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FILE B English Language Arts Reading Item Information and Scoring

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FILE B English Language Arts Reading Item Information and Scoring Powered By Docstoc
					                                               FILE B

                          English Language Arts: Reading

Item Information and Scoring Guide Reference Sheet ........................ B-2

Reading Test Design ............................................................................ B-3

Reading Selections and Items with Keys, Type of Text, Cluster, Content
Standards, Grade Level Expectations, Scoring Guides and
Training Notes, and Student Responses with Annotations .................. B-4




                               Back to Table of Contents




               MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                  B-1
   Item Information and Scoring Guide Reference Sheet
The following pages are designed to assist you in understanding how Maine Educational Assessment
(MEA) reading items are scored. These pages contain the text for each released item accompanied
by the following information.

Multiple-Choice Items

The boxes containing the multiple-choice items also contain the percent of students statewide who
chose each answer option. The correct option is asterisked(*).

• MC#: the multiple-choice item position in the Class Analysis Report
       One point may be earned for a multiple-choice item.

• Key: the letter of the correct answer for the multiple-choice item

• Type of Text: whether the reading selection was literary or informational

• Cluster: the cluster the item measured

• Content Standard: the content standard that the item measured

• Grade Level Expectation (GLE): the grade level expectation that the item measured

Constructed-Response Items

• CR#: the constructed-response item position in the Class Analysis Report
       Up to four points may be earned for a constructed-response item.

• Type of Text: whether the reading selection was literary or informational

• Cluster: the cluster the item measured

• Content Standard: the content standard that the item measured

• Grade Level Expectation (GLE): the grade level expectation that the item measured

• Constructed-Response Scoring Guide: the description of each score point used to determine
  the score, including the percent of students statewide who received each score and the statewide
  average student score

• Training Notes: in-depth descriptions or particular information used to determine the
  score

• Annotated Student Response: sample student response for each score point with annotations
  that explain the reasoning behind the assigned score




                MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                 B-2
                                         MEA 2005–2006

                English Language Arts: Reading Grade 6
The table below shows the entire MEA reading test design, which is made up of 50% literary passages
and 50% informational passages. Half of the common items are released and can be found in this
document. Item information for all item types, scoring information (average scores, guides, and training
notes) for all constructed-response items, and annotated student responses follow.



                   2005–2006 MEA READING TEST DESIGN
     CONTENT                              EMBEDDED FIELD    TOTAL ITEMS PER   BASE TESTING
                           COMMON                                                              POINTS
      AREA                                    TEST             STUDENT           TIME
                      MC     CR     SA    MC    CR     SA   MC    CR     SA

      READING         40     4      0     20    2      0    60    6      0       130 MIN.       56

Each item on the MEA measures a grade level expectation based on Maine’s Learning Results.




                    MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                     B-3
                                               Imitating Nature
                                                 Laurel Sherman

  I FIRST GOT INTERESTED at the fabric store,                  realized at once that if he could handle this new,
  as a clerk measured the Velcro and prepared to cut           tough fiber, he could make a firmer and more
  it. “Did you know that a botanist invented Velcro?”          durable tape.
  she commented.                                                   But problems mounted. The fuzzy side of the
       Of course, I thought, having always suspected           tape had to have at least three hundred loops per
  that anything so mysterious and wonderful as                 square inch for the hooked side to hold. Glue was
  Velcro must have an unusual origin. As I thought             needed to hold the loops so they wouldn’t slip.
  about it, I began to wonder how someone                          The hooks themselves had to be shaped from
  interested in plants had gotten involved with those          nylon thread. Eventually George found that he
  sticky tapes. But after I learned about George de            could mold the thread into short loops with infrared
  Mestral, it all seemed perfectly obvious.                    heat.* Next he cut each loop in half with clippers to
       George, a Swiss inventor, not a botanist, was           leave two hooks facing each other.
  fond of hunting. In 1948, after a day in the woods               By 1958 George had his fastener. He called it
  and fields with his dog, he sat down to the familiar         “Velcro,” from the French words velours (velvet)
  chore of removing burs from his wool socks                   for the soft, fuzzy part and crochet (hook) for
  and from the dog’s hair. He started wondering                the hooks.
  what it was that made the burs cling so. Under a                 At first people did not want Velcro on their
  microscope he saw that each bur had thousands                shoes or clothes. It was the American space
  of tiny hooks, each facing a different direction.            program that found uses for the product. Away
  The wool in his socks was a tangle of loops—just             from Earth’s gravity, anything not fastened down
  right to catch the hooks of the burs. He couldn’t            will drift around, bouncing off walls and astronauts.
  dislodge them with a simple twist because just as            Astro-Velcro was used to hold tools, food, and
  one set of hooks was free, another set would grab            clothing in place.
  the loops.                                                       Now it’s everywhere. We use it to fasten shoes
       George knew he wanted to duplicate the action           and boots. Flight attendants use it to hold the
  of the bur. The new fastener he had in mind would            headrest on your airline seat; doctors use it to
4 not have to be snapped, buttoned, or zipped. One             tighten the cuff when they read your blood pressure.
  press to fasten, one pull to unfasten.                       But perhaps George de Mestral came up with the
       He spent the next eight years trying to imitate         best idea of all: he used it to fasten articles about
  what nature did so effortlessly every fall. At first         Velcro to a bulletin board. Now, if he’d only gone
  he had two cotton tapes made by hand. They were              on to invent an unfastener, one
  flimsy, but they did stick. By a wonderful accident,         that would remove burs from woolen socks and
  some nylon thread was delivered to his shop. He              dog’s hair!

