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					IMAGINE FLATBUSH 2030




A Community Visioning Project of
                in partnership with the
                Flatbush Development Corporation (FDC)
                and with funding from the Rockefeller Foundation
IMAGINE FLATBUSH 2030
A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009
A Community Visioning Project of The Municipal Art Society of New York
in partnership with the Flatbush Development Corporation (FDC)
and with funding from the Rockefeller Foundation
Table of Contents



1	 About	Us			                                                        4       C Society                                               64
                                                                                 i.   Youth and Educational Attainment
2	 Introduction			                                                     6
                                                                                 ii. Housing Access
   A Flatbush at a Glance                                              6
                                                                                 iii. Civics
   B General Findings                                                  7
                                                                                 iv. Neighborhood Diversity

3	 Imagine	Flatbush	2030	Sustainability	Action	Agenda			               8         v.   Mobility

4	 Project	Background			                                              22   8	 Working	With	PlaNYC	2030	Opportunities			               66
   A Jane Jacobs and PlaNYC 2030                                      23
                                                                           9	 Appendices		                                            69
   B Sustainable Indicators                                           25
                                                                              A Assets and Challenges/11-19-07 Stakeholders Meeting   70
5	 Flatbush	Profile			                                                27
                                                                              B Quality of Life Issues/12-12-07 Workshop              73
6	 Imagine	Flatbush	2030	Process			                                   49      C Final Goals/01-24-08 Workshop                         75
   A Advisory Board Meeting                                           52      D Measures and Actions/02-28-08 Workshop                77
   B Stakeholder Meeting                                              53      E Handout/Designing Sustainable Measures                87
   C Workshop 1                                                       54      F Handout/Glossary                                      88
   D Workshop 2                                                       55      G List of Participants                                  89
   E Workshop 3                                                       56
                                                                           10	 Resources	(Data	Sources)			                            93
   F Follow-up Meeting                                                57
   G Community Board 14 Presentation                                  58

7	 Findings	(Goals,	Indicators,	Measurements)			                      59
   A Economy                                                          61
      i.   Economic Well-Being

   B Environment                                                      62
      i.   Local Environment
      ii. Public Health
      iii. Recreation
      iv. Neighborhood Character




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                    3
1/ About Us



The	following	information	is	brought	to	you	by	the	Municipal	Art	Society	(MAS),	in	partnership	
with	the	Flatbush	Development	Corporation	(FDC)	and	with	funding	from	the	Rockefeller	
Foundation.	It	describes	a	joint	initiative	that	took	place	over	the	course	of	six	months,	beginning	
in	November	of	2007	and	culminating	in	May,	2008.	Each	of	these	organizations	has	a	different	
mission	but	came	together	on	this	pilot	project	to	begin	addressing	issues	of	sustainability	at	the	
neighborhood	level.

The	Municipal	Art	Society	of	New	York (MAS.org) is a                  Flatbush	Development	Corporation’s (fdconline.org)
non-profit membership organization whose mission is to                mission is to enhance the quality of life for all segments of the
promote a more livable city. Since 1893, the MAS has worked           Flatbush community. FDC identifies and responds to neigh-
to enrich the culture, neighborhoods and physical design of           borhood needs and concerns, proactively creating programs
New York City. It advocates for excellence in urban design            and campaigns that work towards a healthy, safe and vibrant
and planning, contemporary architecture, historic preserva-           community. Their economic development, housing, youth,
tion and public art.                                                  and immigration programs serve the exceptionally diverse
                                                                      needs of our constituents.
                                                                      The	Rockefeller	Foundation (rockfound.org) was estab-
                                                                      lished in 1913 by John D. Rockefeller, Sr., to “promote the
                                                                      well-being” of humanity by addressing the root causes of
                                                                      serious problems. The Foundation works around the world
                                                                      to expand opportunities for poor or vulnerable people and
                                                                      to help ensure that globalization’s benefits are more widely
                                                                      shared.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                   4
1/ About Us




Imagine Flatbush 2030 debuts at the 2007 Flatbush Frolic


Acknowledgements                                                      special thanks to the Center for the Study of Brooklyn and to
A very sincere thank you to the Flatbush Development                  Gretchen Maneval for her leadership, sustained participation,
Corporation for their partnership and for the dedication of           and expertise. (See Appendix G for a full list of participants.)
FDC staff members Mannix Gordon, Robin Redmond, and             We want to express our gratitude to the staff members and
Aga Trojniak. Thanks also to former FDC Executive Director      volunteers who shared their skills and time including Chaka
Susan Siegel.                                                   Blackman, Willemine Dassonville, Kody Emmanuel and
Thank you also to advisory committee members State Senator Public Allies, Eddy Disla, Jasper Goldman, Cheryl Herber,
Parker, State Assemblyman Brennan, State Assemblywoman          Keenan Hughes, Lisa Kersavage, Michele Luc, Alexis Meisels,
Jacobs, New York City Council Member Eugene, Lucretia           David Parrish, Genevieve Sherman, Hans Yoo, and Kate Zidar.
John of Senator Parker’s office, Kevin Parris of Brooklyn       Most importantly we would like to acknowledge the work of
Borough President Marty Markowitz’s office, Lindsey Lusher the Flatbush community members who participated in this
of Transportation Alternatives, Gretchen Maneval of the         project, lending us their time over a series of four workshops
Center for the Study of Brooklyn, and Anne Pope of Sustain-     and sharing their thoughts, ideas, and enthusiasm.
able Flatbush for sharing their thoughts and insight. A special
                                                                This project was made possible through the generous support
thanks to Ryan Buck and Mitzu Adams of Brooklyn College
                                                                of the Rockefeller Foundation.
for the generous use of their space. We also want to extend


Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                  5
2/ Introduction



Imagine	Flatbush	2030	is	a	demonstration	proj-   • A detailed socio-economic description of Flatbush,
ect	launched	in	November,	2007	by	the	Municipal	   Brooklyn.
Art	Society	in	partnership	with	the	Flatbush	    • The participatory process used to build reciprocal un-
Development	Corporation	(FDC)	and	with	fund-       derstanding by neighborhood stakeholders of traditional
                                                   concepts of sustainability; of PlaNYC 2030; and of sustain-
ing	from	the	Rockefeller	Foundation.               ability defined as the overlapping of economic, environ-
The basic idea was to test an approach to sustainable develop-       mental, and social concerns.
ment that builds on local knowledge, emphasizes consensus,       • The priorities that emerged from neighborhood work-
and identifies ways to assist local stewardship of sustainabil-      shops;
ity through measurable goals.
                                                                 • A suggested agenda that is offered by the Municipal Art
Imagine Flatbush 2030 builds on Mayor Bloomberg’s 2007               Society as a collection of action steps for Flatbush resi-
PlaNYC2030—a citywide sustainability agenda that lays the            dents and organizations to use to engage the city around
groundwork for achieving and maintaining affordable hous-            the priorities in Flatbush.
ing, open space, good transportation, clean air, water, and land
and reliable energy. The objectives of Imagine Flatbush were     A/	Flatbush	at	a	Glance	
to use PlaNYC as a framework that allows communities to col- We worked with multiple organizations and resources to
lectively generate their own sustainability goals; create their  identify the generally-accepted boundaries of the neighbor-
own measures for progress toward those goals; and develop        hood of Flatbush: Parkside Avenue to the north; the railroad
and manage the data sets that will be used for these measures. cut just below Avenue H to the south; roughly, Coney Island
During the course of the project another objective emerged:      Avenue to the west, and Bedford Avenue to the east, with
the need for a set of action items as a platform for further     some meandering east and west south of Ditmas Avenue. The
community engagement on the issues identified during work- primary land use is residential, with concentrations of com-
shops. The overall goal of the project was and is to provide     mercial uses along Coney Island Avenue, Flatbush Avenue,
the neighborhood organizations, residents, business people,      Church Avenue, Cortelyou Road, Foster Avenue, Avenue H,
local elected officials, and city agencies with information
                                                                 Newkirk Avenue, and Newkirk Plaza.
about community priorities as they related to sustainability,
generated through a community-based and consensus-driven This area is divided into thirty-one census tracts. According
process.                                                         to the 2000 census, there were a total of 148,737 people living
As the next step, the creators of Imagine Flatbush 2030          in these tracts. Young people are the largest group: those aged
have produced a report that provides information about the       5-17 make up 21 percent of the population. The largest groups
background and purpose of the initiative, a detailed socio-      are: African-American (53 percent of the total population),
economic profile of Flatbush, the process by which informa-      White (21 percent), and Hispanic (14 percent). The median
tion on community goals and measures of progress toward          household income in Flatbush is $32,103. Most people rent;
those goals was gathered, and how the information gathered       only 16 percent are owners.
might be used in the future by both the community and by
                                                                 The neighborhood is served by one major open space: the
government agencies. This report provides information on:
                                                                 Parade Grounds to the north, primarily given over to ball
• What methods were used to develop the initiative and           fields. There are four historic districts: Albermarle Kenmore
    how this process relates to comparable efforts elsewhere
                                                                 Terraces Historic District; Prospect Park Historic District;
    in the United States and abroad.
                                                                 Fiske Terrace-Midwood Park, and Ditmas Park Historic

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                            6
2/ Introduction




District which cover parts of the area containing historic de-        • Energy inefficiencies, and lack of education about energy
tached Victorian-style homes. Brooklyn College, a part of the           efficiency
City University of New York system, is in the southern part of        • Public safety concerns
the area. There are eight public schools serving the area.
                                                                      • Concentrated poverty in some parts of neighborhood
B/	General	Findings                                                   • Lack of community meeting space
Throughout meetings and workshops, special attention was              • Lack of community centers
paid to maximizing and documenting all community input.
                                                                      • Insufficient supermarkets
The framework of sustainability allows for much discussion
about the interconnections among issues and while discus-             • Lack of bike paths
sions of sustainability are often reduced to concerns about           • Disengaged youth
the physical environment, people in the Flatbush workshops
were encouraged to think about the interconnections among             • Lack of space for artists
issues. For example, housing affordability relates to supply of       • Lack of retail diversity
housing (a question, often, of development) but also relates          (See Appendix A for full listing of Assets and Challenges)
to wages and the purchasing power of prevailing wages. The
state of community health relates to air quality and oppor-           However, setting agendas means looking for common themes
tunities for local recreation but also to food access, access to      and much of the labor in the workshops was devoted to
health care, and access to information, for example.                  prioritizing issues and concerns. The predominant concerns
                                                                      to emerge were:
When asked to identify key neighborhood assets that contrib-
ute to the quality of life in Flatbush, many people pointed to:       • A supply of housing that suits a range of income levels and
                                                                        a range of household sizes;
• Diversity: cultural; socioeconomic; ethnic; religious
                                                                      • Retail diversity to expand choice and provide opportuni-
• Access to Prospect Park                                               ties for entrepreneurship;
• Well-served by subways                                              • Intensified civic engagement;
• Affordable housing                                                  • Space for public assembly;
• Strong community institutions                                       • Sustaining a diverse population;
• Great schools                                                       • Improving access to healthy foods;
• Abundant tree cover                                                 • Improving air quality and reducing noise pollution;
• Strong community character                                          • Promoting harmony between historic buildings and new
And when asked to identify key challenges, people often                 construction;
pointed to:                                                           • More, and better, alternatives to traveling by car;
• Traffic                                                             • Improved community interaction.
• Threats to affordable housing                                       (See Appendix C for full listing of Final Goals.)


Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                 7
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030
Sustainability Action Agenda


Participants	in	the	Imagine	Flatbush	process	
made	it	known	that	in	addition	to	the	creation	
of	neighborhood	sustainability	goals	and	
                                                                      Completing these action
indicators,	they	also	desired	that	the	Municipal	
Art	Society	compile	a	list	of	recom-mendations	
                                                                      steps depends upon the
from	workshop	responses	that	could	serve	as	a	
neighborhood	action	agenda	and	guide	future	
                                                                      participation of people
participation	in	neighborhood	affairs.	                               like you!
We present the following action agenda, distilled from
workshop feedback and offer it as a set of suggestions for
moving forward on the sustainability agenda. It is divided into
the categories used during the workshop discussions. Action
steps are further identified by what can be accomplished in
the short-term (steps that can be accomplished within the
next six months), mid-term (steps that can be accomplished
within the next year), and long-term (steps that will take a
year or more to complete).




