; Driver Education Curriculum Guide
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Driver Education Curriculum Guide

VIEWS: 446 PAGES: 33

  • pg 1
									  Driver Education Curriculum Guide
                                 North: DE0D01, DE0D03


                                 West: DE1D01, DE1D03



Course Description: The classroom, range and behind-the-wheel phases of Driver
Education are offered in an integrated program for a full semester. Content includes
existing and proposed rules of the road, physical and mental factors affecting the driver,
concepts necessary for safe motoring, understanding of the functioning of the motor
vehicle, teaching of motor skills, visual skills, application of laws, driving emergencies,
accurate judgments and properly-timed correct responses. Students will need to be
scheduled for the course by their counselor. Generally, those sophomores who are 15
years old at the beginning of the class can be scheduled for Driver Education.



                   District 219
          Niles Township High Schools
Niles North High School & Niles West High School
              Skokie, Illinois 60077

                                                                 Prepared by:
                                                                  Mario Faso
                                                                   Ed Toledo
                                                            Bryan Wittersheim

                                                                         Director:
                                                                    Paul Swanson
                                                                     August, 2009

                                             1
                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

Driver Education Course Description.………………………........................................3

Driver Education Enrollment Requirements …...………………………….…………..3

Explanation of District 219 3-Phase Driver Education Program…….…………………4

Classroom Rules and Procedures…………………………………………...……….…6

Driver Education Student Learning Targets….…… ………….………………..……..8

Classroom Units of Instruction ………………………………………………….…….9

Unit 1…………………………………………………………………………………10

Unit 2…………………………………………………………………………………14

Unit 3…………………………………………………………………………………19

Unit 4…………………………………………………………………………………25

Multiple Car Range Curriculum of Instruction ……..…………………………….....30

Behind The Wheel Curriculum of Instruction ...……………...………………..........31




                                            2
                  DRIVER EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTION

                                     3 Phase Program

       I.      Classroom – 30 hours – 45 classes
               Multiple Car Range – 12 days
               Behind the Wheel Session - 6
               Textbook -- Drive Right 11th Edition
               Workbook -- Drive Right Workbook 11th Edition
               Open to Grade 9-12
               Course Title: North: Driver Education DE0D01, DE0D03
                             West: Driver Education DE1D01, DE1D03
               Grade Weight : None
               Number of Semesters: 1
               Number of Credits: 0

Prerequisites: Meet age requirement. There is a user fee of $350 which must be paid to
the Bookkeeper prior to receiving the permit packet. No grace period is in effect. If, for
some reason, a student decides not to take Driver Education, he/she must return the
permit application packet in order to receive a refund. Students must be 15 years old at
the beginning of the class. Additionally, no student will be enrolled unless he/she has
passed a minimum of eight (8) courses during the previous two semesters.
Freshmen that will turn 15 years old by the start of the second semester are eligible
to enroll in the class provided they meet the requirement of passing (8) courses
between the last semester of junior high and the fall semester of high school.

Note: The classroom grade for Driver Education is included in the unweighted
(honor roll) grade point average.

Course Description: The classroom, range and behind-the-wheel phases of Driver
Education are offered in an integrated program for a full semester. Content includes
existing and proposed rules of the road, physical and mental factors affecting the driver,
concepts necessary for safe motoring, understanding of the functioning of the motor
vehicle, teaching of motor skills, visual skills, application of laws, driving emergencies,
accurate judgments and properly-timed correct responses. Students will need to be
scheduled for the course by their counselor. Generally, those sophomores who are 15
years old at the beginning of the class can be scheduled for Driver Education.




                                             3
                         District 219 Driver Education Program


The Driver Education Program in District 219 is made up of three phases: classroom,
multiple car range, and behind the wheel. Content includes existing and proposed rules
of the road, physical and mental factors affecting the driver, concepts necessary for safe
motoring, understanding of the functioning of the motor vehicle, teaching of motor skills,
visual skills, application of laws, driving emergencies, accurate judgments and properly-
timed correct responses. Students are scheduled for the course by their counselor.

   There are a total of forty-five classroom days of which a student must attend forty
    sessions. Students missing more than five classroom sessions will be dropped from
    the course.
   There are a total of twelve multiple car range lessons. During range lessons students
    learn and practice basic, advanced, and emergency procedures.
   There are a total of six behind-the-wheel lessons. Behind-the-wheel lessons are
    designed to incorporate the skills learned on the multiple car range in realistic traffic
    situations.


Sample Program

   Students are given numerical numbers and divided into groups of ten on the first day
    of the course. These numbers are utilized to schedule the students for their multiple
    car range and behind-the-wheel lessons. Students begin driving on the second day of
    the course and everyday thereafter.
   Students are given a daily schedule for the length of the course detailing where they
    should be on any given day. A sample schedule is attached for the second semester
    of 2001 and an example of a typical week in the Driver Education program.
   Jan. 22 all students are in the classroom.
   Jan. 23 all students report to the classroom and students numbered 1 & 2 report to
    behind-the-wheel.
   Jan. 24 all students report to the classroom and students numbered 3 & 4 report to
    behind-the-wheel.
   Jan. 25 There is no classroom on this day. Students numbered 1-10 are driven to the
    range at Niles West H. S., while students numbered 11 & 12 report to behind-the-
    wheel. Students not participating in range or behind-the-wheel lessons report to The
    Point, IRC, or cafeteria for study hall.
   Jan. 26 all students report to the classroom and students numbered 5 & 6 report to
    behind-the-wheel.
   Jan. 29 There is no classroom on this day. Students numbered 11-20 are driven to the
    range at Niles West H. S., while students numbered 7 & 8 report to behind-the-wheel.
    Students not participating in a range or behind-the-wheel lesson report to The Point,
    library, or cafeteria for study hall.

   Jan. 30 all students report to the classroom and students numbered 9 & 10 report to
    behind-the-wheel.

