.
•       The table on the lower half of the screen will display a matching list of wines.
•       Select the wine of interest by clicking on the wine displayed in the table.
•       The fields in the top half of the screen will show the details of that wine.
•       To uncork a bottle, Press the Uncork button.
•       To modify details about a wine, just update the information in the field in the upper half of the
screen, then press the Modify button

3. Generating Reports
Reports are described in How do I... Print a report
4. Operating Modes
The Uncorked Cellar can operate in three different Operating Modes. The above discussion assumes that
you are running The Uncorked Cellar in Full Mode (which is how The Uncorked Cellar operates when you
run it for the first time)

5. Other Hints
•        If you are unsure what a field does, just place the mouse cursor over that field and hold it steady. A
hint relating to that field will be displayed
•        In addition to the menu commands, many functions are available from a menu you can view by
pressing the right button of the mouse on one of the grids in the lower half of the screen.
•        If you are not seeing wines displayed from the winery you have entered, press the Clear button in
the top toolbar to remove information from any previous wine that you have displayed.


See also
        Tips & Tricks
        How do I...
The Sample Cellar
When you started we created a small sample cellar to help you evaluate The Uncorked Cellar. This cellar is
exactly the same as one you would create except for three exceptions.

•      The Sample Cellar already has some wine in it.
•      The Sample Cellar may be overwritten when you install a new version of The Uncorked Cellar.
•      The Sample Cellar has random data in the graphs which show what wines you have added or
uncorked during the last year.

The purpose of The Sample Cellar is to allow you to quickly evaluate all the features of The Uncorked Cellar
If you have accidentally erased your sample cellar and wish to re-generate it, use the menu command Help,
Recreate The Sample Cellar

Note: The cellar is not available in Wine Guide Mode
Changing The Uncorked Cellar Operating Mode
You can choose one of three operating modes depending on how you wish to use The Uncorked Cellar.

The Operating Modes are as follows:

Full mode
This mode combines the full-featured Uncorked Cellar with both Cellar Management and a built in Wine
Guide.

Wine Guide mode
This mode provides the Uncorked Wine Guide and includes all of wines that are in the Full Mode.

Cellar mode
This mode provides Cellar Management and includes details all of wineries that are in the Full Mode.


Wine Guide mode and Cellar mode provide cost effective options.


The correct mode will be automatically selected when you enter your registration key


To change The Uncorked Cellar operating mode choose Mode on the main menu, or do the following:
•      From the main menu, choose Registration. The Registration window appears.
•      In the Operating Mode section, click the appropriate button to select the desired mode

If you are registered for Wine Guide mode or Cellar mode and wish to upgrade to Full Mode, you can do this
at www.uncork.biz

See also
        Comparing the three modes of The Uncorked Cellar....
Mode Comparison
Comparing the operating modes of The Uncorked Cellar....

Feature                       Full Mode              Wine Guide   Cellar Mode
Winery Information            Y                      Y            Y
Wine Information              Y                      Y            -
Cellar Managemen              Y                      -            Y
Barcode Wizard                Y                      -            Y
Supports pre-printed Tags     Y                      -            Y
Print your own tags           Y                      -            Y
Graphs                        Y                      -            Y
Multiple Field Sorting        Y                      -            Y
Automatic backup              Y                      -            Y
Entries per cellar            2000                   -            2000
Bottles per cellar            24000                  -            24000
Rules                         Y                      -            Y
Basic Reports                 Y                      -            Y
Custom Reports                Y                      -            Y
Information provided in The Uncorked Cellar
Information provided in The Uncorked Cellar is increasing each year.


January 2006 Vintage of The Uncorked Cellar lists.....
•      Over 16,000 wineries
•      Over 48,000 wines
•      Over 92,000 vintages of those wines



Country                         Wineries                 Wines                 Vintages

Austria                         473                      -                     -
Australia                       2448                     12900                 39305
Argentina                       84                       144                   -
Canada                          330                      2932                  3375
Chile                           152                      -                     -
England & Wales                 188                      304                   187
France                          1462                     2872                  4110
Germany                         422                      -                     -
Indonesia                       1                        6                     -
Israel                          67                       332                   634
Italy                           3110                     -                     -
New Zealand                     568                      2542                  5551
Portugal                        380                      771                   345
South Africa                    415                      1302                  1568
Spain                           259                      -                     -
USA                             4184                     17008                 33489



To gain some idea of how this has grown, view recent improvements and wine information provided in past
versions.


Note: Information about wines is not available in Cellar Mode
Historical Updates
Here is a snapshot of approximate information content in past versions of The Uncorked Cellar....

        Vintage          Wineries         Wines            Vintages
        2005             16,000           48,000           90,000
        2004             15,000           43,000           76,000
        2003             11,000           26,000           55,000
        2002             10,000           20,500           46,000
        2001             5,800            13,500           19,000
        2000             4,000            11,900           18,800
        1999             1,380            4,500            15,700
        1998             1,300            3,750            13,500


Like all good programs, The Uncorked Cellar is continually improving as a result of feedback from people
like you.

Here are recent functionality improvements implemented as a result of your feedback. (Thank you)

New or changed in 2006
•       Improved wine rack wizard.
•       Support for dual row wine storage units.
•       Allow rows and columns in racks to be displayed in 0-9 or A-Z format.
•       Select any bottle in the rack by clicking on it.
•       Move bottles by click-and-drag.
•       File-level multi user protection.
•       Read-only password protection.
•       More user fields - plus two user notes fields.
•       Fresh, new page styling, with more fields you can customize.
•       Barcode wizard finds barcodes from any country.
•       Default set of report templates.
•       Option to contribute to the Uncork wine database.

New or changed in 2005
•        Automatic detection, retrieval and installation of updates from the web.
•        Virtual Wine rack wizard.
•        Barcode wizard to allow you to uncork or add wines merely by scanning the tag or barcode.
•        Preview of tags now only shows matching wines
•        Added bottle selection on Tag display allow you to print (say) only the selected tags for that wine
•        Fields in printable tags can now be left, right or centre aligned. (use right-click menu item over the
field when designing the tag)
•        When you click on a wine in the reference, "Hold Until" is preset to the start of the "Drink Now"
period, "Drink Now" is preset to the end of the "Drink Now" period, and "Taste Next" is preset to the latter of
now, and the end of the wine's "Young" period
•        When calculating or plotting a wine's maturity, "Drink By" & "Hold Until" fields entered by the user
override the automatically computed (peak derived) dates for the start and end of the "drink'now" period
when displaying a maturity curve or maturity information
•        "Check for Update" menu item added to Help menu and About box
•        Restoring from a backup file gives you control over items to be restored....
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release




If you observe any problems, please email me at mail@uncork.biz
Also, if you have any further Tips & Tricks you wish to pass on to other users, please email them to us and
we will add them to the help
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•         Additional Fields
•         Four additional user fields (10 in total) - and more room on the main screen for (larger) selectable
fields to allow you to display them
•         Two additional notes fields for your own notes as distinct from the supplied winemaker notes
•         Added Total Stock field to cellar & add-wine pages making it more obvious how many bottles you
are adding, or have in stock
•         Added Maturity field to selection of sort and printable fields

•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Speed has been significantly improved for large cellars, and transaction reports
•       Graphs now autoscale when a wine type is selected (red, white etc)
•       You can now select a wine type (red, white etc) when displaying graph of bottles-by-variety

•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       File locking applied to permit multi user use across a network
•       Optional password protection either globally, or on a cellar by cellar basis. The global password
prevents some users modifying any cellar, while still permitting them to view it. The cellar level password
prevents some users modifying this particular cellar, while still permitting them to view it.

•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Preferences moved to a popup dialog
•       Most fields in the preferences dialog have a new, simple help box display explaining what to do

•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Support for dual row storage units - display rows in racks to be displayed as a dual row cellar (front
& back)
•       Allow columns and/or rows in racks to be displayed in either 0-9 or A-Z format
•       Move a bottle to a new location by click & dragging it to an empty location ..... double click to add or
remove a wine
•       Other than when you are specifically adding or uncorking a wine, select which wine to edit in your
rack by clicking on it
•       You can now rename the default blank rack (a default blank rack is always kept for future entry)

•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Added a default set of report templates
•       New report style to print wines in your racks on a per bottle, column-by-column, row-by-row basis
•       New user settable cellar transaction retention time in transaction reports

•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Optionally allow you to contribute information about wines in your cellar to future Uncork
information databases
•       Recognize when User Field 2 is the default of 'Bottle Size' so that wines of different sizes but the
same type cannot get combined
•       Ask for the rack dimensions when a new rack is being created.
•       Free mode has been withdrawn
•       Cellar mode - selecting the country now loads the winery and region dropdown menus with items
from that country

•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
What's New or Changed since 2005
The Uncorked Cellar is constantly being improved as a result of your feedback and suggestions.
Here are the improvements implemented in the 2006 version.

•       Additional Fields
•       Graphs
•       Multi user operation
•       Preferences
•       Racks
•       Reports
•       Operational Changes
•       Miscellaneous user interface improvements
•       Fresh, new page styling
•       New layout on cellar and add-wine pages to allow you to view more user fields
•       Added value calculation to tools menu to explicitly re-calculate the value of your wines in the cellar
•       Adding wine via the barcode wizard finds matching barcodes from any country
•       Total bottles of the specific wine added to reminder message indicating one (or n) bottles added
•       Sorting by Maturity sorts by the calculated maturity rather than alphabetically
•       Added barcode instructions to help
•       Save and load tag layout templates

See Information for complete details regarding the information supplied with this release
Tips & Tricks
These tips have been supplied by.... You.

If you would like to share your tips on how to use The Uncorked Cellar or other wine related tip, please
forward them to mail@uncork.biz

Adding and storing your wine
•        When adding a different wine, Clear All or Clear Most to avoid getting notes etc from previous
winery.
•        If storing location by columns & rows, use 2 digit numbers (for example A01) to sort properly.
•        If you use digits for location, include a leading comma. This stops Excel doing arithmetic on
exported fields.
•        When storing several bottles of the same wine, list location of the first bottle only; then when
uncorking wines, take the last bottle so the location will still be correct.
•        Can't decide which wine to drink? Sort by peak year to see what needs to be consumed.
•        Not enough space in Location? Rename a User definable field to Location 2.
•        Getting close to the record limit for a cellar? Remove wines with zero stock from your cellar.
•        Looking for an inexpensive rack system for your wine? Convert an old cupboard by installing
100mm garden mesh (or concrete reinforcing) spaced 120mm apart. Just be careful to attach the front
mesh to the rear mesh every 600mm or so. Use another cupboard to store wine by the case.
•        After transport, let your wine recover from travel shock. New wines might need only a week; old
wines can require up to six months. Make sure you tag and catalogue them for easy selection and retrieval.
•        If you want to see your sparkling or other non vintage wines appear in any of the 'graphs by
vintage', assign a recognisable vintage to them
•        Use the standard window keyboard shortcut keys to "cut and paste" common information. Highlight
the text you want and "Cut" it by pressing the Control and C keys together. Click the mouse on field where
you want the information to be, and press the Control and V keys together.
•        To get the maximum benefit from your use of The Uncorked Cellar, you need to make sure that
your firewall allows proper access the web when necessary. Here are the internet accesses that you need
to permit:
•        http://www.uncork.biz for the auto-update feature (on startup or any time you use Help, Check web
for latest version)
•        External winery link when you click a http: link to a winery in the winery details box



Graphs
•        For the added/uncorked graphs, the text for each month is lined up with one of the vertical dotted
lines, while the column(s) for that month appear in the gap between that vertical line, and the next vertical
line. With this type of graph read the text on the bottom as '1st of the month' and it will make a bit more
sense.



Reports
•         Seeing a wine printed multiple times? Check that you do not have the option selected to "print one
line per tag" in your report template
•         Seeing a large gap between records? Reduce either the field widths, or the number of selected
fields to print so that each record fits on one line. Try also printing in landscape mode.
How do I...
-A-       Add wines to my cellar Add wine label images to my cellar
          Add Wines using barcodes on the bottle Automatically allocate rack locations for wines in my
cellar
          Add tags to wines in my cellar   Automatically allocate tags for wines in my cellar

-B-       Back up my cellar

-C-       Change the value of a wine     Change wine details
          Contact Uncork Convert different currencies
          Copy deleted wines to another cellar    Create a new cellar
          Create a rule Customize the display

-D-       Display a wine from the wine guide        Display different columns in my cellar
          Display different fields Display earlier vintages
          Display label image files of wines in my cellar   Drink a bottle of wine

- E-G- Export wines from the Uncorked Cellar

-H-       Hide records with zero stock

- I-L -   Install The Uncorked Cellar      Import wines into The Uncorked Cellar

- MN - Modify and save winery details Move records with zero stock
       Move a bottle of wine

-O-       Open an existing cellar

-P-       Print a report   Print Labels or Wine Tags

-Q-       Quit The Uncorked Cellar

-R-       Register        Remove unwanted records from my cellar
          Restore my cellar from a backup

-S-       Select a wine Select a country
          Setup my preferences Specify the date I add or modify wines
          Sort the displayed wines in my cellar Start...

-T-       Transfer wine to another cellar Transfer (export) my cellar to another computer

-U-       Uncork a bottle of wine Uncork Wines using barcodes on the tags
          Uncork Wines using barcodes on the bottle     Uncork Wines From Multiple Cellars using Wine
Tags
          Uninstall The Uncorked Cellar Update information in my cellar after an upgrade
          Upgrade The Uncorked Cellar Use the barcode scanner
          Use wine tags to ensure my inventory is accurate

- V-Z - View a summary of my cellar
How do I... Setup my preferences
From the main menu, select View, Preferences

A popup will be displayed with a selection of tabs containing the fields you can customise or preset.
Select each tab in turn to view the available options.
Most fields in the preferences dialog have a simple help box display explaining what to do for the fields on
that tab

When you have completed selecting your preferences, press OK.
How do I... Register
By Online secure server:
Visit our website at http://www.uncork.biz , go to the Orders page and register online by credit card.

By Mail:
You can print the registration form included with this distribution, or if you don't have a printer, you can just
write a letter giving your name and address, and state that you wish to register The Uncorked Cellar..
Send the form or letter, with your credit authority or payment made out to Uncork Pty Ltd, to:

                    Uncork Pty Ltd
                    PO Box 1391
                    Narre Warren MDC
                    Victoria
                    AUSTRALIA 3805

By Email:
Email your registration request to mail@uncork.biz with your credit card details or a telephone number (and
suitable hours) so we can contact you.

By Fax:
Print the registration form and fax to us at one of the following numbers
                        USA       206 202 3527
                        UK        870 129 6898
                        Aus       03 8610 1063

After registration, we will send you a registration key by email, or we can send you the CD by mail if you do
not have internet access. Once you have installed the software, enter your name and registration key on the
registration form exactly as indicated.


Unregistered copies of this software may be used for an evaluation period of up to sixty days. If you
continue using this software after the evaluation period, you must make a registration payment to Uncork
Pty Ltd. (see registration form)
During the evaluation period, a maximum of 100 wines may be added to your cellar. You may however
uncork as many bottles as you like.

You may copy any version of The Uncorked Cellar for normal backup purposes, and you may give copies
of the shareware version to other individuals, which they may also use and copy subject to the terms of this
agreement. If you copy the shareware version of The Uncorked Cellar for others, you must include all of
the files distributed with it, including this one. You may not give copies of the registered version to any other
person for any purpose, and you may not sell copies of the Registered version without explicit written
permission from Uncork Pty Ltd.

Registered users may download upgraded information until December and will benefit from notification and
discount offers for subsequent version upgrades.

By registering, you support shareware development and affordable Windows Software. Your contribution
will help promote future shareware development and the development of future versions of this program.
Suggestions for improving The Uncorked Cellar are very welcome.

Any questions or discussion regarding the program, can be made via email at mail@uncork.biz



See also' How do I... install The Uncorked Cellar
The Uncorked Cellar Registration Form
Register online at www.uncork.biz or, print this form on your printer, fill it in and mail with your cheque
payable to UNCORK Pty Ltd or fax it to us with your credit authority

               Uncork Pty Ltd
               PO Box 1391
               Narre Warren MDC, Victoria 3805
               Australia

               Email mail@uncork.biz
               Fax Numbers:
                     USA      206 202 3527
                     UK       870 129 6898
                     Aus      03 8610 1063

Registration Details

(Please print your name EXACTLY as you wish it to appear in the software)

Name:
Address:
City, State:                                                       Postcode:
Email Address:

______ Please send the registration key by Email
or
______ No, I do not have internet access. Please send me the software on CD at an additional cost for
shipping and handling.