                                                               *infrared heat: invisible heat rays




                       MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                         B-4
                        ID:176767 C Common
                        1.   Which activity directly inspired George de Mestral
                             to invent Velcro?
                               3%            A.   walking in the field
                              13%            B.   hunting in the woods
                             *74%            C.   removing burs from socks
                               9%            D.   twisting and pulling hooks




MC#: 1
Key: C
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6-Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                           B-5
                        IID:216191 A Common
                        2.   Which word means the same as duplicate in
                             paragraph 4?

                             *85%             A.   copy
                                8%            B.   extend
                                1%            C.   stroke
                                6%            D.   compare




MC#: 2
Key: A
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6-Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                             B-6
                        IID:245636 B Common
                        3.   Short loops are shaped from the nylon thread when
                             the thread is
                              11%             A.   tightened.
                             *56%             B.   heated.
                              25%             C.   hooked.
                               7%             D.   taped.




MC#: 3
Key: B
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6-Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                            B-7
                        D:212794 B Common
                        4.   What was Astro-Velcro first used for?
                               16%          A. fastening shoes and boots
                             *76%           B. holding things in place during space
                                               travel
                                4%          C. tightening the cuffs on blood pressure
                                               machines
                                3%          D. holding the headrests on airplane
                                               seats




MC#: 4
Key: B
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6-Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                         B-8
                        ID:242678 D Common
                        5.   Which sentence best explains the main idea of the
                             article?
                                4%           A. Hunters and scientists often make the
                                                best inventors.
                                3%           B. Inventions often require many people
                                                to perfect them.
                              15%            C. Accidents can show the best way to
                                                fix difficult problems.
                             *76%            D. Interesting inventions can be made
                                                by observing everyday objects.




MC#: 5
Key: D
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A7.6-Students will summarize whole text by selecting and paraphrasing important and representative
texts/passages, including the sequence of major events when appropriate for the genre. [Text complexity
appropriate for grade 6.]




                    MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-9
                  Harriet Tubman
                                                               What Makes a Heroine?
Editor’s Note: Harriet Tubman was a slave in Maryland.
She escaped slavery in 1849. Then she became a famous      Storyworks talked to the poet of
“conductor,” or guide, on the Underground Railroad,        “Harriet Tubman.” We wanted to
the secret system of people, pathways, and houses that     know what it was like to write about
helped slaves escape to the North and freedom. This poem                     this heroine.
celebrates Harriet Tubman’s heroic deeds.