                                              4
   Jan. 31 There is no classroom on this day. Students numbered 21-30 are driven to the
    range at Niles West H. S., while students numbered 13 & 14 report to behind-the-
    wheel. Students not participating in a range or behind-the-wheel lesson report to The
    Point, IRC, or cafeteria for study hall.
   Feb. 1 all students report to the classroom and students numbered 15 & 16 report to
    behind-the-wheel.
   Feb. 2 There is no classroom on this day. Students numbered 1-10 are driven to the
    range at Niles West H. S., while students numbered 17 & 18 report to behind-the-
    wheel. Students not participating in range or behind-the-wheel lessons report to The
    Point, IRC, or cafeteria for study hall.
   The schedule is followed throughout the semester as outlined.
   Students can make-up missed range lessons as long as their make-up session is the
    same lesson.
   Students missing a behind-the-wheel lesson are usually switched with another driver.
    If drivers 1 & 2 are scheduled for BTW- number 2 is absent, so number 3 would take
    the place of number 2 and number 2 would replace number 3 on the master schedule.




                                            5
                        Niles Township High School District 219
                        Driver Education Rules and Procedures

In order to complete the Driver Education course and receive a blue slip, all students are
expected to adhere to the following rules and procedures:

1. Attend 40 out of 44 classroom periods. ** On the fifth (5th) absence student will be
   dropped (THIS INCULDES EXCUSED AS WELL AS UNEXCUSED ABSENCES).

2. Complete six (6) twenty (20) minute behind-the-wheel lessons. **Missing two (2)
   lessons could result in being dropped from the course.

3. Complete 12 multi-car range lessons. **Missing two (2) range lessons will result in
   being dropped from the course.

4. Bring instruction permit to class, behind the wheel, and range lessons each day.

5. Treat fellow classmates, as well as teacher, with RESPECT.

6. Be in assigned seat when the tone sounds.

7. Bring textbook, workbook, paper, pen / pencil to class each day.

8. Adhere to the hat, coat, and no food and drink policies.

9. Expect to learn and practice PROPER driving techniques.



CLASSROOM GRADING SCALE:
A= 90% to 100%
B= 80% to 89%
C= 70 % to 79%
D= 60% to 69%
F= 59% & Below



GRADES WILL BE BASED ON THE FOLLOWING:
1. 4 Unit Exams ------------------------------------ 60 points each
2. 1 Final Exam ------------------------------------ 75 points
3. Chapter Quizzes --------------------2- Quizzes 25 points each
4. Workbook and Worksheet assignments ------ 185 points total
5. Group Projects ----------------------2- Projects 25 points each
                                  Total Points       600 points




                                             6
RANGE GRADING SCALE:
The multiple car range is graded as pass/fail.

BEHIND THE WHEEL GRADING SCALE:
To determine the BTW grade, Niles Township District 219 combines the teacher’s
subjective evaluation and the results of the Secretary of Illinois Road Test.

NOTE: To receive a Cooperative Driver Testing Program (CDTP) Waiver, you must
earn at least an 80% in the classroom and be considered an exceptional driver (B
average in B.T.W.) by your instructors.




                                             7
                            Student Learning Targets


1. Understand the relationship between a driver’s physical, mental and emotional
   characteristics and his/her ability to operate a car safely under normal and adverse
   conditions.

2. Demonstrate a variety of driving skills under varying road and traffic conditions.

3. Demonstrate defensive driving by being alert for the mistakes of other drivers and
   the recklessness of pedestrians.

4. Understand how a vehicle functions.

5. Develop the skill required for safe and efficient driving under adverse conditions.

6. Stimulate interest and participation in efforts to improve traffic conditions through
   legislative processes, engineering developments and the functions of various law
   enforcement agencies and state administrative departments.

7. Recognize and define automobile driving as primarily a mental and social task
   involving the interaction of people and vehicles with the highway environment in
   a rather complex highway transportation system whose malfunction results in
   serious economic and social consequences.

8. Understand the legal and moral responsibilities of driving a motor vehicle.




                                         8
                               CLASSROOM UNITS

I.     The Driving Task
       1.     You are the driver
       2.     Signs, signals, roadway markings
       3.     Basic vehicle operation
       4.     Performing basic maneuvers

II.    Being A Responsible Driver
       5.     Managing risk with the IPDE process
       6.     Effects of driver condition
       7.     Alcohol, other drugs, and driving
       8.     Managing distraction

III.   Controlling Your Vehicle
       9.     Natural laws and car control
       10.    Negotiating intersections
       11.    Sharing the roadway
       12.    Driving in adverse conditions
       13.    Handling emergencies

IV.    Driving In Different Environments
       14.    Driving in city traffic
       15.    Driving in rural areas
       16.    Driving on highways
       17.    Buying and maintaining your vehicle
       18.    Planning your travel




                                          9
Unit 1: The Driving Task

Summary of Unit:

Students will be introduced to the foundations of driving an automobile. Chapter 1
introduces students to the skills, responsibilities, and license requirements needed to
navigate the highway transportation system. Chapter 2 explains how traffic signs,
signals, and roadway markings communicate roadway regulations, warnings and other
essential information to drivers. Chapter 3 introduces students to the purpose and
operation of vehicle instruments and controls. They will also learn the procedures for
preparing to drive and starting, stopping, and steering a vehicle. Chapter 4 discusses
methods drivers can use to accurately and safely perform maneuvers essential for
everyday navigation. This unit is very important to ensure the students have knowledge
of their responsibilities when driving a car and to get them ready for basic car operation.

Student Learning Targets for Unit 1:

Students will be able to:

Chapter 1:
    Describe the three parts of the highway transportation system
    Explain how the National Highway Safety and Motor Vehicle Safety Act helps
       keep drivers and passengers safe.
    Explain how understanding the social, physical, and mental skill related to driving
       helps you become a low-risk driver.
    Identify and explain the four steps in the IPDE process
    Describe the stages of a graduated driver license program.
    Explain how a graduated driver license program can help you become a safe
       driver.
    Explain implied consent.

Chapter 2:
    Describe the shapes and colors of regulatory and warning signs and how to
       respond to each one.
    Explain what to do at a green light, a yellow light, and a red light.
    Identify the meaning of arrows, flashing lights, and lane signals.
    Describe the actions to take with pedestrian and traffic-controlled officers’
       signals.
    Describe the proper actions to take with broken and solid yellow and white lane
       markings.
    Identify the meaning of special roadway markings, including highway exit ramps,
       railroad and school crossings, and parking restrictions.
    Explain the function of rumble strips and raised roadway markers.