Payment Details (see www.uncork.biz for current pricing)

Please register The Uncorked Cellar. See www.uncork.biz for current registration costs

I have enclosed a cheque* payable to UNCORK PTY LTD for a total of $ __________
         or
Please charge this purchase to my Mastercard/Visa/Bankcard*.
My full card number is

____ ____ ____ ____
Valid from                                                         Until end
Name on card:
Signature of cardholder

* Please delete as appropriate

If you have any comments or would like to offer suggestions, please use this space.
(Use reverse side if needed)




Version 2006(Jan)
How do I... Upgrade
If you are already registered for this calendar year, you may download and update your copy to the latest
version for free.
Connect to the internet, then use the menu command Help, Check web for updated version


If you would like to do the update manually, the update process is accomplished simply by downloading and
installing the new version of The Uncorked Cellar. We will email you instructions when you download the
update from our download page.

If you are registered for a previous vintage, you may download and evaluate the new version, but must
upgrade if you wish to use the updated version beyond the evaluation period. You can purchase an update
from our website at www.uncork.biz

If you are registered for Wine Guide mode or Cellar mode and wish to upgrade to Full Mode, you can also
do this at www.uncork.biz

See also
   How do I... Register
How do I... Contact Uncork
Website
                 www.uncork.biz

Email
                 mail@uncork.biz

Fax
                 USA         206 202 3527
                 UK          870 129 6898
                 Aus         03 8610 1063

Snail Mail
                 Uncork Pty Ltd
                 PO Box 1391
                 Narre Warren MDC
                 Victoria
                 AUSTRALIA 3805
How do I... Create a new Cellar
From the main menu, select CELLAR....CREATE and type in the name of a new cellar. You may then add
wines to this cellar from the Add Wine to Cellar page (or the CELLAR page if you are in CELLAR mode)

Alternatively, press the appropriate speed button (place the cursor on each button for a hint)

Physically, you should take a little more care.

For extended cellaring, choose a dark quite place where the temperature is as stable as possible, definitely
out of the sun and preferably out of drafts. Too much moisture may cause the cork to go mouldy from the
outside, while too little will make it dry out, so cellar wine in an area of normal humidity (around 70%). Do not
store wine for extended periods in a normal refrigerator where the cork may dry out....

The single most important factor is temperature stability.

A few bottles on display in the dining room; under the bed, stairs, or house; in a cupboard or a specially built
temperature-controlled, underground room: all these are wine cellars.


Notes:
•      This feature is not available in Wine Guide Mode
How do I... Open an existing Cellar
From the main menu, select CELLAR....OPEN and select an existing cellar. You may then add wines etc to
this cellar from the Add Wine to Cellar page (or the CELLAR page if you are in CELLAR mode).

Alternatively, press the appropriate speed button (place the cursor on each button for a hint)

Once you have opened a cellar, The Uncorked Cellar will automatically open this same cellar for you every
time it starts.



Notes:
•      This feature is not available in Wine Guide Mode
How do I... Back up my Cellar
Manual backups
From the main menu, select CELLAR....EXPORT TO CSV and enter a filename to save your cellar to.


Automatic Backups
Open the Preferences popup
On the Backup tab check the box marked Automatically backup cellar
If this box is checked, a new file will be saved in your Cellar directory every day that you start The Uncorked
Cellar. This file contains all cellar contents and cellar log information suitable for restoring or saving the
entire contents of your cellar. The backup file is named in the form of "Backup <dd-mmm-yyyy> of
cellar_name.csv

Items included in backup CSV* files include
•       Wine records
•       Wine notes
•       Wine activity log
•       Names of image files linked to wines (but not the images themselves)
•       Cellar activity log (used for graphing your historic "bottles added each month" etc
•       Rack information for wines in this cellar

Items not included in backup CSV files include
•       Actual label image files



Notes:
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide Mode
•       CSV stands for 'Comma Separated Values'.
•       The first line of the CSV file produced by The Uncorked Cellar provides headings detailing the
contents of each field.
•       Each and every field must be surounded by double quotes.
•       This file can be read by many third party programs such as spreadsheets, editors etc.


See also
   How do I... Restore my cellar from a backup
   How do I... Export wines from The Uncorked Cellar
   How do I... Import wines into The Uncorked Cellar
How do I... Restore my Cellar from a backup
Restoring wines to your cellar reads a CSV* (text) file which can be created by many third party programs.
All previous wines in your cellar are deleted so this makes an easy means of copying a cellar from another
computer, or recovering from a computer failure.

To Restore all wines to your cellar from a single, Ascii readable file..
•      Ensure you have opened the cellar or created the new Cellar you want the wines in
•      From the main menu, select CELLAR, RESTORE
•      A dialog box will be displayed, allowing you to select the file to restore your cellar from
•      Press OK

The wine information will be imported from the CSV file. While the order of each column is not important, the
first line of the file MUST show the contents of each column. Export a small cellar to see the file format
required.


Notes:
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide Mode
•       CSV stands for 'Comma Separated Values'.
•       The first line of the CSV file produced by The Uncorked Cellar provides headings detailing the
contents of each field.
•       Each and every field must be surounded by double quotes.
•       This file can be read by many third party programs such as spreadsheets, editors etc.


See also
   How do I... Back up my cellar
   How do I... Export wines from The Uncorked Cellar
   How do I... Import wines into The Uncorked Cellar
How do I... Select a wine
Either on your Cellar page or the Add Wine to Cellar page, type into the fields a few characters to help
describe the wine.... such as the Winery, Region, Variety etc. The table will display a matching list of wines,
and recent (or matching) vintages. Simply click on the row in the table and the information on that wine will
be displayed in full to the top half os the screen.

If you are on the Add Wine to Cellar page, the wines displayed will be selected from the inbuilt winery
reference.
If you want to see wines from another country you will need to select that country first.
(Note: This feature is not available in Wine Guide Mode)


If you are on your Cellar page, the wines displayed will be selected from bottles in your cellar. If you wish to
only see bottles of which you have more than a certain quantity of in your cellar, set TOTAL BOTTLES to
this quantity.


Notes:
•        The 'Peak' field is ignored if you have entered a specific vintage year.
•        Wines valued within approximately 20% of the value you have entered will be displayed
•        If you are selecting a wine to consume, remember to 'uncork' the bottle to adjust the record of
bottles in your cellar.


See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details
     How do I... Select a Country
     How do I... Drink a Bottle of Wine
     How do I... Display Earlier Vintages
How do I... Display different columns in my cellar
If you want change what information if displayed on the Cellar page, or the order of the displayed
information, move the mouse over the grid and click the right-hand mouse button.


From the displayed menu, select "Insert a column before this column"

In the box marked Fields to display as columns select the information you want to display


You may also remove columns from this menu, or sort the cellar, or automatically set the field widths


Notes
•      Each item can only be specified once. If you want to move where a particular field is displayed you
must delete that column first. Then, move the mouse to where you want to display it, and insert the field.



See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details
     How do I... Select a Wine
     How do I... Drink a Bottle of Wine
     How do I... Display different fields on the Cellar or Add Wine page
How do I... Display different fields on the Cellar or Add Wine page
On both the Cellar page and the Add Wine page are a number of field titles which are shown underlined.
Click any of these field titles to select what information to display in that field when a wine is selected.

Fields you can select include the User fields and Date fields.

You can selectively show or hide two rows of these fields by clicking on the separator above the display
grid, and dragging it up over the fields you no longer wish to see.

Notes:
•      The Cellar page is not available in Wine Guide Mode
•      The Add Wine page is not available in Cellar Mode


See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details
     How do I... Select a Wine
     How do I... Drink a Bottle of Wine
     How do I... Display different columns in my cellar
How do I... Display Earlier Vintages
On the Add Wine to Cellar page, type into the fields a few characters to help describe the wine.... such as
the Winery, Region, Variety etc. The table will display a matching list of wines, and recent (or matching)
vintages. Click on the row in the table for the wine of interest.

Click on the down arrow of the Vintage field and all vintages for that wine will be displayed.

Click on the table entry for the vintage of interest. You can now add that wine to your cellar.

If you want change how many vintages are displayed by default or printed in reports, open the Preferences
popup and view either the Display Preferences or Print Preferences tab.

Once you are back on the Add Wine to Cellar page, press Clear All Fields to refresh the display. If you want
to see wines from another country you will need to select that country first.


Notes:
•      This feature is not available in Cellar Mode


See also
     How do I... Select a Wine
     How do I... Change Wine Details
     How do I... Select a Country
     How do I... Drink a Bottle of Wine
How do I... Select a Country
On the Add Wine to Cellar page select a country from the list supplied. The appropriate database will be
loaded so that you can then select a wine or winery from the internal database of wine or wineries from that
country. If maps and vintage reference details are available for the selected country then this page will
become enabled.


If you are using the Barcode Wizard to add wines, you should select the appropriate country before you
scan the barcode on the bottle

Notes
•          This feature is not available in Cellar Mode
•          You can change countries at any time.
•          Changing countries does not affect any other aspect of operation of The Uncorked Cellar.
•          The region information of the wines in your cellar includes a country code.
•          At this stage, we do not have information on wines or wineries from countries below the line marked
"--------"


See also
     How do I... Select a Wine
How do I... Convert different currencies
Wine value information in The Uncorked Cellar is generally expressed in the currency of origin for that wine,
for wine purchased in that country.

So, if the wine comes from Australia, the value in the reference database is expressed in Australian Dollar,
while wine which comes from Canada is expressed in Canadian Dollars etc.

To convert these values to your local currency simply enter the conversion rate for each country on the
Preferences popup, under Add Wine Display Preferences, in the International Exchange rate box.

For example, if you live in America, you would multiply the price of Australian wine by about 0.70,
depending on the current exchange rates. Values of Australian wines from the reference would then be
displayed in American Dollars.

Of course, this can only provide an approximate guide as this value reflects what the wine would cost in
your local currency if it were purchased in the source country. It does not reflect added shipping costs or
pricing policies of the various importers, wholesalers etc.

If you want to fine tune this conversion, you can check the price of regional wine from your local supplier,
and adjust the multiplication factor accordingly.

This conversion factor only applies until the particular wine has been added to your cellar.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Cellar Mode

See also
     How do I... Select a Country
     How do I... Select a Wine
How do I... Specify the Date I add or modify wines
When adding wines, Modifying wines, or Transfering wines, you may select the date subsequently used for
logging and subsequent display in the graphs showing the number and value of wines you have added or
uncorked to or from your cellar.
To do this, modify the Date in the Purchased field by using the date picker. This will display the selected
date in the following format...
      "dd mmm yyyy"

where
    dd = the day of the month
    mmm = the month in the form of Jan, Feb etc..
    yyyy = the year

If the date is not precisely this format it cannot be recognised, and the log and subsequent graph will default
to the current date.

Please note that the wine log will always note the actual date you modify wine records.




Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
How do I... Display a Wine from the Wine Guide
The Wine Guide Page page shows details of lots (but sadly, not yet all) of wines from the selected country.
You can select wineries from a growing list of countries on this page. Select the appropriate country before
you start entering wine details so that the respective database can be loaded.

For the sake of speed and ease of selection, we limit the display in the display grid to the first 500 matching
wines.

To see a specific wine,
•      Enter the first few letters of the winery you want into the field marked Winery.
•      Click on the wine in the lower half of the screen.
•      To see other vintages, use the up/down arrows on the Vintage field to select the correct vintage.




Notes
•       This feature is not available in Cellar Mode
How do I... View a Summary Of My Cellar
To view a brief summary of the wines in your cellar including the total number of bottles, total price paid and
current estimate value, use the main menu command Cellar, Cellar Summary
How do I... Add Wines to my Cellar
Full mode

Adding wines to your cellar is done from the Add Wine to Cellar page of wines. This page shows details of
lots (but sadly, not yet all) of wines from the selected country. You can select wineries from a growing list of
countries on this page. Select the appropriate country before you start entering wine details so that the
respective database can be loaded.

•       Ensure you have opened a cellar
•       Go to the Add Wine to Cellar page
•       Display the wine you are adding to the cellar.
•       If you wish, modify any of the fields from the reference information, and add location details
•       Press the Add Wine To Cellar button
•       The Tag Wizard will be displayed to allow you to enter tag details for this wine


If the wine exists in the supplied database, but the specific vintage does not then
•        Ensure you have opened a cellar
•        On the Add Wine to Cellar page, Select the closest available vintage of the wine you are adding to
the cellar.
•        Use the up/down arrows on the vintage field to select the correct vintage.
•        Press the Add Wine To Cellar button


If the wine, winery or region do not exist in the supplied database then
•        Ensure you have opened a cellar
•        On the Add Wine to Cellar page, select the winery if it exists, or just type its name in the Winery
field.
•        Enter other details such as variety, region etc
•        If you have them, enter the winery's address and other details in the winery details field
•        Make sure you select the wine type by depressing one of the wine bottles
•        Press the Add Wine To Cellar button


Cellar mode

Adding wines to your cellar is done from the Cellar page. Select the appropriate country before you start
entering wine details so that the respective database can be loaded.

•       Ensure you have opened a cellar
•       If you have previously selected a wine, it is usually best to clear the details of the previous wine
before you add your new wine by pressing the Clear All Fields button.
•       Enter the details about the wine you are adding to the cellar.
•       Enter the quantity of bottles you are adding, and add it's location details
•       Press the Add a Wine button


Notes
•      This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•      If you wish to use the Barcode Wizard, press the Barcode button, or use the menu command Tools,
Barcode Wizard


See also
     How do I... Add tags to wines in my cellar
How do I... Display label image files of wines in my cellar
How do I... Change Wine Details
How do I... Select a country
Barcode Wizard
Rack Wizard
Tag Wizard
How do I... Add Tags To Wines in my Cellar
Numbered wine tags are a great idea to ensure that your wine records are always accurate. Both
pre-printed and wine printable tags can be purchased from our website at www.uncork.biz

Each tag has a barcode which can be read by a barcode reader (also available from our website) to easily
and accurately identify each bottle in your cellar. You can print your own tags using our printable wine tags
- creating your own layout of wine information directly from your cellar records. Include a barcode for easy
and accurate uncorking using the Barcode Wizard.

To use, just attach an individually numbered wine tag to each bottle as you add the wine to your cellar.

When you consume a bottle, remove the tag and put it aside for the next time you are at your computer and
can adjust your records in The Uncorked Cellar.
It is then a simple matter to enter each tag number and uncork the bottle(s).

Pre-printed tags, Printable tags and barcode readers can all be purchased from our website at
www.uncork.biz.
To print your own tags see How do I... Print Labels or Wine Tags



To add tags as you add wines to your cellar
•      Press the Tags and Racks button

This opens the Tag Wizard.
•       If you want to use tags, ensure that the box marked Do Not Allocate Tags is cleared.
•       Select your choice of adding tags either to each record, or to each wine.
•       Select if you want tags added automatically, or manually.
•       If you want to add tags automatically, enter the starting tag number and the last tag in the box to the
appropriate fields.
•       If you have selected to add a tag per bottle, a tag for each bottle will be allocated when you add
wines to your cellar.
•       If you do not want to use tags, ensure that the box marked Do Not Allocate Tags is checked.

When you add a wine, the Tag Wizard will be displayed.
•      If you wish to alter these tags manually as you add each wine, turn off automatic tag allocation.
•      If you have selected to add tags automatically, the tag fields will automatically show the next set of
tags.
•      If you have selected to add tags manually, you can enter each tag fields manually, either using the
keyboard, or a barcode scanner
•      The tag information will be saved when you press OK.'



To add or modify tags already in your cellar
•      On the Cellar page, press the Tags and Racks button

•       This opens the Tag Wizard.
•       Ensure that the box marked Do Not Allocate Tags is cleared.
•       Modify the appropriate tag fields manually, either using the keyboard, or a barcode scanner
•       The tag information will be saved when you press OK


Notes
•     This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•      The Add Wine page is not available in Cellar Mode
•      Up to 2000 records can be stored per cellar in Full mode or Cellar mode
•      Up to 10 cases (120 bottles) can be stored per record in Full mode or Cellar mode


See also
   How do I... Add Tags To Wines in my Cellar
   How do I... Change Wine Details
   How do I... Drink a Bottle of Wine
   How do I... Move a bottle of wine
   How do I... Print Labels or Wine Tags
   How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the tags
Barcode Wizard
The Barcode Wizard allows you to use a barcode scanner to read barcodes directly off a bottle or wine tag,
and uncork a bottle in your cellar simply by scanning it's barcode, or add any wine with a barcode listed in
the database.

The major limitation of adding a wine via the barcode on the bottle is that barcodes on the bottle do not
normally define the vintage. This also makes the printed barcode on the bottle unsuitable for use as
inventory control. We recommend the use of wine tags with barcodes for inventory control. Suitable tags are
available from our website at www.uncork.biz

To install your Uncork USB scanner, plug the appropriate connector into the end of your scanner, and the
USB plug into the USB port of your computer. The Uncork Barcode Scanner is now ready for use. The
barcode scanner reads a barcode and enters the barcode number as if you had typed the number with the
keyboard. This means that using the scanner with The Uncorked Cellar allows you to select your wines by
scanning a barcode instead of manually typing the wine details. Before you scan a barcode, click on the
barcode field where you add or uncork a wine, or use the Barcode Wizard.

