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Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated Strategic

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					Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated
Strategic Tourism Plan
Consultation Report
(Companion Document to Strategic Plan)


Prepared for the:
       Clare and Gilbert Valleys Council
       The Barossa Council
       Barossa & Light Regional Development Board Inc
       Mid North Regional Development Board Inc
       Regional Council of Goyder
       Light Regional Council
       South Australian Tourism Commission

January 2005




                           Kristine Peters Project Management




Consultant Contact: Angela Hazebroek
Urban and Regional Planning Solutions
3 / 207 The Parade
Norwood SA 5067
Telephone: (08) 8333 3335
Email: angela@pp.net.au
                                             Integrated Strategic Tourism Plan - Consultation Report
                                                                                            Contents




    CONTENTS



  1 INTRODUCTION                                                                     1

  2 PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE –
    VISION ELEMENTS AND SWOT ANALYSIS                                                2

  3 REGIONAL LEADERS FORUM                                                           5

  4 SURVEYS OF BUSINESSES AND RESIDENTS IN EIGHT
    REGIONAL TOWNS                                                                  17

  5 SURVEY OF VISITORS TO THE REGION                                                22

  6 SURVEY OF VISITORS TO SOUTH AUSTRALIA                                           32

  7 MARKET ANALYSIS WORKSHOP                                                        35

  8 FOCUS GROUPS TO TEST STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS                                       44

  9 MEDIA ARTICLES                                                                  55

  10 OPPORTUNITY TO COMMENT ON FINAL DRAFT STRATEGY                                 56



APPENDICES

  1. Summary of Business Surveys

  2. Summary of Community Surveys Undertaken in 8 Regional Towns, August 2004

  3. Detailed Analysis of Surveys Conducted with Visitors to the Regions – August-
    November 2004

  4. Detailed Analysis of Surveys Conducted with Visitors to South Australia – August-
    September 2004

  5. Copy of Discussion Paper Used for Consultation – List of Those Attending Focus
    Groups and Apologies

  6. Copies of Media Articles for Local Newspapers




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                                                                                    Introduction




1.            INTRODUCTION

This Consultation Report documents the process and findings of the consultation
undertaken with tourism stakeholders, visitors to the regions, and local businesses and
communities, to inform the development of the Regional Tourism Strategy.


The following consultation activities were undertaken between July and December
2004:


        SWOT Analysis and Visioning Workshop with Project Steering committee (15th
        July 2004);

        Three meetings of the Regional Leaders Forum (August, September and
        November 2004);

        Surveys of Businesses and Residents in 8 towns of Burra, Clare, Eudunda,
        Kapunda, Angaston, Nuriootpa, Tanunda and Mount Pleasant;

        56 surveys of visitors to the regions collected through Visitor Information Centres
        and selected tourism operators;

        Surveys of visitors to South Australia surveyed in Adelaide and McLaren Vale
        (respondents may not have visited the Clare Valley or Barossa Regions on this
        trip);

        A Marketing / Product Development Workshop with Regional Marketing Managers
        and the Chairs of Marketing Committees, plus the Project Steering Committee,
        held in November 2004;

        Four focus groups with invited representatives of Local Government, Regional
        Development Boards, Wine Industry Associations, Local Tourism Associations,
        Department of Environment and Heritage and Traders or Main Street Associations
        held in November and December 2004;

        Media articles in local newspapers advising the wider community of the availability
        of a Discussion Paper outlining Draft Strategic Directions on Councils’ websites
        and in hard copy at Council Offices and Visitor Information Centres. Written
        responses were invited from interested members of the community.




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                                  Project Steering Committee – Vision Elements and SWOT Analysis




2             PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE – VISION ELEMENTS AND
              SWOT ANALYSIS

This section of the Consultation Report summarises the outcomes of the PS (Planning
Solutions) Workshop held with the Project Steering Committee on Thursday 15th July
2004.




Elements of our Vision for Tourism in 2010

The regions seek to be a multi-attraction destination that has broad appeal across a
number of market segments.

Expanding the range of experiences that supplement a vibrant wine tourism sector
through reinvigorating the interpretation of mining history and strengthening the role of
food as a key part of the historic and cultural tourism experience is considered
essential.

Providing a high quality visitor experience will ensure that visitors remember their
experiences positively and promote the regions to others.

A strong local economy provides the basis for “real visitor experiences” and the best
opportunity to capture expenditure. A core part of our vision is that “no one leaves with
money in their pockets”. The authentic visitor experience is also based on the quality
of their encounters with local people, not just tourism operators. Successful tourism
regions have communities that embrace tourism.

A core part of the vision is the desire to respect the valued character and identity of the
region and build upon this with tourism developments that are sustainable in the
context of a triple bottom line approach.



Building on our Existing Strengths

The following attributes of the regions were identified as potential opportunities that are
currently undeveloped or not fully realised:

        a diversity of landscapes in conservation parks that could support nature based
        experiences;




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        internationally recognised thoroughbred racing industry;

        quality golf courses and sporting facilities in selected towns;

        high profile local artists;

        differences in food and culture related to historic settlement patterns; and

        small scale conferences related to industry strengths.

The collaboration between the wine and tourism industries is an existing strength that
can be further developed through targetted actions to cater for a broader range of
markets.

Other important strengths of the region are the significant contributions made by
volunteers to tourism and the quality of the product and experience provided by some
operators.




Overcoming Our Weaknesses

It was generally considered by the Project Steering Committee that a degree of
complacency has set in within some parts of the region, while the performance of other
areas has declined in recent years. The Barossa is considered to have traded on its
reputation as the premier wine region in South Australia without maintaining a
consistent quality of product. Burra is in need of reinvigoration, particularly with regard
to mining heritage while Kapunda needs to establish stronger recognition. Clare is in a
growth phase and needs to build on these sound beginnings.

Some of the threats to tourism were identified as:

        planning policy that restricts appropriate development;

        pressures for inappropriate development;

        lack of infrastructure – water, STEDS, power, roads, transport, broadband access
        and mobile phone coverage;

        lack of incentives to invest in tourism and competition from other forms of
        investment;

        proliferation of festivals reducing the quality of the experience for the visitor;

        short term novelty factor attractions or large developments that are not in keeping
        with the character and identity of the area.




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One of the important areas of focus was considered to be motivating operators to take
the next step and get serious about their product. This needs to be done within a clear
overall strategic direction for the region including a sound understanding of the target
markets.



Essential Outcomes for the Project

Project Steering Committee members identified the following essential project
outcomes. To be considered successful, the project must result in:

        real identifiable actions and outcomes;

        a process that has built a momentum for change that can be maintained;

        mechanisms for implementation, such as:
        -     links to Better Development Plan Tourism Module;
        -     integration into Council Strategic Plans and inclusion in Council budgets;
        -     recognition by Tourism Associations and Regional Development Boards in
              their Plans;

        an ability to leverage funding;

        improved regional collaboration between Councils; and

        sustainable tourism development.




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                                                                       Regional Leaders Forum




3             REGIONAL LEADERS FORUM

3.1           SUMMARY OF FIRST FORUM MEETING HELD ON 24TH AUGUST 2004

Introduction

The first Regional Leaders Forum was attended by 14 leaders and Paul Weymouth
from the SATC and Peter Beare from the Regional Council of Light. Paul and Peter
are members of the Project Steering Committee. Consultants Angela Hazebroek and
Simon McArthur facilitated the Forum.

Members of the Forum introduced themselves and explained their interest in tourism.
Angela Hazebroek provided an outline of the project and the study process.
Participants had been previously provided with a Supporters Kit containing additional
information about the project.



Reflecting On The Past

What was the State of Tourism 10 Years Ago?

Participants considered that tourism in the region 10 years ago was characterised by:

        Significant parochial attitudes with people who didn’t want to work together;

        Focus on icons and destinations as determined by the Australian Tourism
        Commission and SA Tourism Commission;

        Frequent changes of regional boundaries and names;

        Strong brand recognition of Barossa and Clare Valley, 2 of Australia’s top wine
        regions;

        Operators less professional;

        Tourism not seen as an industry by many;

        Increasing pressures for living in rural towns and country areas have placed
        demands on water and other natural resources;

        The recession in the rural sector has led to some farmers becoming involved in
        tourism, but not always successfully;

        The emergence of food and wine, especially wine;

        A focus on eco-tourism;




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        Strong events management – some very successful key events;

        Less lobby groups promoting tourism; and

        Some parts of the region experiencing themselves as “lost in the wilderness”.




Understanding the Present

Where are we now and what has changed?

The responses have been grouped under a number of headings to assist in focusing
on the main elements.

Regional Context

The wine industry is facing challenging times with a very competitive retail environment
and considerable rationalisation appears likely.

There is a greater focus on accreditation and professionalism in the tourism industry.
Operators appear to be more willing to collaborate.

Product

Some of the product such as wine tourism needs reinvigoration due to its maturity.
There are too many of certain products such as bed and breakfast accommodation.
This proliferation of similar businesses leads to a sense that there is too much of the
same kind of product. Some B&B’s are seen as too expensive.

There are some gaps in the products currently available especially those that might
appeal to families with children. There appears to be a lack of cabins and cafes
suitable for those on mid range budgets.

Markets

There is a sense that the market has changed and that as people are having children
later in life there are two income couples in their mid to late 30’s who are looking for
family friendly accommodation and experiences.

This market demand can clash with the tourism providers who are seeking a lifestyle
based operation post children. They may not want children in their product.




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There was not a consistent view about who are the target markets for the regions.
Some participants were concerned that a focus on children could dilute the existing
image of the regions as an escape for couples.

There is a perception that there has been an explosion in the number of retirees
heading north for outback adventure experiences.

There was some discussion about the SATC’s recent and current focus on Most
Profitable Prospects (MPP’s). These are seen by some participants as representing
only a very small part of the regions’ target markets. The Rediscover campaign has
beautiful images and music but the lack of people fails to make a connection between
the visitor and the operator providing the experience.

There was a concern that marketing to MPP’s ignores other sectors which may be
more relevant to the Clare Valley and Barossa.

There was also some concern expressed about the level of State Government funding
for tourism. While it was acknowledged that this has increased, it is still considered to
be proportionally lower than spending by other State Governments.

Experiences

The regions are moving away from a reliance on food and wine, seeking to value add
to these experiences. Walking and cycling and the promotion of links to the trails
within and beyond the region are recognised as becoming more important.

Regional, State and Commonwealth Structures

The SATC set up the regions in South Australia 4 years ago and these now appear to
be working well. The State Tourism Plan is now in place and that provides a clear
strategic framework within which the regions can operate by aligning their products and
promotion.

There is more Commonwealth Government funding for product development and
infrastructure. However, it was noted that competition for these funds is huge and only
a relatively small number of regions benefit.




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Attitudes of Local Businesses and Communities

There is still considered to be a lack of understanding of the value of tourism to local
businesses and the community. The challenge is to show businesses what they get
from their contribution to regional marketing.

Demonstrating the importance of the economic contribution of the operators to the
local economy could involve using a sticker on invoices that says “this account has
been paid by tourism”. This mechanism was used in Clare some time ago.

Those involved in tourism get lots of gratuitous advice from others who see themselves
as “experts”.




SWOT Analysis

Our Key Strengths: What makes us Competitive, that is Different and that is
Difficult for Competitors to Copy?

Accessible Diversity

The breadth of experiences accessible in the two regions is seen as a strength.

The visual landscape is soft and relaxing. It invites people to take time out for
indulging themselves. While this “chill out” factor is not unique to the region, it is
encouraged by the landscape and topography.

The closeness of townships gives some people a sense of safety and definition. They
are not overwhelmed by the spaces as sometimes happens in the outback.

The regions provide the most attractive drive to the Flinders Ranges and the recent
focus of the SATC on the journey through the Discover The Unwinding Roads
campaign has increased the awareness of the self drive market of this potential.

Authentic Environments and Experiences

The regions encourage people to get off the main road and discover their own “real”
people and places. There is a sense of pleasure in being able to say “I found this
place, I met this local character”.




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The heritage buildings are not simply able to be viewed but provide accommodation or
cellar door experiences that promote a sense of living history. Most towns have some
buildings with significant historic character.

People are able to connect with the “way we were” through meeting the winemaker or
the food producer. They are able to be inspired by the “sea-change” stories of those
who have been attracted to the regions to start new enterprises or breathe new life into
old properties.

It is possible to experience really exceptional food or wine and very indulgent
accommodation with accessible exercise opportunities available to offset the
“damage”.




Brand Recognition

No one else makes Barossa Shiraz or Clare Valley Riesling.

The Heysen and Mawson Trails connect through the region to the outback. The
Riesling Trail has a high level of recognition within South Australia.

What are our weaknesses: What do our natural competitors do better than us?
What aspects are we a little lazy in?

Many premises are not open 7 days a week. It is hard to know when food
establishments are open and what they charge.

We have become complacent about how we tell our story. There appears to be less
excitement now than before.

There is a lack of recognition of the life of Burra and Kapunda beyond mining – there
are other stories that could be told.

Lack of control of European wasps is a real threat to alfresco dining and picnics.

While some operators have a strong commitment to providing information about other
places to visit and encouraging people to move on through the regions, this is far from
universal and needs much more work.




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What are the Main Threats we Face?

The greatest risk to an “authentic” product would be losing the face to face experience
with the local people.

Getting too big and being perceived as a mass market / commercial destination could
threaten the sense of authenticity. People don’t want the Barossa or Clare Valley to
become the Hunter Valley.

If Councils approve large scale retail and industrial developments these could detract
from the character of the area and diminish their appeal to tourists. Designated heavy
vehicle routes can also adversely impact on rural accommodation and cellar door
experiences.

Complacency of tourism operators is a major threat. There is a sense that Barossa
may have been relying on their past reputation for a while.

Another threat is being too scattered by trying too hard to be all things to all people.
However, conversely some people thought that being too single minded in our focus on
existing markets could limit future opportunities.

Competition from other “newer” tourism regions is always a threat.

Where are our Opportunities?

Education about value adding to wine, primary production and food products will assist
in broadening the links to tourism.

Some wineries are beginning to increase the diversity of experiences by introducing
winery tours and establishing trails which link with existing regional trails.

Consideration could be given to cross marketing the regions across the seasons to
even up the visitor peaks and troughs. Clare is more popular in winter and Barossa
receives more visitors in the summer months.




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The Future

Where do we want to be 10 years from now?

Participants wanted to see:

        The same number of people spending more money as this will protect the small
        town character;

        More people visiting during the week;

        Shops and operations open 7 days a week;

        People staying an extra night;

        A borderless region that is experiential rather than geographical promoting driving
        loops and links;

        Integrity retained;

        More non-winery based tourism products;

        Better capitalisation of opportunities related to winery development;

        More activities for children;

        Further development of visitor access through trails and facilities in conservation
        parks;

        Affordable food available 7 days a week;

        Good value accommodation with more for families and retirees;

        Niche experiences such as night time entertainment and targeted events;

        Links established with tour operators to better package accommodation and
        attractions;

        Focus on day visitor experiences retained;

        Increased opportunities for coaches especially in Clare Valley and as part of the
        connection to the Flinders Ranges; and

        Clear targets set with respect to increasing visitor nights and yield.




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Other Resources For The Project

Some members of the group expressed concern about the low attendance of Barossa
invitees and suggested some other contacts. These included:

        Bruce Theile, Jacobs Creek Visitor Information Centre;

        Alison, Food Barossa;

        John, Barossa Daimler Tours;

        John Heneker, Chair, Barossa BWTA;

        John Breur, Adelaide University.

Fiona Cartwright was also suggested. The consultants have already met with Fiona
and will continue to liaise with her regarding the regional components of The Food and
Wine Strategy.

The Mid North Development Board has undertaken a skills audit and a report will be
available shortly focusing on areas for skill development. The Mid North region is also
undertaking retail and urban design studies which may be relevant.

The consultants need to follow up with Paul Anderson regarding planning and
development issues for developers of tourism product.




3.2           SECOND FORUM MEETING HELD ON 21ST SEPTEMBER 2004

The second Regional Leaders Forum was held on 21st September 2004 and
addressed strategies to build community capacity for a more competitive tourism
product. The forum considered the gaps in the current tourism offering and strategies
that can build the capacity of local people to address those gaps.

Gaps In The Current Offering By The Local Tourism Industry

The following gaps were identified:

        Education of the community about their involvement in tourism and of the tourism
        operators to be able to better promote what’s available in the region;

        Developing the quality of the personal service to visitors – finding and developing
        both paid and volunteer staff who are happy to be with visitors, who want to
        explain and ‘up-sell’ the local product, and who can tell the stories of the region;



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        Lack of certainty in opening hours, particularly of food venues, but also retail and
        hospitality. The lack of a collective approach to sharing information and building
        cross-referrals between businesses that service tourist needs;

        Co-ordination and professionalism of the Visitor Information Centres and greater
        professionalism needed in the industry generally;

        There is insufficient accommodation in the $75-$150 per night price range and
        strategies are needed to increase mid-week demand;

        Access to personal transport is needed – particularly for dining and evening
        entertainment;

        More family friendly activities, and / or greater promotion of existing activities and
        venues that are family friendly;

        Conflict between passenger vehicles and heavy freight vehicles;

        There needs to be a focus on packaged activities, particularly to attract niches in
        growth markets and the self-drive market from Adelaide; and

        The lack of a regional view. There is duplication and limited knowledge of tourism
        product in neighbouring areas, which encourages shorter stays and means that
        visitors tend to pass through the region rather than staying for longer periods.
        Maps are needed to help both operators and visitors find out about attractions in
        the region.




Capacity-Building Strategies

The leaders identified a number of strategies to address these gaps. Most of the
strategies focused on the development of a ‘packaging ethos’ that supported
cooperation and building collaborative attitudes and approaches.

Suggestions included:

        Collaborative Packaging Model - driven by the Regional Development Boards,
        SATC and the Tourism Marketing groups, using a paid consultant to establish
        packages at a regional level. Local packaging (three or four operators working
        together) would be a secondary outcome of this model;

        Self-drive packages from Adelaide presented in a brochure that features maps of
        routes, themed by visitor / attraction type;




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        Education of tourism operators, volunteers and communities about the available
        products using familiarisation visits (famils), explaining expectations of tourists
        and providing information and support to assist them to improve their business;

        Working one-on-one with operators using the local media and established
        community networks to build community awareness of their contribution to a
        quality visitor experience;

        Employing a product development officer who can work with the regional
        marketing committees to assist interested businesses to package their products;

        Conduct a packaging forum for regional operators using expertise from larger
        corporations such as Qantas and Coopers;

        Exploring what has been tried successfully in this region and in other areas;

        Identify opportunities to develop and promote children’s activities by:
        -     engaging school students in an audit of each other’s towns, eg “What’s good
              for kids in this area”;
        -     highlighting those businesses and activities that are already catering well for
              children;

        Explore the use of tourism students from Flinders University to undertake
        research; and

        Ensure better co-ordination of the Visitor Information Centres and work with them
        to improve their delivery of the key messages about the region and their local
        area. Considerable work will be needed to ensure that volunteers providing the
        information have first hand knowledge of the product and excellent skills in
        customer service. Finding local people with a story to tell and the capacity to
        deliver it well was suggested as a way to provide a more memorable first
        encounter with the region.




3.3           THIRD FORUM MEETING HELD ON 30TH NOVEMBER 2004

Discussion on the Draft Strategic Directions Paper

There were some specific errors, gaps and omissions identified, and there was some
concern expressed about the quality of existing baseline data at a regional level (eg no
current expenditure patterns for the Clare Valley). This makes trend analysis very
difficult. It highlights the need to establish a baseline and agreed data set for collection




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in an appropriate time series, eg every 3 years for a clearly designated regional
boundary.

Directions Supported

There was general agreement with the focus on improving experiences for families
with children. This probably involves refurbishing and reinvigorating children’s
activities that exist, promoting parks and playgrounds and venues with safe open
space areas.

Rather than ask tourism establishments to identify themselves as “children welcome”,
criteria need to be established to define a child friendly attraction or venue and an
independent annual audit conducted to verify the extent to which these criteria are met.

This triggered a discussion on accreditation which highlighted the view that if tourism
accreditation does not directly benefit the consumer, then there is no reason for an
operator or the agency responsible for accreditation to make the effort involved.

A Child Friendly Brochure and guidelines for operators wishing to be child friendly were
suggested as useful short term goals.

Product Development and Reinvigoration

There is a very important link between regional foods and tourism. The emerging
network of regional food groups each has to define its specific nature and regional
tourism bodies need to identify how this can become a regional selling point.

Anlaby Station is being refurbished and the garden restored by its new owners who
intend to offer tours and accommodation. Some concern was expressed that
restoration of older buildings can take away the “sense of decay / decline” that is an
essential part of understanding our history.

