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					              DRAFT
LOUISIANA COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE
               PLAN

            State of Louisiana
    Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco




     Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
             Secretary Scott A. Angelle


    Office of Coastal Restoration and Management
    Acting Assistant Secretary Gerald M. Duszynski


                   February 2007
                    TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………………………………..3

II. DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY……………………...…………………………….9

III. DESIGNATED CONTACTS FOR COASTAL POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS…...10

IV. GOVERNOR’S CERTIFICATION OF PUBLIC PARTICIPATION……………...14

V. COORDINATION WITH OTHER FEDERAL RESOURCES AND
   PROGRAMS……………………………………………………….……………......20

VI. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM………………….…………...….............22

VII. PROPOSED PROJECT LISTS……………………………….………………….....53

VIII. PROPOSED PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS………………….…………………......60

IX. APPENDICES

     APPENDIX A - MAPS OF SELECTED STATE FUNDED RESTORATION
     PROJECTS……………………………………………………………………..A-1

     APPENDIX B – GOVERNOR’S LETTER DESIGNATING STATE
     AGENCY.……….………………………………...............................................B-1

     APPENDIX C – SUMMARY OF PUBLIC COMMENTS RECEIVED ON
     DRAFT COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PLAN…………………….…...C-1

     APPENDIX D – ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FOR THE COASTAL IMPACT
     ASSISTANCE PLAN .…………….…..…………………………....................D-1

     APPENDIX E – LOUISIANA STATE AND PARISH COASTAL IMPACT
     ASSISTANCE BUDGET SHEETS..…..………………….…………..……......E-1




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I.   INTRODUCTION

     The Coastal Impact Assistance Program (CIAP; Program) was established by
     Section 384 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Act) to assist producing states and
     their coastal political subdivisions (CPSs) in mitigating the impacts from Outer
     Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas production. The CIAP legislation
     appropriated $250 million per year for fiscal years 2007 through 2010 to be
     distributed among eligible producing States (States) and their CPSs. Allocations
     to each State will be based on the ratio of qualified OCS revenues offshore of that
     State to the total qualified OCS revenues from all States. To receive CIAP funds,
     States must submit a Coastal Impact Assistance Plan (Plan), describing how these
     funds will be expended, to the U.S. Minerals Management Service (MMS). The
     MMS must approve that Plan before disbursing any CIAP funds to a State and its
     CPSs.

     The CIAP provision of the Act, established by amending Section 31.d.1. of the
     Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1356 a.), listed five categories of
     authorized uses of CIAP funds. Thus, a State or CPS can use CIAP funds only for
     one or more of the following purposes:

        1. projects and activities for the conservation, protection, or restoration of
        coastal areas, including wetland;

        2. mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, or natural resources;

        3. planning assistance and the administrative costs of complying with CIAP;

        4. implementation of a Federally approved marine, coastal, or comprehensive
        conservation management plan; and

        5. mitigation of the impact of OCS activities through funding of onshore
        infrastructure projects and public service needs.

     Louisiana is one of six States currently eligible to receive CIAP funds. Funds
     received by Louisiana and its CPSs, which consist of its 19 coastal parishes, will
     be expended according to the requirements of the Act and the CIAP guidelines
     developed by MMS. This document is the State of Louisiana’s Coastal Impact
     Assistance Plan as required under the CIAP legislation. The Plan identifies CIAP
     projects to be implemented by the State, by the coastal parishes, and jointly by the
     State and parishes.

     The State of Louisiana has worked cooperatively with the 19 coastal parishes to
     assemble a group of restoration, conservation, and infrastructure projects that will
     produce significant results in a timely manner. The restoration and conservation
     projects that are included in the Plan embody principles of sustainable coastal
     restoration and protection. The Plan components involving proposed



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expenditures of the State’s share of CIAP funds include the following major
categories (maps of selected restoration projects are shown in Appendix A):

   1. Enhanced Management of Mississippi River Water and Sediment

   Improved management of the fresh water and associated sediments and
   nutrients transported by the Lower Mississippi River system is essential to the
   sustainability of coastal Louisiana. This Plan component includes:

       a. construction of a freshwater diversion near Violet into the Central
   Wetlands Complex adjacent to the Mississippi River–Gulf Outlet. St. Bernard
   Parish plans to cost-share with the State on this project;

       b. removal of the floodgates on the existing Bayou Lamoque freshwater
   diversion structure on the east bank of the Mississippi River near Venice,
   along with cutting openings in the banks of Bayou Lamoque to enhance the
   distribution of up to 12,000 cubic feet per second of reintroduced river inflow;

       c. installation and use of a long-distance pipeline dedicated to transporting
   Mississippi River sediment into the Barataria Basin for marsh and ridge
   restoration and creation. The pipeline will be financed with CIAP funds
   provided to the State and to Plaquemines, Jefferson, and Lafourche parishes.
   Some of the marsh creation is expected to occur in the area to be influenced
   by river inflow via the planned Myrtle Grove Sediment Diversion Project;

       d. implementation of a siphon to reintroduce Mississippi River water and
   nutrients into the Blind River and adjacent coastal swamps of the Maurepas
   Basin. St. James Parish will provide a cost-share to assist in implementation
   of this project; and

       e. strategic planning for large-scale measures to enhance management of
   the freshwater, nutrients, and sediment resources of the Lower Mississippi
   River within its deltaic plain to better sustain that region of coastal Louisiana.

   2. Protection and Restoration of Critical Land Bridges

   Maintaining the Orleans Land Bridge and the Barataria Basin Land Bridge has
   been identified in collaborative restoration planning efforts as a key strategy
   for the long-term sustainability of the ecosystems and communities that they
   protect. This Plan component proposes:

       a. protection of a key portion of the eastern Orleans Land Bridge by
    reducing shoreline erosion along Lake Borgne (Alligator Point to Bayou
    Bienvenue), and creating marsh with dredged material in the adjacent Golden
    Triangle wetlands complex between the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW)




                                     4
and the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet. Orleans Parish plans to provide nearly
all of its CIAP funds to assist in implementation of this project; and

   b. marsh creation with dredged material on a portion of the Barataria
Basin Land Bridge, behind existing shoreline protection structures. This
project is part of an integrated system of completed and proposed projects
designed to sustain that land bridge and its landscape-level ecological and
infrastructure-protection functions.

3. Barrier Shoreline Restoration and Protection

Louisiana’s barrier shorelines are eroding rapidly as a result of wave erosion,
subsidence, sea level rise, and human alteration of sediment transport
processes. This Plan feature includes:

    a. accelerated restoration of the East Grand Terre Island component of the
Barataria Basin barrier shoreline complex. This essentially construction-ready
project was designed with Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and
Restoration Act (CWPPRA) funds, and is part of an unfunded backlog of
numerous CWPPRA projects. Plaquemines Parish has indicated its
willingness to share in the cost of this project with the State; and

    b. a CWPPRA-designed shoreline protection demonstration project along
the rapidly eroding Gulf of Mexico marsh shoreline of Rockefeller Wildlife
Management Area and Game Preserve. That erosion is occurring at the
expense of the adjacent marshes.

4. Interior Shoreline Protection

Severe shoreline erosion is occurring along major navigation canals and lake
shorelines in Louisiana. Many of these (i.e., those along navigation canals)
are artificial shorelines that cause problems due to lack of operation and
maintenance funds to reduce wetland impacts. The Plan includes the
following projects to address these issues:

   a. installation of bank protection along portions of Freshwater Bayou
Navigation Channel, where wake erosion primarily from OCS support vessels
and resultant saltwater intrusion threaten extensive adjacent fresh marshes;

    b. placement of shoreline protection measures along critical reaches of the
GIWW in Terrebonne Parish, where boat wakes are causing erosion of highly
sensitive floating freshwater marshes. Knowledge gained from the Mandalay
National Wildlife Refuge erosion protection demonstration project would be
applied to the proposed project’s design. This project represents a segment of
a construction-ready but unfunded CWPPRA project;




                                 5
    c. installation of a CWPPRA-designed breakwater to prevent erosion of
the southern shoreline of Grand Lake and the adjacent coastal marshes,
located in the lower Mermentau River Basin; and

   d. implementation of the third and final phase of the Lake Salvador
Shoreline Protection Project, through cost-sharing with St. Charles Parish.

5. Marsh Creation with Dredged Material

The wetlands of coastal Louisiana are disappearing at an average rate of
nearly 24 square miles per year. This Plan element will establish marsh by
depositing dredged material in shallow open water at elevations that support
marsh vegetation. Two basic approaches will be used: creating marsh with
sediment removed during maintenance of existing Federal navigation
channels, and using material obtained by and deposited with dredges
specifically dedicated to marsh creation. In the case of marsh creation using
material from channel maintenance, CIAP funds will share in the additional
cost associated with beneficial use of that material but will not be used to
subsidize maintenance dredging. The following marsh creation features (in
addition to the marsh creation components of projects mentioned in categories
1 and 2 above) are included in the Plan:

    a. marsh creation via beneficial use of material removed via maintenance
dredging of the Calcasieu Ship Channel in southwestern Louisiana; marsh
creation sites will be located generally between the GIWW and the lower end
of Calcasieu Lake;

   b. beneficial use of dredged material along other Federally maintained
navigation channels in coastal Louisiana, to establish marsh and other
important coastal habitat; and

    c. financial support of marsh creation in Plaquemines Parish by providing
matching funds to reestablish marsh needed for buffering storm effects on an
adjacent hurricane protection levee.

6. Coastal Forest Conservation Initiative

The conservation, restoration, and sustainability of coastal Louisiana’s
swamps, wooded cheniers (maritime forests), and natural levee forests are
increasingly recognized as key to the overall sustainability and ecological
diversity of southern Louisiana. This Plan component includes several
measures focused on those goals, and is consistent with recommendations by
participants in the Governor’s Coastal Wetland Forest Conservation and Use
and Science Working Group and Advisory Panel. The primary thrust of this
initiative is to acquire from willing landowners the land rights (primarily
conservation easements) on coastal forest tracts, to address demonstrated



                                 6
   threats and/or opportunities for restoration or enhanced sustainability. In
   some cases, acquisition of land rights would be used to facilitate those
   wetland assimilation projects that utilize nutrients and fresh water in
   secondarily treated municipal wastewater and stormwater runoff to enhance
   coastal forest restoration and survival. The initiative also includes
   implementation of small-scale projects to restore and enhance forest
   sustainability, such as those that reduce impoundment, help offset subsidence,
   and reforest disturbed sites.

    7. Infrastructure Projects to Mitigate Onshore OCS Impacts

   The Plan includes supplemental funding for critically needed improvement of
   Louisiana Highway 1 in the Port Fourchon-Leeville area, a vital link to one of
   the most important OCS-support complexes in the nation. It also includes
   funding to expedite construction of the Houma Navigation Canal (HNC)
   Lock, a key component of the Morganza to the Gulf of Mexico Hurricane
   Protection Project now awaiting Congressional authorization. The HNC has
   served as an important OCS-support channel, but has also produced
   significant adverse onshore effects. In addition, the Plan provides for State
   CIAP cost share for the repair of roads affected by heavy OCS-related
   vehicular traffic in Morgan City, New Iberia, and lower Cameron Parish. All
   of those areas have experienced significantly increased infrastructure costs as
   part of their support for OCS exploration and production activities.

The restoration and conservation projects to be supported with the State of
Louisiana’s CIAP funds will have significant beneficial synergistic effects. Those
benefits will accrue via synergies among CIAP-funded projects, and interactions
among CIAP projects and those funded through other restoration and conservation
programs.

In the Pontchartrain Basin of southeastern Louisiana, significant synergistic
effects are expected from the proposed reintroduction (at Violet) of Mississippi
River inflows into the Central Wetlands Complex and adjacent wetlands (such as
the Golden Triangle marshes), the envisioned project for enhanced wetland
assimilation of secondarily treated municipal wastewater and associated nutrients
within that wetlands complex, and the potential reestablishment of cypress swamp
in portions of that complex with support from the CIAP Coastal Forest
Conservation Initiative. Those restoration efforts will also work in synergy with
the proposed CIAP Lake Borgne shoreline protection and marsh creation project
on the eastern Orleans Land Bridge between Alligator Point and Bayou
Bienvenue, to be funded by the State and Orleans Parish with CIAP funds, and
will complement other CWPPRA-funded shoreline protection projects along
western Lake Borgne. Farther upstream, yet still within the Pontchartrain Basin,
the proposed Blind River siphon will complement coastal forest conservation and
restoration actions implemented in the Maurepas Swamp complex of the
Pontchartrain Basin via the proposed Coastal Forest Conservation Initiative. That



                                    7
structure will divert Mississippi River nutrients and fresh water to forested
wetlands in that complex, and is thus expected to complement the Hope Canal
diversion into the Maurepas Swamp, now being designed with CWPPRA funds.

Several proposed CIAP projects in the Barataria Basin would have synergistic
effects on coastal habitats of that basin and the functions that they serve. The East
Grand Terre barrier island restoration project is an essential feature of the
comprehensive restoration strategy for the Barataria Basin barrier shoreline
complex. That project will work in concert with the Barataria Basin Barrier
Shoreline Restoration near-term critical feature of the Louisiana Coastal Area
Ecosystem Restoration (LCA) Plan now awaiting Congressional authorization and
funding. The Proposed Mississippi River sediment pipeline will work in synergy
with the Myrtle Grove Sediment Diversion Project, with a portion of the marsh
created via that sediment pipeline planned to be located in the freshwater outflow
footprint of that proposed diversion. Thus, the sustainability of pipeline-created
marsh within that outflow footprint would be enhanced. Furthermore, the marsh
ultimately created with that pipeline, in concert with the other CIAP-financed
marsh creation project near the upper end of Little Lake, will help to sustain the
Barataria Basin Land Bridge and its vital ecological and surge-reduction
functions. That latter project will also work in synergy with numerous other
CWPPRA projects focused on sustaining the Barataria Basin Land Bridge, and
with additional restoration work to be accomplished in that area with hurricane-
related supplemental appropriations being administered by the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers (USACE).

In the adjacent Terrebonne Basin, accelerating the construction of the HNC and
associated floodgates with State and Terrebonne Parish CIAP funds will provide
an opportunity to expedite hurricane protection and facilitate systemic wetland
benefits. The magnitude of those wetland benefits will depend on how the lock,
floodgate, and associated structures are operated, especially for the purpose of
enhancing the distribution of Atchafalaya River flows moving down the HNC
from the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. Lock operation will also determine the
extent to which HNC elevated salinity levels and their effects on water supply and
vegetation are addressed.

In and immediately adjacent to the Chenier Plain region of southwestern
Louisiana, the proposed protection of the Freshwater Bayou Canal banks will
complement at least two other bank-protection projects installed along that
waterway. Damaging wakes from offshore oil and gas supply vessels and crew
boats are a serious erosion threat to the sensitive adjacent wetlands, as well as to
the spoil banks that help to buffer the tidal-surge effects of tropical storms.
Extensive freshwater marshes to the west of that channel are especially vulnerable
to adverse impacts from saltwater intrusion, which would greatly increase with
continued erosion of the waterway’s banks. A CIAP-funded project, North Prong
Schooner Bayou, proposed by Vermilion Parish, will work in concert with the
Freshwater Bayou Canal bank protection features to address the threat of



                                     8
      saltwater intrusion into the Mermentau Basin’s freshwater wetlands by closing
      gaps currently allowing such intrusion.

      Several beneficial use projects are planned for areas adjacent to the Calcasieu
      Ship Channel, also located in the Chenier Plain region. Those projects will work
      in synergy with other beneficial use projects already completed with CWPPRA
      funds and through the USACE Water Resource Development Act authorities,
      creating marsh with material dredged during maintenance of that navigation
      channel. The proposed beneficial use projects will specifically address the
      conversion of marsh to open water that has severely affected the Calcasieu Basin.
      Beneficial use of dredged material along other USACE-maintained navigation
      channels will be facilitated with CIAP funds.


II.   DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY

      The Act’s CIAP provision requires that the Governor designate a State agency to
      develop the Plan and represent the State in interactions with the U.S. Department
      of the Interior for purposes of the Program. Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco
      named the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR) to fulfill that
      function. The LDNR point of contact for development and implementation of the
      Plan is Secretary Scott A. Angelle. He may be reached at:

                     Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                     P.O. Box 44027
                     Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70804-4027
                     Voice (225) 342-2710 Fax (225) 342-5861

      The LDNR is charged with the preservation and enhancement of the
      nonrenewable natural resources of the State, consisting of land, water, oil, gas,
      and other minerals, through conservation, regulation, and
      management/exploitation, to ensure that the State of Louisiana realizes
      appropriate economic benefit from its asset base. LDNR’s Office of Coastal
      Restoration and Management (OCRM) is responsible for the maintenance and
      protection of the State's coastal wetlands. OCRM’s Coastal Restoration and
      Engineering divisions are responsible for planning and implementing projects
      aimed at creating, protecting, and restoring the state's coastal wetlands and other
      key coastal habitats. The primary function of OCRM’s Coastal Management
      Division is to regulate resource uses in the Louisiana coastal zone, especially
      those having a direct and significant impact on coastal waters. LDNR also houses
      the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority’s (CPRA’s) Integrated
      Planning Team, which comprises technical personnel from LDNR, the Louisiana
      Department of Transportation and Development, and the USACE. That team,
      which operates under the direct oversight of the LDNR Deputy Secretary, is
      preparing a comprehensive master plan for integrating the State’s coastal
      restoration and hurricane protection activities. Extensive coordination between



                                           9
       the OCRM CIAP planning team and the CPRA Integrated Planning Team has
       helped ensure consistency between those two efforts.

       Many positive steps have been taken to address Louisiana’s coastal land loss
       problem. In 1981, LDNR began planning and implementing coastal restoration
       projects through the State’s Coastal Protection Trust Fund (Act 41). Since that
       time, the LDNR has been involved in many other coastal programs, such as the
       Vegetative Planting Program, relevant Water Resources Development Act
       projects, the CWPPRA program, and the 2000 version of the CIAP.

       Recognizing that the above efforts were not sufficient to adequately address the
       ongoing and future threats to the sustainability of coastal Louisiana, LDNR
       played a key leadership role in the “Coast 2050” collaborative restoration
       planning effort. That large-scale effort involved the Louisiana Wetlands
       Conservation and Restoration Authority, the CWPPRA Task Force, parish
       governments, and the public. The Coast 2050 initiative sought to develop a
       technically sound strategic plan to sustain Louisiana’s coastal resources and
       provide an integrated multiple-use approach to ecosystem management. The
       Coast 2050 plan, endorsed by the CWPPRA Task Force and Louisiana’s Wetland
       Conservation and Restoration Authority, was published by LDNR in 1998. That
       strategic plan’s premise and its recognition of the need for a larger-scale
       restoration effort served as the primary basis for the Louisiana Coastal Area
       Ecosystem Restoration Plan (LCA Plan), conducted by the USACE and LDNR
       with assistance from numerous other entities.