 Legend


                    Society                    Short-term


                    Environment                Mid-term


                    Economy                    Long-term



Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                             8
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Economic Well-Being

Action	Step
Continue to develop leadership among business owners                  Immediate	opportunity	to	begin	working
regarding the opportunities and challenges that affect this           FDC has been organizing and supporting a merchants
sector of the local economy to:                                       committee to discuss and implement the current and
                                                                      future needs of this sector of the economy.
• Track provision and training for small business owners.
• Implement customer surveys, and encourage business                  Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
  owners to keep track and respond to local needs; immedi-            Evaluate participation of merchants in FDC’s umbrella
  ate and long-term.                                                  group; track new businesses and how responsive they are
• Assess local opportunities for cultural performance/exhi-           to needs expressed through IF 2030 process.
  bition space to service the local artistic scene.


          This is a mid-term action step.




Local businesses.

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                             9
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Local Environment

Action	Step	1
Take a leading role in reviewing land use applications for                             Immediate	opportunity
compatibility with sustainability goals. Advocate that all                             1) Present the standards above to Community Board 14,
future land use actions, whether publicly or privately spon-                              the Brooklyn Borough President, and City Council
sored, meet the following standards:                                                      members and propose a motion for their incorpora-
                                                                                          tion as a) an energy efficiency evaluation checklist for
• Safe, affordable, and diverse housing stock that incorpo-                               reviewing land use proposals and b) a housing oppor-
  rates Inclusionary Zoning to achieve 30 percent afford-                                 tunity checklist for reviewing land use proposals.
  ability, defined as at least 50 percent below the average
  regional income ($70,000), with a mix of housing units of                            2) Convene a meeting with representatives of the De-
  different sizes.                                                                        partment of City Planning (DCP) and present to them
                                                                                          the standards above, in order to examine how well the
• Energy efficient buildings that respect neighborhood                                    proposed Flatbush rezoning responds to the sustain-
  character.                                                                              ability standards established by IF2030, and how the
• Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green                                     rezoning proposal can maximize/maintain Flatbush’s
  Building Rating System (LEED)1 certification for new                                    potential as a Solar Empowerment Zone (see below).
  buildings.
• Design guidelines that promote harmony between old and                               Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
  new buildings.                                                                       Track incorporation of these standards 1) as a guideline
                                                                                       used throughout the land use review process, and 2) as
                                                                                       a part of the final, approved version of DCP’s rezoning
           This is a short-term action step.                                           proposal.




1. LEED certification is the U.S. Green Building Council’s nationally-accepted
   benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance “green”
   buildings.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                                  10
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Local Environment

Action	Step	2
Strengthen the neighborhood’s capacity to increase the                                    Immediate	opportunity
                                                                                          1) A local group with Preservation Consultant Coun-
energy efficiency of all buildings. This includes technical
                                                                                             selor status, such as FDC, can provide tenant and
training to identify what structural changes can be made in
                                                                                             homeowner training. In particular, existing housing
the buildings to achieve this, the financial literacy required                               workshops can be expanded to provide financial
to finance these operations, and taking advantage of new                                     training for home improvement—particularly, on how
citywide programs and policies.                                                              to apply for the Department of Housing Preservation
                                                                                             and Development’s (HPD) home improvement loan
                                                                                             programs; such as the Article 8A Loan Program2, the
            This is a long-term action step.                                                 Home Improvement Program (HIP)3 and the Partici-
                                                                                             pation Loan Program (PLP)4.
                                                                                          2) Promotion and awareness-building of HPD’s seminars
                                                                                             on water/energy conservation, maintaining heat/hot
                                                                                             water, and environmental health issues.

                                                                                          Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
                                                                                          Track participation in FDC’s housing programs. Track
                                                                                          successful local applications to HPD’s home improve-
                                                                                          ment loan programs.




2. The Article 8A Loan Program provides rehabilitation loans to correct substandard
   or unsanitary conditions and to prolong the useful life of multiple dwellings in New
   York City.
3. HIP in cooperation with private banks provides loans, not exceeding $20,000, to help
   small homeowners improve their properties.
4. PLP provides low-interest loans to private residential building owners for the
   moderate-to-gut rehabilitation of housing for low-to-moderate income households.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                                11
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Public Health and Safety

Action	Step
Form a task force to examine public safety issues that include,       Immediate	opportunity
but are not limited to:                                               Work with Community Board 14’s Public Safety Commit-
• Safe living conditions                                              tee to further refine and examine neighborhood public
                                                                      safety priorities.
• Criminal activity, including drug dealing and gangs
• Disaster contingency planning at the building level


          This is a long-term action step.




Subway tracks side-by-side with housing.


Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                           12
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Recreation

Action	Step
Create a space for outdoor public assembly that can be used           Immediate	opportunity
for recreation, civic activity, and public art exhibitions.           The Department of Transportation is now accepting
                                                                      proposals for its Public Plaza Initiative. Entities who have
                                                                      demonstrated that they have consulted with the local
          This is a mid- to long-term action step.                    community receive additional points on their application.

                                                                      Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
                                                                      Track how much open space has been added to the
                                                                      neighborhood (3.6 percent of land area in Community
                                                                      District 14 as of 2006).




School playground doubles as neighborhood open space

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                  13
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Neighborhood Character

Action	Step
Take a leading role in reviewing land use applications for            Immediate	opportunity
compatibility with sustainability goals. Advocate that all            1) Present the standards above to Community Board 14
future land use actions, whether publicly or privately spon-             and propose a motion for their incorporation as a) an
sored, meet the following standards:                                     energy efficiency evaluation checklist for reviewing
                                                                         land use proposals and b) a housing opportunity
• Safe, affordable, and diverse housing stock that incorpo-              checklist for reviewing land use proposals.
  rates Inclusionary Zoning to achieve 30 percent afford-
  ability, defined as 50 percent or lower of area median
                                                                      Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
  income (AMI) (currently $70,000 per year), with a mix of
                                                                      1) Track incorporation of these standards a) as a
  housing units of different sizes.
                                                                         guideline in the community board’s land use review
• Energy-efficient buildings that respect neighborhood                   process, and b) as a part of final rezoning proposal for
  character.                                                             Flatbush.
• Design guidelines that promote harmony between old and              2) Track the number of housing units produced annually.
  new buildings


           This is a short- to mid-term action step.




Flatbush row houses on a tree-lined street.

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                 14
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Youth and Educational Attainment

Action	Step
Create a central source of information on all training and            Immediate	opportunity
programming opportunities that serve local youth by:                  Request that the local City Council Member undertake an
                                                                      audit of youth services available in Flatbush, beginning
• Assessing what organizations/groups offer educational,              with information from the Department of Youth and
  after-school trainings and recreational programs, as well           Community Development and the Citizens Committee
  as how to access them.                                              for Children, but also augmenting existing data by sur-
• Making this information available to people through                 veying local faith-based groups and other social service
  electronic and printed form so anybody in the community             providers that target youth.
  can access these listings.
• Creating ways for employers looking for youth employees             Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
  to post available positions.                                        Identification of a local group to take the lead on this step.


           This is a mid-term action step.




Young Flatbush residents visit the 2008 Frolic booth.

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                    15
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Civics

Action	Step	1
Incorporate the findings and recommendations of the                   Immediate	opportunity	
Imagine Flatbush participants into Community Board 14’s               Present to the board’s committees (such as Land Use and
agenda and priorities for the coming year. Community Board            Public Safety, for example), and request a motion from
14, which covers Flatbush and Midwood, plays an important             each committee that all relevant items from the Imagine
advisory role in decisions made about the neighborhood’s              Flatbush list of sustainability goals be included into
quality of life: land use; service delivery; and share of the         Community Board 14’s annual District Needs Statement,
city’s budget, among other things.                                    thereby becoming part of the document that serves as the
                                                                      community board’s guide in dealings with the city and
                                                                      private developers.
         This is a short-term action step.
                                                                      Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal	
                                                                      Track number of items included in the Community Board
                                                                      14 District Needs Statement.



Action	Step	2
Create a network of the groups involved in the Imagine                Immediate	opportunity
Flatbush 2030 effort. Continue to meet as a group, under the          Present findings to local elected officials for use as they
leadership of a consortium of local organizations, with the           conduct their own reviews of land use actions.
goal of providing the information from the process to city
agencies, elected officials, schools, and other community             Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
groups.                                                               Track whether local elected officials use the Imagine
                                                                      Flatbush land use recommendations to inform and guide
                                                                      their own reviews of projects.
         This is a mid- to long-term action step.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                 16
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Civics

Action	Step	3
Form an Advisory Task Force to work with Community                    Immediate	opportunity	
Board 14 on the creation of a board website that includes             The Mayor’s Community Assistance Unit, in conjunction
information referenced in Imagine Flatbush and serves as a            with the Department of Information Telecommunica-
centralized source of information about all things related to         tions and Technology, offers free website creation
Flatbush.                                                             assistance and website hosting to community boards.
                                                                      Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal	
                                                                      Secure agreement of Community Board 14 to form a
         This is a mid- to long-term action step.
                                                                      website task force.




Action	Step	4
Incorporate the findings and recommendations of the Imag-             Immediate	opportunity
ine Flatbush participants into a long-term planning process           Recommend to Community Board 14’s Executive Com-
for Community District 14 with the goal of producing a                mittee that the board assess its capacity to undertake a
district-wide 197-a plan grounded in local ideas about sustain-       197-a planning process.
ability. A 197-a plan (197-a refers to a section of the New York
City Charter) is a community-generated plan that is meant to          Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal	
guide future development, growth, and improvement deci-               Secure agreement from Community Board 14 to put the
sions in the neighborhood.                                            capacity assessment item on its Executive Committee
                                                                      agenda for consideration.

         This is a long-term action step.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                              17
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Housing Access

Action	Step
Strengthen access to affordable, safe, and comfortable hous-                             Immediate	opportunity
ing for low-income households in the neighborhood, by:                                   Support and participate in FDC’s housing workshops
                                                                                         so they can become a local conduit to distribute all
• Ensuring that information about the Home Mortgage                                      relevant materials and opportunities for sustainable
  Disclosure Act (HMDA)5 and the Community Reinvest-                                     home-ownership; in particular, those resources coming
  ment Act (CRA)6 are readily available and user-friendly;                               from the Center for NYC Neighborhoods, which address
  if necessary, produce one-page, community-friendly fact                                foreclosure issues at the individual and neighborhood
  sheets.                                                                                level.
• Advocating for financial literacy forums and first-time
  homebuyer programs.                                                                    Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
• Ensuring that local financial institutions use multiple                                1) Use data available from the Federal Financial Institu-
  languages.                                                                                tions Examination Council’s (FFIEC) website (or
                                                                                            from www.dataplace.org) to track successful home
                                                                                            mortgage loan applications by race and income, across
            This is a long-term action step.                                                the census tracts of the neighborhood; for private
                                                                                            mortgage insurance companies (PMIC).
                                                                                         2) Track CRA ratings of local lending institutions.




5. HMDA requires lending institutions to report public loan data.
6. The CRA mandates that institutions that receive local deposits help meet the credit
   needs of the communities in which they operate, including low- and moderate-
   income neighborhoods.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                                  18
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Neighborhood Diversity

Action	Step	1
Continue to develop the leadership potential of the diverse           Immediate	opportunity
individuals who participated in the workshops.                        FDC welcomes volunteers from the process to join their
                                                                      working groups: Economic Development and Community
                                                                      Revitalization; Housing and Immigration; Youth Services;
          This is a mid- to long-term action step.                    and Neighborhood Associations. There are also opportu-
                                                                      nities to get involved in the community board and even to
                                                                      apply for community board membership (applications are
                                                                      generally collected in January: http://www.brooklyn-usa.
                                                                      org/pages/Community_Board/getinvolved.htm).

                                                                      Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
                                                                      Track how well, over the course of time, community lead-
                                                                      ership in local organizations mirrors the demographic
                                                                      profile of Flatbush.




Flatbush youth participate in a workshop.

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                               19
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Mobility

Action	Step	1
Convene a Task Force to discuss mobility (which was defined           Immediate	opportunity
in the workshops as “getting around the neighborhood and              1) Follow Transportation Alternative’s idea for organiz-
getting into and out of the neighborhood”). This group will              ing a meeting with the participants of IF2030, to
be responsible for clarifying the main transportation issues/            engage members of Community Board 14 transporta-
questions and determining specific opportunities in this                 tion committee into the conversation.
regard.                                                               2) This group can take on the creation of a list of mobil-
                                                                         ity concerns and present them to city/state agencies,
                                                                         such as the Department of City Planning, or any other
           This is a short-term action step.                             relevant agencies. This presentation can be framed
                                                                         as a question to examine how well the type of devel-
                                                                         opment these agencies plan for the neighborhood
                                                                         responds to the community’s mobility concerns.

                                                                      Ways	to	measure	progress	toward	this	goal
                                                                      Extent to which the mobility committee is created, and
                                                                      the relevant concerns/questions are presented to the
                                                                      transportation committee of Community Board 14; the
                                                                      Department of City Planning; and any other relevant
                                                                      agency.