Other operations of The Uncorked Cellar remain unchanged.

How do I...
•      Add Wines to my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
•      Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the tags
•      Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle

See also
   Rack Wizard
   Tag Wizard

Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide
How do I... Add Wines to my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
The Barcode Wizard allows you to use a barcode scanner to read barcodes directly off a bottle, and add any
wine with a barcode listed in the database.

To add a wine to your cellar using a barcode reader to scan barcodes on the bottle

•      Open your Cellar
•      Go to the Add Wine page
•      Click on the barcode button (beside the Country field.) The barcode wizard will be displayed.
•      Enter the country of the wine you are adding to load the appropriate database
•      Enter the vintage of the wine you are adding
•      Enter how many bottles, and the purchase price
•      Scan the barcode on the bottle
•      Scan your remaining bottles in turn to add each bottle, remembering each time to add the vintage,
number of bottles and the purchase price for each bottle before you scan the barcode




Notes
•        One limitation of barcodes already printed the bottle is that this often only defines the wine, not the
vintage. Also, many wineries have not supplied the barcodes for their wines. For these reasons, we
recommend that you use wine tags to control your wine inventory, as this way you can scan your stock on a
bottle by bottle basis.
•        If the barcode is not listed in the database, you should place the bottle to one side while you scan
the rest of the wines that you are adding, then close the barcode wizard enter the details via the manual Add
Wine mechanism. In this case, enter the barcode last so that it will get added to your cellar records and can
be recognized in future.
•        If you want to look up a wine (or do anything except uncork a wine), you should enter the barcode in
the barcode field on the main cellar page
•        If the wine already exists in your reference cellar, the notes and merit will be copied from your cellar
•        If you make a mistake and inadvertantly add an incorrect wine, press the Undo button
•        This feature is only available in Full mode

See also
   How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the tags
   How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the tags
The Barcode Wizard allows you to use a barcode scanner to read barcodes directly off a tag, and uncork
specific bottles of wine in your cellar.
To uncork specific bottles from your cellar by using a barcode reader to scan barcodes on wine tags

•       Open your Cellar
•       Go to the Cellar page
•       Click on the tag button (beside the "Tag" field) The barcode wizard will be displayed.
•       Scan the barcode on the wine tag
•       If you have more bottles to uncork, scan the remaining bottles in turn to uncork each bottle

Notes
•        If you want to look up a wine (or do anything except uncork a wine), you should enter the barcode in
the tag field on the main cellar page
•        If you make a mistake and inadvertantly uncork an incorrect wine, press the Undo button
•        This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode

See also
   How do I... Uncork Wines From Multiple Cellars using Wine Tags
   How do I... Add Wines to my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
   How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
The Barcode Wizard allows you to use a barcode scanner to read barcodes directly off a bottle, and uncork
the first matching bottle of any wine with a barcode listed in your cellar.

To uncork a wine from your cellar by using a barcode reader to scan barcodes on the bottle

•       Open your Cellar
•       Go to the Cellar page
•       Click on the barcode button (beside the "Country" field.) The barcode wizard will be displayed.
•       Enter the vintage of the wine that you are uncorking
•       Scan the barcode on the bottle
•       If you have more bottles to uncork, scan the remaining bottles in turn to uncork each bottle


Scan the Barcode on the bottle to uncork a bottle from the first matching wine in your cellar.

Notes
•       If you want to look up a wine (or do anything except uncork a wine), you should enter the barcode in
the barcode field on the main cellar page
•       If you make a mistake and inadvertantly uncork an incorrect wine, press the Undo button
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode

See also
   How do I... Add Wines to my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
   How do I... Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the tag
How do I... Uncork wines from multiple cellar files using wine tags
By default, all wine searching is only carried out on the cellar that you have opened.
The Barcode Wizard allows you to use a bottle tag to find and uncork a specific bottle of wine from several
cellars.

To do this...
•         Start the Barcode Wizard
•         Press the button marked Multiple cellars
•         Check the box marked Search wines from these cellars..
•         If you want to revert to single cellar operation, clear the box marked Search wines from these
cellars..
•         Enter the cellar filenames containing your wine records, or use the box marked ... to browse and
find the files
•         If you no longer wish to search for wines in this cellar, clear the cellar name

Notes
•        This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•        The current open cellar is always searched first so if you know which cellar each tag is from, it is
fastest to group your tags by cellar before uncorking them

See also
   Barcode Wizard
   Rack Wizard
   Tag Wizard
   Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the tags
   Uncork Wines in my Cellar using barcodes on the bottle
Rack Wizard
The Rack Wizard can be used to automatically show where you have located wines in your cellar.

The rack location can be used in association with wine tags that you attach to each bottle. The idea is to use
sequential numbers on each wine tag, which then become bottle identifiers. Having identified a particular
bottle, you then associate a rack row & column to that bottle.

You can manually allocate bottle locations as you add each wine, or setup The Uncorked Cellar to
automatically allocate an empty rack location for each bottle as you add them to your cellar.

Before you allocate any bottles to a rack, you should create the rack, and define its' size in terms of how
many rows or columns exist in this particular rack. See How do I... Create a Rack or change its size and
shape

General rules within the rack wizard.
•        A single click on a wine in the visual rack will select that wine.
•        A double click on a wine will uncork that bottle.
•        A double click on an empty location will add an extra bottle of that wine to this record.
•        A bottle may be moved to a new location by clicking on it and draging it to a new, empty location.
•        If you make a mistake and inadvertantly add an incorrect wine or location, press the Cancel button
•        If you make a mistake and have already pressed OK to the rack wizard, press the Undo button in
the toolbar


To manually allocate wine locations in your rack as you add each wine
•      Open the Rack wizard by pressing the button marked Tags & Racks
•      Clear the box marked Automatically Allocate Bottles to Rack...
•      When you add each wine to your cellar, the Tag & Rack Wizard will be displayed.
•      In the field marked Rack, select the rack to add your new bottles to
•      Alternatively, you can enter the rack names and locations manually in the grid beside the tag
numbers
•      Double-click on empty locations within the rack to automatically fill in the rack location details for
each bottle


To manually move a wine location in a rack
•     Go to the Cellar Page and click on a wine to select it
•     Open the Rack wizard by pressing the button marked Tags & Racks
•     Click on the bottle you wish to move, and drag it to the new location.
•     Alternatively, you can enter the new location manually in the grid beside the tag numbers


Setting up The Uncorked Cellar to automatically allocate wine locations in your rack as you add
each wine
•       Open the Rack wizard by pressing the button marked Tags & Racks
•       Check the box marked Automatically Allocate Bottles to Rack...
•       In the entry field to the right of this, select the rack where you want to add new wines
•       To create a new rack, select NEW, then enter a rack name
•       In the entry field below this, select the order you want to add new wines within the rack

How do I...
•     Use the visual rack display to locate Wines in my Cellar
•     Create a Rack or change its size and shape
•     Find Wines in my Cellar using the visual rack display
•     Add a wine to a rack
•     Move a bottle of wine
•     Uncork a wine from a rack

See also
  Barcode Wizard
  Tag Wizard
How do I... Move a bottle of wine
To move a bottle to a new location within a rack
•        On the Cellar page, click on the wine you wish to move
•        Press the Tags and Racks button to open the Tag Wizard.
•        Move the bottle to a new location by clicking on the required bottle & dragging it to an empty
location within the rack
•        The new information will be saved when you press OK


To move a bottle to a new rack
•        On the Cellar page, click on the wine you wish to move
•        Press the Tags and Racks button to open the Tag Wizard.
•        Clear the existing rack information for the bottle you want to move
•        Check the box on the left hand side of the grid marked Tags beside the bottle that you wish to
move.
•        Press the button marked Clear Selected Racks
•        Open the new rack that you want to move the botttle to by selecting it in the Rack field above the
visual rack display.
•        Double click on an empty location within the rack
•        The new information will be saved when you press OK

See also
  How do I... Find Wines in my Cellar using the visual rack display
  How do I... Uncork a wine from a rack
How do I... Use the visual rack display to locate Wines in my Cellar
When you add a wine to your cellar, a popup dialog will be displayed which allows you to select where to
place your wine in your wine rack.

To setup The Uncorked Cellar to automatically allocate rack locations in your cellar as you add each wine,
•      On the Rack Wizard, check the box marked Automatically Allocate Bottles to Rack...
•      Select the rack new wines will be added.
•      Select where in the rack new wines will be added

To manually allocate rack locations in your cellar as you add each wine,
•       On the Rack Wizard, clear the box marked Automatically Allocate Bottles to Rack...
•       On the Rack display on the right hand side of the screen, click on an empty location to add the
(Rack Name, Rack Column and Rack Row) details to the appropriate entry in the tags grid on the left of the
screen
•       Alternatively, click on the wine in the tags grid on the left of the screen, and manually enter the rack
details

Having added rack information for your wines, you can select which wine to uncork by
•      Go to the Cellar Page
•      Click on the wine you wish to uncork
•      Press the button marked Tags and Racks
•      The popup display will show you a display of wines in your rack
•      You may select a different rack from the Rack field at the top of the form
•      Click on one of the bottles (shown larger than other wines in this rack) to uncork that wine

Notes:
•       When you uncork a wine using the Uncork button in the toolbar of the main screen, the first
available wine wil be removed from the rack.
•       If you have turned off the prompts and wish to get prompted again before wines are added or
uncorked, use the menu command Tools, Show all optional reminders
•       If you do not wish to view the location of each bottle of wine in your cellar, just leave the rack fields
blank
See also
   How do I... Create a rack or change its size and shape
   How do I... Find Wines in my Cellar using the visual rack display
   How do I... Move a wine in a rack
   How do I... Uncork a wine from a rack
How do I... Create a Rack or change its size and shape
To create a new virtual rack for your wines
•       Go to the Cellar Page
•       Click on a wine
•       Press the button marked Tags and Racks
•       The popup Rack Wizard will show you a display of wines in your rack
•       Under Rack Selection on the right hand side of the screen, click in the Rack field
•       Select Create New Rack and enter a new Rack name when prompted

To increase or decrease the number of columns or rows in your wine rack, press the arrows on the side or
bottom of the rack display.

To make a rack location unavailable,
•       Click on the Unavailable box at the bottom of the rack display,
•       Click on the cell or cells you want to make unavailable.
•       This allows you to make your wine rack almost any shape you wish.
Click on the row or column number to allocate or clear every bottle location in that rack or column

If you make a mistake while on this dialog, press cancel.

See also
  How do I... Find Wines in my Cellar using the visual rack display
  How do I... Move a wine in a rack
  How do I... Uncork a wine from a rack
How do I... Add a wine to a rack
When you add each wine, the tag and rack wizard will be displayed.
•        If you have selected "Automatically Allocate Bottles to Rack..." then the wizard will allocate empty
rack locations to your new bottles
•        If you elect to do this manually, click on an empty rack location to allocate a bottle to the selected
location
If you make a mistake and inadvertantly add an incorrect wine or location, press the Cancel button
If you have already pressed OK to the rack wizard, press the Undo button


If you already have the particular wine in your cellar you can add another bottle by...
•        Go to the Cellar Page
•        Click on the wine you wish to add another bottle
•        Press the button marked "Tags and Racks"
•        The popup display will show you a display of wines in your rack
•        You may select a different rack from the "Rack" field at the top of the form
•        The bottles in this record are shown larger than other wines in this rack
•        Click on one (or more) of the empty locations to add another bottle of this wine


Notes:
•      If you have turned off the prompts and wish to get prompted again before wines are added or
uncorked, use the menu command "Tools, Show all optional reminders"
•      If you do not wish to view the location of each bottle of wine in your cellar, just leave the rack fields
blank
•      Click on the row or column number to allocate or clear every bottle location in that rack or column
How do I... Uncork a wine from a rack
Having added rack information for your wines, you can select which wine to uncork by
•        Go to the Cellar Page
•        Click on the wine you wish to uncork
•        Press the button marked "Tags and Racks"
•        The popup display will show you a display of wines in your rack
•        You may select a different rack from the "Rack" field at the top of the form
•        Click on one of the bottles (shown larger than other wines in this rack) to uncork that wine
If you make a mistake and inadvertantly add an incorrect wine or location, press the Cancel button
If you have already pressed OK to the rack wizard, press the Undo button


Notes:
•       When you uncork a wine using the "Uncork" button in the toolbar of the main screen, the first
available bottle will be removed from the rack.
•       If you have turned off the prompts and wish to get prompted again before wines are added or
uncorked, use the menu command "Tools, Show all optional reminders"
•       If you do not wish to view the location of each bottle of wine in your cellar, just leave the rack fields
blank
How do I... Sort Displayed Wines in my Cellar
Sorting the order your wines are displayed is done from the cellar page. This page shows the contents of
the wine in your cellar

•       Ensure you have opened a cellar, then either
•       Double click in the column you wish to sort the display of your wines, or
•       Move the mouse over the grid, click the right-hand mouse button, then select "Sort Cellar..." from
the popup menu, or
•       Sort using multiple fields, or in descending order by clicking the sort button
You can also sort your cellar from the main menu.
To do this, select..
•       Tools
•       Sort Cellar By
•       .. Then select the field you want to sort the cellar display by, or select MULTIPLE FIELDS to sort
your cellar by up to 4 fields

The sort order is saved to your disk immediately and applies both to the display and any printout of your
cellar.

You can also use the popup menu by moving the mouse over the grid and clicking the right-hand mouse
button.




Notes:
•       Because newly sorted cellars are saved to disk at the actual time of sorting, selecting the option to
sort whenever a new wine is added may cause noticable delays when adding wines to a large cellar
•       Sorting by tags is limited to sorting by the first tag in the list.
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide Mode



See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details
How do I... Display label image files of wines in my cellar
To display a label image which you have previously scanned in and saved as a JPEG format file.

•       Ensure you have opened a cellar
•       Select the wine you are associating a label image with.
•       Place the mouse button over the label image and click the right mouse button.
•       Select the JPEG file and press OK.

This label image will now be displayed each time you select this wine from your cellar.
If you make a mistake, you may clear this image by repeating the process, but pressing cancel instead of
selecting a file.

See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
How do I... Change Wine Details
To change the details of a wine you have stored in your cellar
•      Ensure you have opened a cellar
•      Select the wine you want to change the details of.
•      Change the details of the wine.
•      Press the Update button.

Notes
•       The update button is a multi-function button to the right of the "Add Wine" button.
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
How do I... Change the value of a wine
The Uncorked Cellar adjusts the estimated value of wine in your cellar for:-
•     Inflation
•     Improvement in the wine as it slowly matures
•     Decline in the wine as it slowly ages beyond it's nominated "Best At" year

You can set what factor is used for inflation, and for how much the wine's estimated value changes per year
during each of the defined age breaks (Young, Improving, Maturing and Aged). It is presumed that the
wine's value remains relatively stable (except for inflation) during the Drink Now period.

The displayed and printed value for each wine in your cellar will reflect the new factors you have entered.
Note that each wine's estimated value is computed as it is displayed. The underlying data you have entered
is untouched and can be always viewed by setting each factor to zero.
To change the default factors
•       Go to the Preferences popup
•       Select the Display Preferences tab
•       Enter your desired values for the Wine Value Estimation Factors

The value estimation factors are saved to your disk immediately, but the table display will not reflect the
changes until it is re-displayed. You can do this by pressing the Clear all Fields button.

If you want to only display the value you have entered manually for each of your wines, change each of the
factors to zero. You can then set the values on a wine by wine basis by changing the wine details

The default factors used in The Uncorked Cellar are as follows
•      3% pa Inflation
•      5% pa Improvement in the wine's value while it is Young
•      5% pa Improvement in the wine's value while it is Improving
•      4% pa Decline in the wine's value while it is Maturing
•      5% pa Decline in the wine's value when it is Aged


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details
How do I... Remove Unwanted Empty Records From My Cellar
Records with zero stock may be removed by using the main menu command Tools, Remove Entries With
Zero Stock
This will normally be used to free records if you are nearing the 2000 record limit for wines in a particular
cellar

The details are saved to your disk immediately, but the grid display will not reflect the changes until it is
re-displayed. You can do this by pressing the Clear all Fields button.

Please use with caution because removed records cannot be recovered



You can also use the popup menu to delete records by moving the mouse over specific wine on the grid and
clicking the right-hand mouse button.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Hide records with zero stock
     How do I... Move records with zero stock
How do I... Move Records With Zero Stock In My Cellar
Wines without any remaining stock are usually still displayed for reference.

To move records for which all wines have been consumed to another celler, go to the cellar page, then
•     Use the menu command Tools, Move Entries with Zero Stock to Cellar....
•     Select the cellar to move the wines to.
•     Press OK.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Hide records with zero stock
     How do I... Remove Unwanted Records From My Cellar
How do I... Hide Records With Zero Stock In My Cellar
Wines without any remaining stock are usually still displayed for reference.