III.   DESIGNATED CONTACTS FOR COASTAL POLITICAL
       SUBDIVISIONS

       Nineteen Louisiana parishes lie totally or partially within the Louisiana Coastal
       Zone, established in accordance with amended section 304(1) of the Coastal Zone
       Management Act of 1972. Those parishes constitute the State’s coastal political
       subdivisions (CPSs), and include: Assumption, Calcasieu, Cameron, Iberia,
       Jefferson, Lafourche, Livingston, Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles,
       St. James, St. John the Baptist, St. Martin, St. Mary, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa,
       Terrebonne and Vermilion. The designated point of contact for each of those 19
       CPSs qualified to participate in the CIAP from Louisiana are as follows:

       Assumption Parish:           John Boudreaux
                                    Director
                                    Assumption Office of Homeland Security &
                                    Emergency Preparedness
                                    Post Office Box 520
                                    Napoleonville, Louisiana 70390
                                    Phone: (985) 369-7386
                                    Fax: (985)369-7341
                                    johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com



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Calcasieu Parish:   Pam Mattingly
                    Senior Planner
                    Division of Planning and Development
                    Post Office Drawer 3287
                    Lake Charles, Louisiana 70602-3287
                    Phone: (337) 721-3606
                    Fax: (337)-437-3586
                    pmattingly@cppi.net

Cameron Parish:     Tina Horn
                    Parish Administrator
                    Post Office Box 1280
                    Cameron, Louisiana 70631
                    Phone: (337) 905-1189
                    Fax: (337) 905-1191
                    cppjury@camtel.net

Iberia Parish:      Jim Anderson
                    Director
                    Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                    Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                    New Iberia, Louisiana 70560-4587
                    Phone: (337) 369-4427
                    Fax: (337) 369-9956
                    jla@cox-internet.com

Jefferson Parish:   Marnie Winter
                    Director
                    Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental
                    Affairs
                    1221 Elmwood Park Boulevard, Suite 1002
                    Jefferson, Louisiana 70123
                    Phone: (504) 736-6443
                    Fax: (504) 731-4607
                    mwinter@jeffparish.net

Lafourche Parish:   Windell Curole
                    Coastal Zone Management Administrator
                    South Lafourche Levee District
                    Post Office Box 426
                    Galliano, Louisiana 70354
                    Phone: (985) 632-7554
                    Fax: (985) 632-7555
                    slld@mobiletel.com




                          11
Livingston Parish:    Karla Cormier
                      30259 Eden Church Road
                      Denham Springs, Louisiana 70726
                      Phone: (225) 667-8777
                      Fax: (225) 665-9779
                      karlacormier@cox.net

Orleans Parish:       Julie Schwam Harris
                      Director
                      Federal and State Programs
                      1300 Perdido Street
                      New Orleans, Louisiana 70112
                      Phone: (504) 658-4961
                      Fax: (504) 658-4076
                      julie.harris@mayorofno.com

Plaquemines Parish:   Andrew MacInnes
                      Coastal Zone Management Administrator
                      106 Avenue “G”
                      Belle Chasse, Louisiana 70037
                      Phone: (504) 297-5320
                      Fax: (504) 297-5325
                      andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

St. Bernard Parish:   Charles Reppel
                      Special Assistant to the Parish President
                      St. Bernard Parish Government
                      8201 West Judge Perez Drive
                      Chalmette, Louisiana 70443
                      Phone: (504) 442-1452
                      Fax: (504) 278-4484
                      creppel@sbpg.com

St. Charles Parish:   Earl Matherne
                      Coastal Zone Management Administrator
                      Post Office Box 302
                      Hahnville, Louisiana 70057
                      Phone: (985) 783-5060
                      Fax: (985) 753-783-6447
                      ematherne@stcharlesgov.net

St. James Parish:     Jody Chenier
                      Director of Operations
                      5800 LA 44
                      Post Office Box 106
                      Convent, Louisiana 70723



                            12
                               Phone: (225) 562-2262
                               Fax: (225) 562-2279
                               jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

St. John the Baptist Parish:   Adrienne Labat
                               Director of Planning and Zoning
                               102 East Airline
                               LaPlace, Louisiana 70068
                               Phone: (985) 651-5565
                               Fax: (985) 653-9808
                               a.labat@sjbparish.com

St. Martin Parish:             Guy Cormier
                               Parish President
                               Post Office Box 9
                               St. Martinville, Louisiana 70582
                               Phone: (337) 394-2200
                               Fax: (337) 394-5580
                               parishpresident@bellsouth.net

St. Mary Parish:               Henry C. “Bo” LaGrange
                               Chief Administrative Officer
                               St. Mary Parish Government
                               500 Main Street, Fifth Floor Courthouse
                               Franklin, Louisiana 70538
                               Phone: (337) 828-4100
                               Fax: (337) 828-4092
                               hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

St. Tammany Parish:            Greg Gorden
                               Director, Department of Environmental Sciences
                               Post Office Box 628
                               Covington, Louisiana 70434
                               Phone: (985) 898-2535
                               Fax: (985) 898-2523
                               gordo@stpgov.org

Tangipahoa Parish:             Maurice Jordan
                               Parish Engineer
                               Post Office Box 215
                               Amite, Louisiana 70434
                               Phone: (985) 748-3211
                               Fax: (985) 748-7050
                               tpcroad@i55.com

Terrebonne Parish:             Al Levron (contact person Leslie Suazo)



                                     13
                                    Director of Public Works
                                    Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                                    Post Office Box 0697
                                    Houma, Louisiana 70361
                                    Phone: (985) 873-6407
                                    Fax: (985) 873-6409
                                    allevron@tpcg.org

      Vermilion Parish:             Clay Menard
                                    Secretary Treasurer
                                    100 North State Street, Suite 200
                                    Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                                    Phone: (337) 898-6407
                                    Fax: (337) 898-4310
                                    vermilionppj@yahoo.com

IV.   GOVERNOR’S CERTIFICATION OF PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

      A. Public and Coastal Political Subdivision Involvement in Development of
      the Plan

      LDNR has implemented extensive efforts to provide information to the public,
      coastal parishes, and numerous other entities regarding the CIAP and Louisiana’s
      Plan formulation process, and to involve those parties in that process. These
      efforts began in December 2005 with an introductory CIAP meeting involving
      Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco and her staff, LDNR Secretary Scott
      Angelle, and representatives of the coastal parishes. The public outreach portion
      of the Louisiana CIAP formulation and review process incorporates the following
      phases: 1) initial Program notification and input by the public and parish and State
      entities regarding the State’s Plan goals and procedures; 2) dissemination of the
      State’s CIAP goals, objectives, procedures and project proposals to the coastal
      parishes, other entities, and the public; 3) communication of the Draft Plan; and 4)
      dissemination of the Final Plan.

         1. Initial Program Notification and Input on the State’s Plan Goals and
         Procedures

         On December 14, 2005, David Frugé (LDNR Office of Coastal Restoration
         and Management [OCRM] Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary) presented
         preliminary program guidance and the program schedule at a Local Coastal
         Programs Quarterly Meeting hosted by LDNR in Baton Rouge.

         On December 19, 2005, Governor Kathleen Blanco, LDNR Secretary Scott
         Angelle, and David Frugé of LDNR presented preliminary program guidance
         and the program schedule at a meeting of the Parishes Against Coastal
         Erosion held at the Governor’s Mansion in Baton Rouge.



                                          14
On December 20, 2005, Greg Grandy (LDNR Senior Project Manager)
presented preliminary program guidance and the program schedule at a
meeting of the Cameron Parish Long-Term Recovery (Post-Hurricane Rita)
Environmental Subcommittee in Lake Charles.

On January 10, 2006, Greg Grandy of LDNR presented preliminary program
guidance and the program schedule at the CWPPRA Regional Planning Team
(CWPPRA RPT) meeting in Abbeville. Individuals were invited to provide
their contact information so that future program or meeting information could
be provided to them in a timely manner.

On January 11, 2006, Will Norman (LDNR Coastal Resources Scientist)
presented preliminary program guidance and the program schedule at the
CWPPRA RPT meeting in Morgan City. Individuals were invited to provide
their contact information so that future program or meeting information could
be provided to them in a timely manner.

On January 12, 2006, Will Norman of LDNR presented preliminary program
guidance and the program schedule at the CWPPRA RPT meeting in New
Orleans. Individuals were invited to provide their contact information so that
future program or meeting information could be provided to them in a timely
manner.

On January 12, 2006, David Frugé of LDNR presented preliminary program
guidance and the program schedule at a meeting of the Louisiana Association
of Conservation Districts’ (LACD) Marsh Committee in Lafayette. The
following day, Frugé made a similar CIAP presentation at the general session
of the annual LACD meeting.

On January 12, 2006, David Frugé of LDNR presented preliminary program
guidance and the program schedule at the Civitan Club meeting in Lafayette.

On January 18, 2006, Gerald Duszynski (LDNR-OCRM Acting Assistant
Secretary) presented preliminary program guidance and the program schedule
at a Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) meeting in Baton
Rouge.

On January 30, 2006, Gerald Duszynski and David Frugé of LDNR met in
Baton Rouge with Marnie Winter and O’Neal Malbrough, representing
Jefferson Parish, to discuss preliminary program guidance, the program
schedule, and potential Jefferson Parish CIAP proposals.

On February 1, 2006, David Frugé, Greg Grandy, and Will Norman of LDNR
met in Baton Rouge with Jerome Zeringue of the Terrebonne Levee and
Conservation District to discuss that agency’s request for CIAP funding of the
Houma Navigation Canal Lock.



                                15
On February 2, 2006, Greg Grandy and Will Norman of LDNR met with John
Boudreaux and Kayte Landry of Assumption Parish in Napoleonville to
discuss preliminary program guidance and the program schedule.

On February 3, 2006, Greg Grandy and Will Norman of LDNR met with Jim
Anderson of Iberia Parish in New Iberia, and with Camille Punch of St. Mary
Parish in Franklin, to discuss preliminary program guidance and the program
schedule.

On February 7, 2006, Greg Grandy and Will Norman of LDNR met with
Parish President Dale Hymel, Jody Chenier, and Joan Louque of St. James
Parish in Convent to discuss preliminary program guidance and the program
schedule.

On February 8, 2006, David Frugé of LDNR presented program guidance and
a program schedule at the CWPPRA Task Force meeting in New Orleans.

On February 8, 2006, Greg Grandy of LDNR met with Leslie Suazo of
Terrebonne Parish and Andrew MacInnes of Plaquemines Parish at the
CWPPRA Task Force meeting in New Orleans to discuss preliminary
program guidance and the program schedule.

On February 9, 2006, Greg Grandy of LDNR met with Maurice Jordan of
Tangipahoa Parish in Amite to discuss preliminary program guidance and the
program schedule.

On February 9, 2006, David Frugé and Will Norman of LDNR met with staff
from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to discuss
preliminary program guidance and the program schedule, and to solicit CIAP
project proposals.

On February 10, 2006, David Frugé, Greg Grandy, and Antoinette DeBosier
(Coastal Resources Specialist) of LDNR met with Parish President Guy
Cormier of St. Martin Parish in St. Martinville to discuss preliminary program
guidance, the program schedule, and potential proposals for CIAP projects.

On February 10, 2006, Greg Grandy of LDNR presented preliminary program
guidance and a program schedule to the Republican Round Table in Lake
Charles.

On February 13, 2006, David Frugé, Greg Grandy, and Will Norman of
LDNR met with Greg Gordon of St. Tammany Parish in Covington to discuss
preliminary program guidance, the program schedule, and potential candidates
for CIAP funding.




                                16
On February 14, 2006, David Frugé, Greg Grandy, and Will Norman of
LDNR met with Wendell Curole of Lafourche Parish in Thibodaux to discuss
preliminary program guidance and the program schedule.

On February 15, 2006, David Frugé, Greg Grandy, and Will Norman of
LDNR met with Grant Bush of Calcasieu Parish and Tina Horn of Cameron
Parish in Lake Charles to discuss preliminary program guidance and the
program schedule.

On February 16, 2006, Greg Grandy and Will Norman of LDNR met with
Earl Matherne and Milton Cambre of St. Charles Parish in Hahnville to
discuss preliminary program guidance and the program schedule.

On February 17, 2006, David Frugé, Greg Grandy, and Will Norman of
LDNR met with Albert Foulcold and Bo LaGrange of St. Mary Parish in
Franklin to discuss preliminary program guidance and the program schedule.

On February 22, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Antoinette DeBosier
of LDNR met with Parish President Mike Grimes of Livingston Parish in
Livingston to discuss preliminary program guidance and the program
schedule.

On March 3, 2006, Greg Grandy and Will Norman of LDNR met with Parish
President Henry Rodriguez and Charlie Reppel of St. Bernard Parish in
Chalmette to discuss preliminary program guidance and the program schedule.

2. Dissemination of the State’s CIAP Goals, Objectives, Procedures, and
Project Proposals to the Coastal Parishes, Other Entities, and the Public

LDNR hosted five introductory public meetings across southern Louisiana to
educate the public on the CIAP and the State’s related goals, procedures, and
timelines, and to encourage future submittal of project proposals. The first of
those public meetings was held February 13, 2006, at Southeastern Louisiana
University in Hammond. Over 60 people attended this meeting, which was co-
hosted by the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation. The second meeting was
held on February 14, 2006, at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux. Over
30 members of the public attended this meeting, which was co-hosted by the
Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program. The third public meeting
occurred on February 15, 2006, at the Civic Center in Lake Charles. Over 35
people attended this meeting, which was co-hosted by the Coalition to Restore
Coastal Louisiana. The fourth public meeting was held February 16, 2006, at
the Jefferson Parish Library in Metairie, and over 66 people participated. That
meeting was co-hosted by the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation. The
final introductory public meeting was held February 17, 2006, at the LSU
Cooperative Extension Service office in Abbeville. Over 20 people attended
this meeting, co-hosted by the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana.



                                17
An Orleans Parish Local Coastal Advisory Program meeting was held on
February 17, 2006, in New Orleans. Tom Bernard (LDNR engineer) and
Honora Buras (LDNR Coastal Resources Scientist) participated in that
meeting, which reviewed the CIAP requirements and discussed possible
restoration projects that Orleans Parish would consider submitting as part of
the CIAP.

A Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee meeting was held
on March 2, 2006, in Belle Chasse. At that meeting, Greg Grandy of LDNR
presented CIAP-related information and provided guidance to the Parish
Coastal Zone Advisory Committee regarding the development of a CIAP
project proposal for Plaquemines Parish.

On March 9, 2006, David Frugé of LDNR made a CIAP presentation to the
Governor’s Advisory Commission on Coastal Protection, Restoration and
Conservation in Baton Rouge. He provided basic information on the CIAP as
well as LDNR’s proposed Plan goals, objectives, selection criteria, and
procedures.

On March 23, 2006, Gerald Duszynski of LDNR made a presentation to the
Louisiana Ports Association in Lake Charles, providing information on the
CIAP and Louisiana’s CIAP-related goals and Plan formulation schedule.

On April 5, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Daniel Dearmond (LDNR
Engineer) of LDNR reviewed Assumption Parish CIAP project proposals with
John Boudreaux of Assumption Parish in Napoleonville.

On April 10, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Chris Williams (LDNR
Engineer) of LDNR met with Parish President Nickie Monica, Natalie
Robottom, Virgil Rayneu, Ralph Bean, Paul Oncale, and Adrian Labat of St.
John the Baptist Parish in LaPlace to review that parish’s CIAP project
proposals.

On April 24, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Dewey Billodeau (LDNR
Engineer) of LDNR reviewed Iberia Parish’s CIAP project proposals with Jim
Anderson of that parish in New Iberia.

On April 25, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Tom Bernard of LDNR
reviewed Plaquemines Parish CIAP project proposals with Andrew MacInnes
of Plaquemines Parish in Belle Chasse.

On April 27, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Chris Williams of LDNR
reviewed St. Bernard Parish’s CIAP project proposals with Parish President
Henry Rodriguez and parish staff member Charlie Reppel in Chalmette,
Louisiana.



                                18
On May 5, 2006, LDNR hosted a CIAP workshop for the Parishes Against
Coastal Erosion organization at the LaSalle Building in Baton Rouge. The
goal of the meeting was to answer questions and clarify issues regarding the
Draft CIAP Plan guidance issued by the MMS in May 2006.

On May 9, 2006, Greg Grandy, Will Norman, and Project Manager Ralph
Liebersat of LDNR reviewed Vermilion Parish’s CIAP project proposals with
W.P. “Judge” Edwards III and Sherrill Sagrera of the Vermilion Parish
Coastal Advisory Committee in Abbeville.

On May 16, 2006, Greg Grandy and Will Norman of LDNR reviewed St.
Tammany Parish CIAP project proposals with Greg Gordon of St. Tammany
Parish at the LDNR office in Baton Rouge.

By May 22, 2006 (the deadline for CIAP proposals), LDNR had received 222
proposals involving the use of the State’s CIAP funds, and an additional 104
proposals involving the parishes’ share of those funds.

On June 14, 2006, Greg Grandy of LDNR gave a general update to the
CWPPRA Task Force’s Technical Committee in Baton Rouge on the status of
the Louisiana CIAP Plan development process and how LDNR would
coordinate CIAP project activities with CWPPRA.

On June 20, 2006, LDNR hosted a public open house meeting at the LaSalle
Building in Baton Rouge. Another such open house event was held on June
22, 2006, at the Estuarine Habitats and Coastal Fisheries Center in Lafayette.
At both of those events, all of the CIAP project proposals were displayed for
the public to review, ask questions of LDNR representatives in attendance,
and provide comments. Comments received from the public on those
proposals were considered during the selection of projects for inclusion in the
Draft Plan.

On June 21, 2006, Greg Grandy of LDNR gave a general update on the status
of the Louisiana CIAP at the Local Coastal Programs Quarterly Meeting held
at the LDNR building in Baton Rouge.

On July 12, 2006, David Frugé of LDNR attended a CWPPRA Task Force
meeting in Baton Rouge and gave a brief update on the status of Louisiana’s
CIAP Plan development and on the possible use of CIAP funds to implement
construction-ready but unfunded CWPPRA projects (CWPRRA funds might
be used for operation and maintenance of those projects).

3. Communication of the Draft Plan




                                 19
        On February 6, 2007, LDNR announced the availability of the Draft Plan for
        review and comments by the public via news release and the LDNR web site.
        The Draft Plan was also placed on that web site for public review. Copies of
        the plan were provided to the coastal parishes’ CIAP contacts; members of the
        CPRA; the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Coastal Protection,
        Restoration and Conservation; MMS; the CWPPRA Task Force; other key
        Federal and state agencies; and members of the Louisiana Legislature and the
        Louisiana Congressional delegation.

        A series of regional public meetings will be held February 26 – February 28,
        2007, to communicate key elements of the Draft Plan and to solicit comments
        on that document.

        4. Dissemination of the Final Plan

        LDNR will announce, via news release and the LDNR web site, the
        availability of the Final Plan transmitted by Governor Kathleen Babineaux
        Blanco to MMS. Paper or digital copies of the Plan will be disseminated to
        the CPRA; Parishes Against Coastal Erosion; the Coastal Wetlands Planning
        Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) Task Force; the Governor’s
        Advisory Commission on Coastal Protection, Restoration and Conservation;
        members of the Louisiana Legislature and the Louisiana Congressional
        delegation representing coastal areas; and the general public as requested.
        The Final Plan will be posted on the LDNR web site.

V.   COORDINATION WITH OTHER FEDERAL RESOURCES AND
     PROGRAMS

     The CIAP legislation requires that the State’s Plan contain “measures for taking
     into account other relevant Federal resources and programs.” As part of the
     State’s effort to satisfy that requirement, LDNR coordinated extensively with
     Federal agencies responsible for administering Federal programs and resources
     affecting coastal Louisiana. LDNR encouraged those agencies to submit proposals
     for CIAP funding, and presented opportunities for them to provide input during
     the Plan formulation and review process. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     submitted several proposals for use of CIAP funds to restore coastal habitats on
     National Wildlife Refuges in southeastern Louisiana. Furthermore, Federal
     agencies provided informal comments on proposals that were being considered by
     the State for CIAP funding.