                                             10
Chapter 3:
    Describe the operational controls of a vehicle and how to use them effectively.
    Identify gauges and warning lights on an instrument panel and explain their
       purpose.
    Describe how to reduce risk while walking to your vehicle.
    Explain outside checks you can make before getting in your vehicle.

Chapter 4:
    Explain when the rearview and outside mirrors should be checked.
    Explain why backing is a high risk maneuver and how to minimize the risk.
    List the steps for safely backing a vehicle
    Explain situations and timing for communication using signal lights.
    Explain three methods for making a turnabout, and state which is the safest.
    List the advantages and disadvantages of angle, perpendicular, and parallel
       parking.
    Describe how to perform each parking maneuver.


Key Vocabulary Terms

Chapter 1:
   1. Collision
   2. Graduated driver licensing program
   3. Highway transportation system
   4. IPDE process
   5. Low risk driving
   6. Operating cost
   7. Zone control system

Chapter 2:
   1. Flashing signal
   2. Guide sign
   3. HOV lane
   4. International sign
   5. Lane signal
   6. Pedestrian signal
   7. Regulatory sign
   8. Right-turn-on-red
   9. Roadway marking
   10. Rumble strip
   11. Shared left-turn lane
   12. Traffic signal
   13. Warning Sign



                                           11
Chapter 3:
   1. Antilock braking system (ABS)
   2. Cruise Control
   3. Key fob
   4. Blind spot
   5. Odometer
   6. Tachometer
   7. Warning lights

Chapter 4:
   1. Angle parking
   2. Parallel parking
   3. Perpendicular parking
   4. Turnabout

Time Line

After two introductory class periods in which we go over class rules and fill out our State
of Illinois paperwork, we begin Chapter 2 on the third day. Chapter 2 will take three
class periods to finish, ending with a 25 question quiz. The next chapter we cover is
Chapter 3, which will take two days to finish. We then go back to Chapter 1, followed by
Chapter 4. Chapters 1 and 4 will both take two class periods to finish. Our rationale for
starting with Chapters 2 and 3 is that we start driving on the third class and those chapters
cover essential information for the students to drive a car.

Essential Questions

Chapter 1:
   1. List the parts and purpose of the HTS.
   2. Explain how the HTS is regulated.
   3. Describe the purpose of the National Highway Safety Act and how it affects states
       and local government.
   4. Explain the purpose of the National Traffic and Motor vehicle Safety Act and
       how it helps keep drivers and passengers safe.
   5. How do mental, social, and physical habits help you in the driving task?
   6. Explain how to use the IPDE process in the driving task.
   7. Name three financial responsibilities that drivers have in maintaining and
       operating a vehicle.
   8. How can a new driver protect the environment from vehicle-related pollution?
   9. Name and describe the three stages of a graduated license program.

Chapter 2:
   1. How can you recognize a warning sign? How should you proceed when you see
       one?
   2. Compare the action you should take at a stop sign with the action you take at a
       yield sign.
   3. Describe the kind of information you would find on each of the following signs:
       red, white, and blue shield; green rectangle; blue rectangle; brown rectangle.

                                             12
   4. What action should you take as you approach a red light? A yellow light? A green
      light?
   5. Compare the meaning of a flashing yellow light with that of a flashing red light.
   6. At an intersection you see an officer directing traffic. Which do you follow, the
      officer or the traffic control device?
   7. What is the difference between broken white lines and broken yellow lines?
   8. How are railroad crossings indicated?
   9. What is a rumble strip and how can it help you drive safely?

Chapter 3:
   1. Identify three operational controls and explain how to use them.
   2. Why is it important to check your indicator lights every time you start the car?
   3. How should you enter the vehicle when it is parked on the street?
   4. What checks should you make before opening the door to the car?
   5. Explain the purpose of a transmission.
   6. List three advantages and disadvantages of driving a car with a manual
       transmission.

Chapter 4:
   1. What effect does the curvature of a mirror have on image size and your perception
       of its distance from your vehicle?
   2. What outside checks should you make before backing any vehicle?
   3. Explain how and when braking and acceleration actions should take place when
       making a moving right turn.
   4. Explain how lane positioning is used before and after making a lane change.
   5. What is the safest way to perform a turnabout?
   6. List and explain three basic types of parking methods.
   7. Explain why street-side angle parking is the most dangerous parking method.
   8. How should the tires be turned when parked uphill with a curb?


Evidence and Assessment:

To assess the students’ knowledge of the chapter we will give homework, a quiz, and a
unit exam. The students will be assigned the four workbook pages for each chapter.
When we finish the chapter we will collect and grade the homework. For chapter one, we
give a project where they go home and work with their parents to identify and get
familiar with the control devices in their car. We give them a twenty five point quiz on
chapter 2, which deals with rules of the road. At the end of the unit we give them the
Unit One exam. It is 60 questions from all four chapters.




                                           13
Unit 2: Being A Responsible Driver

Summary of Unit:

In chapter 5 Students learn about the factors that contribute to higher degrees of risk
while driving. Students also revisit the steps of the IPDE Process, as well as the Zone
Control System and how the two systems work together. Chapter 6 discusses how
physical, mental, and emotional conditions affect driving ability. Students will learn to
recognize and manage limitations. Chapter 7 discusses the effect alcohol and other drugs
have on the driving safety. Chapter 8 explains how to manage distractions that take
focus away from the driving task.

Student Learning Targets for Unit 2:

Students will be able to:

Chapter 5:
    Describe three factors that contribute to the degree of risk you face when driving.
    Name the four steps in the IPDE Process and explain how IPDE helps you to be a
       low-risk driver.
    Explain what it means to identify as it relates to the IPDE Process.
    Identify the eight steps of an orderly visual search pattern.
    Name the three decisions you must make when applying the IPDE Process.
    List the three most important actions you take to avoid conflicts.
    Describe what is meant by selective use in the IPDE Process.
    Explain why the IPDE Process takes time to learn and use.

Chapter 6:
    Describe how emotions can affect your ability to drive.
    Explain how passengers can help a driver.
    Describe the influence emotions have on your willingness to accept risk.
    Explain how you can manage your emotions while driving.
    Define visual acuity and the parts of your field of vision.
    Explain how your senses help you drive.
    Describe the importance of managing sensory distractions.
    Describe what you can do to combat fatigue.
    Explain how medicines, carbon monoxide, and smoking affect a driver.
    Describe what drivers who have permanent disabilities can do to compensate.