Cars, buses, and pedestrians compete for street space.

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                20
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




Immediate Opportunities for
Continued Involvement
Local	groups	are	taking	the	findings	of	the	
Imagine	Flatbush	2030	workshops	and	working	
with	the	agenda	to	make	progress	toward	
neighborhood	sustainability.	Here	are	ways	for	
you	to	get	even	more	involved:

The	Flatbush	Development	Corporation
Whether you are interested in joining a committee, commit-
ting to a special event, or even providing office support, FDC
has a range of volunteer opportunities that will allow you to
get more deeply involved in some of the agenda topics. Visit
www.fdconline.org.
• Housing and Immigration Committee
  (contact Aga Trojniak)
• Youth and After School Committee
  (contact Shamar or Klein)
• Flatbush Frolic Committee (contact Mannix Gordon)
• House Tour Committee (contact Aga Trojniak)
• Economic Development Committee
  (contact Mannix Gordon)

Sustainable	Flatbush
Visit them at their website: http://sustainableflatbush.org/
participate/




                                                                      Top: Flatbush Development Corporation; bottom: Sustainable Flatbush.

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                          21
3/ Imagine Flatbush 2030 Sustainability Action Agenda




4
Project
Background

A/	 Jane	Jacobs	and	PlaNYC	2030
B/	 Sustainable	Indicators




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   22
4 – Project Background                                                A/ Jane Jacobs and PLANYC 2030




A/ Jane Jacobs
and PlaNYC 2030
In September 2007, the Rockefeller Foundation
announced the winners of the first Jane Jacobs Medal,
an award that honored the path-breaking urbanist and
recognized two visionary practitioners whose work
has helped to foster a more diverse, dynamic and
equitable city.
With the establishment of this annual award, the
Foundation honored the work of one of the greatest
thinkers in urban planning and used the occasion as
the springboard for a major Jane Jacobs—inspired
public education and civic-engagement effort. MAS was
honored to be invited to partner with the Rockefeller
Foundation in bringing New York closer to the kind of
urban environment that Jane Jacobs helped us all to
understand and envision more clearly.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                    23
4 – Project Background                                                A/ Jane Jacobs and PLANYC 2030




Jane Jacobs is as relevant today as she was during the 1960s.         In light of the Mayor’s 2030 initiative, MAS believed that the
More redevelopment is happening now in New York City—                 most effective way to perpetuate the legacy of Jane Jacobs
and in other cities across the globe—than at almost any time          and have positive impact on the urban vitality of the city
since the 1930s, but it is clear that the lessons of Jane Jacobs      would be for the Rockefeller Foundation and the Municipal
have not been absorbed. Jacobs espoused a common-sense                Art Society to ensure that, as the city plans for 2030, it
approach to urban planning issues. She saw clearly that the           genuinely engages communities in devising a truly urban and
urban renewal of the 1950s and ’60s was failing to create             sustainable future for our city that survives well beyond the
human-oriented places, instead creating sterile, automobile-          Bloomberg Administration. To this end, we set out to design
centric new environments. Worse, they were destroying                 an approach to neighborhood visioning, planning, and devel-
neighborhoods that had grown organically and functioned as            opment that imparted the fullness of Jane Jacobs’ principles
safe, vibrant, successful human environments.                         of livability into the Administration’s notions of sustainability.
Today, we are no longer bulldozing neighborhoods. Yet we are          The important lesson from Jane Jacobs’ work is that urban
at times approaching city revitalization as if inspired by bad        planning is too important to be left to planners and politi-
memories of the Robert Moses years, moving toward mega-               cians. If a writer-editor living humbly in Greenwich Village
developments, such as the Atlantic Yards project, with little         in the 1950s could see serious flaws in urban renewal that
public input.                                                         eluded the professional planners of the time, then all of us
On a positive note, we have a mayor who has demonstrated              who live and work in New York are qualified to have a say in
an interest in planning and, through his PlaNYC2030, has              how the city is developed.
begun to take on the challenge of how to green the city even          MAS set out to address how a neighborhood could organize
as it grows over the next twenty-five years. PlaNYC addresses         and collectively evaluate what makes communities livable;
three basic concerns—population growth; aging infrastruc-             and to understand the level of public education and plan-
ture; and climate change—by taking action on the creation of          ning assistance required to help communities translate their
housing; reducing commute times; increasing parkland and              interpretations of livability into planning goals, objectives,
open space; improving water, energy, and transit infrastruc-          measures and strategies to be utilized to evaluate develop-
ture; reducing carbon emissions; improving air and water              ment proposals, react to plans and, ultimately, to create
quality; and cleaning contaminated land. The mayor’s engage-          neighborhood plans. This community visioning project set
ment in planning is an unprecedented opportunity to broaden           out to define New Yorkers’ aspirations for a sustainable
discussions of environmental sustainability to include lessons        city based on local knowledge – in essence, broadening the
from Jane Jacobs of what elements make urban communities              Mayor’s terms of sustainability to incorporate more Jane
work. The city, however, has not given much thought, yet, as          Jacobs-style ideals of livability – and using the opportunity
to how to solicit this input in a way that successfully engages       of PlaNYC2030 to engage New Yorkers in planning in a more
communities and makes their needs part of the solution.               meaningful way that ensures that communities are true
                                                                      partners with the city, and not merely sites for large-scale
                                                                      development.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                   24
4 – Project Background                                                             B/ Sustainable Indicators




B/ Sustainable Indicators

Why	an	indicators	project?                                        paved surface will increase stormwater runoff into nearby
Sustainability is based on equilibrium, or balance, among the     water bodies, polluting the water, limiting the water’s use for
environment, society, and the economy. Activities in one area recreation, and affecting the marine life. Beach recreation and
affect the others, and activities that benefit one aspect but are tourism also depends on water and air quality. Widening the
harmful to another aspect are unsustainable. For example, a       road is not a sustainable solution to the problem because it
community struggling with traffic congestion may look for         creates problems in other areas, and actually does very little
ways to solve this problem. Widening the road to ease conges- to solve the true problem in the long run. Maintaining balance
tion is one obvious, immediate solution. But it is a temporary    among the economy, ecology, and society is the ultimate goal
solution that creates problems in other areas. While the          of sustainability.
wider road may improve traffic flow temporarily, the added




             What is an indicator?
       An indicator is something that helps you understand where you are,
       which way you are going, and how far you are from where you want to
       be. A good indicator alerts you to a problem before it gets too bad and
       helps you recognize what needs to be done to fix the problem.
       Examples:
       • gas gauge
                                                                                                               Where you WANT TO BE
                                                                  Where you WERE



                                                                                        Where you ARE




       • grade on a report card




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                   25
4 – Project Background                                                B/ Sustainable Indicators




An indicator is a tool used to zero in on a particular issue or       A sustainable measurement for air quality would instead
condition to describe how well the larger system is working.          focus on the need for better integrated mobility in the neigh-
Indicators are used to help direct solutions to problems.             borhood, to decrease usage of cars. Measurements would
Developing sustainability indicators for a community has a            instead focus on the reason for extensive use of automobiles.
two-fold purpose:                                                     This type of indicator should also examine changes in the use
                                                                      of alternative means of transportation, commuting distances,
• To help a community articulate and prioritize what it               and other elements beyond fuel efficiency. It is important to
  values; and                                                         distinguish what the actual problem is, the factors that are
• To measure progress toward goals set by the community.              causing it (causes) and the potential actions that can be taken
For the purpose of raising awareness and beginning the                (responses).
conversation about sustainability on a community level, a list
of indicators grouped by issue area is very useful in preparing         Cause                 Problem               Responses
the sustainability plan. Additionally, these indicators can be
used when reviewing and providing feedback on plans for                 Too many              Air pollution         Standards
development in other neighborhoods, or can be altered and               people driving                              for fuel
used to measure progress towards sustainability goals.                  cars
                                                                                                                    Auto
Decisions about what items should go into a sustainability                                                          emissions
agenda, how they should be prioritized, and how people in                                                           standards
Flatbush can go about measuring progress (through indica-
tors) toward sustainability goals was the subject matter of                                                         Car pools
community workshops.

What	is	the	role	of	indicators	in	planning		
                                                                      How	can	indicators	be	put	to	work	and	used	
for	sustainability?	(or, why measuring air quality
                                                                      beyond	the	Imagine	Flatbush	2030	process?
is not enough.)
                                                                      This document presents the sustainability agenda that has
Sustainable indicators are the result of a planning process.
                                                                      been discussed by the participants in the Imagine Flatbush
They specify a problem, identify the cause of the problem,
                                                                      2030 workshops. The agenda comprises goals, and each of
and establish some of the impacts that result from having/
                                                                      these goals is accompanied by a series of sustainability indica-
solving the problem. For example: a common theme that
                                                                      tors that describe the current conditions of the community.
arose during the workshops was the need to reduce air pollu-
                                                                      This information is helpful data that is available to users of
tion caused by motor vehicles. Some standard techniques to
                                                                      this report as an updated scientific portrait of various aspects
measure air quality include monitoring the pollution emitted
                                                                      of the community. These measurements can be used down
by automobiles, or counting the number of programs/policies
                                                                      the road to evaluate how much and in what ways future pro-
that have been created to control the issue. However, this fails
                                                                      posals (by the community, by the city, or by external private
to address the underlying problem: the cause of automobile
                                                                      stakeholders) can contribute or deviate from the community’s
congestion in the community. In other words, measuring air
                                                                      vision for the future of the neighborhood.
quality is not enough.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                 26
4 – Project Background




5
Flatbush
Profile




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   27
5 - Flatbush Profile




The study area for Imagine Flatbush 2030
encompasses an area of 767.46 acres in central
Brooklyn. This area extends south from
Prospect Park to the Long Island Rail Road
(LIRR) Bay Ridge Line, which runs east-west
just north of Avenue I. With a minor exception
in the southeastern corner, this section covers
the northern half of Community District 14.
The area incorporates an additional series of
blocks along the railroad line between Flatbush
and Brooklyn Avenues.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   28
5 - Flatbush Profile




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   29
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Census Tracts




Census	Tracts
This study area intersects 31 census tracts (units of population determined by the federal government
for purposes of enumeration every ten years), which have been used to build the demographic and
socioeconomic description of the area produced for this profile. Although some sections of these tracts
extend beyond the boundaries of the catchment area, they have all been included in this analysis to
show any trends in and around the boundaries of the study area. However, the location of these tracts
in New York City indicate that Community District 14 and Kings County, in general, would be the most
appropriate geographies to establish a comparison to understand these numbers in context with other
neighborhoods and surrounding communities.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                       30
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Population




Population
According to the 2000 census, a total of 148,737 people live in these tracts. This number represents a
five percent increase from 1990, when the total number of residents was 142,809 (percentages have been
rounded to the nearest whole number). This phenomenon follows an increasing trend experienced by
Community District 14 that has been growing since 1980; although, at a decreasing rate of change (from
11 percent in 1990 , to 6 percent in the year 2000).
The population is distributed in three main areas. The highest density is present in tracts 05080, 07960,
05160 and 05100, which together host 29 percent of the total population. At the same time, tracts such as
046002 and 05220 present a considerably lower density at 0.41 percent and 0.67 percent. The rest of the
population tends to concentrate almost evenly across the rest of the study area (Figure 1).




Figure	1:	Distribution	of	the	Population		by	Census	Tract	in	the	Year	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                         31
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Age




Age
As Figure 2 illustrates, the study area has a large population of young people – 5-17 year-olds constitute
the largest age group, with 21 percent of the total population. The adult population of ages 30-39, 40-49,
and 50-59 constitute the next-largest age groups, with slightly more than 15 percent, 15 percent, and 13
percent of the population, respectively. The age groups with the least population in the neighborhood
are senior citizens, young children, and ages 18-21.




Figure	2:	Age	Distribution	in	the	Year	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                          32
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Race and Nativity




Race	and	Nativity
The racial/ethnic distribution of the community divides the population into three major groups. In
2000, Black/African-American residents accounted for a majority 53 percent of the total population. The
other major ethnic groups are White (21 percent) and Hispanic (14 percent), which combined represent
35 percent of the total population. The remaining 12 percent breaks down into 6 percent Asian, 5 percent
claiming two or more races, 0.69 percent claiming some other race alone, 0.11 percent American Indian/
Alaska Natives, and 0.06 percent Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders (Figure 3).




Figure	3:	Racial/Ethnic	Breakdown	in	the	Year	2000	(including	Hispanic	descent)	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                        33
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Race and Nativity




The foreign-born population accounts for 52 percent of the total population. This group is distributed
across the study area. Some of the tracts with the highest percentage of foreign-born residents were
tracts 046001 at 67 percent, 048200 at 63 percent, and 07900 at 59 percent. With the exception of tracts
046002, 05220, 04780 and 05280, where this group drops from 38 percent of the population, all other
areas oscillate between 40 and 58 percent (Figure 4).