     The development of Louisiana’s CIAP Plan relied heavily on the strategies
     developed by previous State and Federal comprehensive planning efforts. Those
     efforts include the CWPPRA Louisiana Coastal Restoration Plan, the Coast 2050
     Plan, and the Louisiana Coastal Area Ecosystem Restoration Plan (LCA Plan).




                                        20
CWPPRA required the development of a comprehensive Louisiana Coastal
Wetlands Restoration Plan. The first such plan was completed in 1993.
Subsequently, the CWPPRA Task Force and the State Wetlands Authority
developed the Coast 2050 Plan under the legislative mandates described above,
recognizing that a single plan was needed. The Coast 2050 Plan incorporates a
vision for the coast, builds on previous work, integrates coastal management and
coastal restoration approaches, and adopts a multiple-use approach to restoration
planning.

In 1999, Louisiana and the USACE began a reconnaissance study that grew out of
the Coast 2050 Plan. The two entities envisioned that a series of feasibility reports
assessing restoration projects would be prepared over a 10-year period and
submitted to the U.S. Congress for funding through the Water Resources
Development Act. The first feasibility report focused on barrier shoreline
restoration and marsh creation features in the Barataria Basin.

In 2002, the State of Louisiana and the USACE recognized that it would be more
efficient to develop a comprehensive restoration proposal for submittal to
Congress as a blueprint for future coastal restoration efforts in Louisiana. The
Louisiana–USACE effort, which included extensive participation from numerous
other Federal and State agencies and outside scientific advisors, culminated in a
January 31, 2005, report by the USACE’s Chief of Engineers to the Secretary of
the Army. That report recommended approval of the LCA Plan, including: a) 15
near-term critical restoration features (with Congressional authorization
recommended for 5 features, and feasibility studies proposed for the other 10); b)
an LCA Science and Technology Program; c) programmatic authorization of
demonstration projects recommended by the LCA Science and Technology
Program; d) programmatic authorization for the beneficial use of material dredged
during Federal navigation channel maintenance, and for studies of changes to
existing water resources structures and/or their operation to meet LCA Plan
restoration objectives; and e) studies of large-scale, long-term coastal restoration
concepts.

The LCA Plan was included in Water Resource Development Act bills considered
during the previous session of Congress. The State intended to use CIAP funds as
the required non-Federal match on several features of the LCA Plan (such as
beneficial use of dredged material). Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil
Works) John Paul Woodley, Jr., however, advised Governor Kathleen Babineaux
Blanco in an October 2, 2006, letter that the USACE lacked legal authority to
accept CIAP funds to meet non-Federal cost-sharing requirements.

LDNR has met several times with the CWPPRA Task Force and its Technical
Committee to encourage a CIAP/CWPPRA partnership designed to expedite
implementation of coastal restoration projects and facilitate their operation and
management. The CWPPRA Task Force approved, during its October 18, 2006,




                                     21
      meeting, a process for approving CWPPRA operations and maintenance funding
      for selected CWPPRA-designed projects that are constructed with CIAP funds.

      Louisiana relies heavily on Coastal Zone Management Act grants administered by
      the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to operate the
      State’s coastal permitting program. Therefore, redirecting NOAA funds from
      coastal permitting activities to implement coastal conservation and restoration
      projects is not an acceptable funding alternative.

      Other NOAA programs may offer a viable mechanism for leveraging CIAP funds.
      NOAA’s Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program (CELCP) was
      established in 2002 to protect coastal and estuarine lands considered important for
      their ecological, conservation, recreational, historical, or aesthetic values. The
      program provides State and local governments with matching funds to purchase
      significant coastal and estuarine lands, or conservation easements on such lands,
      from willing sellers. Lands or conservation easements acquired with CELCP
      funds are protected in perpetuity so that they may be enjoyed by future
      generations. The Coastal Forest Conservation Initiative of Louisiana’s CIAP Plan
      includes protection and restoration of declining coastal forested habitats (see
      Section I). The State intends to seek opportunities under the CELCP to help
      fulfill those objectives, in concert with other complementary Federal funding
      mechanisms such as the North American Wetlands Conservation Act, U.S.
      Department of Agriculture (USDA) landowner incentive programs, CWPPRA,
      and the proposed LCA Plan.

      LDNR staff also coordinated with USDA personnel regarding Federal landowner
      incentive programs that could complement efforts funded by CIAP. One example
      involves the establishment of vegetative filter strips along streams in the Lake
      Verret watershed to reduce excessive nutrient and sediment inflow into that lake.

      LDNR personnel and CIAP Selection Committee members familiar with
      CWPPRA Task Force restoration activities, LCA Plan formulation, and other
      coastal restoration efforts were mindful of additional relevant Federal resources
      and programs of potential use in maximizing CIAP funding benefits. When
      appropriate, CIAP proposals were coordinated with Federal, State, and local
      entities as well as relevant non-governmental organizations. An example is the
      proposed use of CIAP funds to accelerate construction of the Houma Navigation
      Canal Lock, awaiting Congressional authorization as part of the proposed USACE
      Morganza to the Gulf of Mexico Hurricane Protection Project.


VI.   PLAN IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM

             State of Louisiana CIAP Plan Implementation Program

      A. State of Louisiana Goals and Objectives Under the CIAP



                                          22
The goals of the Louisiana CIAP are to: 1) implement, support, and accelerate
effective and timely coastal conservation and restoration projects; and 2)
implement, support, and accelerate coastal infrastructure projects which mitigate
onshore impacts within the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The conservation and
restoration objectives of the Louisiana CIAP are to: a) implement Coast 2050
near-term and intermediate-term strategies; b) implement certain construction-
ready CWPPRA projects and LCA Plan features that can be initiated in the near
term; c) implement a coastal forest conservation and restoration initiative; d)
support projects to benefit wetland and aquatic habitats in inland portions of
coastal parishes; and e) conduct monitoring and related science-support activities.
The objectives of the infrastructure portion of the Louisiana CIAP are to: a)
implement and support projects that provide protection to coastal communities
and infrastructure which support and are impacted by OCS-related exploration
and production activities; and b) implement and support onshore projects that
address other infrastructure needs associated with and impacted by OCS-related
exploration and production activities.

B. How the State of Louisiana will Manage, Implement, and Monitor the
CIAP

The State of Louisiana will manage the CIAP through LDNR’s Office of Coastal
Restoration and Management (OCRM). OCRM’s Coastal Engineering and
Coastal Restoration Divisions house the employees responsible for managing that
Program. Those employees, assisted by contract staff, also will be primarily
responsible for engineering and design, permitting, and land rights tasks for CIAP
projects. Staff from LDNR field offices in Thibodaux, New Orleans, and
Lafayette will be primarily responsible for supervising construction and
monitoring specific completed projects.

Coordination of State and parish activities on cost-shared projects will be
formalized through periodic (e.g., monthly) conference calls documented through
meeting minutes, dissemination of preliminary design reports, preliminary design
conferences, dissemination of formal bid packages, and dissemination of
construction completion reports. LDNR will communicate at regular intervals
with parishes regarding parish CIAP projects that are not cost-shared, to facilitate
LDNR’s maintenance of a comprehensive status list of all Louisiana CIAP
projects.

Program implementation will be structured to provide significant benefits early,
and to initiate pre-construction work on complex projects so that they can be
completed in a timely manner. Projects that are more complex will also be phased
in over several years to facilitate cash flow management. Early implementation
of selected construction-ready but unfunded CWPPRA projects that are
particularly certain to provide benefits will be a priority. Engineering and design
of highly complex projects expected to have substantial benefits will also be



                                     23
initiated early in the Program. Programmatic efforts (e.g., coastal forest
conservation and beneficial use of dredged material) and construction of other
projects for which engineering, design, and land rights tasks have not been
completed will be phased in over the life of the Program, providing flexibility to
the implementation effort. LDNR will hold an annual review of CIAP funding
and project implementation priorities in conjunction with the annual State Coastal
Protection and Restoration Plan development and review, and will adjust the
implementation schedule to best achieve Program priorities.

The State of Louisiana will perform project-specific performance analysis on a
limited number of projects, and general performance analysis on all completed
CIAP conservation and restoration projects, in conjunction with the Coastwide
Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) administered by LDNR for the CWPPRA
program. Project-specific performance monitoring will be conducted on a limited
number of CIAP projects to answer specific questions regarding coastal
restoration and conservation effectiveness. LDNR intends to carry out an internal
and external review of selected restoration issues and/or project types, and
potentially a performance analysis that could address those issues, to identify the
specific intensive monitoring activities to be implemented through this Program.
In addition, pre- and post-implementation aerial imagery will be analyzed on all
CIAP-funded restoration projects, using coastwide aerial imagery being collected
for the CRMS monitoring of CWPPRA restoration projects. LDNR will use
CIAP funds to pay for the incremental cost of specific monitoring-related analysis
of CIAP-funded projects to determine their effectiveness.

C. State of Louisiana Public Participation Process: Dates and Periodicals in
which Notices are Placed; Locations, Dates, and Times of Meetings, and
Number of Attendees; and Summary of Public Comments on the Draft Plan

Appropriate text will be added upon the conclusion of the comment period for the
Draft Plan, prior to submittal of the Final Plan.

D. State of Louisiana Decision-Making Process for Selecting Projects

Early in the Plan formulation process, LDNR began soliciting input and project
proposals from the 19 coastal parishes, State agencies, Federal agencies, non-
governmental organizations, and the general public (see Section IV). A
description of the Program, guidelines for application, and project selection
criteria were disseminated through meetings and mailings, and were posted for
download from the LDNR CIAP website. LDNR noted during the initial public
meetings that the CIAP Plan would draw heavily from previous collaborative
coastal planning efforts that have occurred in recent years (e.g., the Coast 2050
Plan, the LCA Plan, and the Governor’s Advisory Panel and Science Working
Group on Coastal Wetland Forest Conservation and Use).




                                    24
The evaluation criteria for coastal conservation and restoration project proposals
(CIAP authorized uses 1, 2, and 4; see page 3) included the following:

   1. Is the proposed project free of issues that may impact timely
   implementation of the project features?

   2. Is the proposed project linked to a regional strategy that maintains
   established landscape features critical to a sustainable ecosystem structure and
   function?

   3. Does the proposed project protect health, safety, or infrastructure of
   national, State, regional, or local significance?

   4.    How cost effective is the project?

   5.    What is the certainty of the project’s benefits?

   6.    Does the project address an area of critical need or high land loss?

   7.    How sustainable are the project’s benefits?

LDNR staff provided technical assistance to parishes and other potential
submitters as needed in the development of their proposals. May 22, 2006, was
set as the deadline for receipt of project proposals; that date represents an
extension of two earlier deadlines. Response to the notice of CIAP funding
availability was very impressive. Three hundred and thirty-seven (337) proposals
were received and reviewed by LDNR. Those proposals were received from the
19 coastal political subdivisions (CPSs; Louisiana’s coastal parishes),
municipalities, State agencies, Federal agencies, universities, private corporations,
non-governmental organizations, landowners, and the general public.

Following the May 22, 2006, proposal deadline, LDNR staff visited sites of
proposed projects for which additional information was needed to assess the
project-area conditions and the proposed projects’ features and potential benefits.
LDNR’s Restoration Technology Section assembled four regional maps that
showed the location of each proposed restoration project (Figures 1-4 in
Appendix D). After completing those maps, the Restoration Technology Section
generated reports on each project proposed to receive State CIAP funds. Those
reports identified up to 67 key features found within a 500-foot radius of proposed
projects (e.g., existing restoration projects, permitted coastal use activities,
pipeline rights of way, etc.). The LDNR Land Section reviewed projects proposed
for State CIAP funding to evaluate landowner status within the proposed project
area, existence of infrastructure, existence of leases, and any other land-rights
issue that might impact project implementation. Project proposals were also
evaluated for potential conflicts with coastal protection projects, using




                                     25
Geographic Information System data provided by the Coastal Protection and
Restoration Authority (CPRA) Integrated Planning Team.

LDNR solicited public input on the proposed projects at regional open house
events in Baton Rouge and Lafayette (June 20 and 22, 2006, respectively). All
proposals were also available for review on the LDNR CIAP website, and
comments from the public were solicited via the web site for consideration during
the selection process.

Project proposals were initially screened by LDNR CIAP staff to determine
whether State CIAP funds were being requested, whether the projects complied
with the authorized uses of CIAP funds, and whether the proposals were focused
on conservation/restoration or infrastructure. Each conservation and restoration
proposal involving State CIAP funding for one or more of the authorized uses was
then reviewed to determine whether it had clear links to a regional strategy for
maintaining established landscape features deemed critical to a sustainable
ecosystem structure and function. A key related question asked by LDNR staff in
making that determination was whether the proposal would produce regional
benefits. Another key question was whether the cost of the proposal would
exceed a level reasonably supportable by CIAP. Those conservation/restoration
projects which met the above criteria, had a high degree of certainty of benefits,
and were generally of a cost range deemed to be supportable with CIAP funds
were then selected for detailed technical analysis. An exception to that procedure
involved projects that were currently being engineered and designed with
CWPPRA funds; those projects were generally excluded from further
consideration for CIAP evaluation and funding purposes.

An external technical review of CIAP conservation and restoration projects
proposed for State funding and selected by LDNR staff for detailed analysis was
conducted by a group of natural resource researchers from Louisiana. That
interactive review identified the strengths and weaknesses of individual proposals,
and assessed their competitiveness as candidates for CIAP funding.

Using information compiled for those projects selected for detailed analysis
(including but not limited to the external technical review findings), an LDNR
technical review panel assigned a score (0 to 10) to each proposal. That panel
then generated a preliminary list of projects for inclusion in the Draft CIAP Plan.
That preliminary list formed the primary basis of the recommended list of State-
funded projects presented by LDNR’s CIAP Team to the CIAP project selection
committee. That committee comprised CPRA agency representatives from the
Louisiana Departments of Transportation and Development, Wildlife and
Fisheries, Environmental Quality, Natural Resources, and Agriculture and
Forestry, and the Governor’s Office of Coastal Activities. Members of the
CPRA’s Integrated Planning Team participated in that selection meeting. The
lead external science advisor, who coordinated the external science review of
CIAP proposals, also participated at that meeting. The list ultimately adopted by



                                     26
that selection committee at its August 22, 2006, meeting became the primary
component of the Draft CIAP Plan relative to projects involving State CIAP
funding.

On February 5, 2007, the Draft CIAP Plan was made available for public review
and comments. That Draft Plan was then presented at a series of public meetings
held from February 26 through February 28, 2007. Following the comment
period ending April 1, 2007, the Draft Plan will be revised as needed, and a final
Plan will be submitted to MMS for review following approval by Louisiana’s
CPRA.

E. How the State of Louisiana Plans to Ensure Compliance with All
Relevant Federal, State, and Local Laws, Including Its Coastal Zone
Management Program (CZMP)

LDNR’s Office of Coastal Restoration and Management (OCRM) has
implemented coastal restoration projects for nearly two decades and has worked
diligently to ensure that all projects comply with all relevant local, State, and
Federal laws. The process utilized to assure CIAP compliance with relevant laws
will be similar to the implementation procedures followed for CWPPRA project
implementation. Compliance with those laws will be a prerequisite for approval of
CIAP grants by MMS.

During the CIAP planning process, LDNR coordinated with the relevant Federal
regulatory and natural resource agencies to solicit their opinions regarding
potential projects and potential regulatory problems. LDNR intends to
collaborate with those entities throughout the development phase of each project.
In addition, some of those projects have already received all necessary permits
through the appropriate local, State, and Federal regulatory entities, and copies of
those permits will be provided to MMS. In addition to addressing regulatory
issues, LDNR personnel have coordinated with other coastal restoration and
protection efforts in Louisiana to help ensure consistency and eliminate
duplication of effort.

       Assumption Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Assumption Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Assumption Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas are degraded natural ridges and
wetlands which help protect adjacent infrastructure. The parish is specifically
emphasizing the use of existing waterways and the beneficial use of dredged
material to restore these wetlands. Lake Verret Basin, the site of all of the coastal
activities, is the concentrated area for all the projects. Efforts will also be made
there to improve fishing with recreational improvements.




                                     27
B. How Assumption Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of Assumption Parish Government, including the Office of
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, Public Works, Engineering,
and Finance. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through
the Emergency Preparedness Director, who is listed as the CIAP point of contact
for Assumption Parish.

C. The Assumption Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the Assumption Parish CIAP
plan during open public meetings of the Parish Police Jury when the proposed
plan was presented and discussed. These meetings were advertised in the
Assumption Pioneer and meeting notices were posted at the governmental offices
where the meetings were held.

D. The Assumption Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated
through the Police Jury. All of these projects were nominated for funding through
the CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a decision on funding of
proposed CIAP projects, the parish reviewed the remaining projects and selected
the ones that best achieved the parish goals within the funding available. These
projects were reviewed and approved by the Assumption Parish Police Jury at
their August 23, 2006, meeting.

E. How Assumption Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Assumption Parish government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

        Calcasieu Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Calcasieu Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Calcasieu Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. Some areas include assisting with Cameron Parish



                                     28
projects. Calcasieu Parish and Cameron Parish have projects that coincide with
each other. Calcasieu Parish is requesting assistance in efforts to restore and
protect those overlapping target areas of concern for both parishes. Also, in order
to make the most efficient use of existing structures and practices, Calcasieu
Parish is specifically emphasizing the rehabilitation of existing structures and the
beneficial use of materials to restore and protect surrounding wetlands.

B. How Calcasieu Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of Calcasieu Parish Government, including Coastal Zone
Management, Public Works, Engineering, and Finance. The monitoring and
reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through the Coastal Zone Management
(CZM) Administrator, who is listed as the CIAP point of contact for Calcasieu
Parish and will be assisted by other parish departments.

C. The Calcasieu Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public participated in the development of the Calcasieu Parish CIAP plan
during an open public meeting held in Lake Charles on February 15, 2006, hosted
by the LDNR, and again on April 20, 2006, when the proposed plan was
presented to the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury. No comments have been received
by the Parish CZM Administrator from the public regarding the parish CIAP draft
plan.

D. The Calcasieu Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects were nominated by the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury that met the parish
goals and objectives for the CIAP. All of these projects were nominated for
funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana.

E. How Calcasieu Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Calcasieu Parish government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

        Cameron Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program




                                     29
A. Cameron Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Cameron Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas include island restoration, shoreline
protection and restoration, and beneficial use of dredged materials. Many parish
roads in Cameron Parish have been detrimentally impacted by heavy oilfield
traffic. Approximately 23% of the parish’s CIAP grant money will be used to
repair these roads.

B. How Cameron Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of the Cameron Parish Police Jury, including Coastal Zone
Management and Public Works. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be
coordinated through the Parish Administrator and the Coastal Zone Administrator,
who are listed as the CIAP points of contact for Cameron Parish.

C. The Cameron Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public participated in the development of the Cameron Parish CIAP plan
during public meetings calling for project submittals (held in Grand Lake on
February 27, 2006, with 22 participants; in Hackberry on March 22, 2006, with 10
participants; and in Grand Lake on March 29, 2006, with 9 participants). The
parish draft plan was presented to the Cameron Parish Police Jury and approved
on April 3, 2006. The parish’s final plan was approved by the Cameron Parish
Police Jury at its October 30, 2006 meeting.