Chapter 7:
    Explain how alcohol affects the mental and physical abilities needed for driving.
    Define blood-alcohol concentration (BAC).
    List and explain factors that affect blood-alcohol concentration.
    Compare myths and truths about the use of alcohol.
    Explain the difference between over-the-counter medicine and prescription
       medicine.


                                           14
      Explain how depressants, stimulants, and hallucinogenic drugs affect a driver.
      Describe the effects of combining alcohol with other drugs.
      Explain what is meant by the implied consent law.
      Describe zero tolerance levels of impairment, and tell how impairment can be
       detected and measured.
      Explain what actions a driver should take when stopped by a police officer.
      Describe how peer influences and peer pressure might affect a person’s decision
       about drinking and driving.
      List five steps involved in making a responsible decision.
      Explain the meaning of peer education.
      Explain why everyone should share the responsibility of preventing friends from
       drinking and driving.
      Identify five ways to say no to peer pressure.

Chapter 8:
    Describe what is meant by driver inattention.
    Identify how distracted driving differs from inattentive driving.
    List the four categories of driving distractions.
    Describe what drivers can do to avoid driver inattention and distraction.
    Identify five different categories of inside-the-vehicle distractions.
    Explain why cell phone usage while driving can be distracting.
    Describe how a driver can reduce inside-the-vehicle distractions.
    Identify the categories of outside-the-vehicle driver distractions.
    Explain how outside-the-vehicle distractions differ from distractions inside-the-
       vehicle.
    Describe how a driver can avoid outside-the-vehicle distractions.
    Explain ways a driver can avoid becoming a distraction to others.


Key Vocabulary Terms

Chapter 5:
   1. Risk Factors
   2. Identify
   3. Zone
   4. Open zone
   5. Line of sight
   6. Target area
   7. Closed zone
   8. Target-area range
   9. 12-15-second range
   10. 4-6-second range
   11. Orderly visual search pattern
   12. Field of vision
   13. Depth perception
   14. Scanning


                                           15
   15.   Ground viewing
   16.   Predict
   17.   Execute
   18.   Space cushion
   19.   Compromise space

Chapter 6:
   1. Emotion
   2. Aggressive driving
   3. Road rage
   4. Visual acuity
   5. Field of vision
   6. Central vision
   7. Peripheral vision
   8. Fringe vision
   9. Tunnel vision
   10. Color blindness
   11. Depth perception
   12. Night blindness
   13. Glare resistance
   14. Glare recovery time
   15. Speed smear
   16. Disability
   17. Temporary disability
   18. Carbon monoxide
   19. Permanent disabilities
   20. Chronic illness



Chapter 7:
   1. Euphoria
   2. Inhibitions
   3. Alcoholism
   4. Blood-alcohol concentration (BAC)
   5. Designated driver
   6. Over-the-counter medicines
   7. Prescription medicines
   8. Depressants
   9. Stimulant
   10. Synergistic effect
   11. Illegal Per Se Laws
   12. Implied Consent Law
   13. Zero Tolerance Law
   14. Dram Shop Law
   15. DWI
   16. DUI
   17. Field sobriety test

                                          16
   18. Nystagmus
   19. Peer pressure
   20. Peer influence

Chapter 8:
   5. Driver inattention
   6. Distracted driving cognitive distraction
   7. Visual distraction
   8. Auditory distraction
   9. Biomechanical distraction
   10. Projectile
   11. Gawking
   12. Rubbernecking

Time Line

Chapters 5 and 6 will take two class periods to finish. The class will view a video, “Road
Rage”. Chapter 7 will take 4 class periods to finish. The class will view two videos “The
Truth About Drinking”, and a 48 Hours segment on the difference between driving while
tired and driving after drinking, and take a 25 point quiz. Chapter 8 will take two class
periods to finish. At the end of each chapter the students will hand in the skills and
applications work book pages for that chapter.

Essential Questions

Chapter 5:
   1 Describe three risks posed by drivers, vehicles, and the roadway and environment.
       What actions could you take to reduce the risk posed by these factors?
   2 Explain selective seeing and why it’s important for drivers.
   3 Explain how using a orderly search pattern helps you to be a safe driver?
   4 Explain how knowing the zone around your car helps support your ability to
       identify and predict?
   5 Why is it important to predict as you drive?
   6 Explain how communication and deciding to change speed or direction help you
       to be a low-risk driver.
   7 List the three actions you can execute to avoid conflict and explain how these
       actions help you prevent conflicts.

Chapter 6:
   1. How can a strong emotion like anger affect your ability to drive?
   2. How can passengers help a driver?
   3. What affects can emotions have on your willingness to take more risk?
   4. What is the field of vision? What part of your field of vision provides you with
       your clearest vision?
   5. Describe three factors that affect your vision.
   6. How do your senses of hearing, smell, and motion help you assess driving
       situation?
   7. What can you do to avoid the effects of fatigue while driving?

                                           17
   8. How are drivers with permanent physical disabilities able to drive?

Chapter 7:
   1. What are some mental effects that alcohol can have on a driver who has been
       drinking? What are some physical effects?
   2. What is BAC and what relationship does this have to one’s driving abilities?
   3. What factors can affect a person’s BAC?
   4. How does the purchase of over-the-counter medicines differ from the purchase pf
       prescription medicines?
   5. What effect would combining alcohol with one or more drugs have on a person’s
       driving ability?
   6. What is the implied consent law for drivers, and what is likely to happen if a
       driver refuses to take a BAC test if asked to take one by a police officer?
   7. What are zero tolerance levels of impairment and how can they be measured?
   8. How do peer pressure and peer influence differs? How might peer pressure
       influence your decision to drink and drive?
   9. What are the five steps for making responsible decisions?

Chapter 8:
   1. When is a driver considered to be inattentive?
   2. What criterion determines whether something is a driving distraction?
   3. Describe the four categories of driving distractions and give an example of each.
   4. What are five different categories of inside-the-vehicle distractions?
   5. Why is dialing a cell phone or text messaging while driving distracting?
   6. What are the four most common categories of outside-the-vehicle distractions?
   7. Why can outside-the-vehicle distractions be more difficult to deal with then
       inside-the- vehicle distractions?
   8. How can driver avoid being a distraction to others?