                                                                               THE POET
    Harriet Tubman didn’t take no stuff
    Wasn’t scared of nothing neither                                           Eloise
    Didn’t come in this world to be no slave
    And wasn’t going to stay one either                                        Greenfield
5   “Farewell!” she sang to her friends one night
    She was mighty sad to leave ’em                        Why did you decide to write about
    But she ran away that dark, hot night                  Harriet Tubman?
    Ran looking for her freedom
                                                           I was writing a book of love poems.
                                                           I wanted to include a poem about
   She ran to the woods and she ran through the woods
                                                           someone who had given so much—
10 With the slave catchers right behind her
                                                           who had risked her life—for African-
   And she kept on going till she got to the North
                                                           American people. I used a rhythm
   Where those mean men couldn’t find her
                                                           that I hoped would create a mood of
                                                           triumph.
   Nineteen times she went back South
   To get three hundred others
15 She ran for her freedom nineteen times                  What kind of person was Harriet
   To save black sisters and brothers                      Tubman?
   Harriet Tubman didn’t take no stuff                     I did research. I learned that she was
   Wasn’t scared of nothing neither                        not satisfied to save just herself, but
   Didn’t come in this world to be no slave                continued to go to the South and
20 And didn’t stay one either                              save others. I know she loved her
                                                           family, because she rescued them.
    And didn’t stay one either                             She had to be very courageous and
                                                           intelligent to plan all these escapes.
                                      —Eloise Greenfield




                   MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                    B-10
                         ID:212841 C Common
                         6.   In the Editor’s Note, the word “conductor” is in quotes
                              to show that
                               20%            A. the word was spoken by someone
                                                 else.
                               16%            B. the word means the opposite of the
                                                 word “guide.”
                              *59%            C. the emphasis is on a specific
                                                 meaning of the word.
                                 5%           D. the reader should look up the
                                                 meaning of the word.




MC#: 6
Key: C
Type of Text: Literary
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard B: Literature and Culture- Students will use reading, listening, and viewing strategies to
experience, understand, and appreciate literature and culture.
GLE: B8.6- Students will apply effective strategies for analyzing and describing characters’ traits, interactions,
and changes over time; making basic inferences about problem, conflict, or solution; of identifying the
relationships among elements within the text (plot, character, setting, and types of conflict); determining
author’s message and point of view-stated or implied; and identifying the literary devices of flashback,
foreshadowing, and repetition to the reading and interpretation of fiction. [Text complexity appropriate for
grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-11
                         ID:191324 B Common
                         7.   The first and last stanzas of the poem “Harriet
                              Tubman” reflect the
                                21%           A. conditions in which slaves lived.
                              *53%            B. voice and personality of Harriet
                                                 Tubman.
                               19%            C. main point of Eloise Greenfield.
                                7%            D. natural way the narrator speaks.




MC#: 7
Key: B
Type of Text: Literary
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard B: Literature and Culture- Students will use reading, listening, and viewing strategies to
experience, understand, and appreciate literature and culture.
GLE: B8.6- Students will apply effective strategies for analyzing and describing characters’ traits, interactions,
and changes over time; making basic inferences about problem, conflict, or solution; of identifying the
relationships among elements within the text (plot, character, setting, and types of conflict); determining
author’s message and point of view-stated or implied; and identifying the literary devices of flashback,
foreshadowing, and repetition to the reading and interpretation of fiction. [Text complexity appropriate for
grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                           B-12
                        ID:176737 D Common
                        8.   In lines 13 through 16, what was Harriet Tubman
                             doing?
                               11%           A.   escaping from slavery
                                1%           B.   being returned to slavery
                                3%           C.   rescuing the slave owners
                             * 85%           D.   rescuing other slaves




MC#: 8
Key: D
Type of Text: Literary
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6-Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-13
                        ID:212845 C Common
                        9.   What is the main purpose of “What Makes a
                             Heroine?”
                              17%            A. to give more information about poetry
                                                written about Harriet Tubman
                                7%           B. to show that Eloise Greenfield likes
                                                Harriet Tubman
                             *70%            C. to explain why Eloise Greenfield
                                                wrote about Harriet Tubman
                                6%           D. to give information about Eloise
                                                Greenfield’s life




MC#: 9
Key: C
Type of Text: Literary
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6-Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                         B-14
                         ID:176732 B Common
                         10. Which word best describes Harriet Tubman?
                                 5%           A.   content
                              * 87%           B.   determined
                                 5%           C.   passive
                                 2%           D.   angry