Figure	4:	Percentage	of	Foreign-Born	Population	in	each	Census	Tract	by	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                        34
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Income




Income
The median household income (MHI) of the community living inside the study area is $32,103. However,
there are considerable differences between the distinct census tracts. For example, some areas show
individual MHI’s that are more than one-and-a-half times higher than others. This is the case with tracts
052800, 052400, 046002, or 05220; where in the MHI reaches $75,889, which is more than three times
higher than those of the tracts with the lowest MHI. The tracts with the lowest MHI include 048200,
048000, 051000, 079200, and 051600, where the median household income can be as low as $22,265
(Figure 5).




Figure	5:	Median	Household	Income	per	Census	Tract	by	1999	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                         35
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Poverty




Poverty
The number of individuals that reported an income below 200 percent of the poverty level , which
constitutes low income for the purpose of this study, follows another notable pattern. While this number
is only considerably low (as few as 16 percent of the population) in tract 052200, in all other tracts it
represents more than 29 percent of the total population. In tracts such as 051600, 079400, 048000, and
05080, more than 57 percent of the total population fell into this low-income category (Figure 6).




Figure	6:	Percentage	of	Low-Income	Population	per	Census	Tract	by	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                         36
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Housing




Housing
In the year 2000, the census reported a total of 51,735 housing units in the study area. 1,988 of these
units, or 3.84 percent, were reported vacant. The average percent of housing vacancy is 4.23 percent.
However, it is important to note that tracts 082800, 079200, and 079400 present rates higher than 8
percent. Conversely, in tracts 077400, 051200 and 050800 vacant property constitutes just under 2
percent of the total (Figure 7).




Figure	7:	Percentage	of	Vacant	Housing	Units	in	each	Census	Tract	by	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                       37
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Housing




The remaining units were unevenly divided between owner- and renter-occupied. Only 16 percent of
all occupied units were owner-occupied in the year 2000, whereas renter-occupied units comprised
84 percent of the total. However, the percentage of owner-occupied units is high in some census tracts,
including 046002, 05220, and 05280, where owner-occupied units comprised up to 78 percent of the
total units in those tracts (Figure 8). The areas with the highest percentages of renter-occupied units are
concentrated in tracts 051000, 050800 and 051200 (Figure 9).




Figure	8:	Percentage	of	Owner-Occupied	Housing	Units	in	Each	Census	Tract	by	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                           38
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Housing




Figure	9:	Percentage	of	Renter-Occupied	Housing	Units	in	each	Census	Tract	by	2000	
Source: US Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                   39
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Land Use




Land	Use
According to the Department of City Planning’s land-use categorization, the total acreage inside the
project’s study area is divided into ten categories. The majority of the acreage is used for housing
purposes, accounting for 67 percent of the total acreage. The majority of this housing is one and two
family buildings (38 percent) followed by multifamily elevator buildings (18 percent) and multi-family
walk-up buildings (12 percent). The other prevalent land uses include public facilities and institutions
(10 percent), mixed use residential and commercial (6 percent), commercial and office buildings (6
percent), open space and recreation (5 percent), and transportation utilities (3 percent). A portion of the
land that remains vacant (1 percent), or is used for parking facilities (also 1 percent). The least-prevalent
land use type is industrial and manufacturing (0.55 percent). It is important that beyond the acreages
above, there was a 0.54 percent of the total that was not classified because there was no data available.




Figure	10:	Distribution	of	Acreage	Inside	the	Study	Area	by	Land	Use	in	2007		
Source: New York City Department of City Planning, PLUTO, 2006




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                             40
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Land Use




Figure	11:	Percentage	of	Open	Space	
Source: Oasis, 2008; New York City Department of City Planning, PLUTO, 2006

New	York	City	
Open Space: 49,854 acres
Park/Open Space Acreage per 1000 Residents: 6.2

Community	District	14
Open Space: 129.77 acres
District Area: 1891 acres (Rank = 33 out of 59)
Percent of District that is Open Space: 6.9 percent (36/59)
Number of Gardens: 7
Open Space per 1,000 People: 0.77 acres (44/59)
Open Space per 1,000 Kids: 2.66 acres (48/59)
Percent Tree Canopy: 17.8 percent (13/59)

Imagine	Flatbush	Study	Area
Open Space: 36.48 acres
IF2030 Lot Area: 767.46 acres
Percent of District that is Open Space: 4.75 percent
Open Space per 1,000 People: 0.24 acres



Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009              41
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Additional	Neighborhood	Data




Figure	12:	Small	Parks	and	Playgrounds—Acceptable	Conditions	(Percent)	
Source: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, 2007




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  42
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Figure	13:	Small	Parks	and	Playgrounds—Acceptably	Clean	(Percent)	
Source: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, 2007




Figure	14:	Change	in	the	Size	of	the	Housing	Units	Between	1990	and	2000		
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  43
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Figure	15:	Gross	Rent	as	a	Percentage	of	Household	Income	
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Figure	16:	Means	of	Transportation	to	Work	for	Workers	16	Years	and	Over	in	2000	
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  44
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Figure	17:	Travel	Time	to	Work	for	Workers	16	Years	And	Over	Who	Did	Not	Work	At	Home	In	2000	
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Summary File 3, 2000




Figure	18:	Infant	Mortality	Rate	(per	1,000	Live	Births)	in	the	Last	Years	
Source: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2006




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  45
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Figure	19:	New	Cases	Requiring	Environmental	Intervention	for	Lead	Poisoning		
(per	1,000	Children)	in	the	Last	Years	
Source: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, 2007




Figure	20:	Leading	Causes	of	Death	in	Flatbush	in	2001	
Source: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2001




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  46
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Figure	21:	Leading	Causes	of	Hospitalization	in	Flatbush	in	2001	
Source: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2001




Figure	22:	Vulnerability	of	the	Neighborhood;	Education,	Poverty	and	Safety	
Source: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2001




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  47
5 - Flatbush Profile                                                  Additional Neighborhood Data




Figure	23:	Department	of	Buildings	Priority	A	(emergency)	Complaints	
Source: New York City Department of Buildings, 2007




Figure	24:	Department	of	Buildings	Priority	B	(non-emergency)	Complaints	
Source: New York City Department of Buildings, 2007




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                  48
5 - Flatbush Profile




6
Imagine
Flatbush
2030 Process
A/	    Advisory	Board	Meeting
B/	    Stakeholder	Meeting
C/	    Workshop	1
D/	    Workshop	2
E/	    Workshop	3
F/	    Follow-up	Meeting
G/	    Community	Board	14	Presentation




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   49
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030




The process began with the creation of an
advisory board, which met for the first time
in October 2007. At this meeting the Planning
Center introduced the project, the initial
partner organization Flatbush Development
Corporation, and some of the roles that had
been designated thus far.
This meeting served to build a constituency
among other stakeholders, such as other
organizations at work in the area, city agencies,
and elected officials. Participants confirmed
their support for the project, availability to help
with further outreach, and interest in using the
results of the project as a reference for their
own work.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   50
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030




Over a period of five months, the MAS Planning Center, in             These themes constituted the basis for breaking down the
partnership with the Flatbush Development Corporation and             discussion into smaller groups that focused on each of these
the Center for the Study of Brooklyn, hosted one stakeholders         topics separately. The process allowed each group to discuss
meeting and four community workshops in Flatbush. These               priorities and present its conclusions to the larger group.
workshops proceeded with the participation of residents,              At the second workshop, the group of participants was
business owners, and civic leaders of the neighborhood, who           encouraged to revise the quality of life issues under each cat-
were invited to formulate neighborhood sustainability goals           egory and produce a final list of goals. This process involved
and design tools to measure progress toward achieving these           re-locating certain issues to other categories, re-phrasing
consensus-based goals.                                                some of them, and finally, achieving consensus on a list of
During the first stakeholders meeting, the Imagine Flatbush           goals that covered all topics discussed at the tables. At the end
2030 partners initiated the discussion by encouraging partici-        of the meeting, each group presented its goals to the overall
pants to identify what neighborhood assets and/or challenges          group, completing a first draft of the final list of goals.
were most important to them. This discussion provided a first         During the third and final workshop, the groups revised the
glimpse of the general concerns among participants.                   list of goals and made any corrections necessary. Once they
This initial conversation served as a bridge to a more detailed       had revised the goals, each group proceeded to discuss ways
workshop addressing the main quality of life issues affect-           of measuring progress toward each of these goals. In some
ing the neighborhood. At the end of this second event, the            cases, this focused on reducing or increasing the number of
conversation resulted in a list of “symptoms” describing Flat-        amenities or services available; while in others, the conver-
bush’s “health” in regards to the natural, social and economic        sation primarily concentrated on the resources required to
aspects of quality of life in the neighborhood. These thoughts        increase the community’s capacity to respond to its current
were documented and consolidated into a database that                 and future needs.
helped identify the main areas of concern--major categories           These discussions included considerations such as: the
to help structure the community’s vision toward a neighbor-           relevancy of standard measurements related to each topic;
hood sustainability agenda.                                           what local information would be required to measure these
After analyzing the information gathered, ten categories              particular themes; and any particular action that the group
emerged. These themes were used to organize the agenda.               could take in the near future, such as reaching out to other
These categories were:                                                stakeholders and/or gathering additional information, to start
• economic well-being;                                                measuring progress toward these goals.

• youth and educational attainment;                                   The following outline provides a more detailed description of
                                                                      what happened at each meeting:
• local environment;
• public health;
• housing access;
• civics;
• recreation;
• neighborhood diversity;
• mobility (getting around); and
• neighborhood character.



Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                   51
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             A/ Advisory Board Meeting 1




A/ Advisory Board Meeting 1
October 31, 2007


• During the first advisory board meeting, the MAS Plan-
  ning Center staff introduced the project to State Assem-
  bly member Rhoda Jacobs; State Assembly Jim Brennan;
  Special Assistant to State Senator Kevin Parker; Gretchen
  Maneval, Director of the Center for the Study of Brooklyn;
  Kevin Parris, Land Use Coordinator for the Brooklyn Bor-
  ough President’s Office; and Susan Siegel and Aga Trojinak
  from the Flatbush Development Corporation.
• The MAS Planning Center staff described the type of
  support envisioned for the advisory board. Flatbush De-
  velopment Corporation presented its affiliation with the
  project, and described its role in Imagine Flatbush 2030.
• There was a very positive reaction from the members of
  the advisory board, and a general commitment to support
  future outreach to publicize the project’s upcoming meet-
  ings.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                 52
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             B/ Stakeholder Meeting




B/ Stakeholder Meeting
November 19, 2007


• Imagine Flatbush 2030 kicked off on Monday, November
  19 at Temple Beth Emeth with a preliminary stakehold-
  ers meeting. (A list of approximately 150 stakeholders was
  cultivated with help from FDC, neighborhood groups, and
  elected officials. Stakeholders who attended were asked
  to serve as project ambassadors and assist with outreach
  for the next meeting.) Approximately 50 of those invited
  attended—representing Brooklyn College, tenant associa-
  tions, city government, homeowners associations, the
  local YMCA, merchants groups, community development
  groups, and civic and faith-based groups.
• After an introduction by the Planning Center staff to MAS,
  Jane Jacobs, and the goals of the project, UPROSE Execu-
  tive Director Elizabeth Yeampierre led a discussion of
  the meaning of neighborhood sustainability, the Mayor’s
  PlaNYC2030, and why neighborhoods need to create their
  own agendas to work in tandem with the Mayor’s plan.
• Attendees were asked to work in groups to brainstorm
  neighborhood assets and challenges, as a way of beginning
  a dialogue. Six groups produced observations that they
  first recorded on paper, then shared with the entire group
  at the end of the workshop.
• Shared observations about Flatbush’s assets included:
  diversity (cultural; economic; ethnic; racial; religious);
  proximity to Prospect Park; good public transportation;
  good schools; proximity to Brooklyn College; distinctive,
  historic neighborhood character; strong and active com-
  munity-based organizations; aesthetically pleasing; long
  tenure of many residents; and locally-owned businesses.
                                                                 • Some interesting macro-level impressions: the neighbor-
• Shared observations about challenges included: lack of            hood is large and varies in character and composition from
  neighborhood parks; school overcrowding; lack of space            place to place and consequently assets and challenges vary
  for artists; lack of active ways to engage youth; lack of         from place to place.
  space for public assembly, such as community, senior, and
                                                                 (For a detailed list of assets and challenges expressed at this
  youth centers; gentrification; lack of affordable housing;
                                                                 meeting, please refer to Appendix A.)
  traffic; achieving energy efficiency in buildings; gang activ-
  ity (both real and perceived); lack of parking; and inad-
  equate sanitation in some areas.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                           53
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             C/ Workshop 1




C/ Workshop 1
December 12, 2007


• Imagine Flatbush 2030 continued with its second meeting
  on Wednesday, December 12, 2007 at the Brooklyn College
  Student Center. Approximately 100 stakeholders attended,
  some new to the project.
• After a brief introduction by the Planning Center to MAS,
  Jane Jacobs, and the goals of the project, and an overview
  of neighborhood demographics, Elizabeth Yeampierre,
  Executive Director of United Puerto Rican Organization
  of Sunset Park and a member of the Mayor’s Sustainability
  Advisory Committee, then familiarized the group with
  some key terminology, including: sustainability, sustain-
  able communities, sustainable development, and indica-
  tors of community sustainability.
• Attendees were divided into five groups, where they were
  asked to work with a facilitator and note-taker to identify
  quality-of-life issues. Each individual had an opportunity
  to discuss the quality-of-life issue that concerned him or
  her the most.
• After the quality-of-life issues were identified, each table
  worked collectively to assign their quality-of-life issue to
  an applicable category area, i.e. housing, economy, recre-
  ation, etc. The goal of this exercise was to spot the over-
  lapping areas between the various quality-of-life issues
  and discuss their interconnectivity.
• After both exercises were completed, each facilitator led a
  discussion about why that interconnectivity is an impor-
  tant component of sustainability and gave a basic intro-
  duction to standard indicators and sustainability indica-
  tors. Facilitators also asked group members to think about
  groups that weren’t at the table and brainstorm ways of
  reaching out to those groups.
• Each table reported their work back to the group as a
  whole and the notes that were taken at each table were
  used to draft a preliminary outline of neighborhood goals.
(For a detailed list of quality of life issues expressed at this
meeting please refer to Appendix B.)