Evidence and Assessment:

To assess the students’ knowledge of the chapter we will give homework, a quiz, and a
unit exam. The students will be assigned the four workbook pages for each chapter.
When we finish the chapter we will collect and grade the homework. At the end of the
unit we give them the Unit Two exam. It is 60 questions from all four chapters.




                                           18
Unit 3: Controlling Your Vehicle

Summary of Unit:

In Unit 3, students will learn concepts dealing with control of the vehicle. Chapter 9
describes how the laws of motion affect the ability of drivers to control their vehicles.
Chapter 10 discusses the skills needed to approach, enter, and exit different types of
intersections safely. These skills involve proper searching techniques; judgments of time,
space, and distance; and yielding the right of way. In chapter 11 students will learn how
to safely share the roadway with pedestrians and varying types of vehicles. Students will
learn the driver’s responsibility for protecting pedestrians and cyclists and avoiding
conflict with larger vehicles. Chapter 12 teaches students techniques for safely managing
the effects of hazardous weather conditions on driving conditions. Chapter 13 focuses on
how to handle emergency conditions, including situations caused by vehicle malfunction
and driver error.

Student Learning Targets for Unit 3:

Students will be able to:

Chapter 9:
    Describe how inertia affects your vehicle while going straight and while driving
       through a curve.
    Define momentum.
    Identify the factors that affect energy of motion.
    Explain how gravity affects your vehicle.
    Explain how traction controls your car.
    Describe the importance of tread and proper inflation and how they relate to
       vehicle control.
    Identify three factors that can reduce traction.
    Define center of gravity.
    Describe how speed, the sharpness of the curve, vehicle load, and the road shape
       affect control in a curve.
    Describe the three actions that determine total stopping distance.
    Identify key factors that affect braking distance.
    List three factors that affect the force of impact in a collision.

Chapter 10:
    Explain how to identify an intersection.
    Describe the actions to take as you approach an intersection.
    Identify the correct way to enter an intersection.
    Define right of way.
    Describe situations in which the driver must yield the right-of-way.




                                           19
      Describe the correct procedure for entering an intersection controlled by signs.
      Describe the correct action to take at green, yellow, and red traffic lights.
      Explain the procedures for making unprotected and protected left turns and for
       turning on red.
      Tell how to identify an uncontrolled intersection.
      Identify the actions to take as you approach an uncontrolled intersection.
      Identify who has the right-of-way at uncontrolled intersections.
      Identify how roundabouts benefit drivers and pedestrians.
      Describe the correct procedures for driving through roundabouts.

Chapter 11:
    Identify factors that put pedestrians at risk.
    Explain the correct procedures for interacting with pedestrians in different
       situations.
    Describe actions that pedestrians can take to ensure their own safety.
    Explain why riders of bicycles and mopeds are vulnerable on the roadway.
    Describe how to search for cyclists and how to predict their actions.
    Identify actions drivers can take to help protect cyclists.
    Explain key ways in which riding a motorcycle is different than driving a car.
    Describe why it is often difficult to see motorcycles, and how to search for them
       effectively in different locations.
    Identify situations in which motorcycle riders may be at risk.
    Identify the risks associated with sharing the road with large vehicles.
    Describe how to follow, pass, and meet large trucks safely.
    Describe the precautions you must take when driving near school buses and
       emergency vehicles.
    Explain how to share the road with specialized vehicles such as recreational
       vehicles, low-speed vehicles, and snowplows.

Chapter 12:
    Describe how to use the IPDE Process to manage risks in situations involving
       poor visibility.
    Explain what you can do to help others see you at dawn and dusk.
    Describe the special techniques you can use for night driving.
    Explain the procedure to use at night when encountering an oncoming driver who
       fails to use low-beam headlights.
    Describe what happens to traction during rain and snow.
    Identify the steps to take to avoid hydroplaning.
    Describe how to correct an under-steer skid situation.
    Explain how to use the controlled braking technique.
    Explain how to maintain control of your vehicle in windy conditions.
    List precautions for driving in extremely cold or hot weather.
    Describe what to do to maintain vehicle control during winter driving.




                                           20
Chapter 13:
    List actions to take if a tire fails.
    List the proper steps to follow if the brakes fail.
    Describe what to do in case of engine or steering failure.
    Explain what to do in case of loss of forward vision and vehicle fires.
    List the steps necessary to return to the road when two wheels are off the road.
    Explain when to use an emergency swerve (evasive maneuver).
    Describe how to reduce vehicle damage caused by potholes.
    Explain what to do if you enter a curve too fast.
    Tell how to escape from a vehicle that is sinking in water.
    Explain how to avoid or minimize head-on, side impact, and rear-end collisions.
    List the immediate steps and follow-up steps to take if a collision occurs.
    Explain the financial responsibility law.
    List three factors that affect the cost of insurance.



Key Vocabulary Terms

Chapter 9:
   1. Active restraint device
   2. Blowout
   3. Center of gravity
   4. Energy of motion
   5. Force of impact
   6. Friction
   7. Inertia
   8. Passive restraint device
   9. Perception time/distance
   10. Pitch
   11. Reaction time/distance
   12. Total stopping distance
   13. Traction
   14. Tread

Chapter 10:
   1. Active railroad crossing
   2. Controlled intersection
   3. Cross-buck
   4. Delayed green light
   5. Fresh green light
   6. Gap
   7. Intersection
   8. Passive railroad crossing




                                          21
   9. Point of no return
   10. Protected left turn
   11. Right of way
   12. Roundabout
   13. Stale green light
   14. Uncontrolled intersection
   15. Unprotected left turn

Chapter 11:
   1. Emergency vehicle
   2. Jaywalk
   3. Low-speed vehicle
   4. Moped
   5. No zone
   6. Protective gear
   7. Scooter
   8. Tractor trailer

Chapter 12:
   1. Controlled braking
   2. Exhaust pipe
   3. Fishtail
   4. Hydroplaning
   5. Over-driving headlights
   6. Over-steer situation
   7. Rocking the vehicle
   8. Skid
   9. Under-steer situation

Chapter 13:
   1. Blowout
   2. Brake fade
   3. Collision insurance
   4. Compact spare
   5. Deductible
   6. Financial responsibility law
   7. Head-on collision
   8. Liability insurance
   9. Policy
   10. Premium
   11. Rear-end collision
   12. Side-impact collision



Time Line
We cover Unit 3 straight through from chapter 9 to 12. We usually cover each chapter in
two days. At the end of the unit students will have a unit exam.