MC#: 10
Key: B
Type of Text: Literary
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard B: Literature and Culture- Students will use reading, listening, and viewing strategies to
experience, understand, and appreciate literature and culture.
GLE: B8.6- Students will apply effective strategies for analyzing and describing characters’ traits, interactions,
and changes over time; making basic inferences about problem, conflict, or solution; of identifying the
relationships among elements within the text (plot, character, setting, and types of conflict); determining
author’s message and point of view-stated or implied; and identifying the literary devices of flashback,
foreshadowing, and repetition to the reading and interpretation of fiction. [Text complexity appropriate for
grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                           B-15
                                The Fighting Kites



    Since their invention in China over 3,000 years ago, kites of all shapes and
sizes have been flying all over the world. Although kites have been flown mostly
for recreation, Asian folklore is rich with tales of kites used for purpose as well as
pleasure.
    One legend of China’s Han dynasty tells how kites were used to defeat an
invading army. Dozens of kites were secretly flown over the enemy’s camp in the
dark of night. Attached to each kite were bamboo hummers that moaned eerily in the
wind. According to the legend, the enemy fled in terror at the sound. Military leaders
also used kites to spy on enemy strongholds, to carry a person over an obstacle, or
to inject fear in the hearts of a foe. Huge eyes painted in black sumi ink intimidated
the enemy from the air. Eventually, famous military adventures became part of the
art captured on paper kite faces.
    The role of kites changed from supporting military activities into competitive
festivals that mimicked military battles. In the 1500s, one of the first kite-fighting
festivals took place in Japan. Kite fighting between towns has since become a very
popular event, as competitive as soccer in some parts of the world.
    Many towns in Japan compete in the kite-fighting festivals. Participants design
and decorate kites to represent them in the games. Traditional designs are still used
in festival kites. The baramon from Nagasaki has a hummer on it, and the helmet of
an old soldier is depicted on the face. One of the most decorative kites today is the
edo, which requires a dozen lengths of kite string to guide it. The dragon kite is the
jidako, with the Japanese character for “dragon” inked upon the paper surface.
    Fighting kites are fitted with tiny knives, and the goal of a kite fight is to cut
the string of the opponent’s kite, setting the defeated kite free and sending it
crashing to the ground. Known for their symmetry and balance, fighting kites can
fly in any direction at great speed, with or without a tail.
    Selection for a kite-fighting team is very competitive. Prior to a fighting festival,
the town teams practice maneuvering their kites for hours. During the festival days,
town teams pit themselves against one another, waging a battle high above crowds of
spectators. Amidst the shouts and urgings of the fans, the kite battles can go on for
hours. The victorious kite team brings great honor to its town. The fighting kites of
Japan have become the modern samurai of the sky.




        MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                         B-16
Now that you have learned about the history of flying kites, let’s learn how to make two types of kites.

Let’s Make a Kite!
Star Kite
    The star kite is made with three 36-inch
dowels (A-C, D-E, and A-B), glued and lashed
together, as shown in the diagram. There are two
outline strings—one at B-D and one at C-E. Lash
the outline strings securely to the notched ends of
the dowels.
    After covering the frame with paper, fasten a
“bridle string” to the ends of dowel A-C, dowel
D-E, and dowel A-B. The bridle strings should
be somewhat loose to allow you to gather them
together to attach the flying string. Bring the
three bridle strings together at a point slightly
above the middle of dowel D-E. Attach the flying
string where the three bridle strings join.
                                     Two-Stick Kite
                                         Cut dowel A-B 36 inches long and dowel C-D 30 inches long. Apply
                                     glue where sticks cross and then lash them together with several windings
                                     of strong cord. Let glue dry.
                                         Next notch ends of each stick and make a little cut all around the
                                     end of each stick about ½ inch from the tip, as shown. Run string around
                                     and through these notches to form outline of kite.
                                         Place your kite frame on the floor on top of paper. Cut out paper
                                     to fit frame, allowing a 1-inch margin all around. Then decorate your
                                     kite with a picture or some interesting designs. Fold margin of paper
                                     over frame and glue tightly over string. Cut a piece of string about
                                     40 inches long for the bridle string. Fasten it at points C and D. Then
                                     tie your long flying string at the center of the bridle string, and your
                                     kite is ready to fly!

Note: A kite tail will keep your kite flying straight. Cut a piece of string about 36 inches long and tie
strips of paper or cloth about every 6 inches along the string. Attach the tail to the bottom of your kite.