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                   54
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             D/ Workshop 2




D/ Workshop 2
January 24, 2008


• Imagine Flatbush 2030 continued with its second work-
  shop on Wednesday, January 24, 2008 at the Brooklyn
  College Student Center. Approximately 70 Flatbush
  participants attended, some new to the project. There
  were several non-English speaking participants, for whom
  translation service was provided.
• After a brief recap from Planning Center Director Eve
  Baron of the goals of the project and a viewing of a short
  film depicting the project thus far, Planning Center GIS
  Analyst/Planner Juan Camilo Osorio then familiarized
  participants with the process for the evening and the
  anticipated outcome: finalizing the goals of the Flatbush
  sustainability agenda. He then linked this work to what
  participants would be doing at the February 27 workshop:
  creating measures to assess progress toward these goals.
• Attendees were divided into seven groups, where they
  were asked to work with a facilitation team (one person
  from MAS or FDC and one person from the community)
  to prioritize and give final language to the quality-of-life
  issues identified in the previous workshop.
• Each individual participant had the opportunity to discuss
  the goals within the smaller group and to vote on how they
  would prioritize items. Groups also had the opportunity to
  confer with each other.
• Each table reported their work back to the group as a
  whole. Finalized goals from each group were collected and
  complied later into a single document.
• After several requests, the study area map was redrawn
  to include three large housing projects: Norma; Philip
  Howard; and Mansfield Gardens. With help from FDC, the
  MAS Planning Center presented the project to students
  at Erasmus High School on Wednesday, February 13 and
  invited them to the next workshop.
(For a detailed list of final goals produced at this meeting
please refer to Appendix C.)




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                   55
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             E/ Workshop 3




E/ Workshop 3
February 28, 2008


• The project continued with its third and final workshop.
  At the meeting, facilitators helped participants design
  sustainable indicators, or measures, to help assess prog-
  ress made toward the goals set in previous workshops.
  As presented, these measurements were discussed as
  advocacy tools that can be used to assess different types of
  actions, from city-initiated rezonings, to new social service
  programs, to proposals for private development, to perfor-
  mance of city agencies.
• Once again, attendees were divided into groups where
  they were asked to work with a facilitation team (one
  person from MAS or FDC and one person from the com-
  munity). This combination of professional experience in
  the topic, and local expertise regarding the history and
  existing condition of the neighborhood, represented an
  important resource to support the discussion at the tables.
• Participants recorded their conclusions on poster-sized
  printouts, which listed the group’s goals, some pre-fabri-
  cated measurements to help discussion, and criteria for
  designing sustainable measures. Each poster included
  space for recording the measures the group came up with;
  sources of local information; and future action steps.
• During this workshop, participants revised the list of goals
  under each of the tables and made final changes to the list
  of foals that constitute the main structure of the agenda.
• Other resources available for each participant were: an
  explanation of the criteria used to design sustainable mea-
  sures; a list of the final goals; a map of the neighborhood
  with the location of participants that has attended previ-
  ous IF2030 workshops; and a glossary of terms related
  with sustainability and working with indicators.
(For a detailed list of measurements and actions produced at
this meeting please refer to Appendix D.)




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                   56
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             F/ Follow-up Advisory Committee Meeting




F/ Follow-up Advisory Committee
Meeting
March 14, 2008
• The MAS Planning Center met with some members of the
  advisory group to receive their feedback on the process
  thus far, with the goal of incorporating their comments in
  the final report, and nurturing the development of a repli-
  cable model. The conversation focused on segments of the
  project that can be improved to facilitate discussion and
  deliberation among the project’s participants, consider-
  ations in the way the information should be analyzed and
  presented, and particular thoughts on some of the future
  next steps.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                             57
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030                                             G/ Community Board 14 Presentation




G/ Community Board 14
Presentation
May 5, 2008
• The MAS Planning Center, with support from FDC, pre-
  sented an update on Imagine Flatbush 2030 to the com-
  munity board. This presentation highlighted segments of
  the neighborhood agenda with a predominant land use
  component, in an attempt to connect these recommen-
  dations with the board discussion with the Dept. of City
  planning on an upcoming rezoning in the north Flatbush
  area.
• With this presentation the MAS Planning Center recom-
  mended the consideration of the goals in the neighbor-
  hood agenda for inclusion in the community district needs
  statement. Likewise, the MAS Planning Center requested
  the opportunity to present at the board’s committee meet-
  ings in order to focus on specific segments of the agenda.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                        58
6 – Imagine Flatbush 2030




7
Findings
(Goals; Indicators;
Measurements)
A/	    Economy
	      	 i.	 Economic	Well-Being
B/	    Environment
	      	 i.	 Local	Environment
	      	 ii.	 Public	Health
	      	 iii.	 Recreation
	      	 iv.	 Neighborhood	Character
C/	    Society
	      	 i.	 Youth	and	Educational	Attainment
	      	 ii.	 Housing	Access
	      	 iii.	 Civics
	      	 iv.	 Neighborhood	Diversity
	      	 v.	 Mobility
Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   59
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)




This section summarizes the work of the group during
the final workshop, where participants were asked to
use the priorities identified in previous workshops
to generate their own ideas about ways to measure
progress toward goals. Also, in response to previous
requests by participants to Planning Center staff for
more “actionable” items, we asked people to generate
ideas about next steps for each priority. These ideas
were used in part to generate the Imagine Flatbush 2030
Sustainability Action Agenda.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   60
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)                        A/ Economy




A/ Economy

i.	 Economic	Well-Being
The highest priority goal in this category was to maintain
both affordable housing and economic diversity, that people
felt could be best attained and by a wide range of incomes
around the median that can afford decent, safe and com-
fortable housing. People identified the Division of Housing
and Community Renewal; FDC; Housing Preservation and
Development; the Department of City Planning; and the New
York City Housing and Neighborhood Information Service
as sources of information. People felt that appropriate action
steps were to hold electeds accountable for creating afford-
able housing and maintaining economic diversity; to support
organizations that work toward inclusionary zoning (a regula-
tory tool to increase the supply of affordable housing through
zoning); and to work toward ensuring that all affected areas
in rezonings provide 30 percent affordable housing.
Local retail and entrepreneurship, as both a way to meet local
needs for goods and services and as a path toward individual
financial independence, were also identified as priorities.
People wanted better quality, diversity and variety of both
prepared and grocery items and local training and education
that strengthens small business and promotes entrepreneur-
ship. Action steps discussed were persuading businesses to
use customer surveys to track and respond to local needs in
the long term, and tracking the number of loans to small local
businesses.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                61
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)




B/ Environment

i.	 Local	Environment                                                 Another priority was open access to a range of public health
The highest priority goal in this category was dual: improved         services including education, prevention, and treatment. Dis-
air quality and reduced noise pollution. People felt that mea-        cussion here focused on critical needs for information. People
suring these items was best accomplished using data on asth-          felt that to measure progress toward this goal they would
ma rates; the number of air and noise complaints registered           need to identify the various treatment facilities and their spe-
to 311; and measurements of air quality. Potential sources            cialties: get data on how are these facilities are utilized and
for data identified were: Community Board 14; 311; Emer-              by whom; and understand how people accessed information
gency Medical Services; New York Police Department; and               about them. People felt that there was a great need for more
the Department of Health for asthma statistics. Action steps          information about the opportunities that exist for senior
identified were to review existing studies to track change;           centers and in home services; the location and fee structure
review 311 data to track change in number of water, air, and          for local recreational facilities; opportunities for exercise
noise complaints; and to review environmental impact studies          in public schools; a community health assessment; whether
prepared for development projects.                                    after school programs targeting health issues were available;
                                                                      and what public health resources exist at the city and state
Another priority to emerge was ensuring responsible con-
                                                                      level. City hospitals; Families First; local CBO’s were identi-
struction that results in healthy, energy-efficient buildings
                                                                      fied as sources of information. A possible action step was to
that respect neighborhood character. Potential measures are
                                                                      distribute public health information—direct mail and local
the number of LEED-certified and retrofitted buildings; lead-
                                                                      electeds, CBO’s; local merchants; community bulletin boards;
levels in blood; and the number of energy audits conducted
                                                                      to intergenerational and multilingual audiences.
each year. Possible sources of information are the Green
Building Council, and hospitals. This group identified encour-
aging the New York State Energy Research and Development              iii.			Recreation
Authority and energy providers to conduct more energy au-             The number one goal in the category of recreation was better
dits as an action step. A third priority to emerge was balanc-        community interaction. Ways to measure the level of commu-
ing environmental values with development values, measured            nity interaction were enumerating the number of community
by the number of Department of Building permits vs. number            events; the number of languages spoken in the neighbor-
of variances granted.                                                 hood; and the number of appeals for volunteers. Information
                                                                      sources include FDC; local electeds; and schools. Possible
                                                                      action steps were to get relevant information to multilin-
ii.	 Public	Health                                                    gual families through school-aged children; and to organize
The highest priority for public health was to ensure better
                                                                      school-centered meet and greet parties.
access to and availability of affordable food sources, including
food that comes from local sources. One suggested measure             Another goal was to create an information outlet about com-
was an inventory of all local vendors to ascertain who was            munity recreation opportunities. An associated action step
selling what to whom. Possible sources of data Business               was to include more local communities/block associations to
Improvement Districts; Department of Health; community-               get the word out.
based organizations (CBO’s); FDC; and the Department of
City Planning. Potential action steps identified were working
with the green market to conduct a survey of food needs, pro-
vide nutrition information, and more widely distribute infor-
mation about the availability of food assistance programs.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                 62
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)                        B/ Environment




iv.			Neighborhood	Character
The highest priority for neighborhood character was to
preserve the character of historic residential and commercial
structures and community institutions. A sustainable indica-
tor identified within the group was to measure the change in
public and private funding for local preservation. Potential
data sources were community organizations and historic
preservation agencies. An action step was to engage com-
munity organizations to encourage sustained allocations for
historic preservation.
Another sustainability goal was to promote harmony
between the historic and the newly-built private and public
structures, to be measured by the number of variance
requests. Potential data sources identified were DOB; the
Board of Standards and Appeals; CB14; and DCP. Two
action steps were to encourage contextual development by
proposing changes to zoning provisions and to draft design
guidelines that work to preserve aesthetics.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                    63
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)