The suggested product reinvigoration for Burra was seen as particularly necessary and
consistent with the current directions being pursued by the Tourist Association,
National Trust and Council. For Kapunda it was suggested that a key challenge is
changing people’s perceptions of what a “museum” is.

Links between regions are considered very important – maps and / or brochures that
show the links would be helpful (eg The Heartland Heritage Trail).




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Positioning

This area was considered to need further development, building on the essential
elements of intimacy and connection with people. It will be important to focus on
specific regional characteristics so that people can visualise a 3 dimensional image
when they hear “Clare Valley” or “The Barossa”. The seasonal variations in the rural
landscape are part of what many visitors appreciate as well as the very distinctive
villages. Telling the stories – historic and contemporary is a key part of building the
experience of the regions that positions them in visitors’ minds.

Customer Service and Business Performance

The directions related to increasing the skills and knowledge of staff and volunteers
from Visitor Information Centres to provide an excellent and consistent customer focus
and to cross-sell and promote their whole region and adjoining regions were strongly
supported. This is seen as going beyond training to a real cultural shift and
behavioural change.

Priority Directions for the Strategic Plan

Members of the Regional Leaders Forum expressed the following views on the priority
areas for the Plan:

        moving from competition to collaboration between operators, towns and regions
        by fostering linkages;

        understanding what we have and making better use of our existing resources;

        increasing the length of stay by promoting the regions as an integrated package;

        thinking bigger and broader by symbolically working on issues that cross the
        regions, eg some simple cross regional information sharing arrangements such as
        a monthly email exchange – what’s on in the region;

        a summary of the Strategy that appeals to everybody in the community promoted
        through the press;

        implementation of the project assisted by a clear Action Plan that prioritises the
        most important early actions and assigns responsibility for driving these; and

        continued involvement of regional leaders and associations / marketing
        committees in small cross regional teams to drive specific strategy areas.




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                                         Surveys of Businesses and Residents in Eight Regional Towns




4.            SURVEYS OF BUSINESSES AND RESIDENTS IN EIGHT
              REGIONAL TOWNS

INTRODUCTION

Face to face surveys were completed with 78 business owners / operators and 63
residents in Burra, Clare, Eudunda, Kapunda, Mount Pleasant, Angaston, Nuriootpa
and Tanunda. A detailed summary of the Business Survey findings is provided in
Appendix 1. The findings of the Community Survey are provided in Appendix 2.




Importance of Tourism

Tourism was not universally recognised as being important to business, with 12% of
business respondents not considering tourism as important to their business. All
business respondents in Nuriootpa and Tanunda said that tourism was ‘important’ or
‘very important’ but a third of business respondents in Eudunda and Kapunda said that
tourism was not important to their business.

Businesses that are less likely to see tourism as important included clothing and
hardware shops, butchers and petrol stations – a worrying finding considering that
petrol stations are one of the most important sources of local information for visitors,
and that (particularly in small towns) tourists wishing to go shopping expect to shop in
local stores such as clothing and hardware shops. In fact these are often seen as
good opportunities to get in touch with the authentic experience of a region and to buy
products that are best considered at leisure, a luxury not available to busy city people.

Tourism was recognised as being very important by 72% of all residents who
responded to the survey. Tourism receives greatest recognition in Tanunda (100%),
Angaston (100%), Nuriootpa (100%), Burra (88%) and Clare (80%). The figures in
brackets are the proportion of respondents from that town.

The greatest benefits of tourism for businesses were the financial and economic
benefits (42% of responses). Other benefits frequently-mentioned by businesses
were: keeping the town alive / vibrant / more people around (19%), increased
awareness and promotion (14%), and benefit to all businesses in the town (12%).
Businesses in Nuriootpa mentioned proportionally more benefits than other towns, and
Eudunda identified the least number of benefits.




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       Residents also recognised economic benefits (69% of respondents), along with more
       people / better services and an enhanced community (27%). Employment was
       mentioned by 16% of residential respondents, compared to only 6% of businesses.

       The table below shows a summary of the responses to questions relating to the
       importance of tourism. It provides an indicator of the level of readiness to work on
       tourism development in each town.




Table 1: Summary of Responses by Town Relating to the Importance of Tourism

                                           Eudunda   Nuriootpa   Kapunda   Tanunda   Clare     Mt       Angaston   Burra
Comparisons
                                                                                             Pleasant
Towns where tourism is                                  X          X         X        X                             X
most important to
business (> 66%)
Towns were tourism is                                   X                    X        X                    X        X
most important to
residents (>66%)
>49% income from                                                   X         X                                      X
tourism
>49% growth in income                                              X                  X         X
from tourism last 5 yrs

>100% benefits identified                               X          X         X        X         X          X        X
from tourism

TOTAL responses                                 0       3          4         4        4         2          2        4




       Business Income From Tourism

       Business respondents in Kapunda, Tanunda and Burra stated that at least half of their
       income was from tourism. A fifth of the businesses surveyed were not in business five
       years ago - this was most marked in Burra and Clare where new businesses comprise
       over 30% of the businesses surveyed. Of those who had been in business longer than
       five years, Kapunda, Clare and Mount Pleasant had received the greatest increase in
       income from tourists. A third of the businesses in Eudunda and half of the businesses
       in Tanunda that participated in the survey had lower returns from tourism than they did
       five years ago.




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                                         Surveys of Businesses and Residents in Eight Regional Towns




Recognition Of Tourists, Their Needs And The Local Attractions

Over 40% of businesses surveyed could not identify a trend in the age group of tourists
in their businesses.

Residents identified heritage and
history to be the most appealing aspect                         Aspect                 No.   % resp
of their region and saw the retention of
                                                                Heritage and history   22    36%
town character and a healthy
                                                                Wineries               20    32%
environment as a good way of                                    Scenery                11    17%
encouraging visitors to return. Less                            Mining                  9    15%

than a fifth mentioned the scenery.




There was general agreement that providing good quality friendly service and creating
a positive first impression by attention to detail and presentation are the main
ingredients in an enjoyable visitor experience. The availability of good food and
affordable accommodation are also seen as important. Respondents also noted the
need to educate locals to appreciate tourists and provide a welcoming approach and
good information.




Values

Community

                                                            Value                      No.   % resp
Residents were asked what they valued
most about their community. The most
                                                            Friendly                   26    42%
frequently-mentioned response was                           Close / big family         12    19%
friendliness. Other community values                        Supportive/caring          11    18%
                                                            Welcoming / accepting       5     8%
reinforced this finding (see table).
                                                            Strong sense of community 5       8%
                                                            Lovely / good people        3     5%
A few people noted that the community
                                                            Able to do everything here  3     5%
can be hard to break into and can be a                      Easy going                  2     3%
bit “cliquey”.




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Disadvantages of Tourism


A third (34%) of residential respondents did not identify any disadvantages from
increasing the focus on tourism in the local economy. Twenty five percent of residents
did not respond to this question. The remaining 41% of respondents mentioned
concerns about:

        Changing the character of the town;

        Traffic and parking problems;

        The needs of locals given lower priority;

        Locals reluctance to embrace growth (and that it would be preferable to have the
        same number of tourists spending more money than having more tourists); and

        The need for businesses to be open 7 days to cater for tourists.




Environmental Values

The environmental values are shown in
the table, with the most frequently-                        Value                      No.   % resp
mentioned being:
                                                            Landscape & scenery         12   19%
        landscape and scenery;                              Close to bush and mallee     9   15%
                                                            Open Air                     8   13%
        the proximity to the bush and                       Peace and quiet              8   13%
        mallee;                                             Green                        7   11%
                                                            Cropping and agriculture     4    6%
        open air;                                           Orchards and vineyards       4    6%
                                                            Burra Gorge                  4    6%
        peace and quiet; and
                                                            Waterways                    3    5%
                                                            Wildlife and native species 2     3%
        green countryside.
                                                            Historic buildings           2    3%
                                                            Healthy environment          2    3%
There was a low level mention of
                                                            Climate / seasons            2    3%
specific locations, with only four people                   Heysen Trail                 1    2%
mentioning the Burra Gorge and one
mentioning the Heysen Trail.




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Appropriate Tourism Development

Residential respondents were asked about appropriate and inappropriate tourism
development. Respondents suggested the following types of appropriate
developments:

        More for children and teenagers including family friendly wineries;

        More shops and retail opportunities and longer opening hours;

        Cheaper accommodation including caravan parks;

        A greater range of food;

        Environmentally focussed attractions

        Focus on mining; and

        Better infrastructure including signs and roads.

A small number of respondents suggested that the area should remain much the
same.




Inappropriate Tourism Development

Not many people responded to this question, however, the comments mainly related to
avoiding developments that are large scale, garish, and not in keeping with the
character and heritage of the area. Two people stated that fast food outlets were
inappropriate and four respondents said there was too much of a focus on wine.

Three people also mentioned that large scale housing or industrial developments could
detract from tourism and one person suggested that there should be no more B&Bs.
Heritage areas should be protected (5 comments) as should highly visible areas such
as town gateways and main streets (4 comments).

Specific mention was made of the River Torrens, the hills around Clare, the Burra
Creek and the need to protect agricultural land. The dry conditions beyond Goyder’s
Line were also seen as a limit to tourism development.




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                                                                 Survey of Visitors to the Region




5.            SURVEY OF VISITORS TO THE REGION

Over 180 surveys were provided to the 5 Visitor Information Centres and 12 tourism
operators. In spite of personal visits and follow up phone calls and the incentive of a
$250.00 travel voucher, initially only 40 surveys were returned. After an extension of
time, a further 16 surveys were collected, amounting to a total number of some 56
surveys. It is therefore necessary to treat the information in the survey with caution due
to the very small sample size. A copy of the raw data from the surveys is provided in
Appendix 3.

Tables in this section are not numbered as they are used solely for presentation
purposes.



Characteristics of Visitors

Those completing the survey were in the following age groups:

Age Group                                       Number                       Percentage
15 – 24                                             4                            7%
25 – 44                                            15                           27%
45 – 64                                            26                           46%
65+                                                11                           20%



Their travel party was comprised as follows:

Type                                                     Number                Percentage
Couple                                                      35                     63%
Friends/Relatives Group                                     14                     25%
Family – parents with children                               3                      5%
Individual travelling alone                                  3                      5%
School group                                                 1                      2%




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They described themselves as belonging to the following categories of travellers:

Type                                                    Number *               Percentage
Budget                                                      29                     48%
Luxury                                                      21                     34%
Seeking adventure                                            5                      8%
Seeking nature based                                         4                      6%
Not stated                                                   2                      4%
* Please note that multiple responses in these categories result in the total number
exceeding the number of surveys.



Their usual place of residence was:

City of State                                            Number                Percentage
Metropolitan Adelaide                                       30                     54%
Other Australian State                                       7                     12%
Country SA                                                   5                      9%
Country Victoria                                             5                      9%
Melbourne                                                    4                      7%
Sydney                                                       3                      5%
Country NSW                                                  1                      2%
Overseas                                                     1                      2%



They travelled to the region by the following method:

Travel Method                                            Number                Percentage
Own Car                                                     42                     75%
Rented Car                                                  10                     18%
Bicycle                                                      3                      5%
Bus                                                          1                      2%



Comparison with Regional Profiles for Clare Valley and Barossa

The survey sample compares with the visitor statistics for the Clare Valley and Barossa
Regions in the following ways:




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Composition of Travel Party

                                         Clare Valley 2003     Barossa 2003            Survey
Couple                                         46%                  61%                  63%
Friends and Relatives                          7%                   11%                  25%
without Children
Families with Children                         11%                  17%                  5%
Other                                          36%                  11%                  7%
Source: SATC Regional Profiles 2003, and survey


The survey sample was more likely to comprise couples and adults travelling without
children than the regional samples.

Category of Traveller

The survey sample was more likely to describe themselves as luxury travellers (34%)
compared with 27% in Clare Valley and 29% in the Barossa. Survey sample
participants were also more likely to describe themselves as budget travellers – 48% in
the sample, 36% in Clare Valley and 41% in Barossa. For the survey we defined
luxury as spending more than $200 a night on accommodation.

Origin of Traveller

The majority of the sample (63%) were from South Australia with 36% from interstate
and 1% from overseas.

This compares with the regional statistics as follows for overnight visitors:

                                          Clare Valley            Barossa              Survey
Intrastate                                   68%                    60%                 63%
Interstate                                   29%                    30%                 35%
International                                 3%                    10%                  2%
Source: SATC Regional Profiles 2003, and survey


The survey sample is closer to the Barossa Valley profile but is more strongly focussed
on the local South Australian market and the interstate travel market.




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Travel to the Region

The travel profile of the survey sample is similar to that for Clare Valley and the
Barossa Valley, although a higher proportion were travelling in a rented car – 18% for
the survey compared with 5% for both Clare Valley and Barossa in the profile sample.
Private vehicles are the dominant mode of transport in both regions.



Experience of the Regions

Of the 56 respondents, only 14 were visiting for the first time. Wineries had been the
major attraction for a number of these first time visitors with history, word of mouth /
friends and proximity to the Flinders Ranges also noted by several participants as
reasons for visiting. One person had won a travel auction while another was attracted
to the Mawson Trail.

Of the 42 who had visited previously, almost half of these had visited Clare (n = 20)
and the Barossa (n = 17) two to three times in the past 3 years. Respondents were
more likely to have visited the Barossa four to five times (n = 8) than Clare (n = 4).



Main Purpose of Trip and Length of Stay

The majority of respondents were in the regions on a holiday including an overnight
stay (n = 38). Four participants were visiting friends and relatives. Three more were
staying overnight for business or a conference. Only five respondents were day
visitors.

The following table highlights the number of nights spent in the regions.

Number of Nights                                          Clare                  Barossa
1 night                                                      8                       5
2 nights                                                    13                      10
3 nights                                                     4                       2
4 – 7 nights                                                 8                       5
More than 7 nights                                           -                       4




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The highest proportion of overnight visitors in both the Clare Valley and Barossa
Regions are staying for 2 nights. The Barossa total for more than 7 nights may have
been skewed by people visiting friends and taking care of cottages while their owners
were away on holiday.



Accommodation

The following table shows the types of accommodation people in the survey sample
usually choose to stay in:

Accommodation Type                                            Clare                  Barossa
Self contained bed and breakfast                                18                      10
Hotel / Motel                                                    4                       9
Caravan Park / camping                                          11                       1
Hosted bed and breakfast                                         2                       0
Friends or relatives                                             2                       2
Informal camping                                                 2                       2
Not stated / not applicable                                     17                      32



Visitors to the Clare Valley were more likely to stay in a self-contained bed and
breakfast or a caravan park than those to the Barossa. Visitors to the Barossa were
equally likely to choose self-contained bed and breakfast accommodation or a hotel or
motel. Hosted bed and breakfast accommodation was rated low as a preferred choice
in both regions.

People were asked what they would usually spend per night on accommodation. The
following table demonstrates their responses.

Expenditure                              Individual             Couple                 Family
Less than $50                                5                       5                    1
$51 - $100                                   4                       9                    -
$101 - $200                                  1                       23                   -
$201-$300                                    -                       1                    -



Individuals were generally more likely to spend less than $100 on accommodation. The
significant majority of couples spent between $101 and $200 on accommodation.




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Comparison with Regional Profiles for Clare Valley and Barossa

The survey respondents were as likely to be travelling for holiday and leisure (84%) as
the profiles for Barossa (88%) and Clare (85%). They were less likely to be visiting for
business purposes.

For those staying overnight in the region, the survey sample compares with the
regional profile as follows:

                                              Regional Profile                     Survey
Length of Stay                           Clare Valley     Barossa       Clare Valley      Barossa
1 night                                     46%             36%             24%             19%
2 nights                                    27%             34%             39%             38%
3 nights                                    13%             12%             12%              8%
4-7 nights                                   8%             12%             25%             19%
More than 7 nights                           5%              6%               0             16%
Source: SATC Regional Profile 2003, and survey


The survey sample was more likely to be staying longer in the regions than the
regional profiles with more people spending at least 2 nights.

The survey sample in the Barossa were more likely to choose hotel / motel
accommodation (38%) than the regional profile (21%) and self-contained bed and
breakfast (42%) than the regional profile (15%). In Clare the majority of survey
respondents (46%) choose to stay in self-contained bed and breakfast accommodation
compared with 24% in the regional profile, while 28% chose caravan park
accommodation compared with 6% in the regional profile.




Visitor Experiences

Visitors were asked which towns they had visited during their trip. While Clare,
Kapunda, Tanunda, Angaston, Nuriootpa, Lyndoch, Burra and Auburn all received 10
or more mentions, a further 33 towns were noted. Mintaro was only visited by six
survey respondents.




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The following list shows the top 12 activities that people participated in during their
visit:

1.       General sightseeing                              n = 36

2.       Visiting wineries                                n = 35

3.       Visiting historic areas or heritage places       n = 31

4.       Eating out at restaurants                        n = 28

5.       Visiting museums or art galleries                n = 25

6.       Bush walking                                     n = 18

7.       Visiting pubs, clubs and discos                  n = 14

8.       Shopping for pleasure                            n = 14

9.       Picnics / barbeques                              n = 12

10. Visiting friends and relatives                        n = 12

11. Cycling                                               n=7

12. Trips to other places                                 n=5

Participants were asked if they had not done anything on this trip that they had done
previously. The main responses related to not cycling this time, not visiting as many
wineries or not attending events held at different times of the year. Most of the
reasons were personal such as not feeling well, staying with friends, not enough time
or money. Poor previous service was mentioned by only one respondent.

Respondents were asked what kinds of attractions they had visited on this trip.
Wineries were most frequently mentioned (n = 10), with others including Kapunda
Museum (n = 4), Martindale Hall (n = 3), Burra Heritage Trail (n = 3), Collingrove
House (n = 2), Bungaree (n = 2), Maggie Beer’s (n = 2), Riesling Trail (n = 2), walking
trails (n = 2), coffee shops / food (n = 2), Menglers Hill (n = 2), antique craft shops (n =
2), and the Whispering Wall (n = 2). Over 20 other individual attractions were recorded.

The following table shows the comparison between the activities people participated in
during their visit for the survey sample and the top 10 activities listed in the regional
profiles. The survey sample is across the two regions. Data is provided in descending
order of the frequency mentioned.




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Activity                                                     Survey          Clare Valley              Barossa
                                                             Sample
General sightseeing                                            1                    2                        4
Visiting wineries                                              2                    4                        2
Visiting historic areas / heritage                             3                    8                        9
Eating out at restaurants                                      4                    1                        1
Visiting museums or art venues                                 5                    -                        -
Bushwalking                                                    6                    7                not mentioned
                                                                                                       in top 10
Visiting pubs / clubs and discos                               7                    5                        6
Pleasure shopping                                              7                    6                        5
Picnics / barbecues                                            8                    9                        7
Visiting friends and relatives                                 8                    3                        3
Cycling                                                        9            not mentioned            not mentioned
                                                                              in top 10                in top 10
Attending events                                               10           not mentioned            not mentioned
                                                                              in top 10                in top 10
Source: SATC Regional Profiles 2003, and survey

The survey sample group were more likely to visit wineries, historic areas, museums,
art galleries and heritage places than those recorded by the regional profiles. They
were also more likely to be bushwalking or cycling and much less likely to be visiting
friends and relatives or shopping for pleasure.

They were asked how much they would spend on average on items other than
accommodation. The table below provides an overview of their responses.

Expenditure                              Meals         Wine at        Other Food/         Entry to       Art/Craft
                                                      Cellar Door      Produce          Attractions/
                                                                                           Tours
Dollars                           Ind       Cple       Ind    Cple    Ind   Cple        Ind    Cple     Ind      Cple
1 – 10                              -                                  2      2          1       2       -        1
11 – 20                            3                                   3      4          1       2       -        2
21 – 50                            3             8             1       3     11          -      10       -        5
51 – 100                           5             6      1     11       1      5          -       -       2        3
101 – 150                           -            7      3      2       -      1          -       1       -        -
151 – 200                          1             3      3      4       -      2          -       1       -        1
201 – 500                           -            7      -      4       -      -          -       -       -        -
           (1)
Totals                             8         24         5     18       6     19          2       9       2        7
(1)
        Totals do not match total surveys due to multiple answers and this section not
        being completed by all respondents.




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Of the two family groups who responded, one indicated they would spend $130.00 on
items other than accommodation and the other would spend $650.00 highlighting the
range of family markets.

Expenditure on tours and entry to attractions is relatively low – less than $25 a head
per trip possibly reflecting the limited number of tours and attractions available.




Recommended Areas, Activities and Attractions

Sixteen (16) wineries were mentioned and 15 restaurants with Maggie Beer’s and 1918
rating 2 or more mentions. Various wineries were recommended which included
Chateau Barossa, Yaldara, Elderton Wines and Jeanneret. A number of natural areas
were recommended which included the Kaiser Stuhl Conservation Park, the Kapunda
Memorial Park and the Menglers Hill lookout and sculpture.