             1                        2                            3                           4




                   MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                      B-17
                        ID:176784 A Common
                        11. In the first paragraph of “The Fighting Kites,” which
                            word could replace “recreation” without changing the
                            meaning of the sentence?

                             *58%            A.   fun
                               7%            B.   exercise
                              23%            C.   competition
                              11%            D.   festival




MC#: 11
Key: A
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-18
                        ID:216217 D Common
                        12. The author of “The Fighting Kites” compares kite
                            fighting to soccer most likely to show
                              14%            A.   that both were common in Japan.
                               6%            B.   that kite fighting had many rules.
                              13%            C.   how many people play both sports.
                             *66%            D.   how popular kite fighting is.




MC#: 12
Key: D
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-19
                        ID:214152 D Common
                        13. What is the goal of a kite fight?
                              11%            A. to fly a kite higher than the
                                                opponent’s kite
                                6%           B. to build a kite that will carry a person
                                                over an obstacle
                                9%           C. to decorate a kite with the best
                                                traditional kite designs
                             *73%            D. to use a kite to cut the strings of the
                                                opponent’s kite




MC#: 13
Key: D
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                           B-20
                        ID:216211 C Common
                        14. Based on information in “The Fighting Kites,” which
                            statement best summarizes the role of kite flying in
                            China and Japan?
                              12%            A. Although kite flying was important to
                                                Asian culture, today it has lost some
                                                of its value.
                              14%            B. In Asian countries, kite flying is more
                                                popular today than it was in the past.
                             *67%            C. Kite flying is and has been an
                                                important part of Asian cultural
                                                traditions.
                                6%           D. In Asia today, kites are not being
                                                flown in competitions.




MC#: 14
Key: C
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A7.6- Students will summarize whole text by selecting and paraphrasing important and representative
text/passages, including the sequence of major events when appropriate for the genre. [Text complexity
appropriate for grade 6.]




                    MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-21
                        ID:216212 B Common
                        15. When making the star kite, which step comes before
                            covering the frame with paper?
                              16%            A. Fasten the bridle string to the ends of
                                                the dowels.
                             *70%            B. Lash the outline strings to the ends of
                                                the dowels.
                                4%           C. Attach the tail to the bottom of the
                                                kite.
                                9%           D. Bring together the bridle strings.




MC#: 15
Key: B
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                          B-22
                        ID:212773 A Common
                        16. According to the diagram of the star kite in “Let’s Make a
                            Kite!” which dowel ends are connected using string?

                             *47%            A.   C-E
                              17%            B.   A-C
                              23%            C.   D-E
                              12%            D.   A-B




MC#: 16
Key: A
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                        B-23
                        ID:212774 C Common
                        17. The words in all-capital letters near the kite diagrams
                            in “Let’s Make a Kite!” are used as
                                4%           A.   rules.
                               15%           B.   keys.
                             * 57%           C.   labels.
                               22%           D.   directions.




MC#: 17
Key: C
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                            B-24
                        ID:216213 A Common
                        18. Based on the note at the end of “Let’s Make a Kite!”
                            what would most likely happen to a kite with no
                            tail?

                             *74%            A.   It would fly crookedly.
                               4%            B.   It would rip apart.
                              10%            C.   It would rise only a little bit.
                              10%            D.   It would stay on the ground.




MC#: 18
Key: A
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard D: Informational Texts- Students will apply reading, listening, and viewing strategies to
informational texts across all areas of curriculum.
GLE: D5.6- Students will make inferences about text, including the author’s purpose and/or message, by
forming and supporting opinions/judgments and assertions about the text that are relevant. [Text complexity
appropriate for grade 6.]




                    MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                            B-25
                        ID:216214 B Common
                        19. Why are the numbered drawings included with “Let’s
                            Make a Kite!”?
                               11%           A.   to demonstrate how to decorate a kite
                             *53%            B.   to show how to make a two-stick kite
                               21%           C.   to explain how to make a star kite
                               14%           D.   to show what an official fighting kite
                                                  looks like




MC#: 19
Key: B
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard D: Informational Texts- Students will apply reading, listening, and viewing strategies to
informational texts across all areas of curriculum.
GLE: D5.6- Students will make inferences about text, including the author’s purpose and/or message, by
forming and supporting opinions/judgments and assertions about the text that are relevant. [Text complexity
appropriate for grade 6.]