                                          22
Essential Questions

Chapter 9:
   1. How does inertia affect your vehicle and passengers?
   2. Explain why friction is important in controlling your vehicle.
   3. What three actions consume traction?
   4. What steps can you take to ensure that an older car will have good traction?
   5. What is a vehicle’s center of gravity?
   6. Describe three ways that a vehicle may move around the center of gravity.
   7. List four factors that can affect your control as you drive around a curve.
   8. In the order they occur, list the three actions that determine total stopping
       distance.
   9. List six factors that can increase your braking distance.
   10. Name the three factors that affect the force of impact.

Chapter 10:
   1. List six clues that indicate that you are approaching an intersection.
   2. Which zones should you search when approaching an intersection?
   3. Describe what to do when you have a closed front zone at an intersection.
   4. What actions should you take when entering an intersection with a line-of-sight
       restriction?
   5. What is meant by yielding the right of way?
   6. Give six examples of situations in which you would yield the right of way.
   7. What two signs are used to control intersections?
   8. What is the difference between a fresh green light and a stale green light?
   9. How does an unprotected left turn differ from a protected left turn?
   10. What is an uncontrolled intersection?
   11. What are three actions a driver can take when approaching an uncontrolled
       intersection?
   12. Name four line-of-sight and two path-of-travel restrictions you may encounter at
       an uncontrolled intersection.
   13. Who has the right of way at an uncontrolled intersection?
   14. How can you distinguish between an active and a passive railroad crossing?
   15. Describe how to search as you approach a railway crossing.
   16. State three reasons why roundabouts are safer than intersections with traffic
       signals.
   17. In a traffic circle, which vehicle has the right of way?

Chapter 11:
   1. List several reasons why young children and seniors are especially vulnerable as
       pedestrians.
   2. List six situations in which you should be particularly careful to search for
       pedestrians.
   3. As a pedestrian, what steps can you take to ensure your own safety?
   4. Why are cyclists at risk when sharing the roadway with motor vehicles?
   5. Describe at least six areas where drivers should search for bicycles and mopeds.
   6. In what ways can you help protect riders of bicycles and mopeds?

                                           23
   7. What actions can cyclists take to increase their own safety?
   8. How does a motorcycle’s braking and acceleration differ from other vehicles?
   9. Name five places where you should search from motorcycles and scooters.
   10. How does protective riding gear help riders reduce risk?
   11. What is a truck’s no zone?
   12. Where are the truck’s no zones located?
   13. What precautions should you take when following a large truck?
   14. What should you do when you see an emergency vehicle approaching you from
       the other side of a two-lane road?

Chapter 12:
   1. What actions should you take when using the IPDE process in limited-visibility
       situations?
   2. What steps can you take to help others see you at dawn and dusk?
   3. When should you use low-beam headlights at night?
   4. What should you do if an oncoming driver fails to use low-beam headlights?
   5. How does rain and snow affect a vehicle’s traction?
   6. How does hydroplaning affect vehicle control?
   7. How can a driver attain maximum controlled braking in a vehicle that is not
       equipped with ABS?
   8. What actions must you take to maintain vehicle control in strong winds?
   9. What can you do to cool an overheated engine?
   10. Why should you try to keep moving in heavy snow?

Chapter 13:
   1. As a driver, what can you do to minimize the risk of tire failure?
   2. What actions should you take if your steering fails?
   3. When two wheels are off the road, why do you think it is important to keep your
       hands at 9:00 and 3:00 position?
   4. How do potholes increase driving risk?
   5. Why is it important to keep your wheels from locking if you enter a curve too
       fast?
   6. Explain how you would escape a vehicle that is sinking in deep water.
   7. What steps should you take immediately if you are involved in a collision?
   8. Describe what financial responsibility laws require.
   9. What is the purpose of automobile insurance?
   10. What are the main factors that determine the premiums charged for automobile
       insurance?

Evidence and Assessment:

To gauge student knowledge in Unit Three we assign the four homework pages for each
chapter. At the end of the Chapter 13 we will have the unit exam. Unit three exam is 60
questions from all five chapters.




                                          24
Unit 4: Driving In Different Environments

Summary of Unit:

Chapter 14 discusses the skills necessary to navigate driving situations in city traffic.
Chapter 15 teaches students the skills necessary for driving in rural areas and alerts them
to situations they may encounter on rural roads. Chapter 16 discusses ways to manage
risk when entering, driving on, and exiting multilane highways. Students also learn about
problems and features specific to highways. Chapter 17 discusses factors first-time
vehicle buyers should consider when deciding what the best vehicle is for them. Students
will also learn where to locate information about maintaining their vehicle. Chapter 18
covers important details drivers should consider before taking long trips or driving in
their communities.

Student Learning Targets for Unit 4:

Students will be able to:

Chapter 14:
    Name two factors that can make driving difficult in city traffic.
    Describe how to use the IPDE Process for city driving.
    Describe how to use a 3-second following distance.
    Describe how you can safely manage a tailgater.
    List steps to take to avoid conflicts with oncoming traffic.
    Describe how far ahead you should look in city traffic.
    Tell how far ahead you should look in city traffic.
    Tell how to cover the brake.
    Explain how to select the proper lane for driving.
    Describe the procedure for turning left or right from a one-way street.
    Explain how to warn a driver who is driving the wrong way on a street.

Chapter 15:
    Describe rural roadways.
    Describe factors to consider when selecting a safe speed.
    Identify controls and how they help inform, warn, and regulate drivers on rural
       roads.
    List roadside hazards common in rural driving.
    Explain how IPDE and Zone Control should be applied in rural driving.
    Explain the appropriate steps to use to safely handle curves, hills, and
       intersections.
    Identify rural situations that require greater following distances.
    Describe characteristics of multilane rural highways and explain how to safely
       enter them.
    List the steps for passing on two-lane rural roads and multilane roads.
    List situations where passing should never be attempted.
    Describe the actions to take when being passed.