A range of trails – driving, walking, cycling and horse riding were mentioned.

For a complete list of the 80 recommendations see Question 8 in Appendix 3.

Two of the attractions that were not recommended are located in Mintaro and are seen
as looking uninviting or providing inadequate service. Another person was
disappointed that Anlaby was not open.




Source of Information

Prior to the visit, the most frequently mentioned sources of information were brochures,
used by 31% of visitors, travel guides (17%), the internet (15%) and the South
Australian Travel Centre or other similar Visitor Centre, used by 12% of visitors. The
sample group were more likely to use brochures and travel guides than the regional
profiles for both Clare and the Barossa where brochures and guides were only used by
7-9% of the profile sample. The regional profiles for both Clare and the Barossa were
just as likely to use the internet (16%) as the sample group (15%).




Quality of Signage

Of the 51 respondents to this question, only 5 rated directional signage as poor, while
17 rated it as very good. The majority considered it to be average to good (n= 29).



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Informational signage was seen as very good by 14 respondents with only three
people rating it as poor. Most people thought it was average to good (n = 32).

Most concerns related to the size of signs and their positioning too close to the turn-off
making it too late to take the turn easily. A small number of people had trouble finding
the wineries or finding their way once they were off the main road.

A small number of other participants felt that their was often not enough signage in
certain locations while several others felt their was no consistency to the distribution of
signage in the region.

However, the rating and low number of negative responses indicates that for these
visitors, directional and informational signage was generally adequate or better.




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                                                             Survey of Visitors to South Australia




6.            SURVEY OF VISITORS TO SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Thirty three surveys were undertaken in four locations. Fifteen of these were done
face-to-face at Visitor Information Centres in McLaren Vale and King William Street,
Adelaide. Eighteen were completed by guests of the Grosvenor Mercure Hotel,
Adelaide and the Adelaide Shores Holiday Village, West Beach. Appendix 4 provides
a detailed summary of survey responses.

Fourteen people (42%) were visiting for the purpose of holiday or leisure, 10 people
(30%) were involved in business or conference travel and 7 people (21%) were visiting
family and relatives.

The majority of those surveyed were aged 45-64 (45%) with people aged 25-44 the
next most frequent category (30%) with only 18% over the age of 65 years.

Those surveyed were most likely to be travelling as a couple (36%) or with adult family
and friends (30%). People travelling alone comprised 15% of the sample, while
families with children or other adults with children both comprised less than 5% of the
total.

Those surveyed came from almost all Australian States and Territories with a mix of
people from capital cities and the regions.

Victoria (n = 8) and Western Australia (n = 7) provided the largest proportions. Five
overseas visitors were surveyed from Italy, United Kingdom, Japan, Korea and New
Zealand. Over 50% had flown to South Australia (n = 17), while 40% had driven. Fifty
percent were travelling in a private car while 21% were in a rental car and 10% were
travelling by bus.

There was a wide range in the amount spent on accommodation with 36% spending
less than $50 per night (probably mainly those visiting family and relatives), 24%
spending less than $100 a night and 33% spending up to $200 a night.

Over half of all these visitors were spending 2-3 nights in South Australia. People
staying longer than 7 nights tended to be from overseas or more distant interstate
locations, eg Brisbane and Hobart.

Participants were asked which regions they had visited or planned to visit. The most
frequently mentioned regions were:

        Adelaide Hills (58% of respondents);



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        Fleurieu Peninsula (36% of respondents);

        Barossa (33% of respondents);

        Clare Valley (30% of respondents).

Most participants planned to visit at least two regions on this trip.

Those who had visited or planned to visit the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions were
asked how long they planned to stay and their main reasons for visiting these areas.
The table below shows a comparison of their responses.

Table 2: Reasons for Visiting Barossa and Clare Valley as Part of Their Visit to
South Australia

                             Barossa                                                   Clare Valley
       Length of Stay                     Reasons for Visiting            Length of Stay         Reasons for Visiting

Day         1-2          3-7             Wineries/vineyards   6    Day        1-2      3-7      Wineries/vineyards   5
Trip        nights       nights          Sightseeing          3    Trip       nights   nights   Heritage and         2
9           0            2               Food and wine        1    8          2        0        history

                                         Heritage and         1                                 Sightseeing          2
                                         history                                                Golf                 1
                                         Maggie Beer’s        1                                 VFR                  1
                                         restaurant
                                         Scenery              1
                                         VFR                  1

Forty two percent of those surveyed had visited the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions
previously. Half of these had visited in the past 2 years, however, 3 people had visited
more than 10 years ago.

The main reasons given for not visiting the Barossa or Clare Valleys on this visit were
lack of time (57% of those not visiting), lack of knowledge about the region (28%) and
not interested in kinds of activities available there (14%).

All survey respondents including those who had not visited the regions were asked
what characteristics they associate with the region and which of these are most
appealing to them. The table below compares the top responses for each of the
regions.




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Table 3: Appealing Characteristics of Barossa and Clare Valley Regions

                             Barossa                                          Clare Valley
Characteristics                    Number of    Most        Characteristics        Number of   Most
                                   Responses    Appealing                          Responses   Appealing
                                                in Order                                       in Order

Wineries /                               26         1       Wineries /                 20          1
vineyards                                                   vineyards
Scenery                                  12         2       Scenery                     6          2
Food / food and                          8          3       Historic buildings          4          3
wine                                                        and streetscapes
Heritage and                             5          4       Food / food and             3          4
history (including                                          wine
German heritage)
Festivals                                2             -    Golf Courses                1          -
Arts and Crafts                          2           -      Copper and mining           1          -



Both regions are primarily recognised for their wine and scenery with Barossa being
slightly better known. Six respondents said that they either had never heard of the
Clare Valley or did not know anything about it.

Food and wine is more strongly associated with the Barossa, while heritage and history
are recognised elements of both regions.

Survey respondents were asked which regions they would be most likely to visit if they
returned to South Australia. The Clare Valley and Barossa were equal second behind
the Flinders Ranges and Outback. Almost 40% of respondents considered that they
were very likely to visit the Barossa in the future, while 30% thought that they would
visit the Clare Valley.




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                                                                      Market Analysis Workshop




7.            MARKET ANALYSIS WORKSHOP

This workshop was held on 9th November 2004 in Kapunda. It was attended by the
Project Steering Committee, the Chairs and Managers of Regional Marketing
Committees and several staff from the South Australian Tourism Commission.

The purpose of the workshop was to:

        Identify the regions’ preferred future target markets;

        Identify their motivations and needs;

        Agree on the regions’ core products, their life cycle status and their growth
        potential; and

        Consider how well the available product meets the needs of the target markets.




IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET MARKETS

The workshop participants agreed to adapt the Wine Tourism Visitor Segmentation
Model to incorporate the different motivations and behaviours of Generation X (those
born between 1960 and 1974 – 31 – 45 year olds) and Generation Y (those born
between 1975 and 1985 – 21 – 30 year olds). The Strategy Plan provides a
description of this market segmentation in Section 4.4 and proposes target proportions
of each market segment based on the directions of the Market Analysis Workshop.




What are the Target Markets Looking For?

The following list describes the motivation and needs of the visitors the regions wish to
attract:

        Relax and unwind;
        To be in a natural landscape – spiritual wellbeing;
        Spend time with partner;
        Romance;
        Reconnection with self, partner, children;
        Wellbeing / health / exercise;
        Learning – curiosity;
        Want to have a story to tell – having one up on ‘’friends’ – bragging;
        Discovering and reconnecting with family roots;




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        Connect with something that is real;
        Social interaction / “friendship” for a few minutes to feel special;
        To experience generosity;
        Nostalgia for time spent in the country;
        Place to feel secure;
        Snapshots / short sharp experiences for (Gen X / Gen Y); and a
        Sense of achievement / time spent has been worthwhile.

(See Section 4.5 of the Strategy Plan for a description of the influences these
motivations have on positioning the region.)




After considerable discussion the following core products were identified:

1.      Family owned cellar doors:
        -     stories to tell, learning and social interaction;

        -     place reflects people / owners.

2.      Iconic cellar doors with high brand recognition:
        -     story told rather than exchanged;
        -     safe introduction to wine for newcomers;

        -     world renowned innovations.

3.      Guided immersion into a winery:
        -     access into the property – feeling special;
        -     character / culture / history of wine industry or the institution.

4.      Welcoming country pubs:
        -     nostalgia, authentic;
        -     people using it are local;

        -     can hear stories from locals.

5.      Eating foods grown locally using traditional methods:
        -     meet the grower and learn about local context;
        -     story of the grower as a person (local) – why they came / grow / share.

6.      Heritage that can be physically experienced – has a story to tell that’s personal,
        nostalgic, connects to lost familiarity, memory and experience:
        -     opportunity to learn about people.




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7.      Barossa Vintage Festival:
        -     meet the local community as stall holders and participants;
        -     long standing / tradition;
        -     snapshot of local, food, wine and culture;
        -     reflects multiculturalism of region.

8.      Riesling Trail:
        -     connects local heritage, villages, wineries;
        -     exercise and fresh air to work off eating;
        -     safe and easy, kid friendly, can adjust effort.



Figure One presents a generalised product lifecycle analysis for the eight core
products identified for the region, with two of the products being broken down further
by region to reflect significant differences. A lifecycle analysis plots the performance of
tourism products (such as visitation, occupancy, sales or revenue) against the stage of
evolution of a product. The four major lifecycle stages are:

1.      Introduction, where the product is introduced to the market and marketing strives
        to gain awareness and sales.

2.      Growth, where awareness grows and begins to deliver sales and eventually,
        profits.

3.      Maturity, where sales are maintained and profits are sound, but no further
        significant growth occurs.

4.      Decline, where high yielding markets change to lower ones or visitation / sales
        simply declines.


4b. Extension, where the product is reinvigorated to recapture market needs and thus
        begins another growth curve.


Some products may stay in a particular position for many years and others may move
rapidly through the lifecycle. A healthy region has products widely distributed across
the lifecycle stages.




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                                                                                         7
                                                                 6a
                                                        1                            4               6b




                                                 5a
                                             8
                                                                                                                    6c
                                         2



                                  3
                         5b




                     Introduction        Growth                Maturity                      Decline or Extension
                     Year 1              Year 2                Years 3 - 5                   Years 6 - 10



          1. Family owned cellar doors                           6a. Heritage immersion in Barossa & Clare Valley

          2. Iconic cellar doors (high brand recognition)       6b. Heritage immersion in Kapunda

          3. Guided immersion into a winery                      6c. Heritage immersion at Burra

          4. Welcoming country pubs                             7. Barossa Vintage Festival

          5a. Eating food grown and prepared in Barossa          8. Riesling Trail

          5b. Eating food grown and prepared in Clare




Figure 1              Lifecycle analysis for core products of the Barossa Clare
                      Region




Specific conclusions that can be drawn from the lifecycle analysis are:

        the region has a healthy spread of product across the lifecycle, with the strongest
        contributions coming from family cellar doors and heritage immersion in the Clare
        and Barossa (heritage accommodation) – these can be considered the “cash
        cows” for the region;

        the emerging key contributions will be made by eating locally grown food in the
        Barossa, The Riesling Trail and iconic cellar doors – these will play a major role in
        stimulating regional awareness and growth;

        the early introduction of guided immersion into a winery and eating locally grown
        food in the Clare Valley will need solid marketing assistance to move into growth
        mode;



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        welcoming country pubs and the Barossa Vintage Festival have reached the point
        of some reinvigoration being required to maintain their appeal and subsequent
        patronage (some pubs and the Festival are being reinvigorated with positive
        results); and

        heritage immersion in Burra and Kapunda are in decline and probably beginning
        to ‘let the team down’, so – a decision needs to be made whether to let them
        continue their decline or undertake the urgent reinvigoration required for these
        products to regain their appeal. This strategy recommends urgent reinvigoration
        for key products that contribute to the heritage immersion experience in Burra and
        Kapunda.




What Products are Missing from the Region?

        Focus on wellness / spiritual reconnection;
        Luxury 5 star pampering / massage for the indulger market (top end);
        Country Club Resort style accommodation that packages activity;
        Cheaper accommodation $75 - $150 per night;
        Accommodation and activities packaged for families with children aged 0-5 years /
        5-10 years / 10-15 years;
        Group accommodation:
        - Business / Corporate Conferences and events for 100 – 300 people;
        Shopping – retail diversity, consistent weekend opening hours, consistent quality;
        Water in the landscape as a setting for accommodation and activities;
        Tented camp sites in natural settings (serviced);
        Land transport:
        - regular scheduled services;
        - flexible destination oriented.




Product Market Match

A product market match is a subjective evaluation of how well certain products appeal
to certain markets, based on what is known about the characteristics of the products
and the needs of the markets. Tables 1 to 3 present product-market matches for the
Barossa, the Clare Valley Wine Region and the Clare Valley Cultural Heritage Region
(mainly Kapunda and Burra).




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What can be drawn from the Barossa product-market match is that:

        the family owned cellar doors and eating locally grown and prepared food have
        the widest match across the target markets;

        the iconic wineries and welcoming country pubs have a strong match to two of the
        growth target markets, probably a stronger match with other non-target leisure
        markets and business markets;

        heritage immersion matches all markets but doesn’t achieve a strong match with
        any of the growth markets;

        the strongest match is with the Browsers, though these are a consolidated market;
        and

        the weakest match is with the Visiting Friends and Relatives market.




What can be drawn from the Clare Valley wine region product-market match is that:

        the strongest matches are family owned cellar doors, the Riesling Trail and eating
        locally grown and prepared food;

        heritage immersion matches strongly across several markets; and

        welcoming country pubs are a strong match with two of the growth target markets.




What can be drawn from the Clare Valley heritage regions of Kapunda and Burra in
terms of product-market match is that:

        there is a much narrower product range because of the removal of wine tasting
        and any major event or recreational facility;

        the wine focussed and indulger markets are largely absent because of the
        different nature of the available product; and

        the region is dependent on two core products and these attract Browsers (an
        ageing market), Generation Y Discoverers (a young market) and VFR (a
        potentially low yield market).




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Table 4: Product Market Match of Barossa Core Products to Target Markets


                                                                                              Target markets for the Barossa
Core products of the Barossa                                                  Growth target markets                                    Consolidated target markets
                                                          Wine focussed   Indulgers       Gen X Discoverers   Gen Y Discoverers      Browsers                VFR

Family owned cellar doors

Iconic cellar doors

Guided immersion in a winery∇

Welcoming country pubs

Eating locally grown food∇

Barossa Vintage Festival

Heritage immersion



Key:

                      Strong match

                      Modest match

                      Limited match
                      No match




∇
    Likely to attract business marks / Opportunities for new investors
∇
    Likely to attract business marks / Opportunities for new investors



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Table 5: Product Market Match of Clare Valley Wine Region Core Products to Target Markets


                                                                                     Target markets for Clare Valley
Core products of the Clare Valley wine
                                                         Growth target markets                                         Consolidated target markets
region
                                         Wine focussed    Gen X Discoverers      Gen Y Discoverers        Indulgers            Browsers              VFR
Family owned cellar doors

Iconic cellar doors


Guided immersion in a winery


Welcoming country pubs


Eating locally grown food


Riesling Trail

Heritage immersion



Key:

                      Strong match

                      Modest match

                      Limited match
                      No match




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Table 6: Product Market Match of Kapunda / Burra Core Products to Target Markets


                                                                                     Target markets for Burra / Kapunda
Core products of Kapunda / Burra part
                                                           Growth target markets                                          Consolidated target markets
of the Clare Valley
                                                                                                                    (1)                        (2)
                                             Browsers       Gen X Discoverers      Gen Y Discoverers       Indulgers           Wine focussed            VFR
Welcoming country pubs


Eating locally grown food


Heritage immersion




Key:

                      Strong match

                      Modest match

                      Limited match




(1)
      & (2) These markets are very small for the Burra / Kapunda areas of the Clare Valley Tourism Region and the absence of product that appeals to them
              such as 4-5 star resorts, gourmet food and wine means there is no product / market match.




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8.            FOCUS GROUPS TO TEST STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS

INTRODUCTION

Four focus groups were held with invited representatives of local tourism associations,
business, industry and main street committees, councils and tourism operations
between Tuesday 30th November and Friday 3rd December 2004. This section of the
Consultation Report summarises the responses of those present to the Draft Strategic
Directions outlined in the Discussion Paper circulated prior to the meeting. A list of
those who attended the sessions is provided in Appendix 5 as is a copy of the
Discussion Paper provided to Focus Group participants.




Kapunda – 30th November 2004

This meeting was attended by one person, the current Chair of the Kapunda Tourist
Association. The key issues raised were:

        The significant demands placed on a small number of volunteers and their
        incredible contribution to the Visitor Information Centre and the Museum;

        The valued support provided by Council and the importance of obtaining the
        planned budget commitment to funding a part time paid tourism position;

        The need to add value to Museum visits by:

        -    providing materials in advance to schools;

        -    paid guided tours / story tellers;

        -    headsets available for hire with key theme areas highlighted;

        The importance of recording oral histories before people die;

        The need for a greater focus on the Kidman Story – place to display panels,
        commemorative sculpture or art work, links to other places associated with Sir
        Sidney Kidman through a Kidman Trail; and

        Importance of cross-regional contact between volunteers and staff in the Visitor
        Information Centres given that most volunteers have been in Kapunda less than
        10 years.




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The following opportunities were identified:

        Upgrading mine site – signs and access;

        Re-opening of Anlaby for bed and breakfast accommodation and possibly tours
        should be supported by improvements to the road to Anlaby;

        Potential to open the Hamilton Church of England for tours;

        Developing a map of the area that highlights old cemeteries, isolated graves, old
        bridges and stone walls and the Pines Reserve and Government Nursery;

        Better planning policies to protect the visual appearance of the gateways to the
        town; and

        Renovation of Old Show Hall building and restoration of walls.




Burra, 1st December 2004

This meeting was attended by 7 people.

Response to Ideas in Discussion Paper

This group strongly supported strengthening the focus on “Discoverers” travelling with
children through appropriate night time entertainment, tours and story telling
associated with historic places.

There are simple things that could be done to make a visit with children more
enjoyable such as walking tours, bread and pellets for feeding the ducks at the
Information Centre, a Yellow Brick Road style Visitor Bag with samples of local
products and stamps from local traders, a passport for kids as a variation on the
existing Passport.

Some existing activities such as the Cemetery Tours, Trail Rides and Tours of
Mongolata Gold Mine could be promoted more widely.

There are local people with considerable knowledge who could be involved as story
tellers and tour guides.

The fossils at Redbanks offer a significant opportunity for guided visits and maybe at a
later stage, an Earth Watch style programme for paid participation in archaeological
digs associated with the site.




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Accommodation

There appears to be a need to develop some cabin style accommodation and / or to
rejuvenate the school camps concept that was provided by the Redruth Camping
Centre.

The current Caravan Park site is unlikely to be suited to expansion, so alternative sites
within the township should be investigated.

Planning policies may need to be reviewed to ensure these facilitate appropriate higher
end cabin / backpacker and / or motor home facilities.

Heritage Immersion

There are a number of plans already being considered by the National Trust which
include better lighting, rebuilding the boiler house and interpreting the buddle pits.

Council and the National Trust have an Industry Partnership with Flinders University
through the Mid North Regional Development Board. This could provide resources
such as drama students to put on productions / interactive presentations during school
holidays or archaeology students to act as guides for the Redbanks site.

The National Trust is currently operating “Malowen Lowarth” 7 days a week with
volunteers in costume. Souvenirs of locally made products are also being sold.

Discussions have been held regarding the development of a Natural Resource Centre
in Burra that provides an introduction to geology, minerals and fossils in the Burra area
and beyond to the Flinders Ranges and desert areas.

The diprotodon find at Redbanks offers a significant opportunity for tourism. The
Centre could be part of an existing facility. It does not need to be high cost.

Adding Value to Heysen and Mawson Trails

DEH is currently developing a Management Plan for the Heysen Trail. In order for the
Trail to meet national standards, it would need to be open 12 months a year. Currently
it is closed for 6 months of the year during fire season. Any changes will need to be
supported with education and advice to landowners to assist them in managing
access. Trail users will also need to be educated on appropriate behaviour when
walking in the summer months.




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The existing maps for the Heysen Trail are out of date and as a result, they are not
being made freely available. DEH prefers to show people individually where the
changes have been made.

To benefit from proximity to the trail, towns nearby need to promote packages including
land based transport (pick up / drop off), accommodation and meals.

Council is currently working with the Clare Valley Marketing Committee to develop a
4WD ring route that links all the towns with existing trails, scenic drives, etc.

Packages

There is a need for businesses to think more creatively about packages, eg golfing
holidays, bird watching in Caroona Creek Conservation Park, cycling, trail rides, etc.

There has been a tendency by some businesses to rely on the National Trust to do the
promotion of Burra, while they get passive benefits.