C/ Society

i.	 Youth	and	Educational	Attainment                                  and user-friendly—“translated” into a one-page, community-
One priority goal for youth and educational development was           friendly fact sheet; to advocate for financial literacy forums;
improved youth development and youth services program,                and to ensure that local financial institutions use multiple
such as real world mentoring. Possible ways to measure                languages and hire locally.
progress were identifying the percentage of children engaged
in meaningful extra curricular activity; the number of clubs          iii.			Civics
and organizations that are available; the money available             The number one goal in this category is getting people to
for these programs accessibility of programs, while possible          become involved in their neighborhood. Indicators of prog-
data sources were CB14; surveys (including local changing             ress toward this goal rest on measuring the number of and
needs—parents and children); faith based organizations; non-          mapping all the religious, youth, and community based
profits; local politicians; focus groups; police department. One      organizations that exist and what problems they are trying to
possible action step was to use technology (e.g. myspace) to          solve. Potential sources of information are Community Board
increase awareness of programs.                                       14, FDC, library, block associations, elected officials, tenant
People were also focused on quality education for children            associations. Possible action steps are to form partnerships;
of all ages. Measuring that quality of available local educa-         organize speaker events (such as town hall meetings); arrange
tion could hinge on drop out rate; reading, science, math and         youth/adult mentors; organize community events; and form
social science scores; graduation rates; and levels of public         action committees.
assistance.                                                           Another sustainability goal was the creation of a plan to guide
                                                                      future development in the neighborhood. The plan would
ii.	 		Housing	Access                                                 need to address affordable housing, supportive housing, and
The highest priority goal in this category was housing that is        landmarks. An action step on the way to a plan is to hold city
safe, affordable, and can accommodate a range of household            planning accountable for downzoning and contextual and in-
sizes. Safety and affordability were acknowledged as related,         clusionary zoning (zoning that includes affordable housing).
but difficult to measure in tandem. To measure safety, people
identified the number of housing violations; the number of            iv.			Neighborhood	Diversity
fires reported; and NYPD crime statistics to provide a picture.       The highest priority in this category was maintaining and
To measure affordability: number of energy efficient build-           encouraging a diverse population, including race, ethnicity,
ings; percentage of neighborhood housing stock priced below           culture, ability, religion, age, sexual orientation, and income.
50 percent of Area Median Income. One action step was to              Potential indicators identified by participants for this goal
encourage a mix of bedroom sizes in new multi-unit develop-           hinged on measuring the number of different types of orga-
ment.                                                                 nizations: religious, political, cultural, service and support,
The second highest priority goal was to increase affordable           recreation, and educational; and tracking local participation
homeownership and affordable maintenance financing. Po-               in these organizations, with a focus on degree of access, and
tential sustainable measures for this goal include the number         determining whether these organizations are accurately
of banks/lending institutions in the community; relation-             targeting the needs of a diverse population. Potential data
ship between banks and non-profits; and median borrower               sources are census reports, elected officials, community
income. Possible data sources include Home Mortgage Dis-              organizations, religious institutions, community boards,
closure Act/Community Reinvestment Act reports (HMDA/                 schools, city and federal agencies. Social events, community
CRA); Department of Banking; financial institutions; state            welcoming events, meet and greets, special events, holidays,
and local realtors associations. As action steps, people wanted       etc., were identified as possible occasions to gather data from
to ensure that HMDA/CRA information is readily available              people about their involvement.


Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                 64
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)                        C/ Society




A secondary goal in this category was to maintain the strong
connections among the people within the neighborhood—a
sense of community, ownership, and caring across differ-
ences. This goal was difficult to quantify and measure because
social bonds underpin strong communities but are difficult
to quantify. Again, a central measure was seen to be tracking
participation in local events, programs, workshops, commu-
nity board meetings, and community gardening. Participants
thought that public offering of programs that targeted diver-
sity, customs, and traditions would result in strengthening of
connections.
Cultural expression through the arts was also perceived as
playing a critical role in maintaining neighborhood diversity,
and so participants prioritized encouraging arts-related de-
velopment for private and public expression.

v.	 	Mobility
Mobility as a category was as much about “getting around,”
i.e., moving from point A to point B within the neighborhood
and the ease or difficulty of using public transportation with
a physical challenge, and experiencing Flatbush streets as a
pedestrian, as it was about commuting to Manhattan. The
number one priority for the mobility part of the agenda was
more and better alternatives to traveling by car. A related ac-
tion step that this group wanted was to identify streets that
can accommodate alternative modes of transportation.
A secondary goal identified a specific traffic hot spot: par-
ticipants wanted to reduce traffic impact from local big box
stores and in the Junction. An associated action step was to
catalyze the big box stores themselves to encourage public
transit use.
(see Appendix D for a full listing of Actions and Measures.)




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                65
7 - Findings (Goals; Indicators; Measurements)




8
Working with
PlaNYC 2030
Opportunities




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   66
8 - Working with PlaNYC 2030 Opportunities




Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC was presented to the
public in April, 2007. The plan described the more
than 100 initiatives the Administration planned to
undertake in response to a growing population, an
aging infrastructure, a deteriorating environment,
and climate change.
PlaNYC and the Imagine Flatbush Sustainability
Agenda overlap in some important regards. Both
agendas seek to address housing, open space,
transportation, energy, and air quality. While the
Imagine Flatbush goes beyond PlaNYC in terms
of connecting the economy, affordability, the built
environment, and neighborhood diversity with
more traditional approaches to environmentalism,
the Mayor’s plan provides several opportunities
to begin implementing the Imagine Flatbush 2030
Sustainability Action Agenda.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   67
8 - Working with PlaNYC 2030 Opportunities




Housing                                                               Transportation
Transit-oriented rezonings are a centerpiece of the city’s plan       The city plans to improve transportation, in part, by promot-
to increase housing. The North Flatbush rezoning is an op-            ing cycling, managing roads more effectively, strengthen-
portunity to address the community’s desire for safe, afford-         ing enforcement of traffic violations, and facilitating freight
able housing that satisfies a range of incomes and household          movements. These are areas of overlap with the Flatbush
sizes.                                                                agenda, and could be good opportunities for neighborhood
The reforms to the city’s programs to encourage affordable            transportation advocacy.
housing construction through tax exemption have resulted              The city has also identified Church Avenue as a “congested
in over 400 properties in Flatbush becoming eligible for the          corridor” and has pledged to work with neighborhood stake-
421-a tax incentive program.                                          holders on improvements.
The new Center for New York City Neighborhoods provides               Energy
information and resources to address foreclosure at the               While few specific opportunities exist to implement Flat-
neighborhood level.                                                   bush’s energy efficiency goals, the city is taking steps to
Open	Space                                                            reduce energy usage of buildings. NYC’s construction code
MillionTreesNYC is targeting a 20 percent increase in the             was updated to include energy efficient measures and prac-
city’s tree coverage. There are opportunities to obtain, plant,       tices. The city also launched GreeNYC—a public outreach and
and maintain trees through this program.                              education campaign to inform the public about ways to save
                                                                      energy.
Additionally, new construction or substantial enlargement of
buildings triggers a new requirement to plant a street tree for       An important note for Flatbush—in the future, the city plans
every 25 feet of street frontage of the zoning lot.                   to encourage comprehensive energy audits, building up-
                                                                      grades, and updating lighting systems in commercial build-
The city’s goal of creating a public plaza in every community         ings.
may be a way for Flatbush to increase community open space.
The Department of Transportation has issued a Request for             Air	Quality
Proposals for local groups to develop public plazas, with             A major plank in the city’s plan to clean the air is to increase
public support.                                                       tree plantings on lots and to reforest select parkland areas.
                                                                      For more information, go to www.nyc.gov/PlaNYC2030




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                  68
8 - Working with PlaNYC 2030 Opportunities




9
Appendices


A/	    Assets	and	Challenges/Stakeholders	Meeting—November	19,	2007
B/	    Quality	of	Life	Issues/Workshop—December	12,	2007
C/	    Final	Goals/Workshop—January	24,	2008
D/	    Measures	and	Actions/Workshop—February	28,	2008
E/	    Handout/Designing	Sustainable	Measures
F/	    Handout/Glossary
G/	    List	of	Participants




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   69
Appendices




A/ Assets and Challenges/
Stakeholders Meeting
November 19, 2007
Attendees were asked to work in groups to brainstorm neighborhood assets and challenges.
This information was transcribed by the Planning Center and organized in the following table.




 Assets                                                               Challenges
 Urban Park                                                           Traffic and parking
 Diversity                                                            Old, not energy efficient homes
 Nice neighbors                                                       Struggle community strips
 Good public transportation                                           No distinctive community strips
 Historical character                                                 Perception of crime
 Arts program                                                         Limited recreation opportunities
 Very varied housing stock, largely in good condition                 No community center or outlet for teens
 Cultural diversity                                                   Not enough garbage cans on Church Ave.
 Socioeconomic diversity                                              Tree pits and untended trees
 Some wonderful schools                                               Limited transportation access
 Access to a major park facility                                      Transportation access
 Community involvement                                                Too many buses
 Tree canopy                                                          Remote police precinct
 Transportation access                                                Lack of public green space
 Locally owned business                                               Lack of protection of privately owned trees
 Good infrastructure                                                  Too much traffic
 Pretty neighborhood                                                  Inefficient use of road capacity
 Walkable streets                                                     Insufficient parking
 Relatively safe parts                                                Building conditions of multifamily proportions
 Accessibility to some health facilities                              Lack of affordable housing
 Accessibility to higher education                                    Aging of our housing stock
 Accessibility to multiple community events                           Lack of housing energy efficiency
 Accessibility to physical facility                                   Crime/drug related
 Density varying                                                      Limited access to health facilities




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                    70
Appendices                                                            A/ Assets and Challenges/Stakeholders Meeting




 Assets                                                               Challenges
 Peaked roofs for solar panels                                        Very high poverty rate in part/areas
 Quiet life                                                           Haphazard development
 Birds and wildlife                                                   Zoning issues/in appropriate no contextual
 Attractive housing                                                   Limited community meeting space, no real community!
 Affordable housing                                                   Lack of arts facilities
 Prospect park, parade grounds                                        Limited shopping
 Good different kinds of food                                         Limited entertainment
 Distinctive characters                                               Too many non Pro. Business
 Long term residents, local entrepreneurs                             Landlords: non-community focused (absentee)
 Homeownership – stake in community                                   Garbage stored on sidewalk
 Center for study of Brooklyn                                         Dirty sidewalks
 Sustainable Flatbush                                                 Dog waste
 Great schools                                                        Affordable housing is limited
 Prospect park                                                        Seated restaurants
 Lots of trees                                                        Pollution
 Transportation excellent buses and subways                           No community centers for youth and disabilities (in alking
                                                                      distance)
 Brooklyn college as a resource                                       Programs for new Americans/immigrants
 Artists (all)                                                        Foot patrol, uniformed police
 Blogs and list serve                                                 To few banks
 Beautiful neighborhood                                               Insufficient supermarkets
 Diverse! Cultural economy                                            Affordable houses
 Creative energy flowing                                              Gentrification
 Lack of high rises                                                   How can our neighborhood maintain/increase desirability
                                                                      without displacement of people




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                71
Appendices                                                            A/ Assets and Challenges/Stakeholders Meeting




 Assets                                                               Challenges
 Less people                                                          Dealing with the effects of development
 Transportation                                                       Mora art, cultural activates
 Diversity                                                            Places for people to gather – public spaces –
 Park                                                                 More high schools
 Pharmacies                                                           Senior centers
 Police                                                               Lack of access to green space/develop retail air conditioners
                                                                      hanging out of windows
                                                                      Energy efficiency and energy education
                                                                      Retro fitting housing to be more energy efficient
                                                                      Need bike paths
                                                                      Overcrowded schools
                                                                      Gangs, security issues
                                                                      Bridging electronic divide
                                                                      Disengaged youth – untapped resource
                                                                      No place for artist to convene
                                                                      Community impact/ ___ of people knowing development
                                                                      Information
                                                                      Retail – what kind of size of store
                                                                      Parking
                                                                      South has no park
                                                                      Police
                                                                      Better sanitation in a denser population




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                   72
Appendices




B/ Quality of Life Issues/Workshop
December 12, 2007


The following list of quality of life issues was recorded at the tables by the facilitators in the form of working notes. Staff from
the Planning Center performed minor editing to provide additional context, when necessary.




•	 Need for a source of neighborhood information                       •	 Need to control heavy traffic
•	 Need to deal more actively with illegal drug activity.              •	 Need to reduce noise; increase sanitation (especially dog own-
                                                                          ers); reduce hunger (especially among elderly); address high
•	 Need to preserve affordable housing
                                                                          percentage of income spent on rent; address poverty among the
•	 Lack of youth development and career preparation                       elderly.
•	 Need for more senior programs                                       •	 Need to increase affordability; need to maintain diversity; need
•	 Lack of business training fundamentals for youth & foreign             to improve sanitation; need to diversify types of businesses on
   residents                                                              Flatbush Ave.; need to spread banks around.