To hide records for which all wines have been consumed, go to the cellar page, then
•       Press the Clear all Fields button.
•       Set the Total Bottles field to one.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Move records with zero stock
     How do I... Remove Unwanted Records From My Cellar
How do I... Drink a Bottle of Wine
Hmm.... Other than the obvious, once you have selected the wine to drink, you will want to record that fact
in your wine cellar records.

The mechanics are fairly straight forward - Open the Cellar the wine is in, select the wine, and press the
UNCORK button. Alternatively once you have selected the wine you may change the quantity field to reflect
the number of bottles you have removed from the cellar. If you wish, you can also record your tasting notes
in the Notes field or make any other changes to the details of this wine. Once you have made your changes,
click on UPDATE WINE to save the details for future reference.


If you use a barcode scanner and numbered tags, the process is even simpler
To uncork a bottle using a scanner to scan the barcode on a numbered wine tag...
•        Go to the Cellar page
•        Press the Clear all Fields button
•        Click on the Tag field
•        Scan the tag
•        Click the Uncork a bottle button


You can also use the popup menu by moving the mouse over the grid and click the right-hand mouse
button.


Notes
•     You can purchase a barcode scanner and numbered (or printable) wine tags from our website at
www.uncork.biz
•     When you uncork a bottle, the details are saved to your disk immediately.
•     This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Change Wine Details
How do I... Transfer Wine
Notes:
  Transferring wines is not available in Wine Guide mode



You can move an individual wine from one cellar to another by following these steps

•        Open the Cellar the wine is in
•        Move the mouse over the grid and click the right-hand mouse button while the mouse pointer is on
the wine you want to move Select the menu command to "Move 1 bottle", "Move all bottles", or "Move the
entire record"
•        Select the cellar you want to transfer the wine to
•        Press OK

The Uncorked Cellar removes the defined quantity of bottles from your current cellar and adds them to the
new cellar.
The details are saved to your disk immediately


You can move all wines from one cellar to another by following these steps

•      Open the Cellar the wine is in
•      Export the wine to a NEW temporary file. CAUTION: Do not overwrite a cellar file as it will become
unreadable
•      Open the cellar that you want all the wines to go to
•      IMPORT the temporary file containing the wines you EXPORTED from the original cellar

In addition to its initial contents, the new cellar now contains all of the wines from the first cellar.

The details are saved to your disk immediately


You can also use the popup menu by moving the mouse over the wine on the grid and clicking the
right-hand mouse button.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Select a Wine
How do I... Transfer My Cellar To Another PC
Notes:
  Transferring Cellars is not available in Wine Guide mode

To transfer your entire cellar between PC's (say, between your home PC and your laptop)?

1. On your home PC, use the menu command "Cellar, Export to CSV file..."
2. Copy the resulting file to your laptop
3. On your laptop, use the menu command "Cellar, Restore Cellar from Backup CSV file..."
How do I... Copy Deleted Wines To Another Cellar
You can set up to move wine records to another cellar when you delete any record by following these steps

•       Create a New Cellar to move deleted records to
•       Press the rules button
•       Create a new rule by pressing the NEW button in the Rule Name box
•       Give it a name when prompted
•       In the And Is box, select "Deleted" in cellar
•       In the Then do this action box select "Move Wine WIth Tags" to cellar
•       Still in the Then do this action box select what cellar to move the records to
•       Finally, in the Rule Name box click on the Enabled checkbox to enable the new rule, and
•       Press OK


With this rule enabled, when you delete a wine record from your cellar, it will be automatically moved to the
cellar you have defined (unless of course, you delete a wine from that cellar)


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode


See also
     How do I... Create a New Cellar How do I... Select a Wine
     How do I... Transfer a Wine
How do I... Print a Report
Reports are always previewed on screen before printing. The Uncorked Cellar can print to any printer that
you have a Windows driver for.


Basic Reports
To print a report matching what you see on the screen press the Print button.
Set your preferences for basic reports on the Preferences popup.

Report Templates
To create a more specialised report template, press the Reports button, then ....
•         In the block marked Report Name, create a new report template by clicking the NEW button or
select an existing Report name you wish to change
•         In the block marked If wine matches this, select the field to test, the test to apply and the value to
compare with to identify which matching wines this rule applies to. Blank in the value field means all wines
•         To select the fields you want to see in the report, move the mouse over the grid previewing your
wines, and click the right-hand mouse button.
•         You may also modify the field widths as you want them to be in the report by clicking the bar above
the field names and dragging the column until it is the desired width.
•         Choose the report style from the block marked Print Style
•         Cellar Contents prints a simple view of wines in your cellar. This is the report which is generated
when you press the button. You can define a different sort order for each template by pressing the Sort
button.
•          Cellar Menu prints a view of wines in your cellar, sorted and grouped in a similar manner to a wine
list at a Restaurant.
•          Cellar Transctions prints a view of transactions from your cellar log. The fields available to you for
this type of report are limited to those kept in the actual log. Wine tags printed by this report are the tags
either added or deleted by the transaction. Similarly, Stock shows the number of wines added or removed
by this transaction
•          Rack Contents prints a view of wines in your rack(s) with one line for every bottle contained in the
defined rack. To only see wines in a particular rack, enter the filter criteria of Field <Rack name> Contains
<your rack name>
•          Wine Tags prints a report of wines in your cellar, but as either Tags or Labels. See How do I... Print
a Label or Tag


Generating Reports
To generate a report from a report template, press the Report button, then ....
•      In the block marked 'Report Name', select the Report name you wish to generate.
•      Click on the Print button to start the print process.

You can press ESC or click on the Cancel button if you want to stop the report generation.

When the report has been generated, the print preview screen will open, showing a reduced image of the
first page of the report. A tool bar across the top displays the options available to you. The report will not
actually print unless you click on the Print Button.


Notes
•        A number of sample report templates are created when you first use The Uncorked Cellar. Use
these templates as a guide fpr your own customized reports.
•        Report templates are only available in Full Mode
•        You should ensure that you have installed a driver flot your printer and set it up from the windows
control panel. The Uncorked Cellar prints to the default Windows printer.
•        If you get errors and cannot see a report the most likely cause is that Windows does not have a
default printer installed.
How do I... Print Labels or Wine Tags
To setup a Tag or Label template, press the button, then ....
•      Setup a report template as per a normal report
•      In the block marked Print Style, select Wine Tags.
•      Press the button marked Tag Layout to create the Label or Tag.
•      When you are happy with the Tag setup, click on the Print button to start the print process.



Tag and page setup
•       Define the size of the Tag or Label by entering the width and height. Alternatively, you can drag the
right hand or bottom edge to the desired size.
•       Setup how many Tags appear across a page by entering this in the Columns field.
•       Setup how many Tags appear down a page by entering this in the Rows field.
•       The Space Between Tags is the gap left between Tags.
•       Use Page Offsets to move everything relative to the sheet of paper.


Setting up fields to print on each Tag or Label
•        Create new fields on the label by right-clicking the Tag in any position which does not already have
a field.
•        Resize field widths by dragging the right hand border to the desired width.
•        Move a field around by dragging it to the desired position.
•        You can also right-click on the field to define many properties for that field.


You can select which Tag on the page should be used as the starting point when you start printing the Tags
or Labels.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•       If you get errors when you press the Print button and cannot see a report, the most likely cause is
that Windows does not have a default printer installed.
How do I... Quit The Uncorked Cellar
To exit from The Uncorked Cellar, simple choose the menu item Cellar, Exit , or close the application by
clicking in the upper right hand portion of the window.
NOTE - Changes you make to your cellar wines are typically saved on exiting the program.
How do I... Install The Uncorked Cellar
The Uncorked Cellar comes with an automatic installation program. Place the distribution disk in drive A:
or B:. Then from the task bar, click on Start, Run. Windows will display the Run dialog box. In the command
line, type in A:setup or b:setup, depending on which drive you inserted the disk. Click on Okay. answer the
question about the destination drive and directory, and then sit back while windows installs the software
onto your hard disk, and creates an icon for it.
The installation process will place the following files on your system:
       UNCORKED.EXE
       UNCORKED.LOG
       UNCORKED.HLP
The installation process will also create the following subdirectories....all under the directory you specify
       REF
       IMAGES
       CELLARS

Operating the program will create some additional files on your disk to hold cellar information - again all files
are in subdirectories under the directory you specify for installation.

To install, simply run SETUP and follow the instructions. You may remove the program at any time (see
How do I... Uninstall The Uncorked Cellar)

The file README.TXT also contains installation information.
How do I... Uninstall The Uncorked Cellar
If you wish to remove The Uncorked Cellar software from your computer
•        Open Add/Remove programs (see SETTINGS, CONTROL PANEL on your computer's taskbar)
•        Select The Uncorked Cellar
•        Press Add/Remove

This will remove all programs and reference data files used for The Uncorked Cellar, but will leave any
cellar files you have created. These may be removed manually by using Windows Explorer to remove the
sub directories created with your cellar data.

Finally, thanks for trying The Uncorked Cellar.
How do I... Update wine information in my cellar after an upgrade
After you have downloaded and installed a new version of The Uncorked Cellar, you can refresh the
information in your cellar to match the most recent available information. To do this,
•       Open your Cellar
•       Choose the menu command Tools, Update Cellar wine information from Reference
•       Press Change or Ignore for each of the wines identified as potentially requiring change


Information checked and updated includes
•       Wine notes
•       Peak year
•       Wine merit
•       Estimated value


Notes
•       Note: This feature is only available in Full Mode
How do I... Export wines from The Uncorked Cellar
Exporting wines from your cellar creates a CSV file which is readable by many third party programs. It does
not affect the contents of your cellar in any way.

To Export all wines from your cellar to a single, Ascii readable file...
•        Ensure you have opened a cellar
•        From the main menu, select CELLAR, EXPORT
•        A dialog box will be displayed, allowing you to select the directory to save your exported cellar to,
and a filename for the exported file. CAUTION: Any contents in the file you select will be destroyed
•        Press OK

The wine information from your current cellar will be exported to the file in a CSV format, which can be read
by many programs, such as Excel, or your favourite word processor. The first line of the file shows the
contents of each column.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•       If you get errors when you press the Print button and cannot see a report, the most likely cause is
that Windows does not have a default printer installed.


See also
   How do I... Back up my cellar
   How do I... Restore my cellar from a backup
   How do I... Import wines into The Uncorked Cellar
How do I... Import wines into The Uncorked Cellar
Importing wines to your cellar reads a CSV (text) file which can be created by many third party programs.
Each wine in the CSV file is added to the contents of your cellar, so this makes an easy means of
transferring wine from your previous cellar management system.

To Import all wines to your cellar from a single, Ascii readable file..
•      Ensure you have opened the cellar or created the new Cellar you want the wines in
•      From the main menu, select CELLAR, IMPORT
•      A dialog box will be displayed, allowing you to select the file to read your imported cellar from
•      Press OK

The wine information will be imported from the CSV file. While the order of each column is not important, the
first line of the file MUST show the contents of each column. Export a small cellar to see the file format
required.

As well as importing from CSV files, a number of other formats are available. See CELLAR, IMPORT on the
main menu for the list of currently available options. If the format you currently have your wines stored in is
not listed, drop us a line at mail@uncork.biz and we may be able to help.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•       If you get errors when you press the Print button and cannot see a report, the most likely cause is
that Windows does not have a default printer installed.


See also
   How do I... Back up my cellar
   How do I... Restore my cellar from a backup
   How do I... Export wines from The Uncorked Cellar
How do I... Modify and save addresses and other details of a winery
If the winery does not exist in the supplied database, or you wish to change the address details supplied
then
•        Ensure you have opened a cellar
•        On the Add Wine to Cellar page, select the winery if it exists, or just type its name in the Winery
field.
•        Enter or modify the winery's address and other details in the winery details field
•        Enter the other details as explained in How do I.... Add Wine to my Cellar.
•        Press the ADD WINE TO CELLAR button


If you have already entered a wine to your cellar from this winery, you may modify these details on the cellar
page.


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•       If you get errors when you press the Print button and cannot see a report, the most likely cause is
that Windows does not have a default printer installed.


See also
     How do I... Display label image files of wines in my cellar
     How do I... Change Wine Details
     How do I... Select a country
     How do I... Select a wine
     How do I... Add Wine to my Cellar
Rules, Rules, Rules...
Powerful Rules allow you to automatically save records to specific cellars
for example....
•               Automatically add any uncorked wines (with their notes) to another specified cellar
•               Automatically add any wines added to a specified cellar
•               Automatically copy any wines modified to another specified cellar
•               Automatically copy any wines deleted to another specified cellar

To setup these rules, press the button, then ....
•        In the block marked 'Rule Name', create or select the rule name you wish to change
•        In the block marked 'If wine matches this', select the field to test, the test to apply and the value to
compare with to identify which matching wines this rule applies to. Blank in the value field means all wines
•        In the box marked 'and is', select the action this rule applies to, and the cellar it applies to. Blank in
the cellar field means apply the rule to any cellar you open
•        In the box marked 'Then do this action', select the action to do, and the cellar to do it to


Notes
•       This feature is not available in Wine Guide mode
•       If you get errors when you press the Print button and cannot see a report, the most likely cause is
that Windows does not have a default printer installed.
The most common wine storage problems
A wine cellar is not a wine hospital. Once your wine is ruined it’s too late. The best and only cure is
prevention. The following tips avoid the most common wine storage problems. Avoid these and you should
be able to look forward to many years of enjoyment from your cellar.

•      Buy a good quality wine in the first place
•      Make sure it has a good quality cork
•      Lay your wine down
•      Store it in a safe place
•      Keep track of your cellar's contents with The Uncorked Cellar
•      Keep it at a constant temperature
•      Keep it away from UV light
•      Make sure the humidity is right
•      Don't move it around too often
•      Keep it in a clean place
•      Store it for the right number of years (use the 'Best At' field as a guide)
Why Cellar Wine
First and foremost, wine generally improves in the bottle as it ages

All red wines develop and improve in the bottle for the short, medium, or long term, depending on the style
and quality of the wine and vintage. Although some white wines benefit from (usually short-term) cellaring,
it must be said that most are best enjoyed when relatively young.

Wine is best stored somewhere cool, dark, airy, and free from vibration and dampness. A cellar need not be
under the house. The single most important factor is temperature stability. Wine stored when the
temperature varies gradually with the seasons are better off than wine stored in a room which is heated
during the day and then allowed to cool to, say, winter temperatures at night.

If you intend to mature wines for five, 10, 15 years or more, the ideal cellar temperature is 14-15 degrees
celsius, with a relative humidity of 60-75%. If the wine in your cellar is a significant investment, it is worth
using a thermometer to monitor Summer temperatures. It may be cause for concern if cellar temperature
goes much over 18 degrees C as warm conditions will accelerate the development of your wines.

Bottles should be stored on their sides with the label facing up, so that the cork remains wet, the bubble of
air is in the shoulder, and any sediment will collect at the bottom of the bottle and you do not need not
disturb a wine to identify it.. This will make the wine easier to decant.
When is a wine at its best?
There is no simple answer to this question, because so many factors are involved. Do you prefer a bold,
young wine, or do you prefer the gentle, mellow, softer complexity of a fully mature wine? What style is the
wine in the first place? A great and powerful Grange that needs 10 to 15 years in bottle to begin to show its
best? Or an easy-drinking Koonunga Hill that may start to fade after four or five years?

Whatever your level of wine experience, the best answer is to trust your own palate. Taste a wine regularly
to see how it is developing and judge when it reaches a point at which you really enjoy drinking it. If you
have one case of 12 bottles, a typical pattern might be to drink two or three bottles while the wine is
developing, six to eight bottles over the year or two you feel it is at its peak, with two or three bottles left over
to satisfy your curiosity about its longer-term potential. Compare your judgement with the winemaker's
guides given in this program.

Bear in mind, especially if you are using the guides in this program, that your wine will tend to mature more
quickly if your cellaring conditions are not ideal. Also half-bottles mature more quickly, and magnums (1.5
litre) more slowly than standard 750ml bottles.
Serving Temperature
The European idea of serving red wine at "room temperature" works very well in cooler climates. But in
Australia or California it could mean serving Shiraz or Cabernet at over 30 degrees C in Summer. This is too
warm and ruins the experience of drinking a fine red wine.

The bottle should be cool to the touch, but not cold: a "cellar temperature" of 15 to 18 degrees C is ideal. Do
not be concerned if this means cooling your reds in the refrigerator for half an hour prior to serving.

Temperatures for serving whites are not so critical, but beware of over-chilling and avoid storing white wine
in the refrigerator for long periods. Both tend to deaden flavour. It is best to chill white wine as it is needed.
The best way is in an ice-bucket for 20 to 30 minutes with a mixture of ice and water. Chardonnay
particularly, is often served too cold. The wine's real flavour will only begin to emerge when the chill comes
off.
Decanting
When should wine be decanted?