D. The Cameron Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects were nominated for the CIAP and submitted to the LDNR for possible
State and local match funding through the CIAP. Once the State made a decision
on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the Cameron Parish Police Jury
reviewed and selected those that best achieved the CIAP parish goals within the
funding available.

E. How Cameron Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Cameron Parish government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP




                                    30
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

          Iberia Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program


A. Iberia Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Iberia Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas include a barrier island, degraded
natural ridges, and marshes in close proximity to existing infrastructure. Also,
several infrastructure projects were identified that fit the implementation program.

B. How Iberia Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through the engineering
firm of Sellers and Sellers, partnered with The Shaw Group. Iberia Parish
Government and the Department of Public Works will assist. Monitoring and
reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through the CZM Administrator, Jim
Anderson, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, who is
listed as the CIAP point of contact for Iberia Parish.

C. The Iberia Parish public participation process including: the dates and
   periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and times of
   meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the Iberia Parish CIAP plan
during an open public meeting of the Parish Council (held in Council Chambers
on May 12, 2006), when the proposed plan was presented. These meetings were
advertised in the Daily Iberian and the meeting notices were posted at the
governmental offices where the meetings were held. No comments have been
received by Mr. Anderson from the public except for the advisory committee
regarding the parish CIAP draft plan.

D. The Iberia Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated at
the Coastal Planning Advisory Committee. All of these projects were nominated
for funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a
decision on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the parish Coastal Zone
Advisory Committee reviewed the remaining projects and selected those that best
achieved the parish goals within the funding available. These projects will be
reviewed and eventually recommended to the Iberia Parish Council for approval
at an upcoming meeting.




                                     31
E. How Iberia Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant Federal,
   State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone Management
   Program (CZMP)

The Iberia Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

         Jefferson Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Jefferson Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Jefferson Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas include barrier islands, degraded
natural ridges, and marshes in close proximity to existing infrastructure, and
restoration features to maintain and restore the Barataria Basin Land Bridge. The
parish is specifically emphasizing the beneficial use of dredge material to restore
these wetlands.

B. How Jefferson Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through the Jefferson Parish
Department of Environmental Affairs and will be supported by different
departments of Jefferson Parish Government, including Finance, Engineering, and
Public Works. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated
through the Director of the Department of Environmental Affairs, who is listed as
the CIAP point of contact for Jefferson Parish. In addition, Jefferson Parish has
engineering/environmental consultants under contract, selected in accordance
with Federal, State, and local laws for selection of professional services, to assist
with coastal planning, including CIAP project implementation.

C. The Jefferson Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the Jefferson Parish CIAP plan
during a series of open public meetings held by LDNR and as detailed in the
state’s CIAP plan and summarized below:

LDNR hosted five public meetings to advise the public of the process that the
State will use to formulate the plan required by the CIAP, one of which was held
in Jefferson Parish on February 16, 2006, 6:30–8:00 p.m., at the Jefferson Parish
Regional Library, 4747 West Napoleon Avenue, Room A, Metairie.



                                     32
In addition to the public notices issued by LDNR, Jefferson Parish sent letters and
called members of the Jefferson Parish Coastal Stakeholders Citizen Group to
advise them of the local meeting. The parish has maintained a database of coastal
stakeholders that has grown over the years as interest in and awareness of the
coastal restoration increased. That list consists of present and past members of
the Jefferson Parish Marine Fisheries Advisory Board, civic and environmental
group members and leaders, recreational and commercial fishermen, landowners,
and residents of outlying coastal communities, including the Town of Jean Lafitte
and the Town of Grand Isle. Although there has been no formal adoption of a
Coastal Advisory Committee, this diverse group of stakeholders constitutes the
Jefferson Parish Coastal Stakeholders Citizen Group which serves as an adjunct to
the parish’s Coastal Zone Management (CZM) program.

   The Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs hosted a public
   workshop in Jefferson, Louisiana, on March 31, 2006, to garner input from the
   Coastal Stakeholders Citizen’s Group. Letters were sent to all persons on the
   mailing list and calls were made to encourage attendance and to request
   assistance in inviting others who might want to attend, and notices were
   posted at the governmental offices where the meeting was held.
   The proposed project list developed in conjunction with the Coastal
   Stakeholder Citizens Group was approved by Parish Council resolution at a
   regularly scheduled and publicly advertised meeting of the Jefferson Parish
   Council on May 17, 2006.
   LDNR hosted two CIAP “Open House” Public Meetings for the public to
   review, discuss, and comment on all project proposals submitted to the State
   for CIAP funding. The meeting for the eastern region of the State, which
   includes Jefferson Parish, was held on June 20, 2006, 11:00 am to 6:30 p.m.,
   at the LaSalle Building, Griffon Room, 617 North 3rd Street, Baton Rouge.

No comments have been received by the Jefferson Parish Department of
Environmental Affairs regarding the parish CIAP draft plan.

D. The Jefferson Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects for consideration were identified through a review of the Jefferson Parish
Conservation Plan; through projects nominated or approved for the CWPPRA
Project Priority Lists; and through projects identified within the FEMA long-term
community recovery planning process, the Federal Interagency Emergency
Support Function #14 (ESF #14), and through input from the Barataria
Terrebonne National Estuary Program (BTNEP), local coastal parish
representatives, and the Parishes Against Coastal Erosion (PACE) organization.
Projects identified were evaluated for their ability to meet CIAP guidelines,
restoration needs, likelihood of success, and estimated time to implement. A list
of projects deemed suitable for the CIAP was then developed. This “Long List”
was discussed in preliminary meetings with the State of Louisiana to garner the



                                    33
State’s input and was then presented to the Jefferson Parish coastal stakeholder’s
citizen advisory group for comments, additional project identification, and
prioritization. A “Short List” of projects having the most stakeholder support was
developed, and projects that had the most stakeholder support and best achieved
the parish goals within the CPS funding available were selected for parish
funding. The entire Short List was ratified by the Jefferson Parish Council during
a regularly scheduled council meeting and then submitted to the State of
Louisiana with a request for State funding for those projects that lacked sufficient
parish funding. All projects from the Short List were either selected for funding
by the parish or the state, or were included as Tier II projects in the final CIAP
plan.

E. How Jefferson Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Jefferson Parish government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.


        Lafourche Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Lafourche Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

CIAP can provide Lafourche Parish with enough funding to attempt projects
which can aggressively tackle the parish’s extreme land loss. Lafourche Parish
plans to maintain the structure of its estuaries, which are the barrier beaches,
natural ridges, and land bridges, and to use funding for infrastructure that is
directly affected or supportive of offshore oil development. Those projects
include the Larose to Golden Meadow Hurricane Protection Project, LA 1 Project,
and Port Fourchon.

B. How Lafourche Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

CIAP projects will be managed and monitored primarily through the Lafourche
Parish Coastal Zone Office and Advisory Committee and the parish finance
department, with the assistance of field personnel from LDNR. The CZM
Administrator and Permits Officer will provide reporting.

C. The Lafourche Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan


                                     34
The public has always been encouraged and specifically requested to provide
information and guidance for all projects in Lafourche Parish. The projects are a
summation of years of discussions and attempts to mitigate the problems in
coastal Lafourche. Three official meetings were held to discuss the issues. The
administrator discussed the program on local radio. The Parish Council also
provides discussion of CIAP issues at its monthly meeting.

D. The Lafourche Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects were nominated by the CZM Committee and approved by the Lafourche
Parish Council. The projects will be reviewed by the State, and then parish
officials will meet with the State. The Advisory Committee will then select the
projects that maximize the benefits to Lafourche Parish. The Lafourche Parish
Council will provide the last review and approval.

E. How Lafourche Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The CZM Committee will review the projects to ensure compliance. The
administration will also provide a review.


        Livingston Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Livingston Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Livingston Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas include coastal environmental projects,
rebuilding of coastal areas, and restoring degraded natural wetlands in close
proximity to existing infrastructure.

B. How Livingston Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of Livingston Parish Government and agencies within Livingston,
including Public Works, Finance, and Livingston Parish Waterways Commission.
Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through Grant Finders,
Inc.

C. The Livingston Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan




                                    35
The public has participated in the development of the Livingston Parish CIAP
plan during an open public meeting of the Parish Council (held in Livingston
Parish on March 9, 2006) to announce the CIAP funds and the proposed public
meeting to be held on March 20, 2006, when the projects would be accepted. A
second public meeting was held in conjunction with the Livingston Parish
Waterways Commission on March 21, 2006. The public meeting produced two
projects, the Amite Gapping Project and the Bald cypress Tupelo Coastal Forest.
These projects were reviewed at this meeting and also with the Livingston Parish
Waterways Commission during meetings (also held in Livingston on March 21,
2006) when the CIAP was the main issue presented and discussed. These
meetings were advertised in the Livingston Parish News and meeting notices were
posted at the governmental offices where the meetings were held. No comments
have been received by Parish President Mike Grimmer from the public except for
the advisory committee regarding the parish CIAP draft plan.

D. The Livingston Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated by
the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee. All of these projects were nominated for
funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a decision
on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the parish Coastal Zone Advisory
Committee reviewed the remaining projects and selected those that best achieved
the CIAP parish goals within the funding available.

E. How Livingston Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Livingston Parish government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

         Orleans Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Orleans Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Orleans Parish (equivalent to the City of New Orleans) identified Lake Borgne
shoreline protection and marsh creation from Bayou Bienvenue to Alligator Point
as a target for CIAP funding. LDNR has agreed to partner with the City of New
Orleans by providing financial, engineering, and construction management
assistance that will increase the breadth of the project. This project will meet the
goals of protecting and building brackish marsh, which will provide habitat for
estuarine wildlife and fisheries and flood protection for existing communities and
infrastructure. Objectives under these goals will be to measure the reduction of



                                     36
shoreline erosion, the increase in wetland growth, and the overall success of
restoration methods.

B. How Orleans Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through the City of New
Orleans Local Coastal Program (LCP). The LCP is administered by the Mayor’s
Office of Environmental Affairs, which is in the Office of Economic
Development. LDNR will implement the project while the City of New Orleans
shares responsibilities of management and monitoring. The New Orleans’ share
of management, monitoring, and reporting tasks will be the responsibility of the
LCP Administrator, who is listed as the CIAP point of contact for Orleans Parish.
Once the project has undergone the engineering and design phase, the LCP
Administrator will direct some of the management, monitoring, and reporting
duties to an appropriate contractor. The contractor will report project progress to
the LCP Administrator.

C. Orleans Parish public participation process including: the dates and
   periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and times of
   meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public participated in the development of the City of New Orleans CIAP
priorities during an open public meeting held by the Mayor’s Office of
Environmental Affairs at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans
District, on February 17, 2006 (15 people attended). This was an informal
Orleans Coastal Advisory Committee meeting dedicated to CIAP project planning
that was advertised to the public at an LDNR-led CIAP workshop. Over the past
two years, Environmental Affairs presented coastal restoration project priorities at
Environmental Breakfasts (University of New Orleans Research and Technology
Building, January 21, 2005; 30 people attended) and Civic Association meetings
(Lake Catherine Civic Association, April 27, 2005; 27 people attended). One
public meeting was held in the Irish Bayou community (BP Station, March 15,
2004; 60 people attended) to discuss projects in that area. Flyers advertising the
meeting were placed at each home along Highway 11. At each of these meetings,
Environmental Affairs recorded comments and project ideas. The LCP
Administrator has received no public comments on the Lake Borgne shoreline
protection and marsh creation project proposed for CIAP funding.

D. The Orleans Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

After meeting with the public and working with wetlands experts over the past
two years, Environmental Affairs was able to create a list of 11 large-scale coastal
restoration projects. The Coastal Advisory Committee ranked the 11 restoration
projects, with rankings based on both scoring and criteria including timely
implementation, regional appeal, health and safety of the public and



                                     37
infrastructure, certainty of benefits, critical need, sustainability, and proven
methodology. Two of the top five projects were combined into one, which was
submitted to the State.

E. How Orleans Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant Federal,
   State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone Management
   Program (CZMP)

The City of New Orleans will ensure compliance with all relevant laws through
the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for coastal zone
activities in Louisiana. In addition, the city will coordinate CIAP project
activities with all city departments to ensure that they are compatible with other
city activities.

       Plaquemines Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Plaquemines Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Plaquemines Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection
and restoration through the CIAP. These areas include barrier islands, degraded
natural ridges, and marshes in close proximity to existing infrastructure. Also, in
order to make the most efficient use of existing structures and practices,
Plaquemines Parish is specifically emphasizing the rehabilitation of existing
diversion structures and the beneficial use of dredge material to restore these
wetlands.

B. How Plaquemines Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of Plaquemines Parish Government, including Coastal Zone
Management, Public Works, Water Quality, Engineering, Finance, and Port
Authority. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through the
CZM Administrator, who is listed as the CIAP point of contact for Plaquemines
Parish.

C. The Plaquemines Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the Plaquemines Parish CIAP
plan during an open public meeting of the Parish Council (held in Belle Chasse on
May 12, 2006), when the proposed plan was presented, and at Coastal Zone
Advisory Committee meetings (also held in Belle Chasse, on February 13, March
2, April 4, May 16, and July 25, 2006), when the CIAP was the main issue
presented and discussed. These meetings were advertised in the Plaquemines



                                     38
Gazette, and meeting notices were posted at the governmental offices where the
meetings were held. CZM Committee meetings are also advertised in the
“Breaux Act Newsflash,” an email list-serve that has hundreds, if not thousands,
of recipients. No comments have been received from the public except for the
advisory committee regarding the parish CIAP draft plan.

D. The Plaquemines Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated by
the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee. All of these projects were nominated for
funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a decision
on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the parish Coastal Zone Advisory
Committee reviewed the remaining projects and selected those that best achieved
the CIAP parish goals within the funding available. These projects will be
reviewed and eventually recommended to the Plaquemines Parish Council for
approval at an upcoming meeting.

E. How Plaquemines Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Plaquemines Parish government will ensure compliance with all relevant
laws through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

          St. Bernard Parish CIAP Implementation Program

A. St. Bernard Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Marsh restoration, bank stabilization, and shoreline protection in the Lake Lery
area form St. Bernard Parish’s top priority proposed for CIAP funds. The parish
is emphasizing the use of the existing Violet Diversion structure and the
beneficial use of dredge material for the projects.

B. How St. Bernard Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of St. Bernard Parish Government, including Coastal Zone
Administrator, Public Works, Engineering, and Finance. Monitoring and
reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through the CZM Administrator, who
is listed as the CIAP point of contact for St. Bernard Parish. Administrative costs
shall be included.




                                    39
C. The St. Bernard Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the St. Bernard Parish CIAP
plan during open public meetings of the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee
meetings when the CIAP was the main issue presented and discussed. Meeting
notices were posted at the governmental offices where the meetings were held.

D. The St. Bernard Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects were nominated at the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee that met the
parish goals and objectives for the CIAP. All of these projects were nominated
for funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a
decision on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the parish Coastal Zone
Advisory Committee reviewed the remaining projects and selected those that best
achieved the CIAP parish goals within the funding available. These projects were
then reviewed and approved by the St. Bernard Parish Government.

E. How St. Bernard Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The St. Bernard Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
by submitting permits through the regular permit process for coastal zone
activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP project
activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible with other
parish activities.

       St. Charles Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. St. Charles Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

St. Charles Parish identified three priority areas to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas include shorelines on Lakes Salvador
and Pontchartrain that protect delicate marshes in St. Charles Parish. Also, in
order to make the most efficient use of future resources, St. Charles Parish has
identified education as a priority feature in the parish protection and restoration
goals.

B. How St. Charles Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through the Coastal Zone
Management (CZM) Section of St. Charles Parish Government. The CZM
Section is part of the Planning & Zoning Department and has a support staff of 17



                                     40
employees, with one person dedicated to CZM functions full time. The parish
finance department (staff of about 15 people) has assigned an accountant to help
with the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP) system and with
financial reporting. In addition, the CZM Section has retained the services of
Davezac Engineering to assist in the projects with permitting and coordination.
Furthermore, the CZM Section has budgeted an additional clerical employee for
2007 in anticipation of an increased workload once construction begins.

C. The St. Charles Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the St. Charles Parish CIAP
plan during an open public meeting of the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee
meetings in the last quarter of 2005 and first quarter of 2006. These meetings
were advertised in the St. Charles Guide, and meeting notices were posted at the
governmental offices where the meetings were held. CZM Committee meetings
are also advertised in the “Breaux Act Newsflash,” an email list-serve that has
hundreds, if not thousands, of recipients. No comments have been received from
the public except for the advisory committee regarding the parish CIAP draft
plan.

D. The St. Charles Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP program were
nominated by the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee. All St. Charles Parish
projects were existing priorities before the creation of the CIAP. All of these
projects were nominated for funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana.

E. How St. Charles Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The St. Charles Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

        St. James Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program


A. St. James Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP




                                     41
St. James Parish will use funds from the CIAP to target four major objectives that
are eligible for project funding, the first being conservation, restoration, and
protection of coastal and wetland areas. This will be accomplished through land
purchases and restoration projects. Second is the use of funds to develop plans for
future projects and programs that will benefit wetlands through the use of
wastewater assimilation. The third group of projects includes those that can be
developed to mitigate damages to fish, wildlife, and natural resources. These
projects include freshwater diversion projects, water hydrology improvements,
and berm gapping. The fourth category of projects represents small infrastructure
projects that will help parish residents and businesses offset some of the effects of
offshore exploration. All of the projects selected represent activities that can be
readily implemented and monitored for success, and provide for the enhancement
and protection of the parish’s wetland areas. Additionally, several proposed
projects focus on prevention of future destruction of wetland areas and provide for
the protection and nourishment of wetlands and swampland areas within and
around St. James Parish.

B. How St. James Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The oversight and development of all of the activities within the St. James CIAP
plan will be coordinated through the Operations Department of the Parish
President’s Office. The Operations Department oversees all public works
projects, land purchases, and coastal zone activities and permitting. Therefore,
with a single source oversight, the proper monitoring and reporting required in the
program will be the responsibility of the Department of Operations. The Coastal
Zone Management (CZM) Administrator is a component of the Department of
Operations, which will help ensure compliance, prevent duplication of services,
and, most importantly, prevent the permitting of activities that may be detrimental
to the goals and objectives set in the Parish Coastal Impact Assistance Program.
The point of contact for all CIAP activities for St. James Parish will be the
Department of Operations Director.

C. The St. James Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The St. James Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee holds open meetings on
the last Wednesday of every month. These meetings begin at 6:00 p.m. and the
summary of the meeting activities and decisions are published in the minutes in
the parish’s official journal. The St. James Parish CZM Committee met on
February 22, 2006, and was presented with proposed projects and suggestions for
CIAP projects. On April 26, 2006, Ms. Jennifer Bell and Ms. Carol Parson were
part of the CZM agenda; they discussed possible projects and offered planning
and technical assistance on projects that help restore and protect wetland areas in
the parish. Finally, in July, all parish CZM members as well as the members of



                                     42
the parish government were given copies of the proposed CIAP projects for their
review and comments.

D. The St. James Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects were nominated and developed by the St. James Parish CZM
administrator and the Parish President’s Office. All of the projects that met the
objectives and guidelines were further developed and submitted for consideration
to the State. Once the State reviewed the projects for consistency in meeting the
State and CIAP objectives and rules, they were compiled and offered for public
review on June 20, 2006. The projects were prioritized and split into Tier I and
Tier II groups, with Tier I being proposed as those the parish would like to see
funded first. Once the State accepts and/or makes necessary changes to the
projects listed by the parish, the St. James Parish President’s Office will
recommend approval of the local CIAP projects to the Parish Council. The
approval will be at a regular meeting of the Parish Council, which is open to the
public and encourages questions and comments. The adoption of the CIAP
projects will take place through Council resolution.