Product Development

The key to the successful adaptive re-use of heritage buildings is to enable private
enterprise to purchase or lease these and operate tourism businesses in accordance
with an agreed Management and Conservation Plan. This was considered to be the
only way that resources would be available to maintain the physical fabric and cultural
context of Burra.

Capacity Building

The community has not universally accepted a role as ambassadors for tourism.
SATC’s focus on local people’s role in hosting Visiting Friends and Relatives is
supported. The success of this Plan and of rejuvenating the Burra experience relies on
the community embracing the concept.

Training in hospitality and customer service needs to be undertaken regularly and
followed up back in the work place with the employer. Often the employees do the
training but the business doesn’t always support them in practice.

The Mid North Development Board offers training. Aussie Host training was done by
some local businesses previously.




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Clare – 2nd December 2004

This meeting was attended by 5 people from the Council, Development Board,
Winemakers Association and Clare Valley Tourism Marketing.

General Response to Ideas in Discussion Paper

Planning policy change needs to be given higher priority in the final document as it was
the main rationale for the study. It will be important to agree on a definition of scale.
20 beds is defined by the ABS as small scale and 21-50 beds would be considered as
medium scale.

The concept of “Target Markets” would be a concern if defining markets too tightly
limited the ability of the region to attract a variety of markets.

There is a need to recognise that different things appeal to mid-week and weekend
markets.

Product Development

The existing core products need to be further developed and used better. An example
is the proposed extension of the Riesling Trail to the Barinia Railway Station which
would provide access to wineries on the north-eastern side of the Clare township.

Links and loops to the Mawson and Heysen Trail including a pick up / drop off service
offered by accommodation providers would support cycling and walking activities which
appeal to a cross section of markets. This could provide access from Clare to
Riverton, Saddleworth, Spalding and Burra.

Packaging

There is a need for strong direction and support for packaging products together
across the region, eg golfing packages that link Clare, Burra and Balaklava. Clare
Valley Tourism Marketing is best placed to put packages together and take a
commission from operators.

Accommodation

There is a shortfall of accommodation for conferences and events. It is likely that
another “Country Club” / resort style facility could be needed in the future. Family
based accommodation should be linked to towns and facilities.




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Food

It is important to support existing initiatives related to food including those involved with
Clare Valley Cuisine and the Long Lunch at Mt Surmon which provided education on
alternative wine varieties.

The focus of the Gourmet Week is on large numbers of mainly young people. Other
specialised gourmet food and wine events should be supported.

Achieving consistent quality and service of food is a challenge for operators and needs
continual encouragement.

Winery Related Tourism

There are initiatives in the region to increase the range of experiences associated with
wineries. Current examples include the development which is in the planning stage for
the Sevenhill Cellar and Winery complex. This includes an extension to the retreat
house and the expansion of its bottling operations and winery tours.

One of the barriers that needs to be overcome is the risk management procedures that
need to be put in place in order to have visitors in a working winery. It is very
expensive to modify old buildings for safe visitor access, viewing and movement.

Annie’s Lane at Quelltaler is also seeking to focus more on functions, conferences and
events. Since wine making has ceased at this site, the emphasis is more on the visitor
experience at the Cellar Door. There could be potential for accommodation to be
developed to support conferences and events such as concerts. It would be important
that planning policies facilitated rather than hindered such a development proposal.

Planning Policies Affecting Wineries

This would appear to be less of an issue in the Clare Valley wine region where the
expansion in wine production is reasonably modest, rising from 30,000 tonnes from 20
processing plants to 50,000 tonnes, probably without an increase in the number of
processors. It is unlikely that many more new small wineries will be established. The
availability of water will be a significant limiting factor for expansion of the viticulture
industry.

Additional storage and bottling facilities may be desired activities in the future as this
creates local employment. The scale of these facilities is the key. Distribution is the




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main issue as only 5% of wine is stored in the region to be sold through the Cellar
Doors. The rest must be transported to other centres for sale and export.

There may be a need for more industrial land on the edge of townships or in
association with wineries.

PIRSA has undertaken a Land Capability Study which has not yet been released. The
consultants should follow this up, as the first criteria in zoning should be to protect the
land needed for high value primary production. (NB: The consultants met with PIRSA
and obtained detailed maps for the Barossa and light Council Areas within Planning
SA’s inner region. Similar data for the Clare Valley is not yet available.

Building Industry and Business Capacity

All of the businesses in town need to appreciate their role in tourism.

Welcoming Country Pubs are an important feature of the area, however, the operators
are the key to success.

The new Visitor Centre is going to have an interactive area with people telling stories
(probably a video) and a Poets’ Corner. Training could help develop the skills of local
people in taking on these roles.

Positioning

There was some concern that the words in the Discussion Paper did not capture the
essence of the Clare Valley Region. It was agreed that the focus needs to be on
people making connections. The current image “experiencing the best of life” is
recognised as not differentiating the region from other regions. It was suggested that
there could perhaps be a stronger focus on the cultural settlement patterns of the Clare
Valley and the towns of Burra and Kapunda and their continuing influence.

The scale and landscape qualities of the Clare Valley contrast with the Barossa and
enable complementary positioning. Clare is seen as more like the Southern
Tablelands of NSW than the Hunter Valley region.

Priorities for Clare Valley Region

The following were identified as priority outcomes:

        an holistic approach to planning for the future that does not unduly limit tourism
        development;




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        a plan that is a readable and practical document that all stakeholders can use;

        identification of the township character that needs to be protected and the
        buildings that should be maintained; and

        business development and peer support opportunities for tourism operators to
        assist them in growing their business and providing consistent high quality visitor
        experiences.




Barossa – 3rd December 2004

This meeting was held at Fuller Communications Offices in Tanunda. It was attended
by 7 people. The following section summarises the responses to the Discussion Paper
which focussed mainly on Positioning and Branding, Product Development and
Reinvigoration and Business Development.

Positioning and Branding

The Barossa is already acknowledged as one of the world’s greatest wine regions and
the premier wine region in Australia with a special focus on shiraz. It has some of the
oldest vines and longest history of shiraz production in the world – it is seen as an “old”
new world wine region.

Heritage, art, music, people and tradition contribute to an authenticity in the Barossa
Valley that cannot be replicated in other places.

However, it was considered that while food is emerging and there is innovative food, it
is still a long way short of iconic. Caution should therefore be used in branding the
region as an iconic food region. Branding needs to also reflect cultural elements of
pastoral and mining history including Kidman.

The SATC is doing Branding research which will include the Barossa region. Future
positioning will be based on that research as well as the directions of this study.

A key message should be that the Barossa is fun. Delivery must match the promise
(see Business Development below).

Product Development / Reinvigoration

There is concern that there are too many bed and breakfasts that are similar in style.
Change is needed for survival.



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A focus on health and fitness is considered to meet the needs of target markets. A
gym, café, spa and pool would meet the needs of local people as well as be attractive
to visitors. However, the location is important – such a facility will add greater value to
tourism if it is located adjacent to an existing caravan park or in association with tourist
accommodation.

Walking and cycling trails are also considered important. It was suggested that there
needs to be a Barossa version of the Riesling Trail. There could be a Shiraz Trail from
Nuriootpa to Angaston and beyond. Links could be made to Truro, Williamstown and
Mt Pleasant where a walking and cycling trail is currently being established along the
old rail corridor to Verdun.

A brochure could feature Walks of the Barossa.

More promotion is needed of existing soft adventure opportunities such as the Heysen
Trail, camping facilities and BMX tracks. There seems to be limited awareness of
some areas and problems with access for those without a car. Greater use could be
made of the transport brokerage service provided by the Barossa Community
Transport Service.

Target Markets

The focus on children and families was seen as important. Childcare is an issue
generally in the Barossa, so increased out-of-hours care services could help visitors
too. Half day tours and packages with a focus on children could be developed. Care
needs to be taken with regard to children as visitors to wineries with their parents, as
some people consider this to be inappropriate.

A kiosk at Whispering Wall would value add to this popular attraction for families with
children.

People visiting the region expect good quality food (not necessarily high level
indulgence) and decent coffee. This is not always available, especially before 9.00 am
and after 4.00 pm.

The need to attract 18-35 year olds was acknowledged, however, this is a challenge
for the wine industry. Their marketing strategy is focussed around introducing the
“young guns” of the wine making industry, ie the leaders in their late 20’s and early
30’s. These “children of the success era” can tell the stories of the Barossa from a
fresh perspective.




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Participants stressed the need for consistency in product quality and delivery and
focussing on doing better with what we have, rather than aiming for iconic product
development.

Packages and links across the regions were considered to be essential.

Business Development

There appears to be a number of business development and training initiatives which
could be co-ordinated and built upon to assist businesses to improve their
performance.

The Business Development Blue Print Programme is working with businesses with less
than 20 employees to assist them in developing their own marketing plans. This
programme will expand to include tourism businesses.

The Barossa Light Development Board is working with retailers across the region to
help them find ways to complement each other rather than just compete.

Accreditation is an area that needs more work as for many businesses it is a burden
that doesn’t deliver tangible benefits. The Fleurieu Peninsula model developed by
SATC should be extended so that accreditation builds value for businesses.
Accreditation should be undertaken by an independent panel so that it means
something to the operator, ie it demonstrates publicly their commitment to quality.

Planning Policy Imperatives

The Barossa is going to grow as a major wine processing base. Locations for housing
subdivisions and industries will have to be found that do not threaten the region’s
vineyards, landscape and built heritage. Satellite towns such as Truro, Freeling,
Kapunda and Stockwell should be the major focus for new developments.




SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

The four focus group sessions affirmed the general directions of the Draft Directions
Paper with respect to target markets, product development and reinvigoration,
business development and capacity building for both industry operators and the
community.




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Strong clear planning policies that provide guidance rather than disincentives for
appropriate tourism development are considered to be an essential outcome of the
implementation of this strategic plan.

There was some discomfort with the branding and positioning statements as many
participants considered that these had failed to capture the essential “differences”
between the regions and the qualities that could be used to create a distinctive image
that can be supported by an authentic experience. In particular, people were wary
about claiming a position which may not yet be able to be consistently delivered due to
lack of product or the inexperience of operators.

It was also considered that the regions should take their leads from the State level
branding and positioning research which is currently being pursued. It may therefore
be premature for this project to try and establish a definitive brand or position for the
regions.




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                                                                                 Media Articles




9.            MEDIA ARTICLES

Councils were provided with Media Releases to be sent by them to Local Newspapers
in mid December 2004. Given the timing, some newspapers were unable to place the
articles prior to Christmas. A copy of the media releases is provided in Appendix 6.
The timeframe for responses by interested members of the community was extended
until 20th January 2005. Only a small number of verbal and written responses were
received, probably an indication that the timing over the Christmas period was not
ideal.




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                                                 Opportunity to Comment on Final Draft Strategy




10.           OPPORTUNITY TO COMMENT ON FINAL DRAFT STRATEGY

Once the Project Steering Committee has reviewed the Final Draft Strategy and the
consultants have incorporated their feedback, the document will be circulated to the
Regional Leaders Forum and to those stakeholders who attended or apologised for the
Focus Groups for their comments. It is also anticipated that other interested
community members could provide comment on the Draft Strategy using a similar
process to that described in Section 9 above, subject to timing constraints.




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APPENDIX 1

Summary of Business Surveys




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TOTAL NUMBER OF SURVEYS = 78(1)

Key to towns: E = Eudunda, N = Nuriootpa, K = Kapunda, T = Tanunda, C = Clare, MP – Mount Pleasant, A
= Angaston, B = Burra.


1.      HOW IMPORTANT IS TOURISM TO YOUR BUSINESS?

                                           E           N           K           T          C          MP              A   B    Total
Very Important                              2          6           4          13           7          3              9   11    55
Important                                   2          1           -           1           2          3              4   1     14
Not Important                               2           -          2           -           1          1              2   1     9
Total Surveys                               6          7           6          14          10          7          15      13    78

Comparison Between Towns

Proportion (percentage)                    E           N           K           T          C          MP              A   B    Total
Very Important                             33         75          67          93          70         43          60      85    69
Not Important                              33          0          33           0          10         14          13      8     12

Towns > 66%: Nuriootpa, Kapunda, Tanunda, Clare and Burra.
Towns > 20%: Eudunda, Kapunda.

Tourism is seen as very important by almost 70% of businesses surveyed across the regions. Only 12% of
businesses thought that tourism was not at all important to their business. In Tanunda and Nuriootpa all
businesses surveyed acknowledged the importance of tourism.

Businesses less likely to see tourism as important included clothing and hardware shops, butchers and
petrol stations.




(1)
      The low numbers of surveys means that great care should be taken in interpreting data at the township level.




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2.      WHAT PROPORTION OF YOUR INCOME COMES FROM TOURISM?

Percentage of Income                      E    N     K        T       C      MP        A       B      Total
Less than 10                              2     -     2       -       -       1        3       2       10
10 – 24                                   1     3     -       2       3       2        2       1       14
25 – 49                                   1     2     1       5       4       1        5       1       20
50 – 74                                   1     1     -       6       2       2        3       4       19
75 – 100                                  1     1     3       1       1       1        2       5       15
Totals                                    6     7     6      14      10       7       15       13      78
Proportion of businesses                 33%   28%   50%    50%     30%      43%     33%      69%     44%
surveyed receiving more
than 50%

For 44% of the surveyed businesses, income from tourism comprises 50% or more of their total income.

Almost 70% of the businesses surveyed in Burra and 50% of those in Tanunda and Kapunda receive 50% or
more of their income from tourism. A third or less of the businesses that participated in the survey in
Eudunda, Nuriootpa, Clare and Angaston derived more than half of their income from tourism.


3.      COMPARISON WITH PROPORTION OF INCOME FROM TOURISTS FIVE YEARS AGO

Proportion                                E    N     K        T       C      MP        A       B      Total
Higher                                    4     4     4       3       5       3        6       3       32
Same                                      2     2     2       3       1       2        4       3       19
Lower                                     -     -     -       6       1       1        2       2       12
                        (1)
No Response                               -     1     -       2       3       1        3       5       15
Total                                     6     7     6      14      10       7       15       13      78
Percentage receiving                     67%   67%   67%    25%     71%      43%     50%      37%     51%
higher proportion than 5
years ago
(1)
      In business less than 5 years

Just over 50% of those businesses in business 5 years ago receive a higher proportion of their current
income from tourism and 30% receive the same proportion. Nineteen percent receive a lower proportion of
their income from tourism, however, this situation is most marked in Tanunda where half of the businesses
surveyed receive a lower proportion of income from tourists now than 5 years ago.

The towns with the greatest increase in the proportion of the turnover from tourism are Kapunda (67%),
Clare (71%), Eudunda (67%) and Nuriootpa (67%).

Twenty percent of all businesses surveyed are new businesses, ie less than 5 years old. This is most
marked in Burra and Clare where new businesses comprise over 30% of the businesses surveyed.




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4.      DOMINANT AGE GROUP OF TOURISTS SEEN BY BUSINESSES

Age                                      E   N    K          T    C      MP        A       B      Total
25 – 44                                  -   -    1          -    2       1        3       1        8
45 – 64                                  2   3    3          2    5        -       4       3       22
65+                                      2   1    -          2    1       1        3       4       14
Across all ages                          2   3    2          10   2       5        5       5       34
Totals                                   6   7    6          14   10      7       15       13      78

Over 40% of those surveyed could not identify a particular age group that was more prevalent among their
customers. The age group most frequently mentioned was 45-64 year olds with these being highest in Clare
and Angaston. Burra noted the highest proportion of travellers over the age of 65.


5.      BENEFITS OF TOURISM TO THE TOWN

Benefit                                  E   N    K          T    C      MP        A       B     Total(1)
Money / Economy                          3   7    3          8    6       4       10       5       46
Increased awareness and                  1   1    1          4    2       1        3       3       16
promotion
All businesses benefit                   -   -    -          5    2       3        1       3       14
Some businesses benefit,                 -   -    -          1    -       2        2       -        5
eg wineries
Keeps the town alive                     -   -    -          -    -        -       -       6        6
Employment                               -   -    1          1    2        -       3       -        7
Community vibrancy /                     -   -    1          1    2        -       3       1        8
learning from visitors
More people around                       1   -    1          1    1        -       3       1        8
Regional links                           -   -    -          -    -        -       -       1        1
Motivates Council                        -   -    -          -    -       1        1       -        2
(1)
      Total exceeds total surveys due to multiple answers.

Economic benefits for the town were seen as the major benefit being mentioned by 59% of respondents.
Almost 20% of those surveyed thought that all businesses in the town benefited, while some respondents
thought that the wineries (in the Barossa) were the main beneficiaries from tourism. In Burra, almost 50% of
businesses used the same words saying that “tourism keeps the town alive”.

Another significant benefit mentioned across the towns was increased awareness and the word of mouth
promotion tourists do that helps encourage others to visit.




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6.      COMPARISONS BETWEEN TOWNS

Comparisons                                  E       N      K        T       C       MP       A        B
Towns where tourism is most                          x      x        x       x                         x
important (> 66%)
> 49% income from tourism                                   x        x                                 x
> 49% growth in income from                  x       x      x                x                x
tourism last 5 years
Total ‘important / benefits’ per             1       2      3        2       2        0       1        2
town

This comparison identifies those towns where tourism is a high priority and businesses are more likely to be
willing to work on tourism development.


7.      BENEFITS OF TOURISM TO THE REGION

Most participants struggled to see this question as different from Question 5. Over 50% did not provide a
response, 15% said “the same” as for Question 5.

The major responses were:
        links between towns                                          n=9
        economic benefits across region                              n=6
        increases diversity of experiences                           n=4
        improves employment                                          n=4


8.      WHAT DISADVANTAGES COULD THERE BE IN AN INCREASED FOCUS ON TOURISM?

The overwhelming majority of businesses surveyed (76%) said they could see no disadvantages in
increasing the focus on tourism.

The following disadvantages were identified:
        traffic congestion and car parking availability              n=6
        threatening character and natural environment                n=6
        threatening communities who don’t want change                n=3
        shifts focus away from local issues                          n=3
        more emphasis should be placed on industry                   n=2

A balance between promoting tourism, retaining character and respecting community was suggested as the
way to approach future tourism growth.




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9.      QUALITIES THAT APPEAL TO TOURISTS

Across the region the following qualities and features were identified. They are listed in descending order of
frequency:
        Wineries / vineyards                                       n = 43
        Quaint towns / old buildings preserved                     n = 24
        Scenery and attractive scenic drives                       n = 24
        Heritage / history                                         n = 22
        Food and restaurants                                       n = 17
        Character / country charm                                  n=8
        Friendly welcoming people                                  n=7
        German Heritage / culture                                  n=5
        Towns accessible within region                             n=4
        Shopping                                                   n=3
        Antiques                                                   n=3
        Good range of accommodation, especially B&B’s              n=3


A number of specific attractions were mentioned including:
        Burra’s mining heritage                                    n=5
        Oldest mining town (Kapunda)                               n=2
        Riesling Trail
        McLeod’s Daughters
        Colin Thiele trail
        Burra Gorge
        Kidman associations

Wineries were mentioned by 55% of respondents as the most appealing feature for tourists to the regions.

Heritage and history is closely linked to the “quaint” towns and the preservation of old buildings and the
traditional German culture. Taken together, these are even more significant than the wineries.

The scenery and landscape qualities that make for some attractive drives were also seen as a key part of the
region’s appeal.

Food was the only other theme mentioned by more than 10% of survey respondents.

From a business perspective, the regions main attractions are heritage and culture, food and wine and the
scenic landscape.




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10. WHERE WOULD YOU TAKE VISITORS TO GIVE THEM AN AUTHENTIC EXPERIENCE OF THE
    REGION?

The following general and specific attractions and activities were mentioned:

Wineries
General                                  n = 27

Specific wineries mentioned two or more times include:
        Yalumba
        Seppeltsfield
        Saltrams
        Peter Lehmann
        Seven Hill Cellars
        Wolf Blass
        Langmeil
        Bethany
        Rockfords

Food and Restaurants
General                                  n=7
Local pubs                               n=3


Specifically mentioned:
        German Bakeries
        Angel’s Café
        Heidelberg
        Skillogallee
        Maggie Beer’s
        Local Produce
        Rising Sun
        Salters
        Vintners
        1918
        Citadel
        Barossa Bistro
        Angaston Cheese Shop
        CJ Dennis Tea Rooms
        Polly’s Tea Shop
        Thorogoods Apple Wines



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Scenic Drives and Lookouts
Scenic drives                            n = 14
Lookouts                                 n = 14
(especially Mengler’s Hill)

Heritage
        General                          n=5
        Old Churches and Cemeteries      n=4
        Mining                           n=2
        Colin Thiele Trail               n=2
        Family Heritage Gallery          n=2
        Martindale Hall                  n=1
        Collingrove Homestead            n=1

Nature Based
        Burra Gorge                      n=6
        Redbanks CP                      n=2
        Kaiser Stuhl CP                  n=2
        Spring Gully CP                  n=1
        Spalding Hills                   n=1
        Para Wirra NP                    n=1

Towns
        Tanunda                          n=5
        Mintaro                          n=4
        Burra                            n=3
        Clare                            n=2
        Angaston                         n=2
        Greenock                         n=1
        Sevenhills                       n=1
        Auburn                           n=1
        Mount Pleasant                   n=1

Attractions (mentioned more than once)
        Burra Passport                   n=7
        Whispering Wall                  n=3
        Antique Shops                    n=3
        Mintaro Maze                     n=2
        Birdwood Motor Museum            n=2
        Gardens                          n=2



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Events and Activities
        Picnics
        Scenic Walks
        Horse riding
        Barossa Farmers Market
        Music

The responses to Question 9 reflect participants views of the most appealing features of the region.