Decanting Wine is the process of pouring wine from its bottle into another vessel (the decanter). The
decanter usually has a very wide base and is of a greater volume than the average bottle of wine.

There are two good reasons to decant a wine. One is to separate the clear wine from any sediment or
"crust" that has formed in the bottle as the wine has aged. The other is to stimulate or enliven the wine by
exposing it to air and giving it a chance to "breathe".

Wines which generally have lots of tannins often benefit from the aeration decanting provides. The
exposure to oxygen helps soften some of the harsh tannins which makes the wine more enjoyable. This
process is also known as allowing the wine to "breathe" which can take place in the bottle (not as effective)
or in your glass (wine rarely stays in the glass long enough).

If you like, you can use a candle or light underneath the bottle to see when the sediment enters the
shoulder, but it is easier, if you have a marked jug, simply to stop pouring when the wine reaches the 720ml
mark, discarding the last 30ml. If you wish, rinse the bottle and pour the decanted wine back into the bottle,
using a funnel if necessary.

Decanting is not just for old wines. In fact, younger wines benefit most from decanting and breathing, which
"opens them up". Try buying two identical bottles, decanting one and letting the wine breathe for one to two
hours, then opening the other and tasting the wine from both bottles. If it is some time before a wine will be
served, the bottle can be loosely recorked. This is recommended for very old wines, which may deteriorate
quickly once exposed to air.
The Right Glasses
Glassware can make a big difference to the way a wine tastes. Try the same wine out of a tumbler and a
fine, thin-walled wine glass, The wine always seems to taste better out of a good glass. A good, all-purpose
wine glass need not be expensive. It should have a total capacity of about 220ml and be slightly tapered or
tulip-shaped at the top, which helps to concentrate the bouquet when the wine is swirled around in the glass
before nosing. After all, much of what we "taste" is really what our nose tells us about the wine.

Make sure your glasses are clean, which means careful rinsing in warm or hot water and avoidance of the
use of detergent in washing. Glasses should be stored upright and aired before use. Do not use glasses
straight out of an old cupboard or sideboard, or straight from a cardboard box. Sniff a glass straight out of a
box or cupboard and you can easily detect the musty or cardboardy smell.

The pleasures of sharing good bottles are never greater than when the wines that you chose and bought
years ago turn out to have matured magnificently in your cellar. Decanted and served in fine glasses with
good food, such wines epitomise the rewards of patience. We hope this advice on the cellaring and serving
of wine will enable you to make certain that your good bottles taste great, and your great bottles taste truly
memorable. If you love wine, the effort required to achieve this becomes part of the total experience. A good
bottle of red, especially one you have carefully stored for some years, and now decanted ready for serving,
is an investment that is about to pay its dividend in the form of your drinking pleasure. Such experiences are
the rewards of patience.

Notwithstanding the above, you should never avoid drinking wine simply because you don't have the
correct glass.
Reference information about a wine
See also Information in The Uncorked Cellar

% Alcohol - usually printed on the label of the bottle as a percentage.
Wines are usually in the 12.5% to 14% range with some going as high as 17%.
We no longer ask wineries to provide this information, but the field is provided for your use.

Barcode - the barcode printed on the bottle. This barcode is either EAN or UPC format and usually does
not specify the bottle's vintage. This barcode on the bottle should not be confused with the barcode on the
numbered or printable wine tags. The barcode on the tag is a replication of the number on the tag. At the
moment we have few barcodes included in the database but are working to increase this over time

Bottle Size (or User Field 2) - Enter the size of the bottle, in mls. A standard Australian bottle is 750 mls,
although some European bottles have a 700 ml size. Many Italian bottles are either 500 mls or 1 Litre which
is 1000 mls.
If you have different sized bottles you should store them in different records.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

Bottles per Case - Enter the number of bottles per case of this wine (usually 12). Used where you have
multiple cases of the same wine

Country - This is the country in which the wine was made. When adding wines, select this field first to load
the appropriate country database

Cases - Enter the number of cases you have of this wine. Note, if you have both half and full size bottles,
you should enter the wine twice, once for each bottle size. You can enter up to 5 digits here.... see also
Bottle size

Drink By - Enter the date the wine should be consumed before. You may use this field to enter when a
wine is "best until"
See also
    When is a wine at its best

Hold Until - Enter the date the wine should be held before you taste. Usefull in conjunction with "Taste
Next", "Peak" and "Drink By".
See also
   When is a wine at its best

Label - the name of the wine itself.

Location (or User Field 1) - If you use bins or boxes to store your wine, you should uniquely number each
box. Then you can enter the box or bin number here. This saves searching through half the boxes in the
cellar to find the wine you want!
Hint: I categorise our wines first by the year they 'Peak' then by unique bin.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

Maturity - a calculated status based on the vintage of the wine, and when the winemaker thinks that the
wine will be at it's peak (which we take to be 'half the life' of the wine). For the first third of the time between
a wines' vintage and its peak, the wine maturity is reported as YOUNG. The next third is reported as
IMPROVING, then DRINK NOW. A similar progression beyond the peak sees this reported as DRINK NOW
(again), MATURING, MATURED and finally OLD (more than twice the time has elapsed between the
wines' vintage and it's peak year)

Merit - a calculated figure between 0 and 100 for each vintage of this wine. Factors which are considered in
the merit values for wines include a rating of this vintage of this wine as given by the winemaker (or similar
wines by other winemakers in the region), vintage consistency, actual region, my general regard for this
wine or winery, cost of the wine etc. While we do not claim to be experts, we do know what we like. If your
opinion differs from the one displayed here, no problems. Simply change the rating as you add the wine to
your cellar.
In general, ratings of 50 or above represent good wines, 70 or above represent excellent wines, while 90 or
above indicate world class wines. Very few vintages of wines achieve a 100 rating - This indicates that the
winemaker has no higher aspirations for this wine, and that the wine itself is truly world class. Obvious
examples in this category are the better (but not all) Grange vintages.

Peak - the year the winemaker expects the wine to be at its best. Although there is really no such thing as
the one best year for a wine, a wine (either red or white) will typically improve for around a third of its bottle
life, be 'at its peak' for around another third, then gracefully decline as the wine ages further. This field
describes the center of the wine's life (ie: half way through its peak). Where data is unavailable for the
particular wine selected, the average life of wines of this variety and region is given as a guide. If you aren't
sure, enter the current year or leave it blank. For display of vintages, this field is ignored if you enter a
specific vintage year.
      Note: a common recommendation is to open a bottle each year to see how the wine is maturing, so it is
      a good practice to buy wines in dozen lots.

Price - Enter the most recent price you paid per bottle.

Purchased - Enter the date you bought the wine.

Red, White, Sparkling, Fortified. - Simply click on the bottle icon (the buttons on the top left hand side)
representing the style which best represents the wine. If you are unsure, Run the mouse over the
appropriate bottle and you will see it's description

Region - the region in which the wine was made. (see Australian Wine Regions)

Note:
The Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation's (AWBC) Geographical Indications Committee, established
in 1993, is working with the industry to clearly define the winegrape growing regions of Australia. To
implement commitments under the EC/Australia Wine Agreement, a Register of Protected Names has also
been established to provide protection for the names and boundaries of Australian and EC geographical
indications, to register traditional expressions for wine, as well as the winegrape varieties to be used in the
manufacture of wine in Australia.

Tag - Used to control your wine inventory through numbered wine tags. The tags themselves are available
from our website.
See also
    How do I... Add Tags To Wines in my Cellar

Taste Next - Enter the date the wine should be tasted next. You may use this field to enter when a wine is
"best from"
See also
    When is a wine at its best

Total Bottles - Enter the number of bottles you have of this wine. Note, if you have both half and full size
bottles, you should enter the wine twice, once for each bottle size. You can enter up to 5 digits here.... see
also Bottle size

User Field 1 - By default, this is labeled location.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.
As with all user fields, the one field contains information for every bottle in this record.

User Field 2 - By default, this is labeled Bottle Size.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 3 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 4 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 5 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 6 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 7 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 8 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 9 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Field 10 - Enter anything you want here.
You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the Preferences popup.

User Notes 1 - a free form field for entering any notes you may wish to take. We have provided wine tasting
notes of a recent vintage where available from the winemaker or winery in the Winemaker Notes field. You
may create your own tasting notes for wines in your cellar. The default templates for the User Notes fields
are created on the User Fields tab of the Preferences popup.

User Notes 2 - a free form field for entering any notes you may wish to take.

Value Guide - a calculated value based on the most recently reported cellar door price for the current
vintage. Earlier vintage prices are computed based on the individual vintage rating, years improvement in
the bottle (or degradation if they have passed their peak) etc, etc. Remember, the values given are a guide
only. They are meant to serve you as an indication to you of the current worth of each wine - not as an
investment, but to drink. For instance, early vintages of Grange will fetch very high prices at auction for their
collection value, despite the fact that as a wine for drinking, they should have been consumed well before
the present time. Once entered in your cellar, the value is automatically computed each year to reflect
inflation, improvement or degradation as the wine in your cellar ages etc. You may find this useful for
insurance purposes.

Variety - the variety or varieties of grapes used to make the wine.

Note:
Under the EC/Australia Bilateral Wine Agreement, which came into effect on 1 March 1994, Australia
gained improved access to the EC market through the lowering of technical barriers to Australia's wines in
return for the Australian wine industry phasing out its use of European geographical indications. The use of
some names such as 'Hock' and 'White Bordeaux' is being phased out and further negotiations will be held
to establish phase-out arrangements for European names in widespread use in Australia such as 'Chablis'
and 'Champagne'.

The Australian industry will in future use varietal, regional and brand names to market its wines. There will
also be a need to develop replacement names where protected EC names have entered into common use,
such as 'Sherry'.
Vintage - is the year the grapes for the wine were picked. Enter the full year as in 1997.
If the wine is specifically Non Vintage containing a blend of wines from various years, leave the field blank.
In the wine reference section, where a blended wine uses a spread of defined vintages, the vintage given is
the youngest vintage in the blend.

Winemaker Notes - We have provided notes about the wine style, or tasting notes of a recent vintage
supplied by the respective winemaker or winery. You may create your own tasting notes for wines in your
cellar in either of the User Notes fields.

Winery - is the name of the winery which made the wine. Where a winery has multiple brands, this field will
usually be the brand name of the wine.

Winery Details - is a field which looks up the Uncorked Database for a matching winery, and displays
contact details and other notes where available. You can modify these details for wines in your cellar

Many of the above fields are selectable for display or printing.
See also
        How do I... Display different fields on the Cellar or Add Wine page
        How do I... Print a report
Australian Wine Regions
The Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation's (AWBC) Geographical Indications Committee, established
in 1993, is working with the industry to clearly define the winegrape growing regions of Australia. To
implement commitments under the EC/Australia Wine Agreement, a Register of Protected Names has also
been established to provide protection for the names and boundaries of Australian and EC geographical
indications, to register traditional expressions for wine, as well as the winegrape varieties to be used in the
manufacture of wine in Australia.

As of May 1998, the following is a list of the Australian Geographical Indications that have been determined
and entered into part (a) of the Australian Register of Protected Names by the Geographic Indications
Committee of Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation. Note that Geographic Indication relates to where
the grape is grown, and not where the wine is made.

South Eastern Australia
NEW SOUTH WALES
       Big Rivers
              Murray Darling
              Swan Hill
       Central Ranges
              Orange
       Hunter Valley
              Hunter
                     Broke Fordwich
       Northern Rivers
       Northern Slopes
       South Coast
       Southern New South Wales
              Hilltops
              Canberra District
       Western Plains

VICTORIA
      Central Victoria
      Gippsland
      North East Victoria
            Rutherglen
      North West Victoria
      Murray Darling
            Swan Hill
      Mountain Country
      Port Phillip
            Geelong
            Yarra Valley
            Mornington Peninsula
      Western Victoria
            Grampians

SOUTH AUSTRALIA
     Adelaide (Super Zone, above Mount Lofty Ranges, Fleurieu and Barossa)
     Mount Lofty Ranges
            Adelaide Hills
     Fleurieu
            McLaren Vale
     Limestone Coast
            Mount Benson
        The Peninsulas
        Lower Murray
        Far North
        Barossa
              Barossa Valley
              Eden Valley

WESTERN AUSTRALIA
     Eastern Plains, Inland and North of Western Australia
     West Australian South East Coastal
     South West Australia
           Margaret River
           Great Southern
                  Mount Barker
     Central Western Australia
     Greater Perth

QUEENSLAND
TASMANIA
AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY
NORTHERN TERRITORY
Note:
I.       The regions "Murray Darling" and "Swan Hill" are contained within the zones of "Big Rivers" (145W)
and "North West Victoria" (VIC), whilst all other regions are contained within single zones.
2.       The zone "South Eastern Australia" incorporates the whole of the states of New South Wales,
Victoria and Tasmania and part only of the states of Queensland and South Australia.

You will note that many of Australia's traditional wine regions are not yet entered into the Register of
Protected Names. In some instances the Geographical Indications Committee is awaiting receipt of an
application whilst in others the application is being processed.

* Acknowledgment is given to the Registrar of Protected Names for the above information.
Wine Judging
In show wine tasting contests, a wine is judged in 10 categories, points awarded for each category, then
totaled for a total number of points for the wine. A wine scoring 17-20 is regarded as fine wine of
outstanding quality, 13-16 is a sound wine, 9-12 is a commercially viable wine but with noticeable defect,
while 8 or below is regarded as poor to unsatisfactory.

The categories used to judge wines are as follows
Appearance - 0=cloudy, 1=clear, 2=brilliant
Color -                 0=distinctly off, 1=slightly off, 2=correct
Aroma -                 0=vinous (basic wine), 1=distinct but not varietal,3=varietal
Bouquet -               Subtract 1 or 2 for off odours, add 1 for bottle bouquet
Vinegary -              0=obvious, 1=slight, 2=none
Total Acidity - 0=distinctly high or low, 1=slightly high or low, 2=normal, well balanced
Sweetness -             0=too high or low, 1=normal
Body -                  0=too high or low, 1=normal
Flavour -               0=distinctly abnormal, 1=slightly abnormal, 2=normal
Bitterness -            0=distinctly High, 1=slightly high, 2=normal
General Quality -       0=lacking, 1=slight, 2=impressive

Note - The above is not to be confused with the reference merit value which is used in this program. (see
Information about a wine)
Glossary of Wine Terms - A -
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Acetic Acid - All wines contain (normally quite small amounts of) acetic acid or vinegar, not noticeable to
taste or smell. At higher levels - over 0.1% - this flavour can dominate, and flaw the wine.


Acid - An integral part of every wine, the level of acid will appear to decline as the wine ages.

Acidic - When the acid component of a wine is so obvious as to be a major component of the end product.

Acrid - A harsh or bitter taste or pungent smell which is due to too much sulfur.

Aeration - Letting a wine breath oxygenated air by decanting or swirling in the glass. This can be very
helpful for young wines. Too much can also be very harmful to older mature wines.

Aftertaste - The flavour that lingers in your mouth after tasting or swallowing. It can be either pleasant or
unpleasant- or non-existent, which would indicate a neutral-flavoured wine. Harsh or unpleasant aftertaste
might indicate the presence of excessive acidity or tannin in the wine.

Aging Sur Lie - Translated "aging on the lees", and often referred to as "yeast contact". Wine is aged in the
barrel with the yeast retained, rather than being clarified before aging. Aging on the lees increases the
complexity and creaminess of the wine.

Aggressive - A harsh component of a wine, usually due to high tannin or acid levels.

Albarino - A premium white wine grape grown in the Galicia region of Spain. Albarino wines are crisp,
refreshing and light bodied.

Alcohol - The difference between grape juice and wine! Alcohol is produced by fermentation, and in this
context means ethyl alcohol (C2H50H) produced by the action of yeasts on grape sugars during the
fermentation. Wines are usually in the 12.5% to 14% range with some going as high as 17%.

Aleatico - A red member of the Muscat family of grapes and a popular variety in Italy

Alicante Bouschet - A unique grape variety that that actually possesses red flesh. Developed in France in
the late 1880's by Henri Bouschet.

Aligote - Burgundian white-wine grape. Usually a medium-bodied, crisp, dry wine with spicy character.

Alsace - Northeastern province of France, bordering the Rhine, known for it's rich dry white wines,
primarily Riesling and Gewurztraminer.

Amarone - A powerful, hearty dry red wine from Italy's Veneto region, made from a blend of partially dried
red grapes.

American Oak - In contrast to the more expensive French Oak. American Oak is marked by strong vanilla,
dill and cedar flavors. It is commonly used for aging Cabernet, Merlot, and Zinfandel, for which it is the
preferred oak. It's less desirable, although still used for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

American Viticultural Area (AVA) - A delimited, geographical (USA) grape-growing area that has
officially been given appellation status by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

Amontillado - A dry, rather full-bodied style of Sherry from Spain.
Ampelography - The study of grape varieties.