E. How St. James Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The St. James Parish Government will ensure compliance will all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the Parish Department of
Operations will coordinate all CIAP project activities with the parish to ensure
that they are compatible with other parish activities. St. James Parish is an active
participant in the local and State CZMP and will continue to be active in the
planning and implementation of all projects undertaken through the CIAP
process.

   St. John the Baptist Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. St. John the Baptist Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP program

St. John the Baptist Parish identified priority physical features to target for
protection and restoration through the CIAP. These areas include degraded
natural ridges and wetlands in close proximity to existing infrastructure, one of
which is in conjunction with other parishes and governmental entities. Both of
these projects will aid in restoration of critical marshlands to the environment, as
well as flooding and navigation.

B. How St. John the Baptist Parish will manage, implement, and monitor
   the CIAP



                                     43
The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of St. John the Baptist Parish Government, including Coastal Zone
Management, Planning & Zoning, Public Works, Water Quality, Engineering, and
Finance. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated through the
Director of Planning & Zoning, who is listed as a CIAP point of contact for St.
John Parish.

C. The St. John the Baptist Parish public participation process including:
   the dates and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates,
   and times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of
   public comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the St. John the Baptist Parish
CIAP plan during public meetings held February 6, February 15, February 20, and
April 10, 2006, at the Percy Hebert Building, LaPlace; in April 2006 in
conjunction with Tangipahoa Parish for the Manchac project; and on May 4 and
May 18, 2006, in Pleasure Bend, Vacherie. Comments in agreement of the
project were received on the Lac Des Allemands project.

D. The St. John the Baptist Parish decision-making process for selecting
   projects

Projects were nominated through the various committees and advisory boards of
interest that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP program. All of
these projects were nominated for funding through CIAP to the State of
Louisiana. Once the State made a decision on the funding of proposed CIAP
projects, the Parish Planning & Zoning Department reviewed the remaining
projects and selected those that best achieved the parish goals within the funding
available.

E. How St. John the Baptist Parish plans to ensure compliance with all
   relevant Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal
   Zone Management Program (CZMP)

The St. John the Baptist Parish Government will ensure compliance with all
relevant laws through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit
process for coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will
coordinate CIAP project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they
are compatible with other parish activities.



        St. Martin Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. St. Martin Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP




                                    44
St. Martin Parish is specifically emphasizing the conservation, restoration,
enhanced management, and wise use of the key aquatic and wetland habitats
within the parish. Projects are focused on improving and maintaining water
quality and aquatic productivity, and enhancing the public’s recreational and
educational experience through enhanced access and associated environmental
education opportunities of the natural resources of the parish.

The Beau Bayou Swamp Hydrologic Restoration Project meets St. Martin
Parish’s project objectives for conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal
areas, including wetlands. Beau Bayou, a well-known and once heavily used
natural, forested, deep-water swamp, is located inside of the east and west
protection levees of the Atchafalaya Basin. It was once regarded as a highly
productive fisheries area. Hydrologic manipulation within the Atchafalaya Basin,
however, from such activities as levee construction, pipeline canal spoil banks,
sediment diversion, and channelization of the Atchafalaya River, has led to
hypoxic conditions within the swamp. A combination of dredging, gapping, and
creating inline-sediment traps are all project elements that interagency team
members feel will work to restore fisheries habitat and the overall ecology of the
area.

The Stephensville Sanitation System and Wastewater Assimilation Project also
meets St. Martin Parish’s project objectives for conservation, restoration, and
protection of coastal areas, including wetlands. The Stephensville wastewater
facility is located in Lower St. Martin Parish, and is situated between an expanse
of cypress/tupelo swamp and Milhomme Bayou, which feeds into Lake Palourde.
Upgrading of the Stephensville Sanitation System, part of the St. Martin Parish
Water and Sewer Department, will alleviate the current problems associated with
water infiltration into the system’s intake pipes and structures, and eliminate any
seepage into Milhomme Bayou. In addition, as part of the system upgrade, the
town of Stephensville has employed an innovative tertiary biological wastewater
treatment system to utilize the assimilative functions of the adjacent wetlands to
help stimulate growth and productivity of the flora in the adjacent wetlands,
further improving water quality and ultimately restoring fisheries habitat in the
Belle River, Milhomme Bayou, and Lake Palourde areas; all of which are inland
waterways that impact coastal waters.

Of equal importance is the Bayou Amy Boat Launch Facility and Educational
Pavilion Project. This project speaks to St. Martin Parish’s commitment to
continuing environmental awareness through education and public access to the
Parish’s different aquatic ecosystems and their resources, within the Atchafalaya
Basin and surrounding areas. Bayou Amy is located along the toe of the West
Guideline Levee for the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System and provides a
hydrologic connection between Bayous Amy and Berard and Lake Catahoula,
which flows into Lakes Dauterive and Fausse Point. The project will allow for
public access to an existing canoe trail (built by the State’s Atchafalaya Basin
Program), that ends at one of Louisiana’s premiere state parks, Lake Fausse Point



                                     45
State Park. In addition, the Educational Pavilion will support a number of
educational outreach programs that center around “hands-on-experiences” for
children.



B. How St. Martin Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

Program responsibilities will be coordinated through St. Martin Parish
Government. The Public Works, Engineering, and Finance departments will
administer tasks. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated
through the CZM Administrator, who is listed as the CIAP point of contact for St.
Martin Parish.

C. The St. Martin Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public participated in the development of the St. Martin Parish CIAP plan
during an open public meeting of the Parish Council (held in St. Martinville
on October 17, 2006), when the proposed plan was presented. Meetings were
advertised in the Teche News, Daily Iberian, Daily Advertiser, and Morning
Advocate. Meeting notices were posted on the bulletin board of the lobby of St.
Martin Parish Annex Building. CZM Committee meetings are also advertised in
the Breaux Act Newsflash, an email list-serve that has hundreds, if not thousands
of recipients.


D. The St. Martin Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated at
the regular St. Martin Parish Council Meeting held October 17, 2006. All projects
were nominated for funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the
State made a decision on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the Parish
Council reviewed the projects and selected those that best achieved the parish
goals with the available funding.

E. How St. Martin Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

St. Martin Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws by
submitting permit applications where necessary and through the regular permit
process for coastal zone activities in Louisiana where applicable. In addition, the
parish will coordinate CIAP project activities with all parish departments and the



                                    46
LDNR Atchafalaya Basin Program to ensure that they are compatible with other
state and parish activities.


         St. Mary Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. St. Mary Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

St. Mary Parish identified priority infrastructure requirements and essential
coastal restoration elements that require much-needed attention. St. Mary Parish
addresses the establishment and repair of two roads that have been used
extensively by the oil and gas industry. Establishing and improving the
infrastructure that is available now will only increase the quality of life for the
residences and the industries themselves.

The coastal restoration approach was formulated by the parish by taking into
consideration two of the most needed areas. First is the restoration and
maintenance of the shorelines and/or appurtenances associated with them. Two
coastal restoration projects address restoration of shoreline. These projects will
make sure that the sustainability of these features is guaranteed to protect the
natural resources and land-based human infrastructures. The second area of need
is to manipulate and distribute the fresh water, sediments, and nutrients from the
Atchafalaya River. One of the proposed CIAP projects for St. Marty Parish
centers on this theme.

B. How St. Mary Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the program will be coordinated through different
departments of the St. Mary Parish Government. St. Mary Parish will be
contracting with consultants to oversee, implement, and monitor the CIAP
projects under the supervision of the parish. CIAP administration will be
coordinated through the Parish Administrator, who is listed as the CIAP point of
contact for St. Mary Parish.

C. The St. Mary Parish public participation process including: the dates and
   periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and times of
   meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the St. Mary Parish CIAP plan
during an open public meeting of the St. Mary Parish Council when the proposed
plan was presented. These meetings were advertised in the St. Mary Gazette and
meeting notices were posted at the governmental offices where the meetings were
held. CZM Committee meetings are also advertised in the “Breaux Act
Newsflash,” an email list-serve that has hundreds, if not thousands, of recipients.




                                     47
No comments have been received from the public except for the advisory
committee regarding the parish CIAP draft plan.

D. The St. Mary Parish decision-making process for selecting projects.

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated
and discussed at the St. Mary Parish Council. Once the State made a decision on
the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the Parish Council reviewed the
remaining projects and selected those that best achieved the CIAP parish goals
within the funding available.

E. How St. Mary Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The St. Mary Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

           St. Tammany Parish CIAP Implementation Plan

A. St. Tammany Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP
St. Tammany Parish Government identified potential targets for protection,
restoration, and enhancement by utilizing the published CIAP goals and
objectives, as well as the authorized uses of CIAP funds. Further, the Parish
Government identified projects that were consistent with Coast 2050 strategies for
the conservation of the Lake Pontchartrain Basin marshes.

B. How St. Tammany Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for program management, implementation, and monitoring
will be coordinated through different departments of the St. Tammany Parish
Government, including Environmental Services, Engineering, Finance, and
Grants Management. Environmental Services and Engineering will largely
coordinate project management and implementation, whereas Finance and Grants
Management will address monitoring (including the development of progress and
financial reports, as well as the resolution of any financial issues). Though the
parish government will coordinate the CIAP through the aforementioned
departments, the contact person for St. Tammany will remain Greg Gorden,
Director, Department of Environmental Services, and the departments will route
questions and issues requiring guidance from the State through this contact
person.




                                    48
C. The St. Tammany Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates and times
   of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public participated in the development of the St. Tammany CIAP plan during
open public meetings of the Parish Council Committees (held in Mandeville on
March 29 and April 26, 2006) when the proposed plan and its projects were
discussed. There was little public comment; however, representatives from the
incorporated municipalities located in St. Tammany did come forward and present
their project ideas for inclusion in the CIAP plan. The meeting times and
locations were posted at the St. Tammany Parish Government Complex.

D. The St. Tammany Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the goals and objectives vis-à-vis the CIAP were nominated by
St. Tammany Parish Government. All of the projects listed in Tier 1 below were
nominated for funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State
made a decision on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, representatives of the
St. Tammany Parish Government reviewed the remaining projects and selected
those that best achieved the CIAP parish goals within the funding available.
These projects will be reviewed and presented to the St. Tammany Parish Council
for eventual approval.

E. How St. Tammany Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
Management Program (CZMP)

The St. Tammany Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant
laws through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

          Tangipahoa Parish CIAP Implementation Program

A. Tangipahoa Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Tangipahoa Parish has identified priority physical features to target for protection
and restoration through the CIAP. These areas include degraded shorelines and
wetlands in close proximity to existing infrastructure. The parish is emphasizing
the construction of shoreline protection and restoration structures in the form of
rip rap rock dikes to maintain the shoreline integrity of Lake Pontchartrain.

B. How Tangipahoa Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP




                                     49
The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of Tangipahoa Parish Government, including Engineering, Public
Works, and Finance. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be coordinated
through the Parish Engineer, who is listed as the contact person for Tangipahoa
Parish.

C. The Tangipahoa Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates and times
   of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

A public meeting was called and conducted on February 20, 2006, at the
Tangipahoa Parish Council Chambers in Amite, Louisiana, 215 Mulberry Street;
approximately 100 people attended this meeting. A steering committee was
appointed, consisting of five community leaders, the Lake Pontchartrain Basin
Foundation Executive Director (Carlton Dufrechou) and State Wildlife Biologist
for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (Marty Floyd). There
have been no public comments since this meeting. CZM meetings are also
advertised in the “Breaux Act Newsflash,” an e-mail list which has many
recipients.

D. The Tangipahoa Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

The selected project, which met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP, was
nominated at the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee. This project was nominated
for funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a
decision on the funding of the proposed CIAP project, the Tangipahoa Parish
Coastal Zone Advisory Committee reviewed the project in light of funding
available. This project will be reviewed and eventually recommended to the
Tangipahoa Parish Council for approval at an upcoming meeting.

E. How Tangipahoa Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Tangipahoa Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, Tangipahoa Parish will
coordinate CIAP project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they
are compatible with other parish activities.

       Terrebonne Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Terrebonne Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP




                                    50
Terrebonne Parish identified priority physical features to target for protection and
restoration through the CIAP. These areas include: construction of the multi-
purpose Houma Navigation Canal (HNC) Lock; barrier island renourishment;
degraded natural ridges and marshes in close proximity to existing infrastructure;
shoreline stabilization and hydrologic restoration; freshwater enhancements; and
dedicated delivery of sediment via pipeline.

B. How Terrebonne Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through different
departments of Terrebonne Parish Government, including Coastal Zone
Management, Public Works, Engineering, and Finance, and with the Terrebonne
Levee and Conservation District. Monitoring and reporting for the CIAP will be
coordinated through the Public Works Director, who is listed as the CIAP point of
contact for Terrebonne Parish.

C. The Terrebonne Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and
   times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
   comments on the draft plan

The public has participated in the development of the Terrebonne Parish CIAP
plan during open public meetings of the Coastal Zone Management and
Restoration Advisory Committee (CZM & RAC), on September 19, 2005, and the
Terrebonne Parish Council on October 11, 2005. The plan was discussed again at
the CZM & RAC meeting on April 3, 2006, and at the Parish Council meeting on
April 10, 2006. All meetings were held at the Terrebonne Parish Government
Tower, 8026 Main Street, Houma, Louisiana. These meetings were published in
the Houma Courier, and meeting notices were posted throughout the Government
Tower, where the meetings were held. CZM Committee meetings are also
advertised in the “Breaux Act Newsflash,” an email list-serve that has hundreds, if
not thousands, of recipients. In addition, the main CIAP priority for Terrebonne
Parish was discussed openly by other public entities as well as area business
groups. The following groups have provided resolutions of support, which were
submitted with the CIAP application:

Bayou Lafourche Fresh Water District, 11/21/2005
North Lafourche Conservation, Levee & Drainage District, 10/26/2005
Terrebonne Port Commission, 10/18/2005
Terrebonne Consolidated Waterworks District NO.1, 10/17/2005
The Houma Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce, 10/11/2005
Terrebonne Levee and Conservation District, 10/3/2005

No other comments have been received directly from the public except for the
advisory committee regarding the parish CIAP draft plan.




                                     51
D. The Terrebonne Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

Projects that met the parish goals and objectives for the CIAP were nominated at
the Coastal Zone Advisory Committee. All of these projects were nominated for
funding through CIAP to the State of Louisiana. Once the State made a decision
on the funding of proposed CIAP projects, the parish Coastal Zone Advisory
Committee reviewed the remaining projects and selected those that best achieved
the CIAP Parish goals within the funding available. These projects will be
reviewed and eventually recommended to the Terrebonne Parish Council for
approval at an upcoming meeting.

E. How Terrebonne Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
   Federal, State, and local laws, including Louisiana’s Coastal Zone
   Management Program (CZMP)

The Terrebonne Parish Government will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
coastal zone activities in Louisiana. In addition, the Parish will coordinate CIAP
project activities with all parish departments to ensure that they are compatible
with other parish activities.

        Vermilion Parish CIAP Plan Implementation Program

A. Vermilion Parish goals and objectives under the CIAP

Vermilion Parish identified several high-priority coastal restoration projects for
construction and repair of depleted onshore infrastructure to be funded through
the CIAP. These projects include replenishing spoil banks along channels,
preventing further erosion of shorelines along marshes, marsh creation, reef
construction, and repairing of roads and bridges that are impacted by traffic
serving the oil and gas industry. Vermillion Parish is utilizing the CIAP to benefit
the areas of the parish that have been affected by the oil and gas industry.

B. How Vermilion Parish will manage, implement, and monitor the CIAP

The responsibilities for the CIAP will be coordinated through the Vermilion
Parish Police Jury. USDA/NRCS will provide assistance to the parish on the
coastal restoration projects, and the inshore infrastructure efforts will be
coordinated by the Administrative Office of the Vermilion Parish Police Jury.
The monitoring and reporting for the CIAP Program will be coordinated through
the Secretary/Treasurer of the Vermilion Parish Police Jury, who is listed as the
CIAP point of contact for Vermilion Parish.

C. The Vermilion Parish public participation process including: the dates
   and periodicals in which notices are placed; the locations, dates, and




                                    52
       times of meetings and the number of attendees; and a summary of public
       comments on the draft plan

    The Vermilion Parish Police Jury authorized the Vermilion Parish Coastal
    Restoration Advisory Committee and Louisiana Wetlands Association to work
    jointly on the project selection for the CIAP program at a special meeting held on
    December 29, 2005. The Vermilion Parish Coastal Restoration Advisory
    Committee and Louisiana Wetlands Association held a public meeting on May
    17, 2006, at the Vermilion Parish Courthouse and selected 10 projects for the
    CIAP program to be funded by the State and parish. The Vermilion Parish CIAP
    plan was accepted by the Vermilion Parish Police Jury during an open public
    meeting on June 5, 2006, when the proposed plan was presented. At that meeting,
    the Vermilion Parish Police Jury amended their initial CIAP plan to add inshore
    infrastructure at the July 5, 2006, meeting. A meeting was held on August 1,
    2006, with LDNR/CRD and parish representatives to discuss the inshore
    infrastructure projects that the parish submitted. The public meetings were
    advertised in the Abbeville Meridional, and meeting notices were posted at the
    Vermilion Parish Courthouse, where the meetings were held.

    D. The Vermilion Parish decision-making process for selecting projects

    The Vermilion Parish Police Jury nominated projects that met the parish goals and
    objectives for the CIAP. The Vermilion Parish Police Jury projects that were
    nominated are to be funded by parish CIAP funds, State CIAP funds, and cost
    sharing of parish and State CIAP funds.

    E. How Vermilion Parish plans to ensure compliance with all relevant
    Federal, State, and local laws, including each State’s Coastal Zone
    Management Program (CZMP)

    The Vermilion Parish Police Jury will ensure compliance with all relevant laws
    through the submittal of permits according to the regular permit process for
    coastal zone activities in Louisiana.