                                            25
      Explain how to safely deal with slow-moving vehicles.
      Explain precautions to take when encountering animals on or along the roadway.
      Describe two actions you can take to allow hazards to separate when meeting
       oncoming traffic.
      Explain steps to take to safely deal with hazards posed by railroad crossings.
      Describe special safety precautions for mountain driving.
      Describe special safety precautions for desert driving.

Chapter 16:
    Explain the difference between highways that have fully-controlled access and
       those that have non-controlled access.
    Describe the three kinds of highways that are located in each state.
    Describe four different types of highway interchanges.
    Explain what actions you should take on the entrance ramp, the acceleration lane,
       and the merge area.
    Describe four possible entrance problems.
    Explain the importance of a proper speed selection while on the entrance ramp.
    Explain how to apply the IPDE Process on the Interstate Highway System.
    Explain the advantages of a 3 or more second following distance.
    Describe three possible exiting problems.
    Explain how to apply the IPDE Process to exiting a freeway.
    List the steps for exiting a freeway.
    Explain how highway hypnosis and velocitation create risks for drivers.
    Explain what to do if you need to pull your car over to the shoulder.
    Explain the risk associated with toll plazas and how you can reduce them.

Chapter 17:
    Identify questions to be answered before deciding to buy.
    Identify three safety features available in new vehicles and explain their functions.
    Describe the advantages and disadvantages between buying a new and used
       vehicle.
    Identify three parts of a battery’s electrical system.
    Explain how cooling and lubricating systems protect your vehicle.
    Name four parts to a vehicle’s control system.
    Identify the three tire ratings that are part of the Uniform Tire Quality Grading
       System.
    List five techniques for fuel-efficient driving.
    List two vehicle fluids and five vehicle parts that can be recycled.

      Explain how a keyless system works and how it can give you access to your
       vehicle.
      Describe five ways that satellites can make your driving safer.




                                           26
Chapter 18:
    Describe how vehicles affect the ozone layer and the environment.
    Explain how drivers can reduce the effects of driving on the environment.
    Identify two questions you should ask yourself before making a short trip.
    Describe two things you can do to simplify a short trip.
    Explain how a GPS receiver can help you find your destination.
    Explain how to use index and legend on a map.
    List the steps necessary to prepare your vehicle for a long trip.
    List ways to prepare yourself for a long-distance travel.
    Explain how maneuvering a special vehicle is different from maneuvering a
       passenger vehicle.
    Describe the special equipment needed when pulling a trailer.

Key Vocabulary Terms

Chapter 14:
   1. Traffic density
   2. 3-second following
   3. Distance
   4. Tailgate
   5. Blind intersection

Chapter 15:
   1. Graphics
   2. Advisory speed sign
   3. Median
   4. Prohibited

Chapter 16:
   1. Controlled access
   2. Interchange
   3. Grade elevation
   4. Non-controlled access
   5. Highway hypnosis
   6. Velocitation
   7. Beltway
   8. Spur

Chapter 17:
   1. Budget
   2. Variable ride-height suspension
   3. On-board diagnostic (OBD) system
   4. Routine check
   5. Global Positioning system
   6. Legend
   7. Index


                                         27
Time Line

Chapter 14 will take two class periods to finish, Chapter 15 which will take two days to
finish. Chapter 16 will take 2 class periods to finish. Chapter 17 will take two class
periods to finish. Chapter 18 will take two class periods to finish. At the end of each
chapter the students will hand in the skills and applications work book pages for that
chapter.

Essential Questions

Chapter 14:
   1. What two factors can make city driving difficult?
   2. How can you best use the IPDE Process in city driving?
   3. Why do you think three seconds is used as a normal following distance? How do
       tailgaters cause potential conflict to the driver ahead?
   4. How can you avoid a conflict with an oncoming vehicle in your lane?
   5. Why should you look ahead when driving in city traffic?
   6. How do you select the best lane on a multilane street?
   7. What lane should you use when making a right or left turn from a one-way street?

Chapter15:
   1. What are three roadway conditions commonly found in rural driving?
   2. List three examples of common rural roadside hazards.
   3. How should IPDE and Zone Control be applied in rural driving?
   4. List three steps you should take in handling a curve?
   5. What are the steps to take for making a left turn onto a multilane rural highway?
   6. What steps do you need to take when preparing to pass a vehicle ahead if you’ve
       already determined there are no conflicts from any vehicle behind?
   7. What are some situations in which you should never pass?
   8. What can you do to help another driver who is passing you?
   9. As a driver, what do you need to do to safely pass a slow-moving vehicle?
   10. Describe two actions you can take to separate hazards when meeting traffics?
   11. What can you do to avoid conflicts at rural railroad crossings?
   12. What safety Precautions should you take when driving in mountains?
   13. What safety Precautions should you take when driving in deserts?

Chapter 16:
   1. Explain why knowing the difference between a fully-controlled access highway
       and non-controlled access highway helps to make you a low-risk driver.
   2. Explain how each type of interchange helps to keep traffic moving.
   3. Describe the actions that help you merge smoothly while in the acceleration lane.
   4. Why is the correct speed important on the entrance ramp?
   5. Why is it important to look for a hole in traffic?
   6. How is using the IPDE System on interstate highways different from using it on
       other roadways?
   7. How does using the 4-or-more second rule when following a vehicle help you to
       be a low-risk drive?
   8. Explain what to do if you exit lane has an overflow.

                                            28
   9. Explain how you apply the IPDE Process when you exit an interstate.
   10. Explain why it’s important to check your speed at exit ramps.

Chapter 17:
   1. Identify what you know before deciding on a vehicle to buy.
   2. Describe one advantage of buying a new vehicle and a used vehicle.
   3. What two systems protect your vehicle from heat and wear?
   4. Identify the three tire ratings that are part of the Uniform Tire Quality Grading
       Standards.
   5. What actions can you take to reduce fuel consumption?
   6. List two vehicle fluids and five vehicle parts that can be recycled.
   7. How is satellite system a good means of security for your car?

Chapter 18:
   1. Explain how increasing fuel efficiency can protect the environment.
   2. Identify four actions drivers can take to reduce pollution.
   3. Describe how a recreation vehicle’s size affects your field of vision. Summarize
       the driving guidelines for towing a trailer.