•	 Need to maintenance diversity                                       •	 Need to increase affordable housing; need to preserve affordable
                                                                          housing; need to identify means of avoiding displacement; need
•	 Lack of an Arts District/Lack of exhibit space for artists to im-      to reduce noise; increase publicly accessible neighborhood green
   pact on economic development                                           space; plant more trees.
•	 Need for reducing truck traffic on Caton Avenue                     •	 Insufficient information
•	 Need to reduce heavy traffic on Church and Caton                    •	 Need to preserve greatest asset--diversity of the neighborhood,
•	 Need to address how local businesses fit into redevelopment of         meaning people and types of housing. Need to protect parts of
   the area                                                               Victorian Flatbush not covered by historic district.
•	 Need to address litter, and neighborhood sanitation (regular        •	 Need to address affordable housing. Need to find fun things for
   trash pick up for city-owned waste receptacles)                        kids to do, i.e., bike riding.
•	 Need to reduce crime--both gang and domestic                        •	 Need to maintain street cleanliness; need to preserve affordabil-
                                                                          ity and avoid displacement; need to increase food access.
•	 Need for cleaner air
                                                                       •	 Insufficient information
•	 Need for additional green space
                                                                       •	 Need to reduce noise; wants more parking; need to increase ac-
•	 Need for senior citizen programs
                                                                          tivities for children in the neighborhood; need to bring landlords
•	 Need to reduce number of feral cats                                    into discussions of affordability.
•	 Insufficient library hours                                          •	 Need to increase public space for assemble, especially for youth.
•	 Education--No Intermediate School in North Flatbush                    Need to work on noise reduction.

•	 Post office overcrowding                                            •	 Need to ensure reasonable pace of change.

•	 Need for affordable housing                                         •	 Need to preserve historical homes

•	 Need to improve air quality                                         •	 Need to diversify the housing stock commercially while respect-
                                                                          ing established community without gentrification
•	 Need to control litter
                                                                       •	 Continuation of community (prevent gentrification)
•	 Need to support youth development
                                                                       •	 Need for new location with swimming pool, educational and
•	 Need to control violence                                               fitness needs
•	 Need for immigrant training
Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                          73
Appendices                                                               B/ Quality of Life Issues/Workshop




•	 Prevent gentrification, sustain community, through the political      •	 Abandoned housing; Impact of large retail stores in Junction on
   development of local candidates (leaders)                                congestion, noise, pollution, etc.
•	 Need to reduce noise pollution, (Ocean Ave), and for transporta-      •	 Preservation of housing stock
   tion regulation (calming traffic)                                     •	 Noise pollution and crime
•	 Need for transportation integration of East and West                  •	 Diversity, Community, Affordability, Congestion, Pollution,
•	 Need to improve the quality of affordable housing and economic           Keeping the green of Flatbush
   (competitiveness) of local business                                   •	 Appropriate development, Sanitation at Junction, Open space,
•	 Need for community diversity without disparity, sustainable              Accessibility of Brooklyn College
   agriculture, local food production                                    •	 Illegal housing/Affordability of housing, Security/Police pres-
•	 Need for affordable housing, and to improve the quality of educa-        ence in neighborhood
   tion                                                                  •	 Need for a green neighborhood
•	 Need for local identity and local business, spaces for youth, land    •	 Sustaining the merchant quality, wants to see merchants in the
   and resources usage                                                      community give better services to customers in the community
•	 Need to improve/increase local business, affordable housing, rec-     •	 Crime and noise
   reational opportunity, public transportation
                                                                         •	 Transportation - housing and open space, transportation (mass
•	 Need to increase parking, affordable housing, and prevent gen-           transit)
   trification
                                                                         •	 Mortgage crisis
•	 Need to improve the quality of homes architecture, low quality
   architecture, education on AIDS prevention, services for gays/        •	 Neighborhood patrol, arbor day, garage sales, know neighbors
   lesbian, sexuality education., services                                  well- want to keep this
•	 Congestion in junction                                                •	 Don’t have commercial services, open space, parks
•	 Safe, healthy housing for people with sensitivities (allergies,       •	 Preserving the Victorian Flatbush homes, active in zoning to pro-
   asthma ,etc.)                                                            tect against housing being demolished, and landmarking, wants
                                                                            more access to Brooklyn College, where do kids play now??
•	 Affordable housing/development
                                                                         •	 Working to landmark Victorians, like diversity, good transporta-
•	 Prosperity of the commercial corridor in Junction                        tion, more commercial viability that’s representative of needs of
•	 Preservation of housing stock as it is to retain Victorian look,         the community (i.e. grocery store bad produce), don’t want to see
   prevent inappropriate development (Historic preservation)                it over developed
•	 Personal impact on sustainability e.g. recycling, composting, etc.    •	 Would be upset to loose the lovely houses and trees, good that
                                                                            dev.
•	 Transportation: more bikes, less cars, Curbing use of plastic bags.
                                                                         •	 Where do kids play?
•	 Maintaining neighborhood character and diversity
                                                                         •	 Education
•	 Smart development, having plan proactive for development
                                                                         •	 Lack of amenities
•	 Maintaining sense of community/ “neighborhoodiness”

Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                           74
Appendices




C/ Final Goals/Workshop
January 24, 2008


The goals in this list were initially formulated from the quality of life issues recorded in Workshop 1, and finalized by the par-
ticipants of Workshop 2. Finally, they were revisited and modified as part of the exercise developed in Workshop 3.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                              75
Appendices                                                            C/ Final Goals/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                             76
Appendices




D/ Measures and Actions/
Workshop
February 28, 2008
The following measures and actions were recorded during Workshop 3 on poster-size sheets. This information was tran-
scribed later into digital tables by the Planning Center.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                    77
Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                      78
Appendices                                                                         D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




                                                                                                                              A project sponsored by:




                                              Local Environment                                          For more information on the project visit: www.mas.org/imagineflatbush

   Goals                                  Sustainable Measure                      Sources of Local Information                Future Action Steps
                                          Asthma rates.                            CB14; 311; EMS; NYPD                        Review existing studies to track change.
   1. Improved air quality and reduced    Air and noise complaints registered to   CMAQ/DOT Church Avenue                      Review 311 data to track change in
   noise pollution.                       311.                                     DOH for asthma stats                        number of water, air, and noise
                                          Measurements of air quality.                                                         complaints.
                                                                                                                               Review environmental impact studies
                                                                                                                               prepared for development projects.
                                          Number of LEED-certified and retrofitted Green Building Council                      Encourage NYSERTA and energy
   2. Responsible construction that       buildings.                               Hospitals                                   providers to conduct more energy audits.
   results in healthy, energy-efficient   Lead-levels in blood.
   buildings that respect neighborhood    Number of energy audits conducted each
   character.
                                          year.

                                          DOB permits vs. number of variances      DOB                                         Monitor permits.
   3. Balancing environmental values      granted.
   with development values.



                                          Map/inventory public, vacant,            Survey vacant land.                         Submit suggestions for community use of
   4. Better use of public, vacant, and   underutilized space.                                                                 space to neighborhood associations and
   underutilized space.                                                                                                        community board.


                                          DOT traffic studies.                     DOT                                         Evaluate rate of change, as documented
   5. Reduced truck traffic and reduced   Number of accidents involving            TA                                          in reports.
   traffic in general.                    pedestrians.
                                          Number of truck routes vs. number of bus
                                          routes and bike routes.

                                          Number of trees and acres of grass in    OASIS                                       Track number of new trees planted.
   6. More gardens and more trees.        area.                                                                                Track change over time of open space
                                                                                                                               ratio.




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Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                      80
Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




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Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




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Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                      83
Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                      84
Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                      85
Appendices                                                            D/ Measures and Actions/Workshop




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                      86
Appendices




E/ Handout/Designing Sustainable
Measures
The following design guidelines were produced by the Planning Center to support the exercises devel-
oped in Workshops 2 and 3.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                    87
Appendices




F/ Handout/Glossary

The following glossary was produced by the Planning Center to support the exercises developed in
Workshops 2 and 3.




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                88
Appendices




G/ List of Participants

                         First Name          Last Name                Organization/Affiliation
 Observer                F.                  McNeal                   Significant Business Results, LLC
 Stakeholder             A.                  Cleary                   Prospect Park South Committee
 Stakeholder             A.                  Martin                   Resident
 Stakeholder             A.                  Thomas                   Resident
 Stakeholder             A.                  Gaudet                   Caton Park Home Owners Assocation
 Stakeholder             A.                  Venesky                  Resident
 Stakeholder             A.                  Ashitey                  Resident
 Stakeholder             A.                  Celestine                Resident
 Stakeholder             B.                  Sheeran                  Resident
 Stakeholder             B.                  Cape                     Resident
 Stakeholder             C.                  Venning                  Fahari Academy Charter School
 Stakeholder             C.                  Charles                  Washington Mutual
 Stakeholder             C.                  Cortez                   Resident
 Stakeholder             C.                  Collins                  Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             C.                  Kreussling               Beverly Square West
 Stakeholder             C.                  Young                    Resident
 Stakeholder             C.                  Hylton                   FDC
 Stakeholder             C.                  Etienne                  Resident
 Stakeholder             D.                  Pagan                    Resident
 Stakeholder             D.                  Leman                    Resident
 Stakeholder             D.                  Nondlell                 Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             D.                  Bullard                  Resident
 Stakeholder             D.                  Roberts                  Resident
 Stakeholder             D.                  Jourdain                 Flatbush YMCA
 Stakeholder             E. B.               Kennedy                  Caton Park Home Owner Association
 Stakeholder             E.                  Kramer                   Brooklyn Junction
 Stakeholder             E.                  Tufino                   Resident
 Stakeholder             E.                  Martinez                 Resident
 Stakeholder             E.                  Lea                      Resident
 Stakeholder             E.                  O'Donnell-Fitz           Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             E.                  Skinner                  South Midwood Residents Association
 Stakeholder             E.                  Gallimore                Signifigant Business Results



Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                         89
Appendices                                                             G/ List of Participants




                         First Name          Last Name                Organization/Affiliation
 Stakeholder             F.                                           Caton Park Home Owners Association
 Stakeholder             F.                  Perry                    Our Lady of Refuge Roman Catholic Church
 Stakeholder             F.                  Bartholom                Resident
 Stakeholder             F.                  Leman                    Resident
 Stakeholder             F.                  Jump                     Fading Ad Blog
 Stakeholder             F.                  Baer                     Fiske Terrace Association
 Stakeholder             G.                  Harris                   Resident
 Stakeholder             G.                  Ssucher                  Ditmas Park West
 Stakeholder             G.                  Stewart                  Caton Park Association
 Stakeholder             G.                  Wolin                    Beverley Square West
 Stakeholder             H.                  Schiffman                Resident
 Stakeholder             J.                  Katz                     Resident
 Stakeholder             J.                  Mann                     Church Avenue BID
 Stakeholder             J.                  Leonard                  280 E. 21st Tenants Group
 Stakeholder             J.                  Heineman                 Resident
 Stakeholder             J.                  Stratfford               Resident
 Stakeholder             J.                  Grassman                 Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             J.                  Jean                     Ditmas Park West
 Stakeholder             J.                  Cordova-Kramer           Resident
 Stakeholder             J.                  Wills                    Brooklyn College/History Dept.
 Stakeholder             J.l                 Siegel                   Ditmas Park West
 Stakeholder             J.                  Sweet                    Resident
 Stakeholder             J.                  Wright                   South Midwood Residents Association
 Stakeholder             J.                  Hendricks                Resident
 Stakeholder             K..                 Lherisson                Resident
 Stakeholder             K.                  John                     Resident
 Stakeholder             K.                  Walker                   HSBC
 Stakeholder             K.                  Marzagao                 Sustainable Flatbush
 Stakeholder             K.                  Webb                     Resident
 Stakeholder             L.                  Leathers                 Naehe
 Stakeholder             L.                  Harris                   Bold Hope Comm. Coalition
 Stakeholder             L.                  Stanley                  Brave New World Theatre



Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                              90
Appendices                                                             G/ List of Participants




                         First Name          Last Name                Organization/Affiliation
 Stakeholder             L.                  Norsworthy               Resident
 Stakeholder             L.                  Schere                   Brooklyn College Sustainable Flatbush
 Stakeholder             L.                  Iglehart                 Ditmas Park West
 Stakeholder             L.                  Goodman                  Midwood Development Corp
 Stakeholder             L.                  Lusher                   Resident
 Stakeholder             L.                  Baily-Schiffman          Resident
 Stakeholder             L.                  Raphael                  Flatbush/Nostrand Junction BID
 Stakeholder             L.                  Lowe                     Resident
 Stakeholder             L.                  Martinez                 St. Marks Head Start
 Stakeholder             M.                  De Los Angeles           Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                  Sartori - Spencer        Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                  McMichael                Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                  Dicus                    CAMBA
 Stakeholder             M.                  Levy                     Sustainable Flatbush
 Stakeholder             M.                  Schreibuan               Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             M.                  Cullinan                 MDC
 Stakeholder             M.                  Edme                     HSBC
 Stakeholder             M.                  Lardner                  Sustainable Flatbush
 Stakeholder             M.                  Severe                   Happa
 Stakeholder             M.                  Southwood                Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                  Matthews                 Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                  Tufino                   Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                                           Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             M.                  Tomkiewicz               Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             M.                                           Resident
 Stakeholder             M.                  Muller                   Gotham Gazette
 Stakeholder             M.                  Heilbron                 Resident
 Stakeholder             N.                  Campbell                 Resident
 Stakeholder             N.                  Jezin-Jacqes             Resident
 Stakeholder             N.                  Allbray                  Resident
 Stakeholder             N.                  Simon                    Prospect Lefferts Gardens Neighborhood Assoc.
 Stakeholder             N.                  Hosten                   Brooklyn College
 Stakeholder             O.                  Durand                   Resident


Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                   91
Appendices                                                             G/ List of Participants




                         First Name          Last Name                Organization/Affiliation
 Stakeholder             O.                  Flores                   Resident
 Stakeholder             P.                  Brown-Laurenceau         Brooklyn College 42 A.D. Political Club
 Stakeholder             P.                  Akson                    Resident
 Stakeholder             P.                  Pieroni                  Brooklyn College Now Program
 Stakeholder             R.                  Fernandez                Resident
 Stakeholder             R.                  Silverman                SMRA
 Stakeholder             R.                  Silverman                Resident
 Stakeholder             R.                  Gochfeld                 Ditmas Park West
 Stakeholder             R.                  Newman                   South Midwood Residents Association,CB14
 Stakeholder             R.                  Pottinger                Resident
 Stakeholder             R.                  Waldron                  42nd A.D. Democratic Club
 Stakeholder             R.                  Burnett                  Resident
 Stakeholder             R.                  Davies-Adewebi           Resident
 Stakeholder             R.                  Champagnie               Resident
 Stakeholder             S.                  Houghteling              Resident
 Stakeholder             S.                  Abramson                 Resident
 Stakeholder             S.                  Harris                   Ditmas Park West
 Stakeholder             S.                  Burgoyne                 Prospect Park South Committee
 Stakeholder             S.                  Daley                    Flatbush YMCA
 Stakeholder             S.                  Levine                   Campus Rd. Community Garden
 Stakeholder             S.                  Hamilton-Gonzales        PDPA
 Stakeholder             T.                  Courtenay                Resident
 Stakeholder             T.                  Valentino                South Midwood Residents Association
 Stakeholder             T.                  Lee                      Resident
 Stakeholder             T.                  Sharpe                   Resident
 Stakeholder             V.                  Findlay                  Resident
 Stakeholder             V.                  Robinson                 Resident
 Stakeholder             W.                                           Resident
 Stakeholder             W.                  Duroseau                 DOE
 Stakeholder             Y.                  Gallimoe                 FDC Volunteer
 Stakeholder             Y.                  Murray                   Vanderveer Place Block Association
 Stakeholder             Y.                  Tucker                   Resident
 Stakeholder             Z.                  McNally                  Resident


Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                              92
Appendices




10
Resources




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009   93
Resources




For additional information on                                         New	York	City	Local	Law	86
                                                                      Describes green building standards for New York City proj-
sustainability:                                                       ects.
                                                                      http://www.nyc.gov/html/dob/downloads/pdf/11_86of2005.
Community	Tool	Box                                                    pdf
Excellent resource for each stage of community organization.
Free resources and networking for people working to develop
healthier, more sustainable communities. Tips and tools for
                                                                      Sustainable	Communities	Network
                                                                      Tools for community action, a guide to planning a sustainable
creating neighborhood coalitions, help in developing strategic
                                                                      event, fact sheets on ways to reduce global warming, smart
plans, advice on increasing membership, help evaluating and
                                                                      growth, growing a sustainable
sustaining the initiatives once they are developed.
(http://ctb.ku.edu/)                                                  economy and many others.
                                                                      http://www.sustainable.org
Creating	Sustainable	Community	Programs:		
Examples	of	Collaborative	Public	Administration Sustainable	Urban	Neighborhoods	Initiative	
Mark R. Daniels (ed.) In-depth case studies of successful (SUNI)
sustainable community programs. Many of the programs ex-              One of the programs developed by Sustainable Seattle to con-
ist through government funding or regulation, one —“Food              nect with neighborhoods, collect data, and present informa-
Gatherers”—is a purely voluntary, non-profit program with-            tion about neighborhood health and sustainability.
out any government funding.
                                                                      http://www.sustainableseattle.org/Programs/SUNI/
International	Council	for	Local	Environmental	
                                                                      Transportation	Alternatives
Initiatives	(ICLEI)                                            Includes Maps, travel tips, crashstat crash maps, legal advice,
Website includes an information clearinghouse, summaries of
                                                               and calendar of upcoming walks and rides in the NYC area
local government projects addressing environmental and de-
velopment issues, and “Tools for a Sustainable Community,”     http:www.transalt.org/info/index.html
and web conferences. There is also a page for calculating your
ecological footprint.                                          United	Nations	Commission	on	Sustainable	
http://www.iclei.org/                                                 Development
                                                                      Created to provide follow up on the 1992 The Earth Summit
International	Institute	for	Sustainable	                              in Rio. In addition to a list of sustainability indicators, the web
                                                                      site has links to many UN sites related to sustainability.
Development	(IISD)
IISD is a non-profit organization established and supported           http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/
by the Governments of Canada and Manitoba. A great starting
place for web-based information on sustainable development,           Worldwatch	Institute
IISD has a number of documents on world wide sustainable              Nonprofit t public policy research organization working on
development/community projects available for a fee in hard            sustainability issues. Publishes World Watch magazine, the
copy format. Includes the Bellagio Principles for sustainable         annual Vital Signs and State of the World reports, as well as
community indicator development.                                      the World Watch Series on particular issues. Excellent source
http://www.iisd.org/default.asp                                       of detailed information about sustainability issues.
                                                                      http://www.worldwatch.org/
Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                   94
Resources




For additional information on working                                 Sustainable	Development	Indicators-
                                                                      Interagency	Working	Group
with sustainability indicators:                                       Additional resources on sustainable indicators in the U.S.A.
There are various models for working with sustainability              http://www.sdi.gov
indicators. The following list highlights some of the most
common resources for the evaluation and design of sustain-            Energy	Matters
ability evaluation.                                                   An e-news and web resource center providing practical infor-
                                                                      mation about how to make your building more financially sus-
Guide	to	Sustainable	Community	Indicators                             tainable and environmentally friendly, most of all by reducing
Haart, Maureen. Guide to Sustainable Community Indicators.            energy use.
2006. Sustainable Measures: West Hartford, CT.                        http://www.prattcenter.net/energy-matters.php

Developing	Indicators	of	Urban	Sustainability	
Maclaren, V.W., S. Labatt, J. McKay and M. Vande Vegte.               For additional common questions and
1996. Developing Indicators of Urban Sustainability: A Focus          resources regarding the collection of
On The Canadian Experience. Prepared for Environment
Canada, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation; Inter-               data:
governmental Committee on Urban and Regional Research
for Measuring Urban Sustainability: Canadian Indicators               Has	the	data	required	to	use	the	indicator	been	
Workshop, June 19-21, 1995. ICURR Press: Toronto.
                                                                      gathered/created	by	someone	else	already?	Do	
                                                                      you	recall	any	studies	on	the	subject	that	might	
International	Institute	for	Sustainable	
                                                                      have	used	this	information	in	the	past?
Development	(IISD)
Comprehensive list of principles for the design of sustain-           Some examples would be a land-use study, a community pro-
able indicators, and compendium of sustainable development            file, a particular survey.
indicator initiatives and publications.
http://www.iisd.ca                                                    If	so,	who	gathered	the	data	and	for	what	
                                                                      purpose	was	this	data	gathered?	Is	the	data	
United	Nations	Department	of	Economic	and	                            objective,	or	could	it	be	affected	by	a	particular	
Social	Affairs                                                        interest(s)	driving	its	collection?
From Theory to Practice: Indicators of Sustainable Develop-           Government agencies are usually neutral data collectors that
ment                                                                  most likely will provide a detailed and complete illustration of
http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/indi6.htm                               the phenomena studied. On the contrary, private data collec-
                                                                      tion can sometimes be less comprehensive, and might focus
                                                                      on a particular aspect of the phenomenon to satisfy the col-
                                                                      lector’s interest(s).




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                  95
Resources




When	was	the	dataset	created?	Is	this	dataset	                        what would this number be, provided that factors affecting
updated	periodically?	How	often?	What	                                major changes in the size of the population (immigration,
                                                                      migration, etc) remain constant.
determines	the	periodicity	of	its	collection,		
and	why?	                                                             The following list constitutes the most common data re-
                                                                      sources available for your community. Some of them produce
Depending on the specific characteristics of the phenomenon           information at the federal and state levels, but most of these
in question the data can become outdated very quickly, or             figures can be applied to smaller communities--namely com-
rather remain up to date for long periods of time. In conse-          munity district, and the census tract, among others. Most like-
quence, it is important to evaluate the extent to which an old        ly, these datasets are maintained periodically on an annual,
date of collection might reveal the accuracy of the dataset.          bi-annual, and sometimes on a decennial basis. It is very likely
                                                                      that you can find more updated information from other orga-
How	was	the	information	gathered?	What	                               nizations/groups working at the neighborhood level. This use
methodology	was	employed?	Was	this	a	                                 of this information, however, should always take place taking
systematic/scientific	procedure?	How	                                 into account the considerations discussed above.
comprehensive	was	the	population/area/period	                         Additional	Federal	data	sources	for	planning	are:
surveyed?                                                             •	 U.S. Census Bureau (www.census.gov)
Datasets that derive from scientific studies are most likely to
                                                                      •	 Environmental Protection Agency (www.epa.gov)
gather information systematically, and therefore guarantee
a certain levels of accuracy. However, the purpose of these           •	 Bureau of Economic Affairs (www.bea.gov)
studies might allow narrowing the population/area/period              •	 Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov)
surveyed (the use of samples), limiting in turn wider conclu-
sions about these targets as a whole. Nevertheless, recogniz-
                                                                      •	 Department Housing and Urban Development
                                                                         (www.hud.gov)
ing these limitations, and understanding the implications that
might derive, allows a decent level of generalization.

If	the	exact	data	required	does	not	exist,	can	
the	project	use	a	similar	dataset	collected	for	a	
slightly	different	purpose?	Is	there	another	way	
of	identifying	the	data	in	question?
Sometimes, a certain phenomenon might not have been mea-
sured directly. Yet, there could be strategic ways to measure it
indirectly, or make projections from existing datasets. Let us
say, for example, that the project requires knowing the total
population in a given neighborhood. This number can be ob-
tained by analyzing the trend for previous years and establish




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                                96
Resources




Other data sources specifically related                               Ecological	Footprint	Analysis
                                                                      is an excellent way to become educated about how consump-
with sustainability:                                                  tion relates to environmental carrying capacity. Ecological
                                                                      Footprint analysis shows the actual land area—the footprint—
New	York	State	Ambient	Air	Quality	Standards                          necessary to support our consumption patterns. It is a very
New York State Ambient Air Quality Standards are provided             effective way of seeing the hidden costs to society, the envi-
online at the NY State Department of Environmental Conser-            ronment, and related parts of the economy of our choices and
vation’s website:                                                     lifestyle. Ecological Footprint is a tool being used by many
                                                                      communities to measure the impacts of consumption patterns
http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dar/baqs/aqreport/
                                                                      and help develop strategies to solve the larger issues facing
aaqstd.html
                                                                      their communities. Ecological Footprint calculators are avail-
Region 2 (New York City) air quality data is also provided,           able online for individuals or communities.
broken down by nine pollutants monitored throughout the
                                                                      http://www.myfootprint.org/
city. New York City Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) is responsible for monitoring and implementing air              Alternative resources might be available from people who
quality standards throughout the city and has data describing         work on sustainability issues on a local basis, such as eco-
which areas are in non-attainment for air quality standards.          nomic development corporations, civic organizations,
                                                                      environmental groups, business groups, nonprofit organiza-
                                                                      tions, religious organizations, and other government agencies
Water	Quality	Standards
                                                                      (different from the ones above.)
New York City Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) published a Harbor Water Quality report in 2003. This
report, available online, describes the main pollution sources
in New York waterways and provides maps and other graph-
ics detailing where pollution sources are.
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/hwqs/hqws2003.html




Imagine Flatbush 2030 / A Report to the Neighborhood / January 2009                                                               97
Resources




The	Municipal	Art	Society	of	New	York
457 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022
T/ 212-935-3960
F/ 212-753-1816
E/ info@mas.org
MAS.org




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