VII. PROPOSED PROJECT LISTS

    State-Funded Tier One Projects
           o   $18,000,000       Barataria Land Bridge Dedicated Dredging
           o   $1,500,000        Bayou Lamoque Floodgate Removal
           o   $20,000,000       Marsh Creation Via Beneficial Use
           o   $10,000,000       Central Wetlands Assimilation Project (Phase I)
           o   $18,032,500       Coastal Forest Conservation Initiative
           o   $10,600,000       Grand Lake Shoreline Protection
           o   $8,000,000        Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) Bank
                                 Restoration of Critical Areas of Terrebonne



                                        53
     o $5,000,000      Mississippi River Delta Management Strategic
                       Planning
     o $3,000,000      Performance Evaluation and Science Monitoring
     o $8,000,000      Rockefeller Refuge Shoreline Protection
                       Demonstration Project

State Parish Cost Shared Tier One Projects
     o   $28,600,000   Blind River Freshwater Diversion
     o   $27,000,000   East Grand Terre Island Restoration
     o   $14,000,000   Freshwater Bayou Bank Stabilization
     o   $7,880,920    Fringe Marsh Repair
     o   $43,000,000   Houma Navigation Canal (HNC) Lock
     o   $1,870,000    Acadiana Regional Airport Street Improvements –
                       LA 675
     o $35,230,520     LA 1 Improvements Fourchon to Leeville Bridge
                       (Phase IA)
     o   $2,600,000    Lake Salvador Shoreline Protection (Phase III)
     o   $34,000,000   Long Distance MS River Sediment Pipeline
     o   $887,000      Morgan City Industrial Road
     o   $42,400,000   Orleans Land Bridge Shoreline Protection and
                       Marsh Creation
     o $2,958,600      Trosclair Road Improvements
     o $49,600,000     Violet Diversion

Parish-Funded Tier One Projects:
  Assumption Parish
     o $1,100,000      Attakapas Canal Hydrologic Restoration
     o $318,000        Bayou Crab and Cancienne Canal Hydrologic
                       Restoration
     o   $318,000      Brule Canal Hydrologic Restoration
     o   $318,000      Elm Hall Canal Hydrologic Restoration
     o   $318,000      Himalaya Canal Hydrologic Restoration
     o   $1,650,000    Lake Verret Swamp and Lake Rim Restoration
     o   $1,650,000    Shell Beach Restoration
     o   $318,000      Whitmel Canal, bayou St. Vincent, and
                       Company Canal Hydrologic Restoration

  Calcasieu Parish
     o $1,530,000      Black Lake Ecosystem Restoration
     o $2,000,000      Clear Marais Bank Protection
     o $2,000,000      Horseshoe Lake Marsh Restoration
     o $2,000,000      Rabbit Island/West Cove Beneficial Use Marsh
                       Creation
     o $1,000,000      Reclamation of Sand Mines on Cameron Parish
                       Cheniers
     o $800,000        Shoreline Protection at Intracoastal Park


                            54
Cameron Parish
  o $2,000,000      Bank Stabilization – Dugas Cut to Kelso Bayou
  o $220,000        Dreary Island Restoration
  o $200,000        East Little Pecan Bayou Restoration
  o $250,000        Little Chenier Road
  o $2,600,000      Little Florida to Martin Beach Coastal Erosion
                    Bank Stabilization
   o   $1,500,000   Mermentau Ship Channel Sediment By-Pass
   o   $220,000     North Mermentau Restoration
   o   $500,000     Rabbit Island
   o   $770,000     South GIWW Restoration
   o   $120,000     South Johnson Bayou Restoration
   o   $1,000,000   South Little Pecan Bayou Restoration
   o   $270,000     South Oak Grove Restoration
   o   $600,000     West Big Burn Bridge Restoration

Iberia Parish
    o $485,000      Acadiana Regional Airport Street Improvements -
                    Admiral Doyle Drive
   o $30,000        Acadiana Regional Airport Street Improvements -
                    Ember Road
   o   $925,000     Artificial Reef in Bird Island Bayou
   o   $260,000     Iberia Parish CZM Planning and Development
   o   $380,000     Lake Sand Terracing
   o   $380,000     Lake Tom/Lake Michael Terracing
   o   $225,000     Oyster Lake Terracing
   o   $450,000     Port of Iberia Bridge Replacement – David Dubois
                    Road over Commercial Canal
   o $430,000       Port of Iberia Bridge Replacement – Port Road
                    over Commercial Canal
   o $317,500       Port of Iberia Bridge Replacement – Port Road
                    over Rodere Lateral
   o   $40,000      Port of Iberia Street Improvements- Unifab Road
   o   $100,000     Shark Island Shoreline Restoration Demo
   o   $400,000     Vegetative Plantings
   o   $4,800,000   Vermilion Bay Shoreline Restoration
   o   $100,000     Weeks Bay/Commercial Canal Marsh Creation and
                    Shoreline Protection

Jefferson Parish
    o $3,500,000    Bayside Segmented Breakwaters at Grand Isle
    o $3,000,000    Fifi Island Restoration Extension
    o $4,000,000    Goose Bayou Ridge Creation and Shoreline
                    Protection




                          55
   o $4,053,300          Lower Lafitte Shoreline Stabilization at Bayou
                         Rigolettes

Lafourche Parish
   o $700,000            Maritime Forest Ridge Restoration
   o $2,500,000          NW Little Lake Marsh Creation and Enhancement
   o $3,267,413          Small Dredge Program

Livingston Parish
   o $3,114,965          Bald cypress/Tupelo Coastal Forest Protection
   o $3,472,315          Hydrologic Restoration in the West Lake Maurepas
                         Swamps

Orleans Parish
   o No Tier One Parish-Only Projects

Plaquemines Parish
   o $1,417,080          Baptiste Collette Channel Deepening/Beneficial
                         Use
   o $800,000            Jump Basin Dredging and Marsh Creation
   o $3,500,000          Tidewater Road Flood Protection

St. Bernard Parish
    o $6,720,000         Lake Lery Rim Reestablishment and Marsh
                         Creation

St. Charles Parish
    o $3,503,000         East LaBranche Shoreline Protection
    o $1,601,000         West LaBranche Shoreline Protection

St. James Parish
    o $440,000           Baytree Freshwater Diversion Property Purchase
    o $455,700           Blind River Freshwater Diversion Property
                         Purchase
   o   $1,623,000        East Bank Wastewater Assimilation Plant
   o   $201,020          Waterline Booster Pump Station, West Bank
   o   $1,400,000        West Bank Wastewater Assimilation Plant
   o   $718,620          West Bank Wetland Conservation and Protection
   o   $350,000          West Bank Wetland Conservation and Protection II
   o   $50,000           Wetland Wastewater Assimilation Process Planning

St. John the Baptist Parish
    o $1,700,000           Manchac Shoreline Protection Project
    o $389,400             Reserve Relief Canal Shoreline Protection
    o $3,400,000           West Lac Des Allemands Shoreline Protection




                               56
St. Martin Parish
    o $387,280       Bayou Amy Canoe Trail Access and Educational
                     Pavilion
   o $4,000,000      Beau Bayou Swamp Hydrologic Restoration
   o $2,200,000      Stephensville Sanitation System and Wastewater
                     Assimilation

St. Mary Parish
    o $1,010,000     Burns Point Recreation Park Improvements
    o $3,000,000     Deer Island Pass Realignment
    o $25,000        Planning Assistance and Administration
    o $2,048,468     Point Chevreuil Shoreline Protection
    o $1,232,572     Thorguson Road Improvements

St. Tammany Parish
    o $1,500,000     French Property Preservation Project
    o $2,300,000     Fritchie Marsh Creation
    o $1,000,000     Green Property Preservation Project
    o $4,000,000     Mandeville Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project

Tangipahoa Parish
   o $6,700,000      Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection

Terrebonne Parish
   o $4,000,000      Falgout Canal Freshwater Enhancement Phase I

Vermilion Parish
   o $200,000        Bird Island
   o $200,000        Chenier au Tigre Cement Bag Extension
   o $444,730        Four Mile Canal Hydrologic Restoration
   o $400,000        Henry Hub Access Improvements – Charlie Field
                     Road Bridge Replacement
   o $654,270        Henry Hub Access Improvements – Charlie Field
                     Road Improvements
   o $400,000        Henry Hub Access Improvements – Hwy 331
                     Realignment
   o $500,000        Hydrologic Restoration of Little Bayou Chene
   o $650,000        Intracoastal City Street Improvements
   o $100,000        NE White Lake Shoreline Protection and Marsh
                     Creation
   o   $1,000,000    North Prong Schooner Bayou
   o   $2,000,000    Oyster Reef Parallel to Chenier Au Tigre
   o   $100,000      Prien Point Reef Extension
   o   $300,000      Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation at Tiger
                     Point
   o $100,000        Vermilion Parish CZM Planning and Development



                           57
     o $100,000          Weeks Bay/Commercial Canal Marsh Creation and
                         Shoreline Protection

State-Funded Tier Two Projects
     o $12,000,000       Castille Pass Sediment Delivery
     o $30,000,000       Central Wetlands Assimilation Project Phase II
     o $20,000,000       Coastal Wetlands Restoration through the
                         Assimilation of Treated Sanitary Effluent
     o   $18,160,000     Conservation of Coastal Forests in Louisiana
     o   $102,000,000    East Timbalier Island Restoration
     o   $10,000,000     Lake Borgne Shoreline Protection
     o   $14,000,000     Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection
     o   $3,400,000      Marsh Island Terracing
     o   $10,000,000     Point Au Fer/Lake Chapeau Marsh Creation
     o   $53,000,000     Rockefeller Refuge Gulf Shoreline Restoration
     o   $870,000        Sand Search – Evaluation of Sand Resources in
                         Trinity and Tiger Shoals
     o $1,600,000        Sand Search – Evaluation of Sand Resources off
                         Terrebonne Bay/Basin
     o $106,000,000      Shell Island Shoreline Restoration
     o $45,000,000       Ship Shoal: Whiskey Island West Flank

State-Parish Cost Shared Tier Two Projects
     o No Tier Two Cost Shared Projects

Parish-Funded Tier Two Projects
  Assumption Parish
     o No Tier Two Projects

  Calcasieu Parish
     o No Tier Two Projects

  Cameron Parish
    o No Tier Two Projects

  Iberia Parish
      o No Tier Two Projects

  Jefferson Parish
      o $4,000,000       Bayou Dupont Natural Ridge Restoration
      o $33,700,000      Dedicated Dredging on the Barataria Land Bridge
      o $10,000,000      Lake Salvador Shoreline Protection and Marsh
                         Creation at Jean Lafitte National Park
     o $700,000          Marsh Restoration via management of Rosethorne
                         Municipal Effluent



                               58
   o $17,5000,000       South Shore of the Pen Shoreline Protection and
                        Marsh Restoration (BA-41)
   o $11,000,000        Tidal Restrictions Barataria Bay Waterway, Harvey
                        Cut, and Little Lake

Lafourche Parish
   o $79,000,000        East Caminada Headland Beach/Dune Restoration
                        and Marsh Creation
   o $20,000,000        East Timbalier Island Restoration
   o $15,000,000        Hydrologic Restoration of Bayou L’Eau Bleu
   o $25,020,000        West Caminada Headland Restoration

Livingston Parish
   o No Tier Two projects

Orleans Parish
   o $900,000           Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection –
                        Hospital Wall
   o $13,252,000        Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection and Marsh
                        Creation – Irish Bayou to Chef Menteur Pass
   o $7,400,000         The Rigolets Shoreline Protection and Marsh
                        Creation - Grand Coin Pocket

Plaquemines Parish
   o $28,000,000        Bayou Grand Liard Ridge Restoration
   o $5,000,000         Beneficial Use of Dredged Material
   o $36,000,000        Grand Bayou Ridge Restoration

St. Bernard Parish
    o No Tier Two Projects

St. Charles Parish
    o $3,000,000        St. Charles Parish Wetlands Education Center

St. James Parish
    o $185,000          Culvert Installation Through Existing Berms and
                        Board Roads
   o $5,304,000         Mini-Siphon at Baytree
   o $212,000           Waterline Booster Pump Station, East Bank
   o $558,693           West Bank Wetlands Conservation and Protection,
                        Phase III
   o $351,113           West Bank Wetlands Conservation and Protection,
                        Phase IV

St. John the Baptist Parish
    o No Tier Two Projects



                              59
          St. Martin Parish
              o $2,700,000          Bayou Pigeon Hydrologic Restoration
              o $3,600,000          Bayou Sorrel Hydrologic Restoration
              o $6,400,000          Lake Henderson Acquisition
              o $1,000,000          Lower Henderson Exotic-Invasive Species Removal
              o $1,400,000          City of St. Martinville Wastewater Assimilation

          St. Mary Parish
              o No Tier Two Projects

          St. Tammany Parish
              o $14,350,000         Fritchie Marsh Stormwater Diversion
              o $5,200,000          Guste Island Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration
              o $7,000,000          Northshore Beach Marsh Creation/Restoration

          Tangipahoa Parish
             o No Tier Two Projects

          Terrebonne Parish
             o $20,000,000          Beach and Back Barrier Marsh Restoration, East
                                    and Trinity Islands
              o   $19,700,000       Closure of Breaches along the GIWW
              o   $3,830,480        North Lost Lake Marsh Creation/Enhancement
              o   $45,000,000       Ship Shoal: Whiskey West Flank
              o   $5,932,575        Shoreline Protection on the Houma Navigation
                                    Canal
              o $5,800,000          South Lake DeCade Freshwater Enhancement and
                                    Shoreline Protection
              o $21,800,000         Whiskey Island Back Barrier Marsh Creation

          Vermilion Parish
             o No Tier Two Projects

VIII. PROPOSED PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS

   This section identifies the projects selected and associated funded amounts included
   in the Plan for their implementation

State-Funded Tier One Projects
1) Project Title: Barataria Basin Land Bridge Dedicated Dredging

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information: Marnie Winter, Director


                                          60
                         Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                         1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                         Jefferson, Louisiana 70123
                         (504) 736-6440
                         mwinter@jeffparish.net

Total CIAP Funds Proposed:         $18,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

State CIAP Funds Proposed:         $18,000,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0
Description and Location of Project: The project area contains 502 acres of
emergent marsh and 780 acres of open water. It is located along the southeastern side
of Bayou Rigolettes between the Harvey Cut and Bayou Perot in Jefferson Parish,
Louisiana.

The project will create emergent marsh by hydraulically dredging in Bayou
Rigolettes. Existing marsh will be nourished by the addition of a thin layer of
sediment. Where necessary, vegetation will be planted to ensure rapid colonization.

The previously approved Barataria Basin Land Bridge Shoreline Protection Project
(BBLSPP) will protect the project area from the high wave energy of the Perot and
Rigolettes bayous, but the interior wetlands will continue to deteriorate from
subsidence, sea-level rise, and excessive tidal exchange. The Davis Pond Freshwater
Diversion Project will freshen this area, possibly converting it from brackish to
intermediate marsh. However, Davis Pond will not add land-building sediments to
this area, and marsh deterioration will continue even under the freshened conditions.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: This project's objectives are to fill open water areas in order to
create new marsh, and nourish existing marsh by using hydraulic dredges. Shoreline
protection features associated with the BBLSPP will be used as containment. In some
large, open water areas, containment dikes will be necessary. In more isolated areas,
the existing marsh can be used for containment with small containment dikes only
necessary to close breaches into bayous, canals, and other channels. The borrow site
would most likely be Bayou Rigolettes. However, conveyance of Mississippi River
sediment via pipeline could also be utilized. Vegetation such as brown top millet
(Panicum ramosum) and Japanese millet (Echinochloa frumentacea) will be aerially
seeded on the large marsh creation sites that comprise approximately 55% of the
created marsh area. The remaining marsh, which consists of smaller isolated areas,
will vegetate by natural colonization from the surrounding marsh.

The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:


                                         61
   COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

   Coastwide Strategy:
      Dedicated Dredging for Wetland Creation
      Maintenance of Bay and Lake Shoreline Integrity
      Vegetative Planting
      Maintain or Restore Ridge Function

   Regional Strategy:
      #24. Build entire Breaux Act land bridge shore protection project
      #25. Preserve bay and lake shoreline integrity on the land bridge
      #26. Dedicated dredging to create marsh on land bridge

   Mapping Unit Strategies:
      # 12. Maintain ridge function

   Project Cost Share: N/A

2) Project Title: Bayou Lamoque Floodgate Removal

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish
   Coastal Zone Administrator; Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information:       Andrew MacInnes
                              106 Avenue G
                              Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                              (504) 297-5320
                              andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed:         $1,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed:         $1,500,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project is located on the east
   bank of Plaquemines Parish across the river from the Nairn community. The goal of
   this project is to remove the existing floodgates from two separate water control
   structures to allow for the unimpeded flow of river water into Bayou Lamoque and
   the surrounding marshes.




                                           62
   Bayou Lamoque is the largest water control structure in the state (~12,000 cfs). The
   floodgates are currently being operated (though at a significantly reduced capacity)
   by rogue fisherman in the area. Plaquemines Parish would use its CIAP funding to
   remove the gates and allow for an unimpeded flow of fresh water through the two
   structures. This project has also been granted Phase I engineering and design money
   through the CWPPRA program.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands; mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources.

   Project Justification:
      1. The total capacity for the two structures is 12,000 cfs.
      2. The structures already exist and are not being utilized.
      3. The project is being looked at through the CWPPRA program.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

3) Project Title: Marsh Creation via Beneficial Use

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Greg Grandy

   Contact Information: Greg Grandy
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225) 342-6412
                        Gregory.grandy@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposed project would involve the
   beneficial use of dredged material to restore coastal wetlands. The project would pay
   the incremental cost above the Federal standard (if necessary) to beneficially place
   sediment dredged by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to maintain
   navigation channels in coastal Louisiana for the purposes of ecosystem restoration.

   Project Type: 1




                                           63
   Project Justification: The USACE annually dredges millions of cubic yards of
   sediment from navigation channels in Louisiana. This project will work to coordinate
   opportunities to beneficially use sediment dredged from navigation channels for
   ecosystem restoration. LDNR will work in coordination with the USACE, various
   harbor and terminal districts and ports, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Louisiana
   Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, and others that have previously identified
   numerous reclamation projects that have been developed in coordination with
   Dredged Material Management Plans for various waterways and to develop new
   projects for various navigation channels to accelerate implementation of beneficial
   use projects for ecosystem restoration.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: Central Wetlands Assimilation Project – Phase I

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Marcia St. Martin, Executive Director,
   Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans. Henry J. Rodriguez, Jr., Parish
   President, St. Bernard Parish Government.

   Contact Information: Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans
                        Gordon Austin, Chief of Environmental Affairs
                        2900 Peoples Avenue.
                        New Orleans, LA 70122
                        (504) 858-7305
                         gaustin@swbno.org

                           St. Bernard Parish Department of Public Works
                           Chris Merkl, Director of Public Works
                           8201 W. Judge Perez Drive
                           Chalmette, LA 70043
                           (504) 278-4317
                           cmerkl@sbpg.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The Sewerage and Water Board of New
   Orleans and St. Bernard Parish jointly propose that a regional wetland restoration
   project be funded to restore approximately 2300 acres of critical cypress wetlands
   using wetland assimilation of wastewater effluent. The wetland restoration project
   would integrate sustainability with mitigation measures. The enhanced wetlands



                                           64
would protect Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes from future storm vulnerability, while
the environmental improvement would protect the local economy and culture, which
depend on productive wetlands.

The Bayou Bienvenue-Central Wetland Unit to be restored is located between the 40-
Arpent Levee and the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) Levee in Orleans and
St. Bernard Parishes. This area has been determined to be critical for levee protection
against storm surge and storm-generated waves. Wetland loss in this area began
after the construction of MRGO due to the resulting saltwater intrusion. Hurricane
Katrina exacerbated the damage to the once-productive cypress swamp. The
wetlands now require fresh water and nutrients to restore and maintain the cypress
swamps that protect both parishes. Currently, nutrient-rich effluent from both
parishes is discharged to the Mississippi River, where it contributes to the hypoxia, or
dead zone, in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Rerouting the effluent will allow the
nutrients to be used to replenish the wetlands, rather than increasing damage to the
coastal environment.