Evidence and Assessment:

To gauge student knowledge in Unit four we assign the four homework pages for each
chapter. At the end of the Chapter 18 we will have the unit exam. Unit four exam is 60
questions from all five chapters.




                                            29
            COURSE OUTLINE FOR MULTIPLE CAR RANGE


Lessons       Skills                                                       Student
                                                                           Learning
                                                                           Targets
Lesson 1      *Pre ignition                                                1,2,3,4,8
              *Starting vehicle
              *Putting car in motion
              *Both forward and backward
              *Circle outer drive
              *Driving at proper intervals
              *Leave cars in #1 position
Lesson 2      *Circle outer drive                                          1,2,3,4,8
              *Serpentine exercise forward and backward
              *If time permits, start right or left turns on Wolf Road
              *Park cars to show blind spot
Lesson 3      *Serpentine forward and backward in middle range             1,2,3,4,8
              *Left and right turn on and off Wolf Road
              *Tunnel available on skid pad
Lesson 4      *Lane changing                                               1,2,3,4,8
              *Introduce two-way traffic
              *Serpentine and tunnel still in use
Lesson 5      *Three-point turn                                            1,2,3,4,8
              *Backing turn- a- bout
              *Serpentine available
              *Tunnel available
Lesson 6      * Introduction of up and down                                1,2,3,4,8
              *Hill parking (1st time)
              *Serpentine available
              *Tunnel available
              *Three & two-point turn available
Lesson 7      *Introduction of parallel & angle parking                    1,2,3,4,8
              *Parking (1st time)
              *Serpentine available
              *Three-point turn available
              *Up and down hill parking available
Lesson 8      *Introduction of expressway merge                            1,2,3,4,8
              *Angle park (1st time)
              *Serpentine and tunnel still in use
              *Three-point turn
Lesson 9      *Two-way traffic review                                      1,2,3,4,8
              * During last part of period students may work on all
              maneuvers; serpentine, three-point turn, angle &
              parallel parking maneuvers.
Lesson 10     * Introduce evasive maneuvers left, right and back to the    1,2,3,4,8
              middle lane
Lesson 11     *Introduce emergency stops and brake and evade on skid pad   1,2,3,4,8
              *Students in car by themselves
Lesson 12     * Drunk driving simulation                                   1,2,3,4,8
              * Teacher with students in behind-the-wheel car




                                        30
                  BEHIND THE WHEEL CURRICULUM


Lessons           Lesson Descriptions           Time      Student Learning Targets/
                                               Frame           Grading objectives
Lesson 1   * Turning corners                   1 class               1,2,3,4,5
           * Starts & stops                              * Ability to use the brake
           * Handling controlled &                       and gas pedals
             uncontrolled intersections in               * Ability to center the car in
             residential areas                           it’s intended path
           * Light traffic if student is                 * Ability to make turns at
           capable                                       proper speed and into
                                                         correct lane
Lesson 2   * Light medium traffic              1 class               1,2,3,4,5
           * Visual Search Pattern                       *Ability to regulate the
           * Lane changing procedures                    vehicle speed at varying
           * Waukegan, Golf Road,                        speeds
             Milwaukee                                   * Ability to center the car
                                                         in it’s intended path at
                                                         higher speeds
                                                         *Ability to switch lanes
                                                         safely
                                                         * Ability to make turns at
                                                         proper speed and into
                                                         correct lane
Lesson 3   * Light traffic                     1 class               1,2,3,4,5
           * Practice for Illinois Road Test             * Ability to use the brake
             Backing, 3 & 2 point turns,                 and gas pedals
           turns, etc                                    * Ability to center the car in
                                                         it’s intended path
                                                         * Ability to make turns at
                                                         proper speed and into
                                                         correct lane
                                                         *Ability to switch lanes
                                                         safely
                                                         *Ability to park up and
                                                         down hill
                                                         *Ability to do 3point and 2
                                                         point turnabouts
                                                         *Ability to back the vehicle
                                                         in a straight line
Lesson 4   * Expressway driving                1 class               1,2,3,4,5
           * Edens Expressway                            *Ability to enter and exit
                                                         the expressway safely
                                                         * Ability to center the car
                                                         in it’s intended path at
                                                         highway speeds


                                        31
                                                       *Ability to switch lanes
                                                       safely at highway speeds

Lesson 5   * Light to heavy city driving     1 class              1,2,3,4,5
           * Navigating                                * Ability to use the brake
                                                       and gas pedals
                                                       * Ability to center the car in
                                                       its intended path
                                                       * Ability to make turns at
                                                       proper speed and into
                                                       correct lane
                                                       *Ability to switch lanes
                                                       safely
                                                       *Ability to navigate safely
                                                       from point a to point b
Lesson 6   * Illinois State Road Test        1 class              1,2,3,4,5
                                                       * Ability to use the brake
                                                       and gas pedals
                                                       * Ability to center the car in
                                                       its intended path
                                                       * Ability to make turns at
                                                       proper speed and into
                                                       correct lane
                                                       *Ability to switch lanes
                                                       safely
                                                       *Ability to park up and
                                                       down hill
                                                       *Ability to do 3point and 2
                                                       point turnabouts
                                                       *Ability to back the vehicle
                                                       in a straight line




                                        32
                        Student BTW Learning Targets


1. Understand the relationship between a driver’s physical, mental and emotional
   characteristics and his/her ability to operate a car safely under normal and adverse
   conditions.

2. Demonstrate a variety of driving skills under varying road and traffic conditions.

3. Demonstrate defensive driving by being alert for the mistakes of other drivers and
   the recklessness of pedestrians.

4. Understand how a vehicle functions.

5. Develop the skill required for safe and efficient driving under adverse conditions.

6. Stimulate interest and participation in efforts to improve traffic conditions through
   legislative processes, engineering developments and the functions of various law
   enforcement agencies and state administrative departments.

7. Recognize and define automobile driving as primarily a mental and social task
   involving the interaction of people and vehicles with the highway environment in
   a rather complex highway transportation system whose malfunction results in
   serious economic and social consequences.

8. Understand the legal and moral responsibilities of driving a motor vehicle.




                                        33

								
To top