Wine and food featured in many responses with over 16 wineries and 16 restaurants and food outlets being
specifically identified.

Scenic drives and lookouts were a popular choice with Mengler’s Hill being frequently mentioned.

Heritage sites and activities were more likely to be mentioned in Eudunda and Burra as were nature based
activities with Burra Gorge being the most frequently mentioned destination. This response reflects a low
level of awareness of conservation parks and natural areas.


11. WHAT ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECT DO YOU VALUE MOST?

Respondents were asked what environmental aspects of their area they valued. A range of general
responses were received as follows:
        Attractive scenery and views                     n = 18
        Relaxed country lifestyle                        n = 14
        Peace and quiet                                  n = 14
        Natural landscape and vegetation                 n = 10
        Clean fresh air                                  n=7
        Openness                                         n=6
        Vineyards                                        n=6
        Greenness                                        n=5
        Intriguing diversity of landscapes               n=4
        Old buildings / heritage wineries                n=3
        Rivers and creeks                                n=1


Specific responses were noted as follows:
        Sense of enclosure in Clare Valley
        Beauty of Barossa Valley
        Gum trees in Skilly Hills
        Mount Pleasant Summit
        Mount Crawford Forest



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        Burra Gorge
        Kaiser Stuhl Recreation Park

Several people noted threats to the environment such as increased demands for water, development
pressures on primary production land and a busier lifestyle.


12. WHAT DO YOU VALUE MOST ABOUT YOUR COMMUNITY?

Over 35% of respondents considered that their towns had a strong community spirit where everyone is
helpful, supportive and works together. The friendliness of the people and their welcoming and accepting
attitude were mentioned by a similar proportion of respondents.

Other responses mentioned by 2 or more participants included:
    support of local business                          n=8
    everybody knows everybody                          n=8
    excellent facilities and services                  n=6
    strong families / good environment for
    children                                           n=4
    pride in town                                      n=3
    safe, free of crime                                n=3
    sporting clubs                                     n=2
    traditional German food / lifestyle                n=2
    honest                                             n=2
    easy access to everything                          n=2

Several people mentioned that it can take a while to be accepted in some communities.


13.           WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO TO MAKE SURE VISITORS COME BACK TO THE REGION?

Attachment A contains a detailed summary of the responses from each of the 8 townships. This section
notes those common themes from suggestions across the regions.

Family friendly and affordable accommodation including improvements to caravan parks and more
backpackers hostels were suggested in several towns.

The provision of more things for children to do and improved park and playground facilities were particularly
noted in the Barossa.

Quality service, hospitality and a friendly attitude were seen as important in all of the towns.

Improved promotion, cross regional marketing and more information available before people get to the
region were suggested as ways to get people visiting in the first place.

Better signage and maps were mentioned by some respondents.

Several participants across the region noted the need for longer opening hours, especially on weekends.



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Providing excellent food and quality experiences which represent value for money was recognised as one of
the keys to repeat visitation. One suggestion was a rewards programme for repeat visitors. The Frequent
Visitors Programme could offer discounts of meals and accommodation or 2 for 1 offers to encourage people
to come back and bring their friends.




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                                              ATTACHMENT A


WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO TO MAKE SURE VISITORS COME BACK AGAIN?

(NB: n is used for more than one response)

Eudunda
        Caravan park                                   n=3
        Public toilets – better signed                 n=2
        Broader range of food outlets
        Railway heritage
        Caravan parking
        Be friendly
        More shops open on weekends
        Good map and information signs

Nuriootpa
        Family friendly / cheaper accommodation
        Music and Associated Festivals / Concerts      n=3
        Friendly
        Retain authentic look and feel
        Good advertising

Kapunda
        More of mining history – Swan Hill
        More like Ballarat
        Service                                        n=3
        More promotion of what is available
        Good meals / new chef has done a good job
        (SK Hotel)                                     n=2
        longer opening hours

Tanunda
        Keep character as is
        Get trucks out of main street                  n=2
        More family oriented things                    n=3
        More things for children to do
        Better signage and maps                        n=2
        More barbecue facilities
        Make Heineman Park like Rymill Park –
        hire boats / kiosk



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        Better park and playgrounds                                          n=3
        More shops open on weekends
        Teach true German heritage
        Bus bays for buses only at both ends of town
        Pro active marketing
        Maintain quality and range of goods
        Welcoming image / service / friendliness                             n=5
        Wider range of shops / shopping hours
        More accommodation choices
        Better information transfer from business to visitors
        Cellar doors have become factories

Clare
        More social events and activities like gourmet weekend and races     n=2
        New supermarket
        Better service / friendly / welcoming                                n=2
        Shops open longer, especially on weekends
        Authentic experience
        Need an additional ATM in street
        More information and marketing on Barossa (links)

Mount Pleasant
        Decent backpacker accommodation
        Improve caravan park                                                 n=2
        Improved toilets
        Rearrangement of regional tourism boundaries – needs an identity, doesn’t belong
        Increased ecotourism
        More attractions for young people
        More take away places
        Value for money
        Increased focus on history / heritage
        More free advertising
        Good food and wine
        Hospitality
        Longer opening hours
        More innovation




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Angaston
        Service and hospitality                                            n=4
        Friendly locals                                                    n=3
        Bus friendly parking                                               n=3
        Clean and tidy surroundings                                        n=2
        Better signage
        More for families and children
        Greater variety of products / activities                           n=4
        More choice at reasonable price – value for money
        More facilities
        Provide more than just wine
        Community bus
        Maintain character
        More for young people to do                                        n=2

Burra
        Signs and information especially about Burra North
        Quality and level of service                                       n=3
        Retain environment and heritage buildings                          n=2
        More promotion / collaborative advertising:
        - Frequent Visitor Programme with rewards for
          return visits                                                    n=5
        More barbecue facilities
        More money on streetscaping                                        n=2
        Budget accommodation / backpackers
        Good food and products
        Value for money
        Council amalgamation has led to less money spent on tourism in Burra.




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APPENDIX 2

Summary of Community Surveys Undertaken in 8
Regional Towns, August 2004




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TOTAL NUMBER OF SURVEYS = 63

Please note that due to the small sample size it is not appropriate to draw strong conclusions about
particular towns.


1.      CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONDENTS

Towns where surveys completed (see below)(1).

Age                                      C         B          E          T        MP          N          A            K    Total
15 – 24                                  2         2          3          1          1          -         2            3     14
25 – 44                                  4         3          2          2          2          2         1            6     22
45 – 64                                  3         2           -         3          2          4         2            5     21
65+                                      1         1           -         1          -          -          -           3     6
Total                                    10        8          5          7          5          6         5            17    63

There was a reasonably even spread across the age groups except for people aged over 65. It should be
noted that the surveys were undertaken in extremely cold weather which may have kept older people
indoors.

Gender                                   C         B          E          T        MP          N          A            K    Total
Female                                   7         5          4          4          3          5         5            10    43
Male                                     3         3          1          3          2          1          -           7     20
Total                                    10        8          5          7          5          6         5            17    63

Women were twice as likely to complete the survey as men which may reflect the time of the day when
surveys were undertaken and the place, ie in main streets during business hours. There is also often a bias
towards women in surveys due to the reluctance of men to participate.

Length of Time in                        C         B          E          T        MP          N          A            K    Total
District
Less than 5 years                        3         0          2          2          2          3          -           2     14
5 – 10                                   0         1          2          1          -          1          -           5     10
11 – 20                                  0         0           -         1          2          0         1            6     10
21+                                      7         7          1          3          1          2         4            4     29
Total                                    10        8          5          7          5          6         5            17    63




(1)
      C = Clare, B = Burra, E = Eudunda, T = Tanunda, MP = Mount Pleasant, N = Nuriootpa, A = Angaston, K = Kapunda




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The largest group of respondents comprising 46% of the sample had lived in the region for over 20 years.
This was most notable in Clare (70%), Burra (88%) and Angaston (80%). The towns with the greatest
proportion of new residents surveyed were Nuriootpa (50%), Eudunda (40%) and Mount Pleasant (40%).

Importance of                            C     B       E         T       MP         N         A         K      Total
Tourism
Very important                            8     7      3         7         1        6         5         9        46
Important                                 2     1      2         -         4         -         -        7        16
Not important                             -     -      -         -         -         -         -        1         1
Totals                                   10     8      5         7         5        6         5        17        63
% Response Very                          80%   88%   60%      100%       20%      100%      100%      53%       73%
Important

(1)
        C = Clare, B = Burra, E = Eudunda, T = Tanunda, MP = Mount Pleasant, N = Nuriootpa, A = Angaston, K = Kapunda


Tourism is recognised as being very important by 73% of all respondents. It receives greatest recognition in
Clare (80%), Burra (88%), Tanunda (100%), Angaston (100%) and Nuriootpa (100%).


2.      MOST APPEALING ASPECTS OF THE REGION TO TOURISTS

The most frequently mentioned aspects were:
        Heritage and history                               n = 22
        Wineries                                           n = 21
        Scenery                                            n = 12
        Mining                                             n=9
        Country / village feel                             n=4
        Food                                               n=4
        People                                             n=3
        Burra Gorge                                        n=2

A range of other features were mentioned by individual respondents.


3.      BENEFITS TO THE REGION

The most significant benefit mentioned by 68% of the respondents was the money that tourism brings to the
region. The benefits mentioned most frequently were:

        Economic                                           n = 43
        Employment                                         n = 10
        More people in area                                n = 10
        Support for all businesses                         n=5
        Town needs tourism to survive                      n=4



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        Increased awareness and promotion               n=4
        Enhances community                              n=4
        Better services and facilities                  n=3



4.      WHAT DISADVANTAGES COULD THERE BE FROM AN INCREASED FOCUS ON TOURISM?

The largest proportion of respondents, ie 34% of the total could not see any disadvantages from increasing
the focus on tourism in the local economy.

Some respondents were concerned that more tourism could change the character of the town or lead to
traffic and parking problems.

Others were concerned that the needs of locals may be given less priority.

A small number noted that the locals may not be ready for growth and that it would be preferable to have the
same number of tourists spending more money than having more tourists.

The expectations of tourists that businesses would be open 7 days was seen as a disadvantage for workers
and business owners.


5.      WHAT ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS DO YOU VALUE ABOUT YOUR REGION?

The most frequently mentioned environmental values were:
        Landscape and scenery                           n = 12
        Close to bush and mallee                        n=9
        Open air                                        n=8
        Peace and quiet                                 n=8
        Green                                           n=7
        Cropping and agriculture                        n=5
        Orchards and vineyards                          n=5
        Burra Gorge                                     n=4
        Waterways                                       n=4
        Healthy environment                             n=3
        Wildlife and native species                     n=2
        Historic buildings                              n=2
        Climate / seasons                               n=2
        Heysen Trail                                    n=1




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6.      WHAT DO YOU VALUE MOST ABOUT YOUR COMMUNITY?

Respondents were most likely to comment on the friendliness, closeness and supportiveness of the
community. The most frequently mentioned attributes were:
        Friendly                                              n = 26
        Close / big family                                    n = 13
        Supportive / caring                                   n = 12
        Welcoming / accepting                                 n=5
        Strong sense of community                             n=5
        Lovely / good people                                  n=3
        Able to do everything here                            n=3
        Easy going                                            n=2

A few people noted that the community can be hard to break into and be a bit “cliquey”.


7(a) WHAT KINDS OF TOURISM DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE APPROPRIATE?

Respondents suggested the following types of developments that would be appropriate:

        More for children and teenagers including family friendly wineries;
        More shops and retail opportunities and longer opening hours;
        Cheaper accommodation including caravan parks;
        A greater range of food;
        Environmentally focussed attractions;
        Focus on mining; and
        Better infrastructure including signs and roads.

A small number of respondents suggested that the area should remain much the same.


7(b) WHAT KINDS OF TOURISM DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE APPROPRIATE?

Not many people responded to this question, however, the main comments related to avoiding developments
that are large scale, garish and not in keeping with the character and heritage of the area. Fast food outlets
were seen as inappropriate development by two people and four respondents said there was already too
much of a focus on wine.

Large scale housing or industrial developments could detract from tourism and one person suggested that
there should be no more B&B’s.




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7(c) ARE THERE PARTICULAR AREAS WHERE CARE SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH TOURISM
     DEVELOPMENT?

Very few people responded to this question. Those who did commented mainly on the need to protect
heritage (n = 5) and the highly visible areas such as town gateways and main streets (n = 4).

Specific mention was made of the River Torrens, the Hills around Clare, the Burra Creek and the need to
protect agricultural land. The dry conditions beyond Goyder’s line should limit tourism development.


8.      WHERE WOULD YOU TAKE SOMEONE WHO WAS STAYING WITH YOU FROM OUT OF THE
        REGION TO GIVE THEM AN AUTHENTIC EXPERIENCE?

The following groupings of attractions and activities provide details of those experiences mentioned by more
than 2 respondents:
General Wineries                         n=6

Specific Wineries:
    Eldredge
    Leasingham
    Neagles Rock
    Sevenhill
    Skillogallee
    Paulett
    Seppeltsfield
    Yalumba
    Sevenhill Cellars
    Peter Lehmann
    Langmeil
    Rockford
    Wolf Blass
    BV Estate

Scenic Drives and Lookouts               n = 21

Specific mention was made of Menglers Hill, Billy Goat Hill, Brooks, Goundrey’s, Skilly Hills and of
Seppeltsfield.

Heritage and History                     n = 27

Specific mention was made of:
    Mining                               n=8
    Martindale Hall                      n=5
    Kapunda Museum                       n=5
    Burra Passport Tour                  n=4
    Map the Miner                        n=2



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Nature Based
        River                            n=6
        Spring Gully Reserve
        Kaiser Stuhl CP                  n=2
        Mt Crawford Forest               n=2
        Mannum Falls
        Mt Pleasant Summit
        Burra Gorge
        Redbanks
        The Pines
        Davidson Reserve

Attractions
        Riesling Trail
        Barossa Farmers Marker
        Whispering Wall
        Birdwood Motor Museum
        Mintaro Maze
        Shopping                         n=4
        Antiques                         n=2
        Farm visits                      n=2

Food
        Gourmet food / restaurants       n=4
Specific mention was made of Skillogallee, Gaslight, Vintners, 1918, Kaeslers, Bar Vinnum, John Franklin,
Prince of Wales Hotel and the Cheese Shop.

Towns
        Tanunda                          n=6
        Burra                            n=3
        Angaston                         n=2
        Freeling                         n=1

Activities
        Horse riding
        Picnics / barbecues
        Watching football or cricket




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9.      WHAT TOURISM ACTIVITIES, ATTRACTIONS AND ACCOMMODATION IS MISSING FROM THE
        REGION? (NB: n is used for more than one response)

The main gaps mentioned in decreasing order of frequency were:
        Cheaper accommodation suitable for families
        and those on a budget                             n = 15
        Children’s activities and playgrounds             n = 10
        Activities for teenagers                          n=5
        Food outlets                                      n=7
        Shops                                             n=3
        Public transport                                  n=3
        Bus parking                                       n=2
        More barbecues                                    n=2
        More events and entertainment
        More interaction around mining heritage
        Promotion of what is already here.


10. WHAT WOULD INCREASE THE LIKELIHOOD OF VISITORS CHOOSING TO RETURN TO THE
    REGION?

There was general agreement that providing good quality friendly service and creating a positive first
impression by attention to detail and presentation are the main ingredients in an enjoyable visitor experience.

The availability of good food and affordable accommodation is also seen as important.

Educating the locals to appreciate tourists and provide a welcoming approach was noted as was the need for
good information.

Special offers and packages and providing value for money were suggested as was more targetted
advertising for events and festivals.

Retaining the character of the towns and environment will help encourage visitors to return.

Linkages with other areas can encourage people to extend their stay or return to do more. Providing options
and a variety of things to do helps people think they need to spend more time in the area.




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APPENDIX 3

Detailed Analysis of Surveys Conducted with Visitors to
the Regions – August – November 2004




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              BAROSSA AND CLARE VALLEY TOURISM REGIONS VISITOR SURVEY

TOTAL NUMBER OF SURVEYS = 56

Please note that due to the small sample size it is not appropriate to draw strong conclusions about the
information provided to us by respondents.

1. WHERE DID YOU PICK UP THIS SURVEY?

Place Where Survey Obtained                                   Total
Tanunda Information Centre / Barossa Wine Centre               13
Kapunda Visitor Information Centre                              9
Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop                                        5
Bungaree                                                        5
Kapunda Caravan Park                                            5
Burra Visitor Centre                                           4
Wheatsheaf Hotel / Allandale North                             3
Skillogallee                                                    3
Riesling Cottages                                               3
Barossa Secrets                                                 2
Kapunda Museum                                                 1
Blue Wren Cottages                                              1
Rockford Cellar Door                                           1
Clare Country Club                                              1
Total Surveys                                                  56

Participants gathered their surveys from a wide range of centres. This variety provided us with a more
diverse set of responses.


2. (a) IS THIS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO THE BAROSSA AND CLARE VALLEY REGION?

Visited These Regions Before                                   Total
Yes                                                             14
No                                                              42
Total                                                           56

The significant majority of participants had visited the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions before. A total of
fourteen participants (25% of responses) stated that they had not visited the Barossa and Clare Valley
Regions before.

The high number of returning visitors may reflect a high degree of satisfaction among participants.




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2. (b) IF YES, WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO VISIT THE REGIONS?

The most frequently mentioned reasons were:
Wineries / Vineyards                             n=7
Travelling En Route to Flinders Ranges           n=4
History                                          n=3
Word of Mouth / Friends                          n=2
Proximity to Adelaide                            n=1
Sightseeing                                      n=1
Good Range / Choice of Accommodation             n=1
Won a Travel Auction                             n=1
Great Grandparents Live In the Area              n=1
Have Never Visited Region Before                 n=1
Getaway from Sydney                              n=1
Mawson Trail                                     n=1
Friendly People                                  n=1

Wine was identified by participants as being the most significant reason for visiting the Barossa and Clare
Valley Regions.


2. (c) IF NO, HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU VISITED THE REGIONS IN THE PAST 3 YEARS?

Barossa

Number of Visits to the Barossa in the Last 3 Years           Total
None In Past 3 Years                                            1
2-3 Visits                                                     17
4-5 Visits                                                      8
More Than 10 Visits                                            3
Not Applicable/Not Stated                                      13
Total                                                          42

The majority of participants had previously visited the Barossa between two and three times. Another eight
participants had previously visited between four and five times. Participants were more likely to visit the
Barossa for a fourth or fifth time in comparison with visitation to the Clare Valley.

Clare Valley

Number of Visits to the Clare Valley in the Last 3 Years        Total
None In Past 3 Years                                              1
2-3 Visits                                                       20
4-5 Visits                                                        4
More Than 10 Visits                                               3
Not Applicable/Not Stated                                        14
Total                                                            42




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The Clare Valley was equally as appealing to returning visitors. Over the last three years, a significant
number of participants had visited the Clare Valley Region between two and three times.

Fewer people had visited the Clare Valley more than three times when in comparison with the Barossa.


3. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE MAIN PURPOSE OF YOUR VISIT?

Purpose of Visit                                                 Total
Holiday / Leisure (Overnight Stay)                                38
Other                                                              6
Day Trip (No Overnight Stay)                                      5
Visiting Friends and Relatives (Overnight Stay)                    4
Business/Conference/Seminar (Overnight Stay)                      3
Total                                                             56

Holiday and leisure was identified by the significant majority of participants as being the primary reason for
which they were visiting the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions.

One participant was visiting the Barossa as part of a wine evaluation project for the Regency College while
another was looking after a set of cottages while their owners were away on holiday.