Angular - Dominant, tart edged flavors and tastes in many young, dry wines.

Anthocyans - Natural organic chemical compounds responsible for the red, blue and purple colors of
grapes and wine. Incude anthocyanins, anthocyanidins and pro-anthocyanidins.

AOC - Short for Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (sometimes Appellation Contrôlée abbreviated as AC).
Translates literally to protected place name, and is the official French category for higher-ranking wines.
AOC wines are categorized according to name, origin, grape varieties and other legal definitions.

Aperitif - (French) Describes an alcoholic beverage served before dinner to stimulate appetite.

Appearance - Refers to a wine's clarity, not color.

Appellation - Defines the area where a wine's grapes were grown, such as Barossa Valley or Yarra Valley.
(see also Region)

Appellation D'Origine Controlee(AOC) - The French system of appellations. To use an appellation in this
system, a wine must follow rules describing the area the grapes are grown in, the varieties used, the
ripeness, the alcoholic strength, the vineyard yields and the methods used in growing the grapes and
making the wine.

Arneis - A white wine grape grown in the Piedmont area of Italy.

Aroma - The scent or smell of the grape variety; usually meaning pleasing smells, rather than off odours.

Aromatic - Used to refer to a wine, particularly white wines, with intensely floral or fruity aromas, such as
Muscat or Viognier.

Ascescence - Term used to mark the presence of acetic acid and ethyl acetate.

Asti Spumante - A semidry sparkling wine produced from the Moscato di Canelli grape in the village of
Asti, in Piedmont, Italy.

Astringent - Tannins produce astringent tastes in wine. You can detect astringency by the involuntary
'puckering' of your mouth as the tannins hit your tastebuds. Tannins come from grape-skins, seeds and oak.

Attack - In wine tasting, the first impression of a wine on the mouth. Usually perceived as a first "hit" on the
tip of the tongue and at the front of mouth.

Auslese - Designated quality level for a German white wine made from very ripe grape bunches picked out
for their sweetness.

Austere - Means different things to different palates, though generally meant to indicate a wine that has
vinous characters without strong recognisable varietal fruit or oak influence.

AVA - Acronym for American Viticultural Area, indicating wine-growing regions as defined through
geographic and climatic boundaries by the Federal Government.. Theoretically, the American version of the
French AOC system.

Awkard - Used to describe a wine that is out of balance.
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Backbone - Used to denote those wines that are full-bodied, well-structured and balanced by a desirable
level of acidity.

Backward - Used to describe a young wine that is less developed than others of its type and class from the
same vintage.

Balance - A good wine will have a pleasant balance of flavours, acid and tannin to create a smooth
impression on the palate. Some wines will need to be aged before all their elements are in harmony.

Balthazar - An oversized bottle which holds the equivalent of 12 to 16 standard bottles.

Barrel - A small wooden barrel used for aging red wine, and fermenting some styles of white wine. Barrels
are about 220 litres (60 gallons) in size, and are made of oak, primarily from French and American forests.

Barrel Aging - The process of holding wine in oak containers to allow flavor and aromatic compounds to
mature and change beneficially.

Barrel Character - The flavor and aromatic compounds an oak barrel contributes to the wine. Barrel
character varies by the origin or forest of the wood, coopering techniques including toasting and length of
oak aging, and the age of the barrel.

Barrel Fermentation - Most commonly used with Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, this describes the
fermentation of wine in barrels instead of stainless steel tanks. Can give added dimensions of oak and yeast
flavour to the wine.

Barrique - An oak barrel that generally holds 225 litres.

Baumé - Similar to brix. 1 Baumé = 1.8 Brix = approximately 1% alcohol.

Big - Wines with significant (or excessive) flavour or structure.

BITE - A marked degree of acidity or tannin. An acid grip in the finish should be more like a zestful tang and
is tolerable only in a rich, full-bodied wine.

Bitterness - Describes one of the four basic tastes (along with sour, salty and sweet). A common source of
bitterness is tannin or stems. Although a mild bitterness can often be a pleasant addition it is usually an
indication of a flawed wine, detected in the aftertaste. Not to be confused with acidity.

Black fruits - Aromas and flavors found typically in red wines including those of blackberries, black
currants, blueberries and black cherries.

Black grapes - Grapes with reddish or blue pigment in their skins used to make red wine.

Blanc De Blancs - "White of whites," meaning a white wine made of white grapes, such as Champagne
made of Chardonnay.

Blanc de Noirs - "White of blacks," white wine made of red or black grapes, where the juice is squeezed
from the grapes and fermented without skin contact. The wines can have a pale pink hue. E.G.,
Champagne that is made from Pinot Noir or Pinot Meunier.

Bland - Wine-tasting term denoting a wine without character, though not necessarily having any wine
faults.
Blend - Mixing of two or more grape varieties, vintages or locations to increase quality, complexity or
maintain consistency.

Bloom - Flowering of the grapevines. Bloom is also a waxy substance found on the skins of grapes.

Blunt - Strong in flavor and often alcoholic, but lacking in aromatic interest and development on the palate.

Body - 'Full-bodied' describes a wine with fullness of flavour in the mouth; conversely, 'light-bodied' means
the opposite.

Bordeaux - A wine region in France.

Bordeaux blend - A style of wine assembled from the classic red grapes of Bordeaux including Cabernet
Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot.

Botrytis Cinerea - Known also as "Noble Rot". A fungus which attacks grapes in certain climatic conditions
(and only in some years) causing the evaporation of moisture from the grape and a consequent
concentration of flavour and sugar. When controlled, Botrytis can produce highly sought after white dessert
wines. Botrytis is not accepted in red wine production.

Bottle age - Time spent in the bottle after making and oak aging. 'Will mature with bottle age' means the
maker suggests the wine will reward several years with proper cellaring.

Bottle sickness- Travel shock. A temporary condition characterized by muted or disjointed fruit flavors. It
often occurs immediately after bottling or when wines are shaken in travel. Rest is the cure!!

Bottled by - Means the wine could have been purchased ready-made and simply bottled by the brand
owner, or made under contract by another winery. When the label reads "produced and bottled by" or
"made and bottled by" it means the winery produced the wine from start to finish.

Bouquet - The smell of a finished wine. May be affected by time spent in the bottle.

Bright - Perfectly clear wine with no suspended particles. Bright colour is an important pointer to wine
quality, except in premium red wine where some crust can be expected to form after bottle maturation.

Briary - Describes young wines with an earthy or stemmy wild berry character. Often found in Zinfandels!

Brilliant - Describes the appearance of very clear wines with absolutely no visible suspended or particulate
matter. Not always a plus, as it can indicate a highly filtered wine.

Brix - A measurement of the sugar content of grapes, must and wine, indicating the degree of the grapes'
ripeness (meaning sugar level) at harvest. Most table-wine grapes are harvested at between 21 and 25
Brix. To get an alcohol conversion level, multiply the stated Brix by 0.55.

Browning - Describes a wine's color, and is a sign that a wine is mature and may be faded. Could be a bad
sign in young wines, but less significant in older wines. Older wines may have a brownish edge yet still be
enjoyable. Sometimes this brownish edge will look brick colored.

Brut - Dry, usually applied to sparkling wines. Commercial brut styles now have a small amount of
'liqueuring' added to sweeten the wine somewhat, hence the growth of the term brut-de-brut, suggesting
that the wine is fully dry.

Bud - A small protuberance on a stem or branch, often enclosed in protective scales and containing an
undeveloped shoot, leaves or flowers.
Bud Break - When the first shoots emerge on a vine after winter dormancy.

Bung - Barrel stopper made of glass, plastic, rubber, silicone or other material which seals the bung-hole in
the barrel like a cork. Can be removed to permit topping up or racking. The position of the bung-hole can be
changed to maximize or reduce aeration.

Burnt - Describes wines that have an overdone, smoky, toasty or singed edge. Also used to describe
overripe grapes.

Buttery - Indicates the smell of melted butter or toasty oak. Also a reference to texture, as in "a rich, buttery
Chardonnay."
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Cabernet Franc - Cabernet Franc is best known for its role mainly as a blending variety with Cabernet
Sauvignon. Cabernet Franc is typically perfumed and aromatic, with the flavours of dark cherries.

Cabernet Sauvignon - A variety of red grape used to produce high quality red wine. The aroma is often
described as being "dusty", "blackcurrant" or "cassis" and it can take on the aroma of capsicum in cooler
areas. Usually blended with Merlot, another red variety, which can add more fruit flavour and a soft, velvety
texture. Merlot is said to "fill out" the typical Cabernet palate. "Cabernet Merlot", which is often seen on
modern wine labels is a blend of the two varieties.

Carbonic Maceration - Fermentation of whole, uncrushed grapes in a carbon dioxide atmosphere. In
practice, the weight of the upper layers of grapes in a vat will break the skins of the lowest layer; the
resultant wine is partly a product of carbonic maceration and partly of traditional fermentation of juice.

Cassis - A liquor made in France from blackcurrants. The aroma of cassis is attributed to quality Cabernet
Sauvignon.

Castello - The Italian word for castle; refers to a wine estate, such as Castello d'Albola.

Cask number - A meaningless term sometimes used for special wines.

Cayuga - An American hybrid grape (developed in New York) Wines are generally made in a style similar
to the Rieslings of Germany.

Cedare - Denotes the smell of cedar wood associated with mature Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet
blends aged in French or American oak.

Cellared by - Means the wine was not produced at the winery where it was bottled. It usually indicates that
the wine was purchased from another source.

Chambourcin - produces a medium-bodied dry wine with a fruity aroma and cherry and earthy/spicy
complexities.

Champagne - A wine region in France. May also refer to sparkling wines made from grapes grown in the
Champagne region of France and vinified using the Méthode Champenoise winemaking process. Term is
sometimes used to refer to sparkling wines from different regions, but correctly, only sparkling wine from
Champagne may be called Champagne. See also methode champenoise.

Chaptalization - The addition of sugar to juice before and/or during fermentation, used to boost sugar
levels in underripe grapes and alcohol levels in the subsequent wines. Common in northern European
countries, where the cold climates may keep grapes from ripening.

Chardonel - A hybrid of Chardonnay and Seyval grapes

Chardonnay - A premium white wine variety that has only gained popularity in Australia in the past twenty
years. It is most fascinating for the different ways it can be made which affect its flavour and structure. The
most complex Chardonnays require a considerable amount of handling. (eg. fermentation in barrel, stirring
of yeast lees, etc.) Usually made without the addition of other varieties except in Methode Champenoise
sparkling wines, in which Chardonnay and Pinot Noir is a classic blend. Chardonnay is responsible for
some of the finest white wines in the world.

Charmat - Mass production method for sparkling wine. Indicates the wines are fermented in large stainless
steel tanks and later drawn off into the bottle under pressure. Also known as the "bulk process." See also
methode champenoise.

Charry - Aromas and flavors of a toasty nature created by the application of oak barrel aging to the wine.

Château - A French winery estate, typically found in Bordeaux and the Loire Valley, the architecture of
châteaux can range from grand to mundane.

Chenin Blanc - In its native home around the great chateaux and ancient towns of the Loire Valley
(France), Chenin Blanc is the principal white grape variety and the backbone of Vouvray (dry, semi-sweet
or sweet) and Vouvray Mousseux, a sparkling wine. It has performed well in its adopted home, where
surprisingly it is still regarded as a cinderella variety.

Chewy - Describes rich, heavy, tannic wines that are full-bodied.

Cigar box - Another descriptor for a cedary aroma.

Classico - Italian term indicating that wine comes from the heart of a specific region. While Chianti
Classico is a demarcated DOCG district, the Classico for Verdicchio, for example, refers to the central part
of the appellation.

Clean - Fresh taste or aroma with no defects.

Clone - A group of vines originating from a single, individual plant propagated asexually from a single
source.

Closed - Describes wines that are concentrated and have character, yet are shy in aroma or flavor. Can
often open up upon aging and development!

Cloudiness - Lack of clarity to the eye due to sediments or particulates in the wine. Old wines with
sediment are OK, but it can be an indication of a flawed product in young wines.

Cloying - Describes ultra-sweet or sugary wines that lack the balance provided by acid, alcohol, bitterness
or intense flavor.

Coarse - Usually refers to texture, and in particular, excessive tannin or oak. Also used to describe harsh
bubbles in sparkling wines.

Cold stabilisation - A clarification technique in which a wine's temperature is lowered to 32 degrees; F,
causing the tartrates and other insoluble solids to precipitate.

Colheita - Term used in Port winemaking referring to vintage.

Colour - In wine, an extremely important indicator of quality and condition. Darker colours in whites usually
indicate older wines, while red wines tend to lighten and tawny with age.

Compact - Wine described as intense but not full.

Complex - Opposite of simple. A wine that has a lot going on.

Complexity - An element in all great wines and many very good ones; a combination of richness, depth,
flavor intensity, focus, balance, harmony and finesse.

Commune - Typically refers to a wine-growing village in the Burgundy region of France.

Coonawarra - Australian wine region in the southeast of South Australia, not far from the Victorian border.
Cool, and produces some of the best red wines in Australia, especially Cabernet Sauvignon.
Cooperage - Collective term for wooden containers; also used to refer to the activities and workplace of
coopers, who make and repair small barrels and large wooden vats.

Corked - A wine whose quality is affected by contamination from the cork. This produces a sharp taste and
aroma's not unlike nail polish. A surprisingly high percentage of wine is affected by this problem. The
problem has been traced to a chemical compound - TCA or trichloranisole - sometimes resulting from the
chlorine treatment applied to raw cork bark sheets in the manufacturing process. The cork makers
righteously insist that TCA can be engendered in a number of other ways. If you encounter it, re-cork and
return the bottle to the place of purchase, explain the fault and they will replace it.

Cortese - A grape variety new in Australia (Lost Valley Wines) and is famous for the great Piedmontese
white called Gavi di Gavi.

Creamy - Wines, particularly barrel-fermented Chardonnay that has undergone a secondary, malolactic
fermentation, that have a rich, smooth mouthfeel and are fuller in body are often characterized as creamy.

Crisp - Describes wines that are clean, and possibly a bit on the tart side. Opposite of soft. Wines that are
crisp are typically higher in acid, and go well with food.

Crush - Harvest season when the grapes are picked and crushed.

Cuvee - A blend or special lot of wine.

Cynthiana a.k.a. Norton - A native American grape, that produces a rich, full-bodied red wine with
character that is often compared with Cabernet Sauvignon.
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Decanting - A process for separating the sediment from a wine before drinking. Accomplished by slowly
and carefully pouring the wine from its bottle into another container. Also used to air a young wine that is a
little closed.

Delicate - Used to describe light- to medium-weight wines with good flavors. A desirable quality in wines
such as Pinot Noir or Riesling.

Demi sec - In the language of Champagne, a term relating to sweetness. It can be misleading; although
demi-sec means half-dry, demi-sec sparkling wines are usually slightly sweet to medium sweet.

Dense - Describes a wine that has concentrated aromas on the nose and palate. A good sign in young
wines.

Depth - Describes the complexity and concentration of flavors in a wine, as in a wine with excellent or
uncommon depth.

Dirty - Covers any and all foul, rank, off-putting smells that can occur in a wine, including those caused by
bad barrels or corks. A sign of poor winemaking.

Disgorging - The process by which the sediment collected in the neck of the Champagne bottle during the
riddling process is frozen and expelled prior to the final corking.

District - Refers to a geographic area more specific than region, but less specific than commune.

DO - Abbreviation for Denominacion de Origen, which means place name and refers to Spain's official
category for wines whose name, region of origin, variety and other defining factors are regulated by law.

DOC - Abbreviation for Denominazione di Origine Controllata, which means controlled place name. Italy's
official category for wines whose name, region of origin, variety and other defining factors are regulated by
law. In Portugal, DOC is also an abbreviation for the highest official wine category, Denominacao de
Origem Controlada.

DOCG - Abbreviation for Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita , meaning controlled and
guaranteed place. Italy's official category for its highest ranking wines.

Dosage - In bottle-fermented sparkling wines, a small amount of wine (usually sweet) that is added back to
the bottle once the yeast sediment that collects in the neck of the bottle is removed.

Doux - A Champagne style that is sweet.

Domaine - French term for wine estate, commonly used in Burgundy.

Dry - Absence of sweetness in a wine.

Dull - Opposite of bright and clean; can refer to a wine's appearance, aromas and flavors or overall style.
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Early harvest - Denotes a wine made from early-harvested grapes, usually lower than average in alcoholic
content or sweetness.

Earthy - Used to describe both positive and negative attributes in wine. At its best, a pleasant, clean quality
that adds complexity to aroma and flavors. The flip side is a funky, barnyardy character that borders on or
crosses into dirtiness. Often found in Pinot Noirs!

Elegant - Used to describe smooth wines of grace, balance and beauty.