                    MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                           B-26
                        IID:191321 C Common
                        20. The main difference between “The Fighting Kites”
                            and “Let’s Make a Kite!” is that they
                               4%             A.   were written at different times.
                               5%             B.   were written by different people.
                             *85%             C.   have different purposes.
                               5%             D.   are from different books.




MC#: 20
Key: C
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A8.6- Students will read for a variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to
receive instructions, to follow an argument, to enjoy). [Text complexity appropriate for grade 6.]




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                            B-27
    ID:216215 Common
    21. How is a star kite similar to and different from a two-stick kite? Explain your answer by using
        specific details from the article.




CR#: 21
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A7.6- Students will summarize whole text by selecting and paraphrasing important and representative
texts/passages, including the sequence of major events when appropriate for the genre. [Text complexity
appropriate for grade 6.]




                       MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                    B-28
                             CONSTRUCTED-RESPONSE SCORING GUIDE


     Percentage of
       Statewide           Score                                      Description
    Student Scores
                                        Response provides a thorough explanation of how a star kite is similar
           2%                 4         to and different from a two-stick kite. Explanation includes specific and
                                        relevant support information from the articles.
                                        Response provides an explanation of how a star kite is similar to
                                        and different from a two-stick kite. Explanation includes specific and
         13%                  3
                                        relevant supporting information from the articles that lacks specificity
                                        and/or development.
                                        Response provides a partial explanation of how a star kite is similar
         45%                  2         to and different from a two-stick kite. Explanation includes limited or
                                        partially correct information from the articles.
                                        Response gives a minimal or vague statement about how a star kite is
         34%                  1
                                        similar to and different from a two-stick kite.
           4%                 0         Response is totally incorrect or irrelevant.

           1%              Blank        No response.

        1.71               Statewide average student score.


                             Training Notes for Constructed-Response Item 21

Training notes are not an exhaustive list. Readers scoring the student responses can accept other examples
the student offers that are supported by the passage.

How a star kite is SIMILAR TO a two-stick kite:
•     Both kites are traditional Japanese designs.
•     Both kites are made with dowels.
•     Both kites use a bridle string and flying string.
•     Both kites can be decorated (assuming a star kite can) with a picture or interesting designs.
•     Both use outline strings.
How a star kite is DIFFERENT FROM a two-stick kite:
•     Number of dowels used: A star kite is made with 3 dowels; a two-stick kite is made with 2 dowels (or
      sticks).
•     Assembly of bridle and flying strings: With a star kite, one “bridle string” is fastened to each end of
      dowels A-C, D-E, and A-B. The bridle string should be kept somewhat loose to allow the person making
      the kite to gather the bridle strings together at a point in order to attach the flying string. With the two-
      stick kite, the margins of the paper covering the dowels fold over and glue tightly over the string (the
      string mentioned in paragraph 2 of Two-Stick Kite). The bridle string is then attached at points C and D.
      The flying string is then tied to the center of the bridle string.
Accept other plausible responses based on information in the article.




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                       B-29
       Sample 4-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 21

 21.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response gives a thorough explanation of how a star kite is similar to and different from a two-stick
kite. He or she supports the differences between the two kites with support from the text by writing, “The starkite
has three dowels and the two stick kite has two, the star kite is shaped like a star, you cut the dowels for the two
stick kite, and there is more string used with the two stick kite.” (The student’s last statement about the two-stick
kite using more string appears to be based on the illustrations and can not be refuted or confirmed based on the
information in the article.) He or she also supports the similarities between the two kites with support from the
text as, “they both have a tail, they both fly, they both have dowels, you can draw a picture on both of them, you
have to cover the kite frame with paper, and they both use string.”




                      MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                       B-30
       Sample 3-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 21

 21.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response generally explains both the similarities and differences between star kites and two-
stick kites. He or she uses support from the text that lacks specific detail. The student supports the similarities
between the two kites by noting “they both use dowels or sticks,…string…need to be put together in a certain
way” “and they both need to have certain amoonts of things to put on it.” He or she supports the differences
between the two kites with “they are totally different shapes, …different lengths of things that they need, …they
have different dowels, and they have different ways of flying.”