Other significant reasons mentioned by participants included:

Honeymoon                                           n=1
Mawson Trail                                        n=1
Visiting Kapunda                                    n=1
Love the Region                                     n=1


4. (a) NUMBER OF NIGHTS SPENT IN THE BAROSSA AND CLARE VALLEYS

Barossa

Number of Nights in Barossa                                      Total
1 Night                                                            5
2 Nights                                                          10
3 Nights                                                           2
4-7 Nights                                                         5
8-14 Nights                                                        2
More Than 15 Nights                                               2
Not Applicable / Not Stated                                       30
Total                                                             56

The number of nights spent in the Barossa varied, however ten participants had stated that they were
staying for a total of two nights. It is clear that the majority of participants were staying in the Barossa for two
nights or less. This would be expected, as trips to the Barossa are generally short in length, primarily
because of its close proximity to Adelaide.




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One participant who was staying in the Barossa for more than 15 nights stated that they were visiting friends
while another was taking care of a friends set of cottages while they were away.

Clare Valley

Number of Nights in Clare Valley                              Total
1 Night                                                         8
2 Nights                                                       13
3 Nights                                                        4
4-7 Nights                                                      8
Not Applicable / Not Stated                                    23
Total                                                          56

As with the Barossa, participants tend to stay in the Clare Valley for less than two nights. Participants were
however more likely to stay in the Clare Valley for between three and seven nights when compared with the
Barossa Valley.


4. (b) TYPE OF ACCOMMODATION STAYED IN DURING VISIT

Barossa

Type of Accommodation                                         Total
Hotel / Motel                                                   9
Hosted Bed and Breakfast / Guest House                          0
Self-Contained Bed and Breakfast / Rented House                10
Homes of Friends and Relatives                                  2
Caravan Park / Commercial Camping                               1
Informal Camping                                                2
Not Applicable/Not Stated                                      32
Total                                                          56

Hotel / motel and self-contained bed and breakfast / rented house accommodation were by far the most
popular types of accommodation. These made up almost 80% of responses given by participants.

Clare Valley

Type of Accommodation                                         Total
Hotel / Motel                                                   4
Hosted Bed and Breakfast / Guest House                          2
Self-Contained Bed and Breakfast / Rented House                18
Homes of Friends and Relatives                                  2
Caravan Park/Commercial Camping                                11
Informal Camping                                                2
Not Applicable / Not Stated                                    17
Total                                                          56




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Self contained bed and breakfast / rented house accommodation (18 responses) was easily the most
popular type of travel accommodation in the Clare Valley. Caravan Park / Commercial camping was
identified by another eleven participants.

In contrast to the Barossa, only four participants stayed in a hotel / motel.


4. (c) BEST DESCRIBED USUAL AMOUNT SPENT PER NIGHT ON ACCOMMODATION

Amount Spent On                          Individual   Couple          Family      School       Day Trip        Total
Accommodation                                                                     Group
$0                                          1           1               1           0              0            3
Less Than $50                               4            4              0           0              0            8
$51-$100                                    4            9              0           1              0            14
$101-$200                                   1           23              0           0              0            24
$201-$300                                   0           1               0           0              0            1
Not Identified                              0            3              0           0              3            6
Total                                       10          41              1           1              3            56

A number of participants stated that they had received free accommodation during their stay. It is understood
that at least one participant was looking after a set of cottages while their owner was away.

Individuals were generally more likely to spend less than $100 on accommodation. The significant majority of
couples spent between $101 and $200 on accommodation.


5. TOWNS VISITED DURING TRIP

The most frequently mentioned towns were:
Clare                                                        n = 22
Kapunda                                                      n = 20
Tanunda                                                      n = 18
Angaston                                                     n = 15
Nuriootpa                                                    n = 11
Lyndoch                                                      n = 11
Burra                                                        n = 11
Auburn                                                       n = 10
Sevenhills                                                   n=7
Greenock                                                     n=6
Mintaro                                                      n=6
Rowland Flat / Rowland East                                  n=5
Tarlee                                                       n=4
Riverton                                                     n=3
Marabel                                                      n=3
Freeling                                                     n=3
Watervale                                                    n=3




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Eudunda                                           n=3
Leasingham                                        n=2
Penwortham                                        n=2
Moculta                                           n=2
Blacksprings                                      n=2
Waterloo                                          n=2
Spalding                                          n=2
Allendale North                                   n=2
Gawler                                            n=2
Balaklava                                         n=2

The most popular towns visited by participants were Clare, Kapunda, Tanunda, Angaston, Nuriootpa,
Lyndoch and Burra. This would be expected given that they are well recognised for their heritage and
character qualities.

Other towns visited included Stockwell, Hallett, Jamestown, Keyneton, Bethany, Gladstone, Laura, Sandy
Creek, Hamley Bridge, Koolunga, Red Hill, Blyth, Rhyme and Farrell Flat. A number of participants also
mentioned that they had visited all of the towns situated along major and minor regional roads.


6. (a) ACTIVITIES ENGAGED IN OR PLANNED TO UNDERTAKE DURING VISIT

Activities Engaged in or Planned to Undertake                Total
General Sightseeing                                            36
Visiting Wineries                                              35
Visiting Historic Areas or Heritage Places                     31
Eating out at Restaurants                                      28
Visiting Museums or Art Galleries                              25
Bushwalking                                                    18
Visiting Pubs, Clubs and Discos                                14
Shopping for Pleasure                                          14
Picnics / Barbeques                                            12
Visiting Friends and Relatives                                 12
Other                                                          8
Cycling                                                        7
Trips to Other Places                                          5
Attending Events                                                3
Total Number of Activities                                    248

General sightseeing (36 responses) and visiting wineries (35 responses) were the two most popular activities
engaged in by participants. Other significant activities included visiting historic areas or heritage places,
eating out at restaurants and visiting museums or art galleries.

The high variety of responses may indicate a great deal of variety of activities available in the Barossa and
Clare Valley Regions.

A number of participants took trips to other places. These included trips to Clare, The Flinders Ranges,
Tanunda, Mannum and Murray Bridge.




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Several participants mentioned that they had been to or were planning on going to a number of various
events. These events included the Jazz Funday at Light’s Pass, the Vintage Festival and the Spanish Fiesta.

Various other activities mentioned by participants included family history research at the Kapunda Library,
town walks and tours, sleeping in, enjoying views and weather, looking at real estate, general relaxing,
painting, talking to locals and learning about local history.


6. (b) ARE THERE ANY ACTIVITIES OF THESE ACTIVITIES WHICH YOU HAVE PARTICIPATED IN ON
PREVIOUS TRIPS TO THE REGION WHICH YOU WONT BE DOING THIS TIME? WHAT IS THE MAIN
REASON FOR NOT DOING THIS ACTIVITY ON THIS VISIT?

Aspects mentioned by participants included:
•    The Clare Races – Is not on at this time of year;
•    Cycling / Cycling on the Riesling Trail – Did not bring bike this time, decided to walk instead;
•    Visiting Wineries / Wine Tasting – Lack of money, time pressure;
•    Children’s Activities – Doing activities which don’t involve playgrounds because children aren’t with us
     this time;
•    Shopping for Pleasure, Day Trips, Visiting Friends and Relatives, Visiting Museums and Art Galleries –
     Not feeling well;
•    Picnics / Barbeques, General Sightseeing, Eating out at Restaurants, Bushwalking – Had to study;
•    Most of the Above – Too many things happening with friends;
•    Picnics – On push bikes;
•    Barbeques – On push bikes;
•    Visiting Wineries – On push bikes;
•    Wine Tasting / Purchasing – On push bikes;
•    Visiting Roseworthy – Insufficient time; And
•    Penfolds – Unhappy with previous service.

Reasons put forward by participants for not engaging in specific activities were generally restricted to
individual circumstances. Some notable reasons included lack of money and time pressure.

One participant stated that the Clare Races was not on at the time of their trip while another did not bring
their children away on holiday this time.


7. (a) ATTRACTIONS VISITED DURING TRIP

The most frequently mentioned places were:
*Wineries / Vineyards                             n = 10
Kapunda Museum                                    n=4
Martindale Hall                                   n=3
Burra Mine / Heritage Trail                       n=3
Riesling Trail                                    n=2
Walking Trails                                    n=2
Coffee Shops / food                               n=2
Menglers Hill                                     n=2



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Maggie Beer’s                                                n=2
Collingrove House                                            n=2
Bungaree                                                     n=2
Antique / Craft Shops                                        n=2
Whispering Wall                                              n=2
Playgrounds                                                  n=1
Seppeltsfield                                                n=1
Luhrs Cottage                                                n=1
Pheasant Farm                                                n=1
Mawson Trail                                                 n=1
Museums                                                      n=1
Tourist Drives                                               n=1
Kapunda                                                      n=1
Historic Churches                                            n=1

* Wineries mentioned included Wolf Blass, Saltrams, Jacobs Creek, Seppeltsfield, Bethany, Angaston,
Rockford, Turkey Flat and Skillogallee.

Visiting specific wineries and vineyards was the most popular type of activity engaged in by participants.

Other attractions visited by participants included parks and gardens, the Novotel Exhibition Centre, the
Kaiser Stuhl Conservation Park, Turkey Flat, various restaurants, the SA Company Kitchen, lavender farms,
Mintaro Maze, the Mintaro Railway Station, the Lincoln Nitschke Air Museum, Dutton Park, the Kapunda
Visitor Information Centre, Golf Clubs and the Murray Edwards Studio.


8. ON AVERAGE, HOW MUCH WOULD YOU SPEND ON ITEMS OTHER THAN ACCOMMODATION?

Type of Travel                       Meals        Wine         Other         Attractions    Tours       Art
Party                                           Purchases   Food/Produce
Individual                                50       100           20              10           -          -
                                          40       200           20               -           -         50
                                          30        -            30              10          10         50
                                         200       200           50               -           -          -
                                          50       200           20               -           -          -
                                          60       120           60               -           -          -
                                          60        -             -               -           -          -
                                          20        -             -               -           -          -
                                          55       150            -               -           -          -
                                          0         0             0               0           0         0
                                          20        -            10               -           -          -
                                          20        -             2               -           -          -
                                          50       100           50               -           -          -
Total Spent                              $655     $1070         $262             $20         $10       $100
Average Spent                            $50       $82           $20             $1          $1         $7
Couple                                   100       100           50               -           -          -



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Type of Travel                       Meals       Wine        Other         Attractions    Tours       Art
Party                                         Purchases   Food/Produce
                                      125         50            -               -            -          -
                                       40         50           50              10           35         50
                                       25         50           10              10           35         20
                                      500        200           50              50            -          -
                                      150        150          150               -            -          -
                                      100         50           50               -            -          -
                                       40        200           20              30            -          -
                                       40          -           10              10           10         10
                                      300        100          200               -            -         50
                                      300        300          140               -            -          -
                                      200        120          100               -            -         50
                                      300        300          100               -            -         50
                                       80          -            -               -            -          -
                                      200          -            -              50            -        200
                                      500          -           50               -            -          -
                                      100         50           30               -            -          -
                                       30         50           30              20           100         -
                                      100        100          100               -            -          -
                                        -        360            -               -            -          -
                                      250        500           50               -            -          -
                                      300          -            -               -            -          -
                                      130         70           50               -            -          -
                                       50          -           20              50            -          -
                                       75          -            -              50            -          -
                                      100          -           20               -            -        100
                                       45          -            -              200           -          -
                                      120         31           25              42            -          -
                                       80         80           50              15            -          -
                                       75        100           11              25            -         20
                                        -          -           50              10            -         70
                                       40          -            -               4            -         50
                                       80        175           28              25            -         40
Total Spent                          $4,575     $3,186       $1,444           $601         $180      $710
Average Spent                         $138       $96          $43              $18          $5        $21
Family                                 80          -            -              50            -          -
                                      300        300           50               -            -          -
Total Spent                           $380       $300         $50              $50           -          -
Average Spent                         $190       $150         $25              $25           -          -
Total Spent                          $5610      $4556        $1756            $671         $190      $810
Average Spent                         $116       $94          $36              $13          $3        $16

The total amount spent on meals for all participants was some $5,610. On average, each participant spent
approximately $116 on meals. As expected, families spent the largest amounts of money on meals on
average ($190) while couples spent the second largest amount of money on meals on average ($138).




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Participants spent approximately $4,556 on wine purchases. On average, each participant spent
approximately $94 on wine purchases.

Couples spent a significant amount on wine purchases. This amounted to some $3,186. Some couples in
particular spent up to $500 on wine.

Another $1,756 was spent on other food and produce. On average, each participant spent approximately
$36 on other food and produce. Couples were most likely to spend money on these products. Individuals and
families on average spent between $20-$25 each on other food and produce.

Participants were less likely to spend money on tours. Art however attracted some significant purchases.
One participant spent $200 on art during their visit.


9. WHICH AREAS, ACTIVITIES AND ATTRACTIONS WOULD YOU MOST RECOMMEND TO OTHER
VISITORS?

The most frequently mentioned activities and attractions were:
* Wineries/Vineyards                            n = 16
* Restaurants                                   n = 15
* Bakeries                                      n=3
* Pub’s and Clubs                               n=3
Mawson Trail                                    n=3
Kapunda Museum                                  n=3
Kapunda Library                                 n=2
Burra Mine                                      n=2
Kaiser Stuhl Conservation Park                  n=1
Jacobs Creek Visitor Centre                     n=1
SA Company Kitchen                              n=1
Martindale Hall                                 n=1
Mintaro Maze                                    n=1
Burra Heritage Trail                            n=1
Seppeltsfield                                   n=1
Thompson Buildings                              n=1
Murray Edward Studio                            n=1
Horse Trails                                    n=1
Walking Trails in Historic Towns                n=1
Riesling Trail                                  n=1
Bungaree                                        n=1
Tanunda Main Street                             n=1
Tanunda Art Gallery                             n=1
Kapunda Mine Area                               n=1
Menglers Hill Lookout and Sculpture             n=1
Good Shopping                                   n=1



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Novotel Resort                                   n=1
Food Tasting                                     n=1
Whispering Wall                                  n=1
Luhrs Cottage                                    n=1
Paxton Square Museum                             n=1
Paxton’s Cottages                                n=1
Bon Accord Museum                                n=1
Jeff Morgan’s                                    n=1
Panorama                                         n=1
Morilana Scenic Drive                            n=1
Willow Waters                                    n=1
Mt Remarkable                                    n=1
Heritage Buildings                               n=1
Dare’s Hill Area                                 n=1
Memorial Park                                    n=1

* Participants identified a number of excellent restaurants and food places. Maggie Beer’s (4 responses) and
1918 (2 responses) were the most popular restaurants identified. Others included Zinfadels, Skillogallee, Salt
n Vine, Vintners, Rising Sun Hotel, Sevenhill Pub, the Vines and the Magpie and Stump Hotel.

* Significant wineries and vineyards identified by participants included Chateau Barossa, Yaldara, Elderton
Wines, Rockfords, Kies, Kirrihill Estate, Jeanneret, Jim Barry, Tim Adams, Leasingham, Sevenhill, Turkey
Flat, Cider Winery, Skillogallee and Grossett.

* Several high quality bakeries were also identified by participants. These included the Apex Bakery and the
Linkes Bakery. Tanunda in particular was recognised by several participants for its high quality bakeries and
food places.

* Participants identified a number of excellent pubs and hotels. These included the Burra Commercial Hotel
and the Kooringa Pub.


10. ARE THERE ANY AREAS, ACTIVITIES AND ATTRACTIONS YOU WOULD NOT RECOMMEND TO
OTHERS?

The most frequently mentioned activities and attractions were:
The Magpie and Stump Hotel                       n=1
Mintaro Mews                                     n=1
Anlaby                                           n=1
Hampton                                          n=1
Penfolds                                         n=1

Participants were very satisfied and happy with the quality and range of services available throughout the
Barossa and Clare Valley Regions. However, a relatively small number of participants raised a number of
issues in relation to service and activity at a number of attractions.




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One participant felt that the Magpie and Stump Hotel could do so much better in terms of its service and
quality while another participant felt that the Mintaro Mews looked uninviting and unappealing. It is
understood that one participant was disappointed that Anlaby was not open when they were visiting the area.

One participant felt that their experience of Hampton was disappointing. They felt that the town layout could
not be easily viewed when looking at the map of Wellington Street. This participant also felt that the Market
Square Museum needs restoration work.


11. (a) MAIN SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT THE BAROSSA AND CLARE VALLEY REGIONS
BEFORE YOUR VISIT?

Information Sources                                 Total
Brochures                                            31
Travel Guides                                        17
Internet                                             15
Visitor Information Centre / RAA                     12
Other                                                 8
Friends and Relatives                                 7
Travel Agent                                          3
Media Article                                         3
Advertising                                           2
Total Number of Sources                              98

Brochures were by far and away the most useful type of information source available for potential tourists.
Brochures made up 31% of all survey responses. Other useful sources included travel guides (17
responses) and the internet (15 responses).

Other sources participants used to gain information on the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions included past
knowledge and holiday experience, access to unique postcards books, Regency College information and
Bike SA travel information.

One other participant mentioned that they had visited the region over 25 years ago and wanted to return as
they were already in South Australia at the time. Another participant had obtained information on the regions
through the Mawson Trail Guide.


11. (b) WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MAIN SOURCES OF INFORMATION DURING YOUR VISIT?

Information Sources                                 Total
Visitor Information Centre                            32
Accommodation Venues                                  22
Word of Mouth                                        20
Wineries                                              16
Shops/Business in Towns                               12
Tourist Attractions                                   7
Other                                                 3
Total                                                112



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Participants felt that visitor information centres and accommodation venues were very useful in providing a
range of tourism information. Other notable sources included world of mouth and wineries.

One participant felt that staff were very helpful at a number of service stations while another felt that the
Clare Valley tourist guide offered a range of useful information.

One other participant accessed information whilst visiting Barossa Secrets while another discussed with
school library staff, local quality eating and dining places.


11. (c) QUALITY OF DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE IN THE REGION

Directional

Level of Quality                                       Total
1 (Very Bad)                                             2
2                                                        3
3                                                       16
4                                                       13
5 (Very Good)                                           17
Not Stated                                               5
Total                                                   56

A number of participants felt that road signage often appeared too late and only became visible once you
were upon them. Participants felt that this made it very difficult to safely slow down and turn and follow
accordingly.

Several other participants felt that it was very confusing for tourists once driving off of main roads. One
participant felt that it was possible to get lost out in the countryside.

Other significant reasons and comments included:
Well signed                                                 n=6
Some signs are not visible from a distance                  n=4
Not enough signage                                          n=2
Unclear maps                                                n=2
No consistency to signage                                   n=1
Directional signage was often confusing                     n=1
Often signage at the beginning of walks is inadequate       n=1
Have missed a few places                                    n=1
Insufficient signage guiding tourists to wineries           n=1




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Informational

Level of Quality                                     Total
1 (Very Bad)                                           1
2                                                      2
3                                                     12
4                                                     20
5 (Very Good)                                         14
Not Stated                                             7
Total                                                 56

Participants were generally satisfied with the level of information displayed on signage throughout the
Barossa and Clare Valley Regions. Approximately 80% of participants were reasonably satisfied by the
informational quality of signage throughout the regions.

One participant felt that signage was often difficult to understand and read.

Other significant reasons and comments included:
Well signed                                               n=8
There are few interpretive signs                          n=1


12. TRAVEL PARTY

Travel Party                                               Total
Couple                                                      35
Travelling with Friends / Relatives in Group                14
Family – Parents With Children                               3
Individual, Travelling Alone                                 3
School Group                                                1
Total                                                       56

Couples were clearly the most common type of travel party among participants. Interestingly, fourteen
participants stated that they were travelling with friends and relatives in a group. This group made up 25% of
all participants surveyed.


13. TRAVEL TYPE CLASSIFICATION

Travel Type Classification                                 Total
Budget (less that $200)                                     29
Luxury ($200 or more)                                       21
Seeking Adventure                                            5
Seeking Nature Based Experiences                             4
Not Stated                                                   2
Total                                                       61*




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* A number of participants considered themselves as belonging to more than one type of travel category,
such as luxury and seeking adventure. As a result, the total figure is more than the actual total number of
participants surveyed.

The vast majority of participants considered themselves as either luxury or budget travellers. A total of 21
participants spent more than $200 per day on travel related activities while another 29 spent less than $200
per day on various travel activities.

Several other participants considered themselves as genuine nature based travellers. One participant in
particular was visiting the regions especially for its access to nature walks and recreation trails.


14. WHERE DO YOU LIVE?

Place Of Residence                                        Total
Metropolitan Adelaide                                      30
Regional South Australia                                    5
Regional Victoria                                           5
Melbourne                                                   4
Sydney                                                      3
Regional Queensland                                        3
Regional New South Wales                                    1
Regional Western Australia                                  1
Regional Tasmania                                           1
Northern Territory                                          1
ACT                                                         1
Overseas                                                    1
Brisbane                                                    0
Perth                                                       0
Hobart                                                      0
Not Stated                                                  0
Total                                                      56

The vast majority of participants lived in metropolitan Adelaide. Approximately 53% of all participants
surveyed lived in metropolitan Adelaide. Another five participants lived in regional South Australian towns
such as Millicent, Gawler, Nairne, Kadina and Strathalbyn.