Empty - Lack of flavor. (or a glass ready to be re-filled)

Enology - The science and study of winemaking. Also spelled oenology.

Estate bottled - A term once used by producers for those wines made from vineyards that they owned and
that were contiguous to the winery "estate." Today it indicates the winery either owns the vineyard or has a
long-term lease to purchase the grapes.

Ethyl Acetate - A sweet, vinegary smell that often accompanies acetic acid. It exists to some extent in all
wines and in small doses can be a plus. When it is strong and smells like nail polish, it's a defect. (see also
Corked)

Extra dry - A common sparkling wine term not to be taken literally. Most sparkling wines so labeled are
sweet.

Extra-sec - A sparkling wine style that is extra dry, but sweeter than Brut.

Extract - Richness and depth of concentration of fruit in a wine. Usually a positive quality, although high
extract wine can also be highly tannic.
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Fading - Describes a wine that is losing color, fruit or flavor, usually as a result of age.

Fat - Full-bodied, high alcohol wines low in acidity give a "fat" impression on the palate. Can be a plus with
bold, ripe, rich flavors; can also suggest the wine's structure is suspect.

Fermentation - The process by which yeast converts sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide; turns grape
juice into wine.

Field blend - When a vineyard is planted to several different varieties and the grapes are harvested
together to produce a single wine, the wine is called a field blend.

Filtering - The process of removing particles from wine after fermentation.

Fining - A technique for clarifying wine using agents such as bentonite, gelatin or egg whites, which
combine with sediment particles and cause them to settle to the bottom, where they can be easily removed.

Finish - End taste of a wine after it has been swallowed or spat out. High tannin content might produce a
'firm finish', or lack of flavour might yield a 'short finish'.

Finesse - Describes a wine of elegance and subtlety.

Firm - Term referring to taste experience at the back of the palate, caused by tannins.

Flavor - The taste of wine.

Flavor compounds - Organic compounds in grapes responsible for many of the aromas and flavors in
wine.

Flavor intensity - How strongly wine flavors are perceived.

Flabby - Soft wines which lack acidity on the palate. Can seem to be a people pleaser but lacks complexity.

Flat - Having low acidity; the next stage after flabby. Can also refer to a sparkling wine that has lost its
bubbles.

Fleshy - Soft and smooth in texture, with very little tannin.

Flinty - Term usually applied to dry whites, especially Chablis.

Flowery - An attractive scent reminiscent of flowers. 'Floral' and 'fragrant' are similar words of approval
often applied to pleasing young white wines, especially Rieslings.

Fortified Wine - A wine with added grape spirit (alcohol) - originally used as a preservative for long
journeys. Port, Sherry, Madieira, Muscat and Tokay are examples. Their names point to their origins - all
ports from which wine was shipped to Europe from the 16th century.

Foxy - A term used to describe the unique musky and grapey character.

Free run - The juice released from the grape berries when first crushed at the winery, before being pressed
further. Usually the highest-quality juice, because it contains less material extracted from the skins, stalks or
seeds.
French oak - The traditional wood for wine barrels, which supplies vanilla, cedar and sometimes
butterscotch flavors. Much more expensive than American oak.

Fresh - Having a lively, clean and fruity character. Young wines should be fresh.

Fruit character - The characteristics of the wine has derived from the fruit, including aromas, flavors,
tannins, acidity and extract.

Fruity - Having the aroma and taste of fruit or fruits. Can be fresh, dried, cooked; examples include fresh
apples, dried figs, strawberry jam.
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Gamay - A red grape variety used mainly in the Beaujolais region of France and used in Australia to
produce soft, light red wines.

Gewurztraminer - A variety of white grape with a particularly spicy flavour. Originally from Germany.

Graceful - Describes a wine that is harmonious and pleasing in a subtle way. See elegant.

Grape tannin - Tannins in a red wine attributed to the grapes as opposed to winemaking methods.

Grape Variety - Type of grape, such as Chardonnay or Merlot.

Grapey - Characterized by simple flavors and aromas associated with fresh table grapes; distinct from the
more complex fruit flavors of cherry, blackberry, fig, currant, apricot, apple, caramel, etc., etc, found in fine
wines.

Grassy - A signature descriptor for sauvignon blanc and a pleasant one unless overbearing and pungent.

Green - Tasting of unripe fruit. Wines made from unripe grapes will often possess this quality. Pleasant in
some wines.

Grown, produced and bottled - Means the winery handled each aspect of wine growing.
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Half-bottle - Holds 375 milliliters.

Hard - Firm; a quality that usually results from high acidity or tannins. Often a descriptor for young red
wines.

Harmonious - Well balanced.

Harsh - Wines which are very tannic or high in alcohol.

Hazy - Used to describe a wine which is unfined and unfiltered.

Hearty - Used to describe the full, warm, sometimes rustic qualities found in red wines with high alcohol.

Heady - Highly alcoholic wines.

Herbaceous - An aroma related to vegetative or grassy characters. Some reds, notably cabernet
sauvignon, and some whites (sauvignon blanc, for example), are sometimes described as being
'herbaceous'.

Herbal - Aromas and flavors in wine that suggest those of herbs.

Hermitage - Synonym used frequently for the red-grape variety shiraz.

Hogshead - an oak barrel that holds about 300 litres.

Hollow - Describes a wine that has a first taste and a short finish, and lacks depth in the middle. No body!

Hot - High alcohol wines that tend to burn on the finish are called hot. Can be acceptable in fortified wines.
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IGT - Indicazione Geografica Tipica. A category of wines created in Italy by Wine Law 164 in 1992 to
approximate the French Vin de Pays and German Landwein.

Imperial - An oversized bottle holding 4 to 6 litres

Intense - Used to describe wines that express their character powerfully.


-J-

Jeroboam - An oversized bottle holding the equivalent of six bottles. In champagne, a jeroboam holds four
bottles.

-K-

-L-

Late harvest - On labels, indicates that a wine was made from grapes picked later than normal and at a
higher sugar (brix) level than normal. Usually associated with botrytized and dessert-style wines.

Leafy - Describes the slightly herbaceous, vegetal quality reminiscent of leaves.

Lean - Used to describe wines made in an austere style. Can be a criticism when it indicates a wine is
lacking in fruit.

Lees - Sediment remaining in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation. Often used as in sur lie aging,
which indicates a Wine is aged "on its lees." See also sur lie.

Legs - Columns of wines especially fortified wine, which trickle down the inside of a glass. Supposed to
indicate high alcohol content in wine.

Length - The amount of time the aftertaste lingers in your mouth. Long is better!

Lingering - The aftertaste of a wine. If it lasts for a decent length of time it is said to be lingering.

Light - Lack of body or structure.

Lively - Describes wines that are fresh, fruity, and bright.

Luscious - A full-flavoured, rich, ripe, fruity and sweet-flavoured wine.
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Maceration - During fermentation, the steeping of the grape skins and solids in the wine, where alcohol
acts as a solvent to extract color, tannin and aroma from the skins.

Macroclimate - General climate of the region. Weather reports talk about macroclimate.

Made and bottled by - Indicates only that the winery crushed, fermented and bottled a minimum of 10
percent of the wine in the bottle.

Maderized - Describes the brownish color and slightly sweet, somewhat caramelized and often nutty
character found in mature dessert-style wines.

Magnum - An oversized bottle that holds 1.5 litres.

Malbec - Malbec, known at Cot in the Bordeaux region of France, is best known in the Cahors region of
south-west France where traditionally it has been responsible for the famous "black wine" of the region. A
small amount is grown in Australia.

Malic - Describes the green apple-like flavor found in young grapes which diminishes as they ripen and
mature.

Malolactic fermentation - Secondary fermentation occurring in most wines. A natural process which
converts malic acid into softer lactic acid and carbon dioxide. This reduces the wine's total acidity, can add
complexity and soften some wines.

Marsanne - With its heritage most probably in the northern Rhine region of France, Marsanne is an
increasingly popular variety both in Australia and abroad. It is earning itself a justifiable reputation as a
full-bodied characterful varietal and an excellent blending partner for more aromatic and acid varieties such
as Rousanne and Viognier.

Mataro - A grape from France producing red wine, known more commonly as Mourvedre. A small amount
is grown in Australia.

Maturation - The process by which a wine reaches a point of readiness for bottling; can continue in the
bottle.

Mature - Ready to drink.

Meaty - Describes red wines that show plenty of concentration and a chewy quality. They may even have
an aroma of cooked meat.

Medals - Awards from Australian wine shows for well-made wines. Gold medals are awarded to wines
attaining 18.5 points or more out of twenty points; silver medals 17.0 to 18.4; and bronze, 15.5 to 16.9.

Merlot - A premium red variety that is most often used as a blending component with Cabernet Sauvignon
but can be a superb wine on its own. Merlot is one of the principal grape varieties of Bordeaux (France)
where it is the principal grape of the 'right bank' appellations of St Emilion and Pomerol. Merlot is also
important in the Medoc where it is the blending partner to the auspicious Cabernet Sauvignon. Merlot has a
silken texture on the palate and an aroma described as "mushroom", "earthly" or "blood plum". The variety
has good colour and softer spicier flavour profile than the Cabernet, with more middle palate fullness. The
Merlot vine flowers earlier than Cabernet and is usually picked earlier, with generally higher yields.

Mesoclimate - Climate of the specific locality, an example is a specific vineyard site. (This is commonly
wrongly called microclimate by many people including some wine commentators)

Methode Champenoise - This literally means "champagne method" in French and indicates a still wine
has been re fermented in the bottle and matured in that bottle for at least six months (often for two years or
more) to incorporate the complex flavours of the yeast. Australian sparkling wines simply labelled
"champagne" are ironically not usually made in this method. The name "champagne" on products outside of
the Champagne region has been frowned upon by the French and most Australian producers respect this.

Méthode Traditionelle - The equivalent of the traditional French Champagne process know as Méthode
Champenoise, but applied to the making of sparkling wines outside the Champagne region.

Methuselah - An extra-large bottle holding 6 liters; the equivalent of eight standard bottles.

Microclimate - Climate within the grapevine canopy. Can be changed by various pruning and trellising
techniques.

Millerandage - A condition resulting from poor or incomplete pollination, in which the bunches contain
Fewer-than-normal, scattered berries. May result in a "poor set" in such cases. Yields can be drastically
reduced over normal.

Minerally - Used to describe flavors and aromas that suggest minerals, such as flint, steel, chalk etc.

Mourvedre - The trendy name for a grape from France, Mataro. A small amount is grown in Australia to
produce red wine.

Mousse - The ring of light foam at the top of a glass of sparkling wine.

Murky - More than deeply colored; lacking brightness, turbid and sometimes a bit swampy. Mainly a fault of
red wines.

Muscat - A fortified wine named after the red Muscat grape from which it is made. The solera technique of
ageing and blending is employed, which originated in Spain and is used for many fortifieds. Muscats are
unique to Australia.

Must - Unfermented grape juice. Extracted by crushing or pressing grape juice in the cask or vat before it is
converted into Wine.

Musty - Moldy or mildewy smell. Resulting from wine made of moldy grapes, stored in improperly cleaned
tanks and barrels, or contaminated by a poor cork.
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Nebuchadnezzar - Oversized bottle holding 15 liters; the equivalent of 20 standard bottles.

Negociant (negociant-eleveur) - A french wine merchant who buys grapes and vinifies them, or buys
wines and combines them, bottles the result under his own label and ships them. Particularly found in
Burgundy.

New oak - Can refer to brand new barrels, or barrels that have been used from one to four years
previously.

New World - Winemaking countries such as Australia, New Zealand, USA, South Africa, Chile, Argentina,
Canada etc. outside of Western Europe.

Noble rot - Botrytis cinerea.

Nonvintage - A wine blended from more than one vintage. Common is champagnes, sparkling wines,
sherry, nonvintage ports, tawnies and rubies.

Nose - The aroma or bouquet.

Nouveau - A style of light, fruity, youthful red wine bottled and sold as soon as possible. Applies mostly to
Beaujolais.

Nutty - Used to describe oxidized wines. Often a flaw, but when it's close to an oaky flavor it can be a plus.
Can be very nice in tawnie ports, sherry and other fortified wines and dessert wines.
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Oak - Varieties of the wood genus Quercus. Wines are usually storcd in oak containers, to impart extra and
more complex flavours. French, American and German oak barrels are widely used in Australia, but are
getting quite expensive as quality oak becomes scarcer.

Oaky - Describes the aroma and taste imparted to a wine by the oak barrels or casks in which it was aged.
Fairly desirable in many wines if not overdone. The terms toasty, vanilla, dill, cedary and smoky indicate the
desirable qualities of oak; charred, burnt, green cedar, lumber and plywood describe its unpleasant side.
See also American oak, French oak.

Oenophile - A lover of wine, one who has studied the many aspects of wine.

Oenology - The science of winemaking.

Off-dry - Indicates a slightly sweet wine in which the residual sugar is barely perceptible - 0.6 percent to 1.4
percent.

Off Odours - Unpleasant or unexpectedly displeasing smells in a wine.

Old Oak - Barrels old enough to have lost much of its woody character. Generally five year or older.

Old Vines - Term referring to vines that are generally 40 years or older. Presumed to deliver small yields,
but good quality.

Old World - Refers to the winemaking countries of Western Europe including France, Italy, Spain,
Portugal, and Germany.

Oxidised - The cork used to seal wine bottles also allows a small amount of oxygen to seep through (and
is part of the aging process). If wine is exposed to too much oxygen it will turn brown and taste of vinegar.
Wines which are unacceptably oxidised also have a "flat", dull palate as fruit freshness is lost.
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Palate - How a wine's characteristics manifest themselves in the mouth.

Peak - The time when a wine tastes its best.

Peppery - A not entirely unpleasant spicy characteristic sometimes found in young red wines (especially
shiraz wines) and ports. Rather raw, biting. and reminiscent of black pepper.

Perfumed - Describes the strong, usually sweet and floral aromas of some wines.

Petrol - Aromas or flavors reminiscent of gasoline, classic in European versions of Gewürztraminer and
Riesling.

Ph - A chemical measurement of acidity or alkalinity; the higher the ph the weaker the acid. Low ph wines
taste tart and crisp; higher ph wines are flabby. A range of 3.0 to 3.4 is desirable for white wines, while 3.3
to 3.6 is best for reds.

Phylloxera - A louse that attacks the roots of the vine and can spread rapidly to destroy entire regions.
Europeans vineyards were decimated by Phylloxera last century as were many Australian regions. The only
cure is prevention by planting vines on Phylloxera-resistant root stocks.

Pinot Noir - A relatively new red grape variety in Australia, Pinot Noir can be quite one-dimensional or
extremely complex in flavour depending on how it is made and how it is grown. The wines cover a wide
spectrum from very light wines with a pale cherry colour to deep, rich wines more in the style of a Cabernet
Sauvignon. In Methode Champenoise wines, Pinot Noir adds a "low note" to the palate, a broadness that
balances the "high note" or delicacy of Chardonnay.

Plummy - Aromas and flavors that suggest ripe plums.

Plush - Describes a wine that feels luxurious in the mouth.

Port - A fortified red wine, the name coming from Oporto on the Douro River in Portugal. An after-dinner
drink of quite high alcohol content (17 to 20 per cent). There is considerable confusion about port wines, but
the differences can be simply summed up: tawny ports are blended wines that have usually been kept by
the maker in wood barrels for some years in order to mature them for drinking when sold: vintage ports
(which bear a year of origin on the label) are the product of one year's grape production , are usually sold
early by the maker and you, the consumer, are expected to do the cellaring until the wine is ready for
drinking. As with all wines, vintage port should be consumed with one or two days of opening. Australia
makes excellent examples of both styles.

Potent - Intense and powerful.

Powerful - Describes a wine of intensity and strength.

Pretty - Describes a wine of delicacy and finesse.

Pressings - Wine recovered from pressing the grape skins, stalks and pips after fermentation; high in
flavour and tannin.

Primary aromas - Fresh fruit aromas suggestive of the wine varietal.

Private reserve - This description, along with reserve, once stood for the best wines a winery produced.
Some care need be taken when buying wine with this designation as it has no legal definition.
Produced and bottled by - Indicates that the winery crushed, fermented and bottled at least 75 percent of
the wine in the bottle.

Pruny - Having the flavor of overripe, dried-out grapes. Can add complexity in the right dose.

Puckery - Describes highly tannic and very dry wines.

Puncheon - a puncheon generally holds about 500 litres

Pungent - Having a powerful, assertive smell linked to a high level of volatile acidity.

Punt - The dome-shaped indentation in the bottom of a wine bottle.
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-Q-

QBA - (QUALITÄTSWEIN BESTIMMTER ANBAUGEBIETE) - German wine law enacted in 1971,
guaranteeing a particular quality level.

-R-

Racking - The practice of moving wine by hose from one container to another, leaving sediment behind.
For aeration or clarification.