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                      B-31
       Sample 2-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 21

 21.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response explains both the similarities and differences between a star kite and a two-stick kite
in a partial and limited way. He or she explains the similarities between the two kites as, “both kites and are
decorated.” He or she explains the differences between the two kites by writing, “…they are different shapes and
a star kite has 3 sticks.”


       Sample 1-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 21

 21.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response vaguely explains only why the two kites are different. The student writes, “…they both
look totally differnt, and are two differnt shapes. They are both made differnt ways.”


       Sample 0-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 21

 21.




Summary annotation statement:

The student’s response is irrelevant.


                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                     B-32
    ID:191323 Common
    22. Describe the history and function of kite-fighting festivals. Use specific information from “The
        Fighting Kites” in your response.




CR#: 22
Type of Text: Informational
Cluster: Reading
Content Standard A: Process of Reading- Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to
comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read.
GLE: A7.6- Students will summarize whole text by selecting and paraphrasing important and representative
texts/passages, including the sequence of major events when appropriate for the genre. [Text complexity
appropriate for grade 6.]




                       MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                   B-33
                             CONSTRUCTED-RESPONSE SCORING GUIDE


   Percentage of
     Statewide             Score                                      Description
  Student Scores
                                        Response provides a thorough description of history and practice of
           5%                 4         kite-fighting festivals. The description includes specific and relevant
                                        supporting information from “The Fighting Kites.”
                                        Response provides description of history and practice of kite-fighting
         16%                  3         festivals. The description includes relevant supporting information
                                        from the article that lacks specificity and/or development.
                                        Response provides a partial description of the history and practice of
         39%                  2         kite-flying festivals. The description includes limited or partially correct
                                        information from the article.
                                        Response gives a minimal or vague statement about the history and
         28%                  1
                                        practice of kite-flying festivals.
           9%                 0         Response is totally incorrect or irrelevant.

           3%               Blank       No response.

        1.73               Statewide average student score.


                              Training Notes for Constructed-Response Item 22

Training notes are not an exhaustive list. Readers scoring the student responses can accept other examples
the student offers that are supported by the passage.

History of Kite-Fighting Festivals
•     The role of kites changed from supporting military activities into competitive festivals that mimicked
      military battles.
•     In the 1500s, one of the first fighting kite festivals began in Japan.
•     Kite fighting between towns has become popular and competitive in some parts of the world.

Practice of Kite-fighting Festivals
•     Participants design and decorate a kite to represent them.
•     Kite-fighting teams are selected.
•     Town teams practice for hours maneuvering their kites.
•     Town teams pit themselves against one another, battling with their kites high above the crowd.
•     The kites are fitted with tiny knives, which are used to try and cut the string of an opponent’s kite so it is
      set free and crashes to the ground.
•     The kite fights can go on for hours.
•     Victorious kite team brings great honor to its town.




                      MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                       B-34
        Sample 4-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 22

 22.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response thoroughly describes both the history and function of kite-fighting festivals. He or she
uses strong support from the passage by writing, “Kite Flying Festivals started in the 1500s in Japan,” and “Kite
fighting got very competetive.” He or she also describes how the kites were constructed and operated.




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                     B-35
       Sample 3-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 22

 22.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response generally explains the history and function of kite-fighting festivals but lacks specifics.
He or she explains that kite festivals “mimicked the old millitary battles,” and “The kites had tiny knifes on them.
The knifes were used to cut the string of the oponent.”




       Sample 2-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 22

 22.




Summary annotation statement:

This limited response provides brief details of the history and function of kite-fighting festivals and uses limited
support from the text. He or she writes “people would try to cut the other person’s string which is connected to
that person’s kite. And people have been doing this for 3,000 years.”




                      MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                       B-36
       Sample 1-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 22

 22.




Summary annotation statement:

This student’s response minimally states the history and function of kite-fighting festivals. He or she uses minimal
support from the text by noting the festivals “mimick military battle in which kites were used.”




       Sample 0-Point Response with Annotations for Constructed-Response Item 22


 22.




Summary annotation statement:

The student’s response is incorrect.




                     MEA RELEASED ITEMS – MARCH 2006 ASSESSMENT – GRADE 6
                                                      B-37

				
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