Interstate visitors were visiting from places such as Melbourne, Canberra, Alice Springs, Echuca, Mildura,
Bowral, Beaudesert, Penguin, Geelong, Boulder, Bendigo, Caboolture and Albany Creek.

Only one participant was visiting from overseas. It is understood that they were visiting from the USA.




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15. AGE CATEGORY

Age Category                                               Total
15-24                                                       4
25-44                                                       15
45-64                                                       26
65+                                                         11
Not Stated                                                  0
Total                                                       56

The majority of participants (46% of participants) were aged between 45 and 64. Wine, heritage and scenery
may appeal more to these age groups when compared with younger groups.

Fifteen participants were aged between 25 and 44 while another four participants were less than 24 years of
age. A number of these participants were visiting with their partner.


16. TRAVEL MODE TO THE BAROSSA AND CLARE VALLEY REGIONS

The most frequently mentioned modes of travel were:
Own Private Car                                   n = 42
Rental Hire Car                                   n = 10
Bicycle                                           n=3
Bus                                               n=1

Over 70% of participants travelled to the regions in their own private car while a number of other participants
hired rental cars. Participants using a hire car would have most likely accessed South Australia by plane.




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APPENDIX 4

Detailed Analysis of Surveys Conducted with Visitors to
South Australia

August / September 2004




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TOTAL NUMBER OF SURVEYS = 33

Please note that due to the small sample size it is not appropriate to draw strong conclusions about the
information provided to us by respondents.


1.       NAME OF PLACE WHERE SURVEY OBTAINED

Place Where Survey Obtained                                  Total
King William Street Visitor Information Centre                 8
Adelaide Shores Holiday Village                                3
Grosvenor Hotel Adelaide                                      15
McLaren Vale Tourist Information Centre                        7
Total                                                         33

Surveys were conducted face to face with participants at both the King William Street and McLaren Vale
Tourist Information Centres. In contrast, surveys were left with visitors to complete at both the Adelaide
Shores Holiday Village and the Grosvenor Hotel, Adelaide. In this way, participants were given the
opportunity to complete the survey at their own leisure.


2.       PURPOSE OF VISIT TO SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Purpose Of Visit                                             Total
Holiday/Leisure                                               14
Business/Conference                                           10
Visiting Family/Relatives                                      7
Other, Please Describe                                         2
Total                                                         33

The majority of tourists travelling to South Australia were visiting for holiday/leisure and business/conference
purposes. A number of participants who were travelling as part of a business or conference related visit,
stayed at the Grosvenor Hotel. It is understood that some participants visiting family and friends also enjoyed
a holiday at the same time.

One participant, who lives in Millicent, travelled to Adelaide to see a doctor while another participant visiting
from Japan was studying in Adelaide as part of an exchange program.




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3.      LENGTH OF STAY IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Length Of Stay In South Australia                     Total
1 Night                                                1
2 Nights                                               8
3 Nights                                               8
4-7 Nights                                             7
8-14 Nights                                            4
More Than 14 Nights                                    5
Total                                                  33

Trip lengths varied dramatically however it is clear that trips to South Australia, based on this data tend to be
greater than one night. A number of participants staying longer than four nights were visiting from places
such as London and Auckland and domestic destinations such as Hobart and Brisbane. As would be
expected, trip lengths tended to be greater for those visiting for the purposes of holiday and leisure.


4.       REGIONS PLANNING ON VISITING

South Australian Tourism Regions         Trips to Region
Adelaide Hills                                   19
Barossa                                          11
Clare Valley                                     10
Eyre Peninsula                                    0
Fleurieu Peninsula                               12
Kangaroo Island                                   4
Flinders Ranges and Outback                       5
Limestone Coast                                   5
Murraylands                                       1
Riverland                                         2
Yorke Peninsula                                   1
Total Number Of Regional Trips                   69
Total Number Of Respondents                      33

The Adelaide Hills was by far the most visited tourism region with a total number of 19 recorded trips. The
Fleurieu Peninsula (12 trips) and the Barossa Valley (11 trips) were the second and third most popular
tourism destinations respectively.




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5(a). LENGTH OF STAY IN BAROSSA

* This information is only recorded for those visitors staying in the Barossa

Length Of Stay In Barossa                     Total
Day Trip                                        9
1-2 Nights                                      0
3-7 Nights                                      2
More Than 7 Nights                              0
Total                                          11

The significant majority of visitors travelling to the Barossa Valley, had visited or were going to visit for the
day while only two visitors said that they were staying for a period of between 3-7 nights. Based on this data,
it is clearly evident that the Barossa Valley is primarily a short stay destination.

Main Reasons For Visiting Barossa

The most frequently mentioned reasons were:
Wineries/Vineyards                                  n=6
General Sightseeing                                 n=3
Food and Wine                                       n=1
Heritage and History                                n=1
Scenery                                             n=1
Maggie Beer’s                                       n=1
Visiting Friends or Family                          n=1


5(b). LENGTH OF STAY IN CLARE VALLEY

* This information is only recorded for those visitors staying in the Clare Valley

Length Of Stay In Clare Valley                Total
Day Trip                                        8
1-2 Nights                                      2
3-7 Nights                                      0
More Than 7 Nights                              0
Total                                          10

Day Visits were the most common type of trip recorded while only two participants stated that they had
stayed or were staying in the region for between 1-2 nights.




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Main Reason For Visiting Clare Valley?

The most frequently mentioned reasons were:
Wineries/Vineyards                                 n=5
Heritage and History                               n=2
General Sightseeing                                n=2
Golf                                               n=1
Business                                           n=1
Visiting Friends                                   n=1
Driving Through                                    n=1


5(c). VISITED BAROSSA OR CLARE VALLEY REGIONS BEFORE

Visited These Regions Before                Total
Yes                                           14
No                                            4
No Response                                   15
Total                                         33

A significant number of participants had visited the Barossa or Clare Valley regions before, amounting to
some 42% of the total number of survey participants. This may reflect a high degree of customer satisfaction
among participants however the lack of new visitors coming to the region may indicate a low level of interest
or knowledge of the regions.

Those participants who were not planning on visiting the Barossa or Clare Valley regions during their stay
were not invited to respond to any of the questions involving 5 (c). However it is understood that a number of
participants completed some parts of the question anyway. Therefore the no response category reflects
those participants who gave ‘no response’ to any of the questions of 5 (c).

Date of Last Visit                          Total
In the past 2 Years                           6
2-5 Years Ago                                 2
6-10 Years Ago                                1
More Than 10 Years Ago                        3
No Response                                   21
Total                                         33

Half the respondents who had visited the regions before indicated that they had visited either the Barossa or
Clare Valley Regions within the last two years. This may reflect the success of the State’s marketing
campaigns, pitched at bringing new tourists to the Barossa and Clare Valleys.




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Places Visited:

The most frequently mentioned places were:
Tanunda                                             n=4
Clare Valley                                        n=3
Nuriootpa                                           n=3
Visited Most Towns                                  n=3
Angaston                                            n=2
Assorted Wineries                                   n=1

Number of Nights In Region                   Total
Day Trip                                        4
1-2 Nights                                      3
3-7 Nights                                      3
More Than 7 Nights                              0
No Response                                    23
Total                                          33

Day trips were again the most frequent type of trip undertaken by tourists visiting the Barossa and Clare
Valley Regions. However a number of participants stated that they had previously stayed in the region for
between one and seven nights.


6.     MAIN REASON FOR NOT VISITING THE BAROSSA OR CLARE VALLEY

* This information is only recorded for those visitors not visiting the Barossa or Clare Valleys.

Main Reason For Not Visiting                                  Total
Lack Of Time                                                    8
Do Not Know Enough About Them                                   4
Not Interested In Kinds Of Activities Available There           2
Too Expensive                                                   0
No Transport Available                                          0
Other, Please Specify                                           0
Total                                                          14

A lack of time was the primary reason put forward by participants for not visiting either the Barossa or Clare
Valley Regions. A number of these participants were short on time because of either work, business or
conference related activities.




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7. (a) AS A TOURIST, WHAT CHARACTERISTICS DO YOU ASSOCIATE WITH THE BAROSSA REGION

The most frequently mentioned aspects were:
Wineries/Vineyards                              n = 26
Scenery                                         n = 12
Food/Food and Wine                              n=8
Heritage and History/German Heritage            n=5
Festivals                                       n=2
Arts and Crafts                                 n=2
Never Heard of it                               n=2

Some other responses mentioned by individual participants included wheat growing, music, shopping in
Tanunda, fruit, weather, bicycle paths, churches and tours.


7. (b) WHICH ARE APPEALING

The most frequently mentioned aspects were:
Wineries/Vineyards                              n = 18
Scenery                                         n=7
Food                                            n=2
German History and Heritage                     n=2
None                                            n=2
Not sure                                        n=2

Participants found the Barossa’s wine and scenery to be its most appealing aspects. A number of
participants were however unsure as to what appealed to them. Furthermore, two participants stated that the
region does not generally appeal to them, particularly wine. Other responses mentioned included shopping,
history and arts and crafts.


8. (a) AS A TOURIST, WHAT CHARACTERISTICS DO YOU ASSOCIATE WITH THE CLARE VALLEY
REGION

The most frequently mentioned aspects were:
Wineries/Vineyards                              n = 20
Scenery                                         n=6
Historic Buildings and Streetscapes             n=4
Never Heard of it                               n=3
Don’t Know                                      n=3
Food                                            n=2
Food and Wine                                   n=1
Golf Courses                                    n=1
Copper and Mining                               n=1
Pleasant Community                              n=1




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Other responses mentioned by participants included quality bed and breakfast’s, good walking and cycling
trails, beautiful churches and festivals and arts. A higher number of responses relating to a lack of
knowledge or understanding of the region indicates to some extent that the Clare Valley Region is less
recognised by tourists and visitors.

Wine was given lesser emphasis when compared with the Barossa Valley but was still recognised as being
an integral part of the region’s identity and branding. Several participants stated that the region was
recognised for its white wine and shiraz.


8. (b) WHICH ARE APPEALING

The most frequently mentioned aspects were:
Wineries/Vineyards                             n = 10
Scenery                                        n=4
Historic Buildings and Streetscapes            n=4
Food/Food and Wine                             n=2
Golf Courses                                   n=1
Bed and Breakfast’s                            n=1
Churches                                       n=1
Not Sure                                       n=1
Pleasant Community                             n=1


9.     IF RETURNING TO SOUTH AUSTRALIA, WHICH REGIONS WOULD YOU MOST LIKELY VISIT?

Regions Likely To Visit                                 Anticipated Number of Trips
Adelaide Hills                                                       3
Adelaide Metropolitan Area                                           3
Barossa                                                              5
Clare Valley                                                         5
Eyre Peninsula                                                       3
Fleurieu Peninsula                                                   3
Kangaroo Island                                                      4
Flinders Ranges and Outback                                          6
Limestone Coast                                                      3
Murraylands                                                          0
Riverland                                                            0
Yorke Peninsula                                                      0
Have Seen It All, Would Not Come Again                               1
Not Stated                                                           9
Would Be Happy To Visit All Regions                                  1
Total                                                               46




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Six participants felt that they would visit the Flinders Ranges and Outback if they returned to South Australia
while a number of other participants identified the Barossa and Clare Valleys (5 trips each) as being
favourable destinations in which to visit in the future. Other responses were mixed, however the
Murraylands, Riverland and Yorke Peninsula were not considered to be regions in which to visit in the future.

One participant felt that they had seen everything South Australia has to offer while another participant felt
that they would be happy to visit any of the regions of South Australia.


10. LIKELIHOOD THAT THEY WOULD VISIT BAROSSA OR CLARE VALLEY REGIONS IN THE
FUTURE

Likelihood of Visiting Barossa In The Future                              Total
Very Likely                                                                13
Somewhat Likely                                                             9
Not Very Likely                                                             9
Not Stated                                                                  2
Total                                                                      33

A total of thirteen participants felt that it was likely that they would visit the Barossa within the near future. In
contrast, nine participants believe that it would be highly unlikely that they would ever visit the Barossa in the
future. Some of these participants may consider that they have already seen everything the Barossa has to
offer while others may not be interested in the kinds of activities available such as wine and food.

Likelihood of Visiting Clare Valley In The Future                         Total
Very Likely                                                                10
Somewhat Likely                                                            10
Not Very Likely                                                            10
Not Stated                                                                  3
Total                                                                      33

Responses varied significantly for this question, with a number of participants stating that they are not sure
whether they would visit the region in the future. This data is not significantly different when compared with
that of the Barossa Valley. This may reflect the growing popularity and promotion of the Clare Valley Region.




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11. PLACES WHERE INFORMATION ON SOUTH AUSTRALIA WAS OBTAINED

Information Sources                                      Number of Helpful Sources of
                                                                Information
Internet                                                                 9
Travel Agent                                                             1
Visitor Information Centre                                              18
Brochures                                                               16
Advertisements                                                           2
TV/Radio Programmes                                                      1
Newspaper Articles                                                       0
Family and Friends                                                       9
Other, Please Specify                                                    5
Total

Other sources of information identified by participants included guide books, past experience and word of
mouth, RACQ manuals and Lonely Planet guides and brochures. One participant found that a hotel in which
they were staying offered useful tourist information while another felt that airports offered a range of tourist
information.

A number of South Australian residents stated that they knew the regions well through their experience and
knowledge.


12. AGE CATEGORY

Age Category                                                           Total
15-24                                                                    0
25-44                                                                   10
45-64                                                                   15
65+                                                                      6
Not Stated                                                               2
Total                                                                   33

Participants were generally aged between 25 and 64. This data may be slightly misleading in that many of
the participants were aged over 50.

Interestingly, there were no participants aged under 24. This may reflect the limited range of activities and
opportunities available to young tourists and travellers throughout South Australia. However the places in
which participants were surveyed such as the SATC tended to attract interest from older age groups rather
than young travellers.




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13. NATURE OF TRAVEL PARTY

Type Of Travel Party                                                Total
Travelling Alone                                                      5
Couple                                                                12
Family – Parents With Children                                        2
Travelling With Adult Family and Friends                              10
Travelling With Friends, Relatives and Children                       2
Not Stated                                                            2
Total                                                                 33

Couples were the most common type of travel party while adult family and friends were the second most
common type. Surprisingly, only two families were surveyed. It would be expected that family visits would be
much higher during the school holiday seasons.


14. APPROXIMATE AMOUNT SPENT ON ACCOMMODATION

Amount Spent On Accommodation                                       Total
Less than $50                                                         12
$51 - $100                                                            8
$101 - $200                                                           11
$201 - $300                                                           0
More Than $300                                                        0
Not Stated                                                            2
Total                                                                 33

Spending on accommodation was generally below $100 per night. Another eight participants spent between
$101 and $200. Many of these participants were staying at the Grosvenor Hotel.

There were no participants who spent more than $200 on accommodation per night during their visit.


15. WHERE DO YOU LIVE

Place Of Residence                                                          Total
Metropolitan Adelaide                                                        0
Regional South Australia                                                     2
Sydney                                                                       0
Regional New South Wales                                                     3
Melbourne                                                                    5
Regional Victoria                                                            2
Brisbane                                                                     2
Regional Queensland                                                          2
Perth                                                                        3



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Place Of Residence                                                          Total
Regional Western Australia                                                    4
Hobart                                                                        1
Regional Tasmania                                                             0
Northern Territory                                                            3
ACT                                                                           0
Overseas                                                                      5
Not Stated                                                                    1
Total                                                                        33

Five participants were visiting from Melbourne while another five participants were visiting from overseas.
Participants were also visiting South Australia from regional Western Australia, the Northern Territory,
regional New South Wales and Perth.

Origin of Overseas Visitors:

Rome, Italy
Near London, United Kingdom
Korea
Auckland, New Zealand
Japan

A number of participants travelled to South Australia from overseas destinations. Their level of knowledge
and understanding of the Barossa and Clare Valleys was mixed. Some were quite familiar with the types of
activities available while others had never heard of them before.


16. TRAVEL MODE TO SOUTH AUSTRALIA

The most frequently mentioned modes of travel were:
Flying                                         n = 17
Own Private Car                                n = 13
Not Stated                                     n=2
Caravan                                        n=1

Flying (17 responses) was the most popular type of travel mode to South Australia while the private car (13
responses) was the second most popular travel mode to South Australia.




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17. TRAVEL MODE WITHIN SOUTH AUSTRALIA

The most frequently mentioned modes of travel were:
Private Car                                    n = 17
Rental Hire Car                                n=7
Bus                                            n=3
Not Stated                                     n=2
Caravan                                        n=1
Walking                                        n=1
Taxi                                           n=1
Public Transport                               n=1

The private car was by far the most common type of travel mode utilised within South Australia. Many
participants were travelling by car to South Australia from places such as Brisbane and regional New South
Wales. A number of these visitors felt that this enabled them to easily access regions such as the Adelaide
Hills and the Barossa Valley.




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APPENDIX 5

Copy of Discussion Paper used for Consultation

List of Those Attending Focus Groups and Apologies




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1.            INTRODUCTION

This Discussion Paper has been prepared to encourage discussion on the draft strategic directions for
tourism in the Clare Valley and Barossa Regions for the next 5-10 years.

The Paper briefly describes the project scope, study process and research findings prior to outlining the
strategic directions for sustainable tourism.


Sustainable tourism provides benefits to both visitors and host communities, while protecting and enhancing
natural and cultural attributes.


1.1 SCOPE AND PURPOSE OF THIS PROJECT

This project brings together the two tourism regions of Clare Valley and Barossa working through
representatives of the four Councils of The Barossa, Clare and Gilbert Valleys, Goyder and Light, the two
Regional Development Boards and the South Australian Tourism Commission.


The objective of the project is “to provide the Study Regions with a strategic and innovative planning
policy framework that will help attract sustainable tourism investment to the Regions.


1.2           STUDY TEAM AND APPROACH

The study commenced in July 2004 with the engagement of a consultant team comprising:

        Urban & Regional Planning Solutions:
        -     statutory and strategic planning, tourism research and consultation.

        Missing Link Tourism Consultants:
        -    market identification, economic analysis, product development, positioning and branding.

        Resource Environmental Management and Ecological Associates:
        -     environmental assessment and management – natural assets.

        Kristine Peters Project Management
        -     social analysis, industry development and community strengthening.



The study has involved:

        working closely with the Project Steering Committee to develop a shared vision for tourism;

        establishing and facilitating a Regional Leaders Forum;

        undertaking a five day targetted audit of regional product and a family based day trip;




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        review of relevant strategies and policy initiatives;

        market and core product analysis;

        preliminary assessment of environmental assets and landscape values;

        consideration of existing capability and capacity of the tourism industry, other business and the broader
        regional community to contribute to the growth of tourism;

        surveys of over 140 local businesses and residents in 8 towns;

        surveys of 90 tourists – including visitors to the region and those not visiting the region.


1.3           FINDINGS FROM THE RESEARCH

Importance of Tourism to the Regional Economies

Tourism is an extremely important contributor to the regional economies providing direct expenditure of over
$181 million from day visitors and domestic overnight visitors in the Barossa Region in 2003 and
approximately $80 million in the Clare Valley.


The importance of tourism for local economies and township vitality was recognised by the majority of the
businesses and residents who completed surveys. There is still considered to be a lack of understanding of
the value of tourism to some businesses and an inconsistent approach to customer service, hours of opening
and information provision.

Managing Economic Development by Protecting Tourism Assets

Key environmental assets to be recognised and protected in planning and managing tourism developments
are water, natural biodiversity, Indigenous and non-Indigenous culture and heritage and conservation parks.



Strengthening Industry and Community Capacity

The regional audit and the input of the Regional Leaders Forum highlighted the need to develop the quality
of personal service to visitors across all businesses and to increase the skills and capacity of volunteers and
paid staff in Visitor Information Centres. Networking of volunteers across all of the Visitor Information
Centres is needed to build a stronger cross regional experience for visitors. There are opportunities for
packaging and promotion of complementary products in the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions. Operators
may need targetted support and additional skills to realise this potential.




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2             TARGET MARKETS
The Consultant Team has developed a way of describing the kinds of visitors who need to be attracted to the
regions in order to successfully grow the expenditure from tourism over the next 10-15 years. This market
segmentation system is able to be described by age group, accommodation, preferred and activities
undertaken. It provides the basis for identifying changes to tourism products.




3             TOURISM PRODUCT TO MEET MARKET NEEDS

Tourism product is the experience offered to meet the needs of a target market. It therefore needs to be
described in terms of what the customer does, feels and benefits from. Every region typically contains a
huge variety of tourism product, but some plays a much larger role in attracting and satisfying target markets
than other product. The most important product is that which provides the region with a sustainable
competitive advantage, usually symbolised by its ability to differentiate the region from competitors, attract
target markets and generate high yielding economic impact. This strategic plan needs to concentrate on the
most powerful of this product, and the product that has the most potential. To do this, much of the product is
set aside and the focus will be on core product.