Raisiny - Having the taste of raisins from ultra-ripe or overripe grapes. Can be pleasant in small doses in
some wines.

Raw - Young and undeveloped. Raw wines are often tannic and high in alcohol or acidity.

Rayon d'Or - A grape variety that has been widely planted in the Loire Valley of France, where it became
a parent of both Seyval and Vidal Blanc.

Red Grapes - Also called black grapes, with skins that have reddish or blue pigment in their skins.

Reduced - Commonly used to describe a wine that has not been exposed to air.

Refractometer - A scientific instrument that winemakers use to measure the ripeness of the grapes at
harvest time, so named because it actually measures the refractive index--the degree to which the angle of
a light wave is altered when passing through a solution. In the case of grapes, it can determine the
concentration of solutes in the must, particularly sugar concentration, which gives the winemaker a pretty
accurate measure of ripeness.

Region - Geographical area for wine growing less specific than a district; more specific than a state or
country.

Rehoboam - Oversized bottle equivalent to 4.5 liters or six regular bottles.

Reserve - Loose designation for presumably higher quality than "standard" version of the wine. In the case
of Champagne, reserve wine refers to wine from previous vintages added to the cuvée for consistent quality
and style.

Residual sugar - The natural grape sugar left behind (usually by design) after the fermentation has
finished. Characteristic of many modern white wines, usually pleasant though cloying if overdone - or done
with the wrong type of wine.

Rich - Wines with big, smooth, full, pleasant flavors are described as rich.

Riddling - The art of turning and tilting bottles of sparkling wine in order to ease the sediment into the neck
of the bottle. Often performed mechanically in modern facilities.

Riesling - Often known as "Rhine Riesling" due to its origin, the Germans prefer us to drop the "Rhine" as
the wines are made in Australia. Riesling is the noble grape of Germany and is one of the world's great
white wine varieties. The best examples of German Riesling are usually associated with the Mosel and
Rhine valleys, where it is sometimes grown on valley walls so steep that the vineyard workers must harness
themselves like mountain climbers to avoid falling down the mountain! Australian winemakers use the term
to separate their wine from "Hunter Riesling" which is in fact the white variety Semillon or "Clare Riesling"
which in the past has sometimes been Crouchen. Not all Riesling from the Hunter or Clare is Semillon or
Crouchen, in fact the region of Clare in South Australia produces some of the finest examples in the
country. However old labels aren't easily forgotten. Aged Riesling is reasonably rare but can be
magnificent, often taking on the unusual but desirable aromas of kerosene and rubber.

Riserva/Reserva - Italian/Spanish term for "reserve" indicating longer aging before release and
suggesting higher quality. Regulations determine how long this is for individual wines.

Robust - Means full-bodied, intense and vigorous, perhaps a bit overblown.

Rose - This should be the classic summer red of Australia. Light, fresh and fruity wine made from red
grapes, either sweet, medium or dry - but best as a dry, yet flavoursome, young wine. (Pron. 'rose-ay')

Round - Describes a texture that is smooth, not coarse or tannic, sometimes tending to have a low acidic
content.

Rustic - Describes wines made by old-fashioned methods. Less refined and elegant.
Glossary of Wine Terms - S -
A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Salmanazar - An oversized bottle holding 9 litres, the equivalent of 12 regular bottles.

Sauvignon Blanc - A relative newcomer, this white variety often has the pungent aromas of tropical fruits,
freshly-mown grass or asparagus, most evident in wines from New Zealand. When wood matured,
Sauvignon Blanc can be referred to as "Fume Blanc", however the "smokey" character of French Fume
Blanc is a result of the natural yeast bloom on the grapes rather than winemaking.

Sec - A Champagne style that is dry, but sweeter than extra-sec.

Second-label wine - A less expensive or second brand made from grapes or wine a level down from
primary label

Sediment - Residue in the bottom of a bottle of red wine that forms as the wine ages.

Serious - Describes a high-quality wine.

Semillon - A white variety which starts off life quite steely and flinty in character but ages beautifully, taking
on honeyed aromas and flavours.

Seyval - White grape making a wine that is crisp and light exhibiting a herbal-citrus character.

Sharp - Acid taste on the palate. Not necessarily unpleasant.

Sherry - A fortified wine originating in Spain.

Shatter - another condition occurring in early grape development. The tiny grapes have a small "cap" on
the end. Normally, as they start to grow, this cap pops off. However, in a cool, wet spring, such as in 1995,
the grape fails to develop early and the cap toughens. When warmer weather finally hits and the grape
grows, it pushes against this tough cap. Instead of the cap popping off, the grape shatters. Again, this
drastically reduces yields and leads to very low berry count and bunches with only a few grapes.

Shiraz - The backbone of the Australian industry, this red variety can have a spicy, peppery Aroma with
mulberry/blackberry flavours and firm tannins. Shiraz can be blended with Cabernet Sauvignon, a mix only
seen in Australia. There is growing support for the notion that Shiraz may be premium red variety for
Australian conditions.

Smoky - Usually an oak barrel byproduct, a smoky quality can add flavor and aromatic complexity to
wines.

Soft - No harsh sensation on the palate and after-palate.

Solera - A technique of topping up many casks of firtified wine, stacked in a pyramid, by progressively
blending younger wine with increasingly older stock. The better (and more expensive) blends contain a
greater amount of the older stock.

Sparkling Wine - Australia makes "sparkling wine", not champagne. Only the French region of
Champagne makes "champagne". In Australia we tend to label the "champagne" styles as "Methode
Champenoise

Spicy - A descriptor for many wines, indicating the presence of spice flavors such as anise, cinnamon,
cloves, mint and pepper which are often present in complex wines. Very typical in rhones styled wines.
Stale - Old, over the hill wines which have lost their freshness without developing the positive aspects of
successful aging.

Stalky - Stemmy. Smells and tastes of grape stems or has leaf- or hay-like aromas.

Stemmy - Wines fermented too long with the grape stems may develop this quality. An unpleasant and
often dominant stemmy aroma and green astringency.

Structure - The interaction of elements such as acid, tannin, glycerin, alcohol and body as it relates to a
wine's texture and mouthfeel. Usually preceded by a modifier, as in firm or lacking in structure.

Subtle - Delicate wines with finesse and elegance. Understated flavors that are well integrated and
inspiring.

Sulphur dioxide (S02) - Chemical used as an anti-oxidant in winemaking. The smell of sulphur dioxide
can be present in a newly opened bottle of wine, but it should dissipate. With todays truth-in-labelling laws,
it is referred to on food and wine labels as "Preservative(220) added".

Supple - Describes texture, mostly with reds, as it relates to tannin, body and oak. Tends to indicate well
balanced.

Sur lie - wines aged sur lie (french for "on the lees") are kept in contact with the dead yeast cells and are not
racked or otherwise filtered.

Sweet - More than fruity; pertaining to sugar.

Syrah - Shiraz.
Glossary of Wine Terms - T -
A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

T.A - total acid, or more correctly, titratable acid. Measured in g/l of tartaric (in Australia)

Tanky - Describes dull, dank qualities that show up in wines aged too long in tanks.

Tannin - The organic element that occurs naturally in grapes and gives structure to the palate - heavy
tannin can taste of stewed tea with a dry, mouth-puckering effect. Tannins can be "light" or "fine-grained" in
a smooth wine or "heavy" in a rough red. Tannins will mellow and integrate with the wine as it ages.

Tart - Noticeable acidic taste of malic acid.

Tartaric acid - The principal acid in wine.

Tartrates - Harmless crystals of potassium bitartrate that may form in cask, bottle or on the cork from the
tartaric acid naturally present in wine.

Thin - Lacking body and depth.

Tight - Describes a wine's structure, concentration and body, as in a "tightly wound" wine. Closed or
compact are similar terms.

Tinny - Metallic tasting.

Tired - Limp, feeble, lackluster.

Toasty - Describes a flavor derived from the oak barrels in which wines are aged. Also, a character that
sometimes develops in sparkling wines.

Tokay - A fortified wine made using the Solera system (as per Muscat) but using the white grape
Muscadelle.
Glossary of Wine Terms - U..V -
A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

-U-

Ullage - The empty space between the wine and the cork. Ullage in casks or barrels is normally kept to a
minimum by topping to prevent the air exposure oxidizing the wine. A bottle of (young) wine with a large
ullage could indicate a faulty cork. Ullage will generally increase as a wine ages.

Unfiltered - Wine that has not gone through a filtering process to clarify it.


-V-

Vanilla - The slightly sweet character that occurs from maturation of red wines in American oak barrels.
Can also occur in older white wines as a result of bottle-development.

Varietal - Wine made from a particular grape variety (for example, Cabernet Sauvignon); the opposite of a
generic wine (for example, chablis).

Verasion - Color change; the moment color appears in the grapes. It also signals a shift in the
development of the grape, which now begins the long process of ripening.

Vegetal - Some wines contain elements in their smell and taste which are reminiscent of plants and
vegetables. In Cabernet Sauvignon a small amount of this vegetal quality is said to be part of varietal
character. But when the vegetal element takes over, or when it shows up in wines in which it does not
belong, those wines are considered flawed.

Velvety - Having rich flavor and a silky, sumptuous texture.

Vidal - Versatile white grape used to make wines ranging in flavor from dry to a sweet late harvest dessert
wine.

Vigneron - Grape-grower.

Vignoles - This grape produces a wine that has a luscious floral aroma and fruity flavors of pineapple,
pears, and apricot.

Vigorous - In wine, a lively taste or feel.

Vin - Wine (French). As in vin ordinaire, or ordinary wine. To vinify is to make grapes into wine. (Pron.
'vann').

Vinegar - Wines spoiled by the vinegar bacteria, and not pleasant to drink. A major winemaking fault that is
easily detected by the influence of acetic acid on the aroma and taste.

Viniculture - The science or study of grape production for wine and the making of wine.

Vinous - Literally means "winelike" and is usually applied to dull wines lacking in distinct varietal character.

Vinosity - Wine-tasting term pertaining to the alcoholic strength of a wine and its grape character.

Vintage - The annual grape harvest or the year the grapes are harvested, ie. "Non-Vintage" is used to
describe a champagne or sparkling wine which is a blend of more than one year's wine. A "Vintage" wine is
therefore produced from grapes of one year.
Vinted by - Largely meaningless phrase that means the winery purchased the wine in bulk from another
winery and bottled it.

Vintner - Winemaker.

Vintner-grown - Means wine from a winery-owned vineyard situated outside the winery's delimited
viticultural area.

Viscous - Thick appearance in wine; showing the presence of glycerol.

Viticultural area - Defines a legal grape-growing area distinguished by geographical features, climate,
soil, elevation, history and other definable boundaries. Rules vary widely from region to region, and change
often. See also appellation d'origine.

Viticulture - The cultivation and maintenance of grape vines. Involves everything from site selection to
trellising, preparing root stocks, grafting, spray programs, pruning, fruit evaluation, canopy management,
etc. All designed to direct sunlight to the grapes and achieve optimum quality', ripeness and flavour.

Vitis - The botanical name for the vine. Vitis vinifera, the grape-bearing vine. is responsible for most of the
world's quality wines. The North American Vitis labrusca is a native vine.

Volatile - An excessive and undesirable amount of acidity, which gives a wine a slightly sour, vinegary
edge. At very low levels (0.1 percent), it is largely undetectable; at higher levels it is considered a major
defect.
Glossary of Wine Terms - W..Z -
A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Whole Berry or Whole Cluster Fermentation - Techniques that increase the fruitiness and tannin of
whole berries or clusters.

Wine - The fermented juice of grapes.

-X-

-Y-

Yeast Autolysis - The breakdown of yeast during aging on the lees, in which compounds are released that
heighten the sensory qualities of the wine and increase its complexity.

-Z-
Zinfandel - The most widely planted red grape in California. White Zinfandel is a blush-colored, slightly
sweet wine. Real Zinfandel, the red wine, is the quintessential California wine.
System Requirements
To run The Uncorked Cellar you will need:
    A PC running Microsoft Windows 98 or later
    20 Meg free on your hard disk.
Legal Bits
(1) The Uncorked Cellar software and all other programs and documentation distributed or shipped with it
are Copyright (c) Uncork Pty Ltd, and are protected by Australian and international copyright law. You are
granted a license to use a copy of The Uncorked Cellar under the terms and conditions specified in this
license agreement.

(2) A registered copy of this software may be installed on two or more computers (for example, at work and
at home), provided there is no possibility that the program will be in use on the two computers at the same
time, and provided that you yourself have purchased The Uncorked Cellar..

(3) Unregistered copies of this software may be used for an evaluation period as published on
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registration payment to the authors (see order.txt).

(4) You may copy any version of The Uncorked Cellar for normal backup purposes, and you may give
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of this agreement. If you copy the shareware version of The Uncorked Cellar for others, you must include
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(5) Shareware vendors may distribute The Uncorked Cellar shareware version provided they distribute the
entire The Uncorked Cellar package. They may add files to it, but under no circumstances may they
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their individual use provided the entire package is passed on, and the recipient is made aware of their
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Specifically, The Uncorked Cellar is NOT free or Public Domain, and you may not represent it as such.
You may not sell or distribute the registered version without express written permission from Uncork Pty
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(6) While we have attempted to build in reasonable safeguards, if you do not use The Uncorked Cellar
properly you may destroy files or cause other damage to your computer software and data. You assume full
responsibility for the selection and use of The Uncorked Cellar to achieve your intended results. THIS
SOFTWARE AND THE ACCOMPANYING FILES ARE SOLD "AS IS" AND WITHOUT WARRANTIES AS
TO PERFORMANCE OF MERCHANTABILITY OR ANY OTHER WARRANTIES WHETHER
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED. NO WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE IS
OFFERED. Good data processing procedure dictates that any program be thoroughly tested with
non-critical data before relying on it. The user must assume the entire risk of using the program. Uncork Pty
Ltd's warranty is expressly limited to the cost of replacement of any defective diskette or other part. NOTE:
In some countries (including Australia) local laws may prescribe different warranties.

(7) Uncork Pty Ltd warrants to owners of registered copies of The Uncorked Cellar that the software will
operate in accordance with the description given in the documentation, and that the diskette and manual will
be free of physical defects which interfere with normal use. For a period of 90 days from the date of your
purchase of The Uncorked Cellar, Uncork will, at its sole option and subject to the restrictions above and
below, repair or replace any defective item(s), or refund the purchase price of any diskette and/or manual
and/or any other parts or components of Uncorked Cellar found to be defective, if such defect is the fault of
Uncork Pty Ltd and not the result of misuse or abuse. Such a refund, repair, or replacement shall be your
sole remedy for any defects, program error(s), or documentation error(s). In no event shall Uncork Pty Ltd
be responsible for any other costs or damages whatsoever due to errors in usage or your failure to read,
understand, or follow instructions in the documentation.

(8) Uncork Pty Ltd makes no representations about the suitability of this software or about any content or
information made accessible by the software, for any purpose. The software is provided 'as is' without
express or implied warranties, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
Uncork Pty Ltd shall not be liable for (a) incidental, consequential, special or indirect damages of any sort,
whether arising in tort, contract or otherwise, even if the developer has been informed of the possibility of
such damages, or (b) for any claim by any other party. This limitation of liability shall not apply to liability for
death or personal injury to the extent applicable law prohibits such limitation. furthermore, some states
and/or countries do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so this
limitation and exclusion may not apply to you.

In short, we endeavour to ensure both that the software operates correctly, and the information contained in
this software is accurate, but we cannot be held responsible for errors and omissions. If you know of
changes or additions, then please let us know. If you are not satisfied with The Uncorked Cellar we will
refund your purchase price.

(9) Use and licencing of this software shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the
State of Victoria, Australia.

(10) All products, logos, trademarks or registered trademarks shown or mentioned are acknowledged and
remain property of their respective owners.

(phew)
Acknowledgements
Thanks are given to the following for their generous help

The Uncorked 2006 Beta Testers (in first name alphabetic order)
•      Alejandro Garcia
•      Arthur Fowler
•      Bill Buitenhuys
•      Cliff Weiss
•      Connie Mowat
•      David Hotchkin
•      Jason Longland
•      James Wilson
•      Jim Atkinson
•      Mike Bresolin
•      Peter Bittner
•      Ronald Powell
•      Toby Warson
•      Tom Dillon
•      Vincent De Knock


Davig Ling for creating the initial Portugal database
Daniel Rogov for creating the initial Israel database

Bordeaux Central for kindly hosting The Uncorked Forum at
(http://groups.msn.com/BordeauxCentral/uncorkedcellar.msnw)

All contributing users for your suggestions and Tips & Tricks.

All contributing Winemakers, both for the fruit of their labours, and their generous provision of information
about their wines.

Registrar of Protected Names



Regional Maps have been provided by

•       Burnett Valley Winegrowers Association
•       Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association
•       Mark Maguire

				
DOCUMENT INFO