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THE ANIMAL KINGDOM

VIEWS: 19 PAGES: 46

									THE ANIMAL KINGDOM
The animal kingdom can be divided
into 9 smaller groups. Each group is
          called a phylum.
PHYLUM PORIFERA
     Sponges
       Sponges are sessile animals
(they spend their lives attached to rocks)
Water enters the small pores of a sponge,
travels through canals, and exits through
   a large hole at the top of the sponge.
PHYLUM CNIDARIA
Jellyfish, sea anemones, corals
Members of this phylum have tentacles
        with stinging cells.
Cnidarians can have one of two body shapes:
  an umbrella-shaped medusa form, like the
 jellyfish on the left, or a vase-shaped polyp
   form, like the sea anemone on the right.
Coral reefs contain many members of
          Phylum Cnidaria.
    PHYLUM
PLATYHELMINTHES
    Flatworms
The worms in this phylum are all very
   thin and flat, like this parasitic
             liver fluke.
All flatworms, including this planarian,
        have bilateral symmetry.
Flatworms are the first animals to have a
head. Note the hooks and suckers on the
        head of this tapeworm.
PHYLUM NEMATODA
    Roundworms
Nematodes are not segmented; their
  body surfaces appear smooth.
Many nematodes are parasites, such as
 this pork worm named Trichinella.
 Nematodes have a complete digestive
  tract, with a mouth at one end where
food enters, and an opening at the other
          end where wastes exit.
PHYLUM MOLLUSCA
Clams, snails, squid, octopus
Most mollusks have a hard shell
  covering their soft bodies.
Clams have a wedge-shaped muscular
     foot used for locomotion.
Mollusks breathe by means of gills.
Not all mollusks have shells. This squid
               does not.
This octopus does not have a shell either,
         but it is still a mollusk.
 PHYLUM ANNELIDA
Earthworms, sandworms, leeches
Annelids have bodies that are segmented
        (divided into sections).
Annelids have a circulatory system to
 pump blood. This earthworm has 5
               hearts!
Annelid worms
have a body
cavity called a
coelom which
provides room
for organ
development.
PHYLUM ARTHROPODA
  Crayfish, lobsters, crabs,
      insects, spiders
All arthropods, including this tick,
         have jointed legs.
Arthropods have a crunchy shell called
           an exoskeleton.
Arthropods have very well-developed
           sense organs.
      PHYLUM
  ECHINODERMATA
Starfish, sand dollars, sea urchins
Echinoderms have spiny (prickly) skin.
Adult echinoderms have radial
          symmetry.
The bottom of this starfish is covered
   with tube feet for locomotion.
   PHYLUM CHORDATA
Fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals
Members of Phylum Chordata have a
 backbone (they are vertebrates).
Phylum Chordata can be subdivided
         into 7 classes:

        AGNATHA
     CHONDRICHTHYES
      OSTEICHTHYES
        AMPHIBIA
        REPTILIA
          AVES
       MAMMALIA
Class Agnatha includes jawless fish such
as lampreys. They are parasites on other
                  fish.
 Class Chondrichthyes includes fish
whose skeletons are made of cartilage,
  such as sharks, rays, and skates.
Class Osteichthyes includes fish whose
      skeletons are made of bone.
Class Amphibia includes semi-aquatic
 animals with moist skin. They must
     return to the water to breed.
Class Reptilia includes snakes, lizards,
   turtles, crocodiles, and iguanas.
      They have dry, scaly skin.
Members of Class Aves have wings and
         feathers for flight.
Class Mammalia includes animals with
 hair or fur. Females have mammary
glands to nurse their young with milk.

								
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