Core product demonstrates the strongest regional differentiation and market appeal to make the region
competitive, and is the most difficult for competitors to copy. Core product is used to focus and drive
regional positioning and branding.

Supplemental product adds value to the core product through additional differentiation and market appeal,
but isn’t necessarily as distinctive, appealing and readily adopted by the target market.

Table 1 lists the core product and its key attributes. What becomes immediately apparent from this analysis
of the core product is the emphasis on social interaction between customers and local hosts, and between
customers – the food, wine, events, trails and heritage are all vehicles from which to deliver this benefit.

Table 1: Core Product and Key Attributes

Core product                             Differentiating attributes that meet needs of target market
                                               Stories exchanged between wine maker and customers
1. Tasting and interaction
   at family owned cellar                      Learning about the local characteristics of wine growing and
   doors                                       production
                                               An environment that reflects the owners, operators and local
                                               characteristics of the region
                                               Safe introduction to wine for newcomers
2. Tasting and interaction
   at iconic cellar doors with                 Stories told by wine maker’s staff
   high brand recognition
                                               World renowned innovations in wine production and manufacturing




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Core product                             Differentiating attributes that meet needs of target market
                                               Special access into the property to see production and manufacturing
3. Guided immersion into a                     side, making customer feel special
   winery
                                               Authentic and nostalgic setting reflecting local character
4. Welcoming country pubs
                                               Heavily populated by locals who are relaxed and enjoying themselves
                                               Some locals socially interact and share stories with visitors
                                               Food has strong locally authentic and fresh characteristics
5. Eating locally grown food
   prepared using                              Grower interacts with customers and shares local context to the food,
   traditional methods                         and the local context of their local life (such as why they moved to
                                               and live there, their vision and passion)
                                               Well conserved but sometimes adapted heritage that can be
6. Heritage immersion                          physically experienced
                                               Stories that are personal, nostalgic and symbolic of region
                                               Connections to lost familiarity, memory and experience
                                               Opportunity to learn more about oneself through stories and
                                               connections
                                               Snapshot of local food, wine, culture and lifestyle
7. Barossa Vintage Festival
                                               Reflection of multi-culturalism of the region
                                               Meeting locals as stall holders and fellow customers
                                               Being part of a long standing tradition
                                               Alternative connector to local wineries, villages and heritage
8. The Riesling Trail
                                               Exercise and fresh air (to work off eating)
                                               Safe, easy, adjustable effort and children friendly




4.            PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

This section of the Discussion Paper highlights the kinds of products that need to be developed to better
meet the needs of identified target markets.

It also identifies existing product that could be reinvigorated to increase its appeal and ancillary services that
would add value to visitor experiences and increase the economic yield from tourism.



4.1           NEW PRODUCT

To meet the needs of the high yielding Indulger market, a destination spa that offers day treatments and
residential programmes could be linked to a modest sized Indulger accommodation. An attractive protected
hillside location with views over vineyards/ natural landscape would be a key feature of this kind of product.

To assist in regaining the “Generation X” Discoverer market, particularly those with children under the age of
8 a children’s wine-based interpretive programme could be offered by a set of wineries that offer
individual yet interconnected parts of a total programme building on each other through a progressive series



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of challenges. The programme should be highly reflective of regional authenticity and designed to be done
by children on their own or with parents, bringing them all closer together in quality time.

There appears to be a need for additional self-contained cabin style accommodation for this target
market. Possible locations include close to the Riesling Trail or in settings that offer scenic views of the rural
landscape. The accommodation needs to provide two bedrooms and should be provided in a cluster of 3-6
cabins so that children can interact with each other. There may be an opportunity to provide a child
minding service for evenings to allow parents to visit local restaurants.

Families also enjoy staying in historic houses but those with active young children could benefit from
heritage properties that provide more robust and less valuable heritage décor which still complements
the heritage character of the accommodation.

One of the product gaps appears to be self-contained accommodation in the $75 to $120 per night price
range. One opportunity to address this is being realised by Caravan Parks putting in cabins of a higher
quality and ensuring that the landscape setting provides an appealing experience that people would be
prepared to pay more for. For example, the Kapunda Tourist and Leisure Park is planning to achieve an
additional star rating by adding cabins of higher standard and addressing overall design and siting. This will
assist in increasing the proportion of Browsers and their length of stay and spend in this part of the Region.

The provisions of activities such as games, bike hire, film nights and social events by Caravan Parks would
appeal to families with children in the 8-14 year age group.

Regional food presents a huge opportunity for tourism growth. It is especially appealing to the Indulger
market in the Barossa, and Generation X and Y Discoverer markets in both regions. There is an opportunity
to further interpret local food during the consumption experience.



4.2           REINVIGORATED PRODUCT

The Burra Passport will benefit greatly from reinvigoration through converting the publication into an audio
guide adding in sound effects and music as necessary and using acoustic guide technology which ranges
from head set players to hand held wands.

The way this product is presented can make a stronger connection for people with the people of the past and
the present through having interesting people tell their stories or good presenters to provide a human face to
history.

The re-use of heritage buildings for contemporary activities that authentically reflect their past
provides significant appeal to the Discoverer market. An example would be the conservation and adaptation
of the Unicorn Brewery in Burra as a specialised beer venue offering an “end of the mining day”



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experience. This venue could provide regular cost effective entertainment such as a soloist guitar/singer and
story teller of local legends to increase the proportion of “Gen X” Discoverers in the Burra part of the Clare
Valley Region.

The Bungaree Shearing Shed is another existing product that provides a venue for functions such as
weddings, birthdays, etc. It may have the potential to be developed as a very special venue experience for a
wider market, eg corporate retreats, product launches, etc, by a joint venture with an existing events
organiser and food and beverage provider able to invest in upgrading the facility to better meet the
expectations of these markets without losing the heritage value of this very important regional asset.

Winery Cellar Doors are a very significant tourism destination attracting over 43% of all visitors to the
Barossa and 28% of those to the Clare Valley in 2003.

A small number of wineries have developed additional product that encourages immersion in the wine
experience through interpretive guided tours. This product needs to be built up through training and
identifying ways to differentiate each experience to encourage people to participate in more than one.

Many wineries have introduced food offerings into their cellar door operations. There is an opportunity to
better match regional foods with wine tasting. Co-operative arrangements between food providers and
wineries could assist in matching nibbles with wine and provide products for sale and/or information about
other places where people can enjoy these regional foods.

The Kapunda Museum needs to reduce the volume of exhibits to make space for a programmed set of
interpretive activities within the Museum and the surrounding area in order to broaden its appeal to
younger Discoverer markets who generally eschew Museums and historical collections.



4.3           SERVICES TO SUPPORT TOURISM

These include:
        Visitor Information Centres;
        Land based transport;
        Driving, cycling and walking loops and links.

The Strategy will include actions for using these services to enhance the tourism experience.



5.            RESPONSIVE PLANNING POLICY

The Review of Council’s Development Plans undertaken for this study has resulted in recommendations to
amend Development Regulations, Council Development Plans and to strengthen the capacity of developers,
planners and planning authorities to implement sustainable tourism developments.



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A range of amendments to Council’s Development Plan policies are proposed for consideration including:
        adopting a consistent winery definition throughout the region;
 .      better defining what is meant by “small scale tourist facilities/accommodation”, including bed and
        breakfast accommodation;
        ensuring development protects the natural environment, heritage and agriculture productivity of the
        region;
        further promoting the re-use of heritage places for tourism ventures including accommodation.
        introducing planning policy that encourage large scale storage, packaging, transport depots and
        distribution land uses to be located in industry / winery zones;
        introducing planning policies for existing large scale wineries to ensure they minimise potential negative
        impacts on the character of the locality.


It is also proposed to introduce planning policies that provide greater guidance to the developers of a range
of tourist accommodation including:
        cabins;
        eco-huts associated with trails.

Non-complying lists in Councils’ Development Plans will be reviewed to allow on-merit consideration of
shops, small restaurants and uses ancillary to the primary tourist use (eg cellar door / accommodation).




6.            PROTECTING ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS

The natural and rural landscape provides the setting for the tourism experience and it is highly valued by
visitors.

Beautiful countryside and scenery was the strongest attribute associated with the Clare Valley by visitors to
South Australian Cellar Doors in 2003. It was one of the top five qualities associated with the Barossa
Region in the same survey.

Built heritage is also a valued element of these landscapes with “quaint historic villages” and townships
being identified by visitors.

The cultural heritage of the region is experienced in many ways including through food grown locally and
cooked in traditional ways, in churches and cemeteries and in the long history of wine making and pastoral
activities.




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7.            BUILDING THE CAPACITY OF THE COMMUNITY, BUSINESSES AND
              TOURISM OPERATORS

The process of building a stronger capacity to underpin tourism development in the Clare and Barossa
Valleys is multi-layered and should recognise that, in rural regions, ‘the tourism industry’ and ‘the community’
are not separate. Our strategies to build social capacity will therefore overlap although messages will be
modified to suit the audience. Whichever strategy is used, it is important that the community at all levels
receives consistent core messages: tourism is good for our community, focus on quality, work together and
have fun!

This Strategic Plan will identify a range of social capacity building strategies that could be implemented in the
region.

There are key messages that need to get to the community:

        Tourism keeps our region vibrant, it is an important part of our economy - bringing wealth and
        employment;

        Everyone is involved in tourism – whether you are helping a visitor with directions, volunteer at the
        Visitor Information Centre or run a Petrol Station;

        Competing against the next town will damage tourism, work together to bring more visitors and get them
        to stay longer;

        Listen to what visitors are asking for, tell tourism operators what you learn.



The key messages for the tourism industry are:

        People don’t want just wine, food, accommodation or activities, they want combinations of these, the
        tourism industry needs to work collaboratively.

        Visitor Information Centres are an increasingly important part of the tourism product and the industry
        needs to work with VICs to provide a quality experience across the region.

        If people get poor or inconsistent service, or don’t receive local help to make their visit special, they will
        go elsewhere.

        Children are not pests, they bring parents with money!

        Tourists know what they want, ask them!




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8.            SUMMARY OF MAJOR STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS

Strategic Directions are the fundamental ways in which sustainable growth is driven and managed. This
Strategy recommends 12 Strategic Directions. The next stage of the study will be to further develop these
and prepare an Implementation Plan to assist the Regions to move forward with confidence.

The recommended Strategic Directions are as follows:

1.      Adapt the wine visitor market segmentation into the regional market segmentation system and introduce
        a monitoring system to check on the proportions being achieved.

2.      Reposition the region so that the target market’s underlying needs of connection, reinvigoration and
        achievement are implicitly revealed in the wine dominant brand.

3.      Develop new core product and add value to existing core product to increase competitive advantage
        and achieve target market growth forecasts.

4.      Reinvigorate core product to avoid life cycle decline and subsequent loss of target market sales.

5.      Facilitate the provision of services to support tourism including quality visitor information and land based
        transport.

6.      Seek changes to the Development Regulations to provide greater clarity regarding tourist
        accommodation.

7.      Introduce Development Plan policies to facilitate tourism development that protects existing
        environmental and heritage character and controls other forms of development that potentially threaten
        the tourism values of the regions.

8.      Review and fine tune non-complying lists in Councils’ Development Plans.

9.      Strengthen the capacity of tourism developers, Council planners and Elected Members to implement
        design guidelines for sustainable tourism development.

10. Identify, protect and manage the regions’ natural, built and cultural assets as the essential foundation
        for making decisions about future tourism development and activities.

11. Build the capacity of local communities and businesses to be active participants in the tourism
        experience.

12. Strengthen industry awareness and involvement in developing and promoting products to meet the
        needs of target markets and in cross regional packaging.




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List of Those Attending Focus Groups and Apologies




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KAPUNDA – 30TH NOVEMBER 2004

Present

Ms Pam Laver, Kapunda Tourist Association

Apologies

Mr Martin Pfeiffer, Whistler Wines
Ms Patricia Gordon-Stevens, The Wheatsheaf Pub
Mr Peter Beare, Regional Council of Light


BURRA – 1ST DECEMBER 2004

Present

Cr Laurie Sullivan, Chairman, Regional Council of Goyder
Mr Steve Kerrigan, Regional Council of Goyder
Mr Ian Falkenberg, National Parks and Wildlife (DEH)
Mr John Brak, Regional Council of Goyder
Ms Karen Reed, Clare Valley Tourism Marketing
Ms Leonie Fretwell, Regional Council of Goyder
Ms Maureen Wright, Burra Regional Tourism and Business Association

Apology

Andrew Glen, Burra Visitor Centre
Sue Ryan, Burra Regional Tourism & Business Association


CLARE – 2ND DECEMBER 2004

Present

Mark Goldstone, Clare & Gilbert Valleys Council
Rob Veitch, Clare & Gilbert Valleys Council
Graham Mill, Clare Valley Tourism Marketing
Linda Carter, Mid North Development Board
Paul McClure, Clare Valley Wine Makers Association

Apologies

Meg Barker, Clare Valley Tourism Marketing
Peter Wood, Clare Valley Tourist Association
David Cowper Thwaite




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BAROSSA – 3RD DECEMBER 2004

Present

Racheal Klitscher, Barossa Marketing
Dianne Pickard, Angaston Management Group
Roy Blight, Barossa Light Development Board
Ross Dawkins, Barossa Light Development Board
Karren Raper, Barossa Light Development Board
Peter Fuller, Fuller Communications Business & Marketing Centre
Kathryn Fuller, Fuller Communications Business & Marketing Centre

Apologies

John Heneker, Barossa Marketing
Peter Sawrey, Barossa Wine Makers Association
Steve Callery, Barossa Marketing
Judith Jones, The Barossa Council
Margaret Lehmann, Peter Lehmann Wines
Daniel Eggleton, Barossa & Light Regional Development Board
John Matthew, Tanunda Town Committee




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APPENDIX 6

Copies of Media Articles for Local Newspapers




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 WHO VISITS THE BAROSSA AND WHY? WHO IS NOT VISITING AND WHY? WHAT
               CHANGES DO WE NEED TO SUSTAIN TOURISM?


These are among the questions considered by regional leaders in tourism, business, marketing and
regional development at a meeting in Tanunda on Friday 3rd December 2004.

The meeting was convened by Angela Hazebroek of Urban & Regional Planning Solutions, part of the
consultant team preparing the Clare Valley and Barossa Regions Tourism Strategy on behalf of the
Barossa Council and Barossa Light Development Board in association with Councils in the Clare Valley
Region and the South Australian Tourism Commission.

Participants considered a Draft Strategic Directions Discussion Paper and provided their views on the
most important areas to be included in the final Strategy.

Building on the Barossa’s well deserved international reputation as the home of Shiraz and Australia’s
premier wine region, there is a need to focus on consistent quality and service across all sectors of
business and the tourism industry.

Current partnerships such as The Business Development Blue Print Programme are designed to
strengthen an enterprise culture among small businesses.

A renewed emphasis is needed on welcoming young families with children to the Barossa. Parents are
seeking to spend time with their children in settings that allow parents to relax and indulge at the same
time as their children are enjoying themselves.

Copies of the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Strategic Directions Paper will be available
from Council Offices, the Visitor Information Centre and on Council’s website: www.barossa.sa.gov.au
from 15th December 2004.

If you would like to make written comment on the proposed directions you can write to:

              Angela Hazebroek
              Urban & Regional Planning Solutions
              3/207 The Parade
              NORWOOD SA 5067

or email: angela@pp.net.au before Thursday 20th January 2005.

The consultants will be presenting the Draft Strategic Plan to representatives of The Barossa Council
and others members of the Steering Committee on 10th February 2005.

For further information, please contact Judith Jones, The Barossa Council on 8563 8444.




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                                         VISITORS TO BURRA – WHAT DO THEY WANT?


Visitors to Burra are seeking connection to the people and the places they experience. They want to
hear and feel a part of the stories of the past and the present. Burra and the surrounding districts have
a wealth of stories to tell and many great story tellers.

The secret to successful tourism is to make sure that visitors are able to reconnect with their memories
of the past or family links to a place and to connect with the essential qualities of this community as it
lives its life today.

The consultants undertaking the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Strategic Plan have
identified Burra as one of the best places for visitors to experience being immersed in the built and
cultural heritage of the region. It is possible to stay in comfortable heritage accommodation, to eat
surrounded by valued items from the past and to hear the stories at Malowen Lowarth and other historic
sites.

Some of the opportunities for Burra identified in the Draft Strategic Directions Paper currently available
for community comment include reinvigoration of the passport experience, introduction of storytellers
and musicians to heritage venues, investigation of the potential to give an economic life to the Unicorn
Brewery and developing local transport services and tours to connect people to Wally’s unique
Mongolata Gold Mine Experience and the fossils at Redbanks as a guided and managed activity.

Copies of the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Strategic Directions Paper will be available
from Council Offices, the Visitor Information Centre and on Council’s website: www.goyder.sa.gov.au
from 15th December 2004.

If you would like to make written comment on the proposed directions you can write to:

              Angela Hazebroek
              Urban & Regional Planning Solutions
              3/207 The Parade
              NORWOOD SA 5067

or email: angela@pp.net.au before Thursday 20th January 2005.

The consultants will be presenting the Draft Strategic Plan to representatives of Goyder Regional
Council and others members of the Steering Committee on 10th February 2005.

For further information, please contact John Brak on 8892 0100.




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                  PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER FOR TOURISM IN THE CLARE VALLEY


Regional leaders and tourism operators meeting in Clare last week identified that getting the planning
policies right was one of the highest priority outcomes needed from the current Clare Valley and
Barossa Regions Tourism Strategy. Planning needs to facilitate appropriate forms of tourism
development rather than acting as a disincentive for potential investors.

The consultant team working with the Clare and Gilbert Valleys Council and the Mid North Development
Board along with other Councils in the Region and the South Australian Tourism Commission, has
prepared a Discussion Paper highlighting key directions.

The audit for the Clare Valley Region highlighted the quality of accommodation available for those
seeking an indulgent break, emerging regional food experiences, opportunities to explore wineries such
as Sevenhill and Quelltaler and to participate in golf, horse racing and other sporting activities.
Packages are needed to bring together the best of what the Clare Valley has to offer and promote this
to visitors as an integrated experience.

Building a strong focus on welcoming visitors to the region and providing them with consistent friendly
service is the task of all businesses and residents. Tourism benefits everyone in the Clare Valley.

Copies of the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Strategic Directions Paper will be available
from Council Offices, the Visitor Information Centre and on Council’s website:
www.claregilbertvalleys.sa.gov.au from 15th December 2004.

If you would like to make written comment on the proposed directions you can write to:

              Angela Hazebroek
              Urban & Regional Planning Solutions
              3/207 The Parade
              NORWOOD SA 5067

or email: angela@pp.net.au before Thursday 20th January 2005.

The consultants will be presenting the Draft Strategic Plan to representatives of Clare & Gilbert Valleys
Council and others members of the Steering Committee on 10th February 2005.

For further information, please contact Rob Veitch, Clare & Gilbert Valleys Council on 8842 6400.




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       VISITORS SEEKING CONNECTION – WHO WILL TELL KAPUNDA’S STORIES?


What do visitors to our region want? The Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions are preparing a
Strategic Plan to guide future tourism activities.

One of the key findings is that visitors to Kapunda and other heritage areas in the region are seeking to
make a meaningful connection with the people and the place they are in. They want to hear the stories
from the past and the present and they want to experience what is different about Kapunda.

Kapunda has a wealth of interesting stories that are not always easily accessible to visitors – Sir Sidney
Kidman, the Pines Water Reserve, Vivienne Bullwinkle, just to mention a few.

The rejuvenation of Anlaby Station offers an exciting opportunity for people to hear the stories of this
special place, while experiencing the architecture and garden design of a past era.

Visitors also want value for money food and accommodation provided by friendly welcoming people.
Kapunda’s Tourist and Leisure Park was rated highly by the consultants during their audit and the
Strategic Directions Discussion Paper recommends further development of cabins and visitor facilities
to meet the needs of cost conscious travellers seeking a higher quality of caravan park accommodation.

Copies of the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Strategic Directions Paper will be available
from Council Offices, the Visitor Information Centre and on Council’s website: www.light.sa.gov.au from
15th December 2004.

If you would like to make written comment on the proposed directions you can write to:

              Angela Hazebroek
              Urban & Regional Planning Solutions
              3/207 The Parade
              NORWOOD SA 5067

or email: angela@pp.net.au before Thursday 20th January 2005.

The consultants will be presenting the Draft Strategic Plan to representatives of Light Regional Council
and others members of the Steering Committee on 10th February 2005.

For further information, please contact Peter Beare, CEO, Regional Council of Light on
8525 3200.




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