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans, East Bank Sewage Treatment Plant
(EBSTP) is located in the Lower Ninth Ward near Bayou Bienvenue. The EBSTP
provides wastewater treatment for the entire east bank of Orleans Parish and treats
biosolids for both the east and west banks of Orleans Parish. The treatment facility
received approximately $70 million of damage as a result of the 17-foot storm surge
created by Hurricane Katrina. St. Bernard Parish received catastrophic damage to all
seven of its wastewater treatment plants. To mitigate the damage, the St. Bernard
Department of Public Works is planning to implement a consolidation plan that
would allow one discharge line to restore the surrounding wetlands. The Sewerage
and Water Boards of New Orleans and St. Bernard Parish are jointly seeking funding
to implement a phased project that would begin with distribution of partial flow to
wetlands while final design and plant modifications are completed. Phase I would
include engineering design, and installation of a distribution line for each plant to the
wetlands that could utilize existing effluent pumps. Phase II would extend the
distribution line and implement any necessary plant modifications identified in the
Phase I design process. Feasibility and design will determine whether additional
phases could extend the restoration area beyond 10,000 acres. The funding of Phases
I and II would result in the restoration of at least 10,000 acres of cypress swamps,
mitigation of future storm damages, and creation of the largest sustainable wastewater
infrastructure in the world.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: Research has confirmed that the benefits of wetland
wastewater treatment include improved surface water quality, increased accretion
rates to balance a high relative water level rise due mainly to subsidence, improved
plant productivity and habitat quality, protection against storm surge and storm-
generated waves, and decreased capital outlays for engineering treatment systems.




                                         65
   Wetland treatment systems throughout Louisiana have been successfully designed
   and operated to restore deteriorating wetlands.

   Wetland wastewater treatment would replace critical infrastructure that was damaged
   during Hurricane Katrina with sustainable, more economical wastewater treatment.
   Wetland treatment facility capital is roughly one-third the cost of capital for
   conventional wastewater treatment. Furthermore, wetland discharge permits allow
   discharge of higher levels of solids to increase accretion rates. For example, re-
   routing effluent from the Mississippi River to wetlands for the EBSTP would result in
   an annual operation savings of almost two million dollars. More economic
   wastewater treatment will allow for the distressed parishes to continue providing
   sewer service after suffering from severe decreases in revenue.

   Wetland assimilation of wastewater effluent would restore destroyed and rapidly
   disappearing coastal wetlands, which, in addition to their ecological value, protect
   Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes from tropical storm events. Many levees, including
   the 40-Arpent Canal Levee, did not suffer damage where surrounding wetlands acted
   as a buffer against storm surge and storm-generated waves. More recently it has been
   determined that the restoration of the swamps adjacent to the EBSTP, the Bayou
   Bienvenue Central Wetland Unit surrounding the MR-GO, and the wetlands near
   Lake Borne are essential to protect Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes from future
   hurricanes. This project would address restoration of all of these deteriorating
   wetlands as depicted on the attached map. Furthermore, the Louisiana Department of
   Environmental Quality (LDEQ) confirmed after Katrina that other municipalities
   throughout Louisiana that utilized wetland treatment sustained less damage due to the
   hurricane.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

5) Project Title: Coastal Forest Conservation Initiative

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Greg Grandy

   Contact Information:      Greg Grandy
                             Coastal Engineering Division
                             Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                             617 North Third Street
                             Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                             (225) 342-6412
                             gregory.grandy@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Requested: $18,032,500

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0




                                           66
   State CIAP Funds Requested: $18,032,500

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The conservation, restoration, and
   sustainability of coastal Louisiana’s swamps, wooded cheniers, and natural levee
   forests are increasingly recognized as key to the sustainability and ecological
   diversity of southern Louisiana. This Plan component includes several measures that
   are consistent with strategies identified by the Governor’s Coastal Wetland Forest
   Conservation and Use Science Working Group and Advisory Panel. Those measures
   include acquiring land rights on coastal forest tracts from willing landowners to
   facilitate conservation; restoring and enhancing forest sustainability by implementing
   small-scale projects; and facilitating wetland assimilation projects that would
   contribute to coastal forest sustainability.

   Project Type: 4

   Project Justification: Much of Louisiana’s second-growth coastal forested
   landscape is in peril from factors such as levees, navigation and oil and gas canals,
   roads, railway embankments, and agricultural lands that bisect the landscape. In
   addition to these factors, Louisiana has experienced a renewed interest in harvesting
   many wetland forest species, more specifically bald cypress. Many of these factors,
   over time, have led to degradation of the State’s coastal forests. Where alterations to
   hydrology have occurred, these same factors have led to saltwater intrusion,
   prevention of river inflow (accelerating subsidence), and water being held in the
   forest for greater periods of time, rendering valuable productive second-growth
   forests unproductive and unable to serve the same functions and associated values
   that they historically did.

   This project is part of an overall strategy for restoring, protecting, and conserving
   Louisiana’s Coastal Forest System, which consists of barrier live oak forests, salt
   dome hardwood forests, coastal live oak-hackberry forests, bottomland hardwood
   forests, natural levee and chenier forests, mixed hardwood-pine forests, and
   pondcypress and bald cypress-tupelo forests. Implementation consists of purchasing
   upwards of 40,000 forested wetland acres from several different hydrologic classes
   that have been shown to play a significant role as part of Louisiana’s estuarine and
   deltaic ecosystems.

   Project Cost Share: Potentially Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program
   and other sources

6) Project Title: Grand Lake Shoreline Protection ME-21

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Greg Grandy




                                           67
   Contact Information:     Greg Grandy
                            Coastal Engineering Division
                            Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                            617 North Third Street
                            Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                            (225)342-6412
                     gregory.grandy@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $ 0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,600,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in the Mermentau
   Basin in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, on the south shore of Grand Lake.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: A comparison of 1978-1979 aerial photography to 1977-1998
   aerial photography indicates that shoreline erosion rates in this area vary from 11 to
   32 feet per year.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

7) Project Title: Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) Bank Restoration of Critical
   Areas in Terrebonne Parish

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Will Norman

   Contact Information:      Will Norman
                             Coastal Restoration Division
                             Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                             617 North Third Street
                             Baton Rouge, LA 70804
                             (225)342-9432
                             charles.norman@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $8,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $8,000,000



                                           68
Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: This proposed CIAP project is located within
the same general project area as CWPPRA Project TE-43 in the Terrebonne Basin, in
Terrebonne Parish, along the south bank line of the GIWW from the Gulf South
Pipeline to the St. Paul Bayou Oilfield. The project will close four breaches along the
south bank of the GIWW totaling 14,500 linear feet. From west to east along the
GIWW the proposed closures are numbered: Segment 1 - 1,500 feet, Segment 2a -
500 feet, Segment 2b - 4,500 feet, and Segment 6 - 8,000 feet. The breach closures
engineered for this bank line (lightweight aggregate core capped with rock) will
provide immediate benefits to the adjacent thin-mat floating marshes by stopping
water movement through these large breaches where water exchange now occurs.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: The width of the GIWW adjacent to the four proposed breach
closures ranges from 700 feet to almost 2,000 feet. This large area of open water
allows for wave fetch from wind, currents, and boat traffic. These four critical
breaches are allowing water flow from the GIWW into and out of the fragile floating
fresh marsh south of the GIWW. These direct hydrologic connections have destroyed
adjacent floating marsh and are accelerating the breakup of thin-mat floats located
south of these breaches and extending at least 6 miles to the south. This area of thin-
mat floating fresh marsh is quite unique and extremely productive, supporting a wide
variety of fish and wildlife species. The thin-mat floats in this area are 2- 8 inches
thick and float on an unconsolidated organic muck. When protected from high-
velocity turbid water, the floats are usually surrounded by submerged aquatic
vegetation (SAV) beds that provide additional protection from wind and waves.
When water is funneled through these breaches with increased velocity, the floats
eventually break into pieces and are exported from the marsh. This converts floating
fresh marsh into open turbid water subject to increased export of unconsolidated
organics and increased water depths.

This proposed project is fully engineered and free of implementation issues.
Elimination of these hydrologic connections will result in an immediate benefit to a
large area of floating fresh marsh (approx. 30,000 acres). Maintaining this area as
floating fresh marsh rather than allowing it to convert to open turbid water will also
provide added protection to the Bayou Black Ridge located 5 miles north. The size of
this proposed project has been restricted to closing the four existing breaches (14,500
linear feet) with an estimated cost of 28% of the cost for the entire TE-43 project.
Although the extent of shoreline protection is reduced, the area of floating marsh
protected is greater than the project size originally calculated. The sole landowner in
the project area is Continental Land and Fur Company (CL&F). Their land
management experience indicates that floating marshes are more intact when adjacent
to a solid bank line than when subjected to water movement through breaches and




                                        69
   washouts. This has been monitored and demonstrated for many years on CL&F
   property.

   Closure of these breaches will reduce the high rate of breakup of the adjacent thin-
   mat floating marshes while other sources of funds are sought for long-term shoreline
   protection in between these structures. Status reports from the Mandalay Bank
   Protection Demonstration Project (TE-41) may result in a more economical method to
   protect the remaining banks.

   If these breaches along the GIWW are not closed with this proposed CIAP project,
   the adjacent area of fragile thin-mat floating marshes will continue to deteriorate and
   the area will soon be converted from marsh to open turbid water. This project is
   consistent with the Coast 2050 specific regional ecosystem strategies for protecting
   and sustaining the Terrebonne Basin’s coastal resources: restoring swamps, restoring
   and sustaining marshes, and protecting shorelines.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

8) Project Title: Mississippi River Delta Management Strategic Planning

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources

   Contact Information: David Frugé
                        Office of Coastal Restoration and Management
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70804
                        (225) 342-7615
                        david.fruge@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: LDNR will coordinate the development of a
   strategic framework for feasibility evaluation of improved management of fresh
   water, nutrients, and sediment resources of the Lower Mississippi River to better
   sustain its deltaic plain. Preparation of that framework document will involve outside
   expertise, and will identify primary alternatives to be addressed and the appropriate
   analytical approaches to be applied. A central focus of this effort will be to address
   options for greatly increasing the land-building capability of the Mississippi River



                                           70
   below New Orleans while maintaining deep-draft navigation on the river. The
   envisioned approach to strategic plan development will be to:

              a) compile relevant information and findings on all pertinent physical
              modeling of the Lower Mississippi River completed to date;

               b) convene and assign an expert panel with development of alternative
              conceptual approaches to improved river management for addressing
              needs relative to coastal sustainability and continued maintenance of
              Mississippi River deep draft navigation;

              c) identify the critical issues that must be addressed in the feasibility study
              (e.g., navigation-related items, effects on other Mississippi River uses,
              land-building capability, potential saltwater intrusion, and habitat
              impacts);

              d) identify the kinds and scope of technical analyses (e.g., physical and
              mathematical modeling) needed to address the critical issues identified;
              and

              e) identify the level of effort needed for the various analyses.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Improved management of the Mississippi River’s sediment,
   nutrients, and fresh water has long been recognized as critically important to
   sustaining the Mississippi Deltaic Plain portion of coastal Louisiana. The January
   2005 report of the Chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) on the
   Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration Study recommended approval
   of funding for feasibility studies of several identified large-scale, long-term coastal
   restoration concepts. One such concept is the Mississippi River Delta Management
   Study, which would look at alternative means of providing continued navigation on
   the Mississippi River below New Orleans while making much greater use of the river
   for coastal restoration. This proposal is intended to be a first step, designed to
   facilitate the scoping of that feasibility study. An international science group
   supported by British Petroleum recently produced a report strongly recommending
   the Mississippi Delta Management project as the most significant approach to
   stemming coastal land loss in Louisiana.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

9) Project Title: Performance Evaluation and Related Engineering and Science
   Monitoring

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Greg Grandy


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   Contact Information: Greg Grandy
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225)342-6412
                        Gregory.grandy@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project will evaluate the effectiveness of
   project features constructed with either parish or State funds through the CIAP. The
   restoration projects evaluated will be located within the 19 coastal parishes of
   Louisiana.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The performance evaluation done on CIAP projects will
   enable future coastal restoration activities to continue to adaptively manage projects
   to reduce uncertainty and to improve the effectiveness of future restoration projects
   and programs. Implementation of the CIAP project evaluation and science support
   project would help to ensure that the best available practices are integrated into the
   design and construction of restoration projects in Louisiana.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

10) Project Title: Rockefeller Refuge Gulf Shoreline Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Beau Tate

   Contact Information:      Beau Tate
                             Coastal Engineering Division
                             Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                             617 North Third Street
                             Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                             (225)342-6736
                             beau.tate@la.gov




                                           72
   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $8,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $8,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project will analyze four
   different test sections of shoreline protection in the Rockefeller Refuge area.
   Rockefeller Refuge is located in southwestern Louisiana, west of Pecan Island and
   east of Grand Chenier. The project is located along the Rockefeller Refuge Gulf of
   Mexico shoreline from Beach Prong to Joseph Harbor in Cameron Parish, Coast 2050
   Region 4, Mermentau Basin. The center of the project area is located at the
   approximate coordinates 30E 08 '00" N latitude and 92E 45' 00" W longitude.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: One of the most rapidly eroding portions of the Louisiana
   Gulf shoreline is at the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge. Estimates of long-term shoreline
   retreat range from 30 to 40 feet/year. Short-term events, such as Tropical Storm
   Frances in 1998, can cause more than 50 feet of erosion over a few days. Scientists
   have concluded that modern rates of shoreline recession within Louisiana’s Chenier
   Plain are generally increasing with time. The proposed project will determine the
   best option for combating the erosion in this high-energy system.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

State-Parish Cost Shared Tier One Projects

1) Project Title: Blind River Freshwater Diversion

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Whitney Thompson

   Contact Information: Whitney Thompson
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        617 North 3rd St. Suite 1078
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225) 342-9419
                        Whitney.Thompson@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $28,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,300,000


                                           73
State CIAP Funds proposed: $27,300,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: Mississippi River siphon, near Romeville, to
Blind River vicinity.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: The swamp surrounding the origination of the Blind River in
St. James Parish is stagnant, due to prevention of Mississippi River flow. A small
diversion of the Mississippi River would provide supplemental water and associated
nutrients to improve approximately 2,000 acres of swamp and increase the flow of the
Blind River. A siphon with a maximum capacity of 1,500 cubic feet per second
would be constructed in the Mississippi River near Romeville, approximately 2.5
miles upstream from Convent.

The siphon would consist of six pipes, each 72 inches in diameter, extracting fresh
water from the river. The pipes would be placed over the Mississippi River eastern
levee. A section of existing road at the toe of the levee would be excavated to
facilitate the installation of the pipes. The road would be rebuilt on top of the buried
pipes. The pipes would also have to cross a railroad approximately one-half of a mile
to the east. Up to this point, the pipes would be buried. Beyond the railroad, the flow
can be discharged into a field drainage canal where the landowner has granted
preliminary approval. Approximately 1.5 miles of the channel would need to be
dredged to facilitate the increased flow volume. Concrete box culverts would be
installed under LA 3125 to facilitate the channel flow under the highway. Beyond the
highway, the flow would be released into the swamp, initiating sheet flow, and
eventually the fresh water would flow into the Blind River.

Extensive topographic modeling will be required to evaluate the desired sheet flow
effect. That modeling will help facilitate project design and associated optimization
of benefits resulting from implementatio.

The actual flow of a siphon depends on the elevation of the river. Based on existing
data for Mississippi River siphons, siphons only flow well a few months out of the
year, when the water level is high. For a 1500-cfs-capacity siphon, it is estimated that
the best average flow achievable is approximately 900 cfs, but this would not be
constant. Several months out of the year, the water level would be too low for the
siphon to flow at all.

Siphon intake areas must be close to the levee to prevent navigational hazards. To
obtain a significant volume of sediment, the intake must be in a deeper part of the
river than that close to the levee. Therefore, siphons do not discharge much sediment.




                                        74
   The proposed siphon could provide fresh water and associated nutrients into the
   swamp.

   Any projects affecting Mississippi River levees must include extensive levee stability
   analyses as well as compliance with USACE regulations.

   River siphons must be regularly operated and maintained. An outfall management
   plan is envisioned to help achieve full benefits.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

2) Project Title: East Grand Terre Island Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish
   Coastal Zone Administrator; Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information: Andrew MacInnes
                        106 Avenue G
                        Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                        (504) 297-5320
                        andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $27,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $21,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in the lower Barataria
   hydrologic basin as part of the barrier shoreline in southwest Plaquemines Parish,
   Louisiana. The island lies between Pass Abel and West Grand Terre Island to the
   west and Quatre Bayou Pass and Pointe Chenier Ronquille to the east. The proposed
   project seeks to implement the restoration measures as designed and engineered
   through the CWPPRA program. The project has already received approximately $2.3
   million in design funding and it recently just missed the cutoff to receive construction
   funding of approximately $27 million.

   Summary of Project Benefits:

   • Restore 2.8 miles of barrier shoreline through construction of +6-foot dune with
     advanced nourishment.
   • Construct 450-acre marsh platform north of and contiguous to the beach and dune
     fill to provide foundation for continued shoreline rollover and retreat.
   • Create and restore 620 acres of barrier island immediately post-construction.



                                            75
• Provide 335 net acres at TY20.

Project Goals and Strategies:

The goals of this project are to repair breaches and tidal inlets in the shoreline,
reinforce the existing shoreline with sand, and plug/repair the growing tidal inlets
through the shoreline. The design approach is to maximize surface area per unit
volume for island stabilization and dune, supratidal (i.e., swale), and intertidal marsh
creation by preventing a breach (i.e., tidal inlet) with a 20-year or lesser storm event.

Project strategies are: 1) to construct 71 acres of dune platform to +6 feet North
American Vertical Datum (NAVD-88), 82 acres of beach, and 450 acres of back
barrier marsh on East Grand Terre; 2) to place marsh creation material at an elevation
of +2.3 feet NAVD-88 and allow it to settle and dewater down to the intertidal range;
3) to utilize effective planting schemes and sand fencing to maximize vegetative
coverage and survival while providing increased dune stabilization; 4) to create tidal
ponds and creeks and ensure tidal exchange by degrading retention dikes that do not
naturally degrade.

Project Features:

The recommended plan includes beach and dune fill to address the severity of erosion
along the gulf-front shoreline and to repair shoreline breaches. The beach and dune
fill template is approximately 15,000 feet long with a 90-foot-wide dune design
section to +6 feet with 1:30 back-slopes and 1:45 fore-slopes. Advanced fill is
distributed non-uniformly to account for varying longshore transport rates along the
island. The maximum constructed berm width is 195 feet. Total in-place beach and
dune fill volume is estimated at 1,576,650 cubic yards. The recommended plan also
includes a 450-acre marsh platform in the southern portions of Bays Melville and
Dispute with construction elevation of +2.3 feet. The required fill volume is
approximately 1,732,000 cubic yards. Additionally, project features include
extensive vegetative plantings and sand fencing to reduce sediment losses and
retention dike gapping to optimize marsh platform performance.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: The proposed project is strategically very important within the
context of barrier shoreline restoration. As identified through the Coast 2050 and
CWPPRA programs, barrier islands are among the highest-ranked features to be
restored, regarding area of need. Multiple other sections of the Plaquemines Parish
barrier shoreline are being designed or constructed in a concerted effort to
methodically and efficiently rebuild the degrading island segments. Also, millions of
dollars and years of time have already been dedicated to the project as it has
progressed through the CWPPRA program.




                                         76
   Project Cost: Approximately $2.3M has already been spent on the proposed project
   through the CWPPRA program. All engineering and design work has been completed
   and the project is ready for construction. Plaquemines Parish would like to cost-share
   the project with LDNR (amount and/or percentage to be determined).

3) Project Title: Freshwater Bayou Bank Stabilization

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish/Clay Menard

   Contact Information:      Clay Menard, Secretary/Treasurer
                             Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                             100 N. State St.
                             Abbeville, LA 70510
                             (337) 898-4300
                             vermillionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $14,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $ 2,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $12,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project consists of approximately 7
   miles of shoreline protection along critical areas of the Freshwater Bayou navigation
   canal. The project will focus primarily on the western bank reaches that have
   recently breached or are likely to breach in the near term. Critical areas on the
   eastern bank will also be targeted. If sufficient funds remain, the project may extend
   into the CWPPRA Freshwater Bayou Bank Stabilization (TV-11B) project area.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The western shoreline and associated spoil banks of
   Freshwater Bayou navigation canal provide an important barrier to saltwater intrusion
   into the freshwater marshes and lakes of the lower Mermentau Basin. The primary
   problem is that oil and gas support vessel traffic causes erosion of the banks, and the
   erosion and saltwater intrusion are a serious threat to the adjacent marshes, and to the
   supply of fresh water used to support rice and crawfish farming that are so important
   to the local economy. Continued erosion and potential saltwater intrusion is of those
   marshes is also considered a serious threat to LA Highway 82 and LA Highway
   3147. Erosion along the waterway’s east bank is also a threat to the adjacent
   marshes, including the Rainey Wildlife Refuge. This project will address the above
   wetland erosion and saltwater intrusion threat, and thus has strong support from local
   residents and land owners.




                                           77
   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: Fringe Marsh Repair

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish
   Coastal Zone Administrator; Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information:      Andrew MacInnes
                             106 Avenue G
                             Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                             (504) 297-5320
                             andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $7,880,920

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,600,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,280,920

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The fringe marsh is defined as the wetland
   area seaward of the back levee toe. There are several locations in need of restoration
   for this project due to the breakup and fragmentation of the marshes that sit at the
   base of the back levees. If the fragmentation is allowed to continue, the integrity of
   the levees may be compromised. Restoring the marshes through direct/scatter
   dredging and the subsequent reestablishment of vegetation will help to protect the
   back levees from accumulated damage due to elevated water levels and force from
   surge.

   The areas currently identified for target dredging occur in the following
      locations:
      a. Port Sulphur – North of Martin Lane
      b. Port Sulphur – North/South of Hi-Ridge Marina
      c. Port Sulphur – Civic Drive boat launch
      d. Port Sulphur – Southeast of Swift Energy harbor
      e. Homeplace – West of Gainard Woods pump station
      f. Buras – Southeast of Buras Boat Harbor
      g. Pointe a la Hache – Southeast of Beshel’s Marina
      h. Wills Point – Southeast of Belair pump station

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification:
             1. The back levees provide critical protection for businesses and residents.
             2. Restoring the fringe will help protect the back levees.



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   Project Cost Share: N/A

5) Project Title: Houma Navigation Canal Lock

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Levee and Conservation
   District

   Contact Information: Mr. Jerome Zeringue, Executive Director
                        Terrebonne Levee and Conservation District
                        220 Clendenning Road
                        Houma, LA 70361
                        (985) 594-4104
                        jzee@tlcd.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $43,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed:        $33,000,000 (amount proposed by State)

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $33,000,000

   Description and Location of Project: The Houma Navigation Canal Lock (HNC)
   would be located in Dulac, Louisiana, near the confluence of the HNC and Bayou
   Grand Caillou. Enclosures 3 and 4 are a vicinity map and project sketch. The lock
   complex will consist of a 200-ft-wide floodgate, a 110-ft-wide by 800-ft-long lock
   chamber, and the associated necessary improvements to the site, all built in a
   realigned channel just west of the existing HNC. The project also includes a closure
   dam across the existing channel once the new structure and channel are built. The
   new lock and floodgate will be built primarily on an existing maintenance dredging
   spoil disposal area on the west bank of the existing channel. The project will be built
   in this method to allow for continued, uninterrupted navigation in support of Outer
   Continental Shelf (OCS) activities through the channel during construction.

   The 200-ft-wide floodgate is designed to allow for continued use of the channel by
   the offshore fabrication industry located in Houma, 20 miles to the north. It allows
   for use of the channel by structures up to 250-ft-wide through innovative design
   techniques.

   The lock chamber is a key component of the complex because it will allow for
   continued use of the waterway during periods of saltwater intrusion and freshwater
   management. During those periods, the floodgate will be closed, and smaller
   navigation will be routed through the lock chamber. Also during those periods, but
   much less frequently, the larger floodgate will have to be opened for a short period of




                                           79
   time to allow for passage of the larger structures. These passages will usually only
   require a 12-hour opening of the large floodgate.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Cost Share: As outlined in the guidance for the application process as
   dictated by LDNR, as well as the preliminary guidance issued by the U.S. Minerals
   Management Service, the nominating agencies have worked to find other cost sharing
   funding sources for the HNC Lock. The nominating agencies have identified four
   other sources that are available and applicable to the lock project. They are as
   follows:

      Terrebonne Parish CIAP Funding                       $ 10 Million
      State CIAP Funding                                     33 Million*
      State Capital Outlay                                   20 Million
      Federal Appropriations                                 90 Million
      Total                                                $170 Million
      * Nominating agency actually requested $49.3 M (state CIAP funds)

6) Project Title: Acadiana Regional Airport Street Improvements – LA 675 (Hwy 90 to
                  Admiral Doyle Drive)

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, Louisiana 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,870,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,672,500

   State CIAP Funds proposed: $197,500

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $1,870,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will provide financial assistance to Iberia Parish Government to repair and build a
   road that provides access to Acadiana Regional Airport and the Port of Iberia.

   Project Type: 5



                                           80
   Project Justification: This project will patch and overlay 12,400 feet of road in and
   around the Acadiana Regional Airport. These facilities provide a substantial amount
   of commerce and support to OCS facilities and access to them by surface roads is
   vital. These facilities also provide benefits to Louisiana in revenue sharing.

   Project Cost Share: None

7) Project Title: LA 1 Fourchon to Leeville Bridge (Phase IA)

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of
   Transportation and Development

   Contact Information: Johnny Bradberry, Secretary
                        Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development
                        1201 Capitol Access Rd.
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9245
                        (225) 379-1200
                        jbradberry@dotd.louisiana.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: The amount of shortfall on the project, which is
   $90,528,000. The total cost of this project (Phase IA) is estimated at $144,400,000.

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,230,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $33,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $35,230,000

   Description and Location of Project: This project is located 60 miles south of New
   Orleans in lower Lafourche Parish between Leeville and Port Fourchon. It will
   construct a 5-miles-long, two-lane elevated highway (2, 12-ft lanes and 2, 8-ft
   shoulders). The Phase IA project connects to the Phase IB and Phase IC projects (in
   Leeville) by relocating LA 1 on a new alignment. This project is designed for a 100-
   year life cycle and therefore incorporates many unique design features.

   Project Type (from list below of authorized CIAP fund uses): 5

   Project Justification: The new project will mitigate the effects of flooding and
   erosion caused by hurricanes and tropical storms by allowing immediate access to
   Port Fourchon and Grand Isle. Subsidence has also contributed to the flooding of
   existing LA 1, rendering the highway impassable even during minor storm events.
   Because of the ports’ ties to the Gulf of Mexico, the percentage of truck traffic is
   unusually high (36.9%). The existing winding highway, coupled with the high
   percentage of trucks, has caused LA 1 to have an abnormally high accident rate.




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Many unique design features have been incorporated into this project, giving it a 100-
year life cycle. The new highway is elevated above the 500-year storm event (22.5 ft)
and is designed to withstand extreme wind and wave forces. It has also been designed
to withstand scour and collisions from marine vessels. Equally important is the
implementation of current highway and safety standards on this Federal high-priority
corridor.

Project Cost Share: There are three non-CIAP funding sources available for this
project; $24,000,000 of Federal Formula (advanced construction) funds, $25,872,000
of Federal Earmark (SAFETEA-LU) funds, and $4,000,000 of State match funds, for
a total of $53,872,000.

Funds are sought for LA 1 (Phase IA). This project has a Record of Decision on an
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) completed in February of 2003. Plans,
proposals, utility agreements, permits and all rights-of-way have been completed
since January 2006. This project is complete and ready to be let to bid.

A Federal Highway Administration EIS explored the alternative of the retrofitting
(raising) the existing highway and in a May 2004 Record of Decision deemed the
elevated highway alternative as the only cost-effective and safe solution. Many
alternatives were studied and the most cost-effective alternatives have been included
in the plans and proposals.

The LA 1 Improvement Project will secure connectivity between U.S. Highway 90
and Port Fourchon, the busiest U.S. intermodal energy port, located in Lafourche
Parish. In December of 2001 LA 1 was identified as a High Priority Corridor by the
U.S. Congress for its role as critical energy infrastructure. Current OCS oil and gas
activity has had a negative impact on LA 1, including congestion and deterioration,
which has adversely affected the quality of life for the community. This significant
impact warrants an appropriate, substantial mitigation measure, such as the Louisiana
DOTD-designed LA 1 Improvement Project.

The U.S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) clearly identified LA 1 as a “focal
point of stress” in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Gulf of Mexico Oil
and Gas Lease Sales 169, 172, 175, 178, and 182 (MMS 97-0033). An additional
MMS funded study published in 2001, Lafourche Parish and Port Fourchon,
Louisiana: Effects of the Outer Continental Shelf Petroleum Industry on the Economy
and Public Services, Part 1 (MMS 2001-019), further documents the strain LA 1 will
be under as offshore oil and gas activities expand. The study also suggests that
deterioration of LA 1 will also be exacerbated as oil and gas activities expand. The
stress on this highway system was compounded by the hurricanes of 2005. Ports to
the east and west were devastated by these storms and much of their workloads have
moved to Port Fourchon. Already more than twice as deadly as the average road in
its class, LA 1 south of Golden Meadow has experienced double-digit increases in
traffic since the storms, and in March 2006 alone experienced three fatalities from




                                        82
two accidents that involved passenger vehicles colliding into trucks carrying goods to
support the OCS.

Supporting the LA 1 Improvement Project with CIAP funds is sound, progressive
national energy policy. With a design life of 100+ years, the project will provide
sustainable, dependable access to the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, the only expanding
area of domestic production in this country. Critical to the nation, it will reduce U.S.
vulnerability to potentially catastrophic energy shortages that would result from
tropical systems washing out the existing road. Port Fourchon’s critical role in the
gulf’s ability to resume energy production is unquestioned and was elevated to a
national priority immediately after the hurricanes of 2005. The road provides access
to service facilities that support 16-18% of the U.S. total oil supply, both domestic
and foreign. The nation’s only offshore oil port, LOOP (Louisiana Offshore Oil Port),
situated just 18 miles south of Port Fourchon, is also dependent upon LA 1 for
support services. LOOP offloads and stores about 1.2 million barrels per day of
imported crude oil – approximately 14% of the nation’s imported waterborne crude
oil. LOOP also handles about 300,000 barrels per day of domestic OCS crude oil and
is expected to continue increasing its role in accommodating domestic production. A
testament to LOOP’s ability to play an even larger role in future OCS production is
the recent completion of six 500,000 barrel tanks in Galliano and a planned $300M
addition of another pipeline from Fourchon to Galliano. LA 1 is a vital link to
LOOP’s Fourchon Booster Pump Station and to LOOP’s Harbor at Port Fourchon,
which is a support and staging area for LOOP’s offshore facilities. It is the only U.S.
deepwater port capable of offloading VLCCs (Very Large Crude Carriers) and
ULCCs (Ultra Large Crude Carriers). LOOP is connected via pipeline to
approximately 50% of the nation’s refining capacity.

Positive environmental benefits to the region would be realized through the
implementation of the LA 1 Improvement Project. LA 1 is the sole emergency
environmental response route for Port Fourchon and Grand Isle, which, in addition to
holding tremendous energy significance, are extremely important for access to and
support of commercial and recreational fishing as well as to a growing eco-tourism
industry. The Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator has identified LA 1 as the most critical
highway for oil spill response in the State. Another tremendous benefit that the LA 1
project will provide to the state is its long-term effort to rebuild wetlands, and reliable
access to the coast. Port Fourchon and Grand Isle will play a major role in supporting
Louisiana’s future coastal restoration efforts and will most likely be the support bases
for barrier island restoration as well as offshore pipeline transfer of sediment for both
the Eastern Terrebonne and Barataria Basins.

In addition to these life safety, ecological/restoration, and commercial benefits to be
gained by funding the LA 1 Improvement Project, the road also serves as the sole
evacuation route for upwards of 30,000 people, including 8,000 offshore workers
flown in from OCS facilities. An elevated dependable evacuation route would be
invaluable as it would save lives and lower losses of personal property. The road is
designed to clear high-water storm surges (Category 5 Hurricane), and will provide



                                          83
   immediate post-storm access to Port Fourchon and Grand Isle. This will allow
   emergency response services such as law enforcement, fire responders, public health
   officials, and debris clearance personnel to gain immediate access. As an added
   regional economic benefit, an elevated LA 1 will continue to serve as the only land
   route between two of this nation’s most productive estuaries; the Barataria and
   Terrebonne Basins. It is estimated that 70% of the state’s total value for commercial
   seafood landings is derived from the Barataria and Terrebonne systems.

   MMS is today planning a substantial expansion of lease programs in the Central and
   Western Areas of the Gulf of Mexico and it is predicted that the Deepwater Gulf of
   Mexico will produce 80% of the gulf’s oil by 2010. It is Port Fourchon’s unique
   position on the gulf that will continue to provide the greatest efficiency for the oil and
   gas industry to service these new OCS developments. There is reasonable certainty
   that the benefits resulting from the implementation of the LA 1 Improvement Project
   will be substantial, very diverse, and sustainable over the long term, to both the State
   and the nation.

8) Project Title: Lake Salvador Shoreline Protection – Phase III

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: LDNR/Maury Chatellier

   Contact Information:       Maury Chatellier
                              Coastal Engineering Division
                              Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                              P.O. Box 44027
                              Baton Rouge, LA 70804-4027
                              (225) 342-5944
                              maury.chatellier@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,300,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,300,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project is a continuation of rock
   shoreline protection project on the northwestern bank of Lake Salvador in St. Charles
   Parish. The project will consist of installing approximately 7,300 linear feet of rock
   dike at or near the -1.0’ NAVD 88 contour. Associated boat access and fish dips will
   be installed at approximate 1,000-foot intervals. Construction access will be via
   flotation channels excavated to -6.0 NAVD 88 or by direct placement (no flotation) in
   areas with sensitive cultural resources.

   Project Type: 1



                                            84
   Project Justification: The Lake Salvador shoreline is susceptible to erosion because
   of the long fetch across the lake, the vulnerable shoreline configuration, and the highly
   unconsolidated sediment base. These factors are responsible for the high shoreline
   erosion rate of approximately 13 ft/year (4 m/year) in the Lake Salvador area. This
   chronic erosion has breached the lake shoreline in several locations, exposing fragile,
   highly organic marsh substrates to increased wave and tidal energy, resulting in large,
   shallow pond formation in the interior marsh. The existing shoreline protection
   project (CWPPRA, BA-15) completed construction in 2005. Numerous delays in
   project scheduling and financial limitations caused approximately 7,300 linear feet of
   rock dike to be eliminated from the project. This proposed CIAP-funded project
   would extend the current project to the limits of the original design.

9) Project Title: Long Distance Mississippi River Sediment Pipeline

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish
   Coastal Zone Administrator; Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information:       Andrew MacInnes
                              106 Avenue G
                              Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                              (504) 297-5320
                              andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $34,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000 ($1M each from Lafourche,
                                Jefferson, and Plaquemines parishes)

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $31,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0


   Description and Location of Project: The project objective is to establish an
   appropriate long-distance pipeline capability for conveying Mississippi River
   sediments for land building (marsh and ridge) in strategic areas of the central
   Barataria Basin. The currently envisioned pipeline route/corridor would begin in the
   Myrtle Grove-Alliance area (Plaquemines Parish) and extend across Jefferson Parish
   to west and northwest of Little Lake (in Lafourche Parish). The proposed project is
   expected to initially create marsh and ridge habitat (including an area within the
   outflow plume of the proposed Myrtle Grove Diversion Project). The primary project
   purpose, however, is to identify and apply appropriate alignment, construction
   techniques and materials, and (as feasible) reuse strategies and infrastructure for
   future, larger-scale, systemic-benefit marsh and ridge restoration and creation in the
   central Barataria Basin portions of the above parishes. Optimum implementation
   methods and alignment will be determined through careful evaluation of alternative


                                            85
   pipeline engineering, design, construction, and re-use strategies, as well as
   investigations of alternative routes, land building sites, and associated land rights
   needs and availability. Extensive consultation with dredging and pipeline experts
   would occur as part of the planning and design process.

   Each of the above parishes will provide financial assistance for project construction,
   and the State will provide the primary technical and financial (CIAP) support. The
   State will involve the parishes throughout planning and design, as well as during
   project implementation, to ensure full consideration of their views. The project will
   also include an evaluation of existing sediment delivery projects in the general area
   (e.g., the Bayou Dupont and Lake Hermitage CWPPRA projects) to assess the
   potential for consolidation of similar efforts as well as application of lessons learned.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification:
      1. Sediment delivery is the most effective way to rebuild/recreate marsh.
      2. Mississippi River sediment is a renewable and consistently available
             resource.
      3. The project is part of a larger, regional strategy to address coastal land
             loss.
      4. Three parishes are willing to publicly and financially support the project.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

10) Project Title: Morgan City Industrial Road –Alignment 2

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       1. Henry “Bo” Lagrange
                              Chief Administrative Officer
                              Fifth Floor Courthouse Building
                              Franklin, LA 70538-6198.
                              (337) 828-4100
                              hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

                      .       2. Dr. Mohan Menon
                              Shaw E&I
                              (225) 987-7154
                              mohan.menon@shawgrp.com


   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $887,100


   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $552,100



                                            86
State CIAP Funds Proposed: $335,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $887,100

Description and Location of the Project: The project is located in Morgan City, St.
Mary Parish, Louisiana

The area in Morgan City along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) / Bayou
Bouef and the Atchafalaya River south of Adams Street facilitates three large
industrial facilities and a museum, namely Newpark Environmental Services, Baker
Hughes Inteq, Central Boat Rentals, the Mr. Charlie Rig Museum. The Morgan City
Floodwall protects and separates the adjacent residential neighborhoods, but it limits
road access to the industrial facilities and the museum. Although this area is a heavy
industrial zone, the current truck route connecting to US Hwy 90 must pass through
residential neighborhoods along First, Second, and Third Streets, Federal Avenue,
Barrow Street, and Union Street. An estimated 75–100 trucks use this route daily,
with 65 residences affected. Local residents have expressed a need to reroute the
truck traffic away from their neighborhoods.

The proposed project feature is a road alignment that begins at the First Street
floodgate but on the unprotected side of the floodwall on the Baker Hughes Inteq
lease. It proceeds along the unprotected side of the floodwall a distance of 1857 feet
through property leased by Newpark Environmental. This alignment ends at the Port
of Morgan City’s north gate.

The project goal is to reduce the truck traffic through the residential neighborhoods
by rerouting the traffic through the proposed realigned road.

The preliminary project benefit is to provide more road access to the industrial
facilities and the museum through the proposed new road, and decrease the traffic in
the residential area.

Project Type: Mitigation of the impacts of OCS activities through funding of
onshore infrastructure projects and public service needs.

The proposed alignment crosses a wetland area and requires the extension of the
discharge pipes from the Federal Avenue drainage pump station. A USACE 404
wetland permit with mitigation may be required as well as a bulkhead across an
existing slip, a portion of which will be filled to facilitate construction of the new
road. The minimum roadway elevation is equal to the Second Street Floodgate (6.85
feet) to allow access during periods of high water in the GIWW/ Bayou Bouef. A 28-
foot-wide pavement with aggregate shoulders and swale ditches will be required.
Required right of way will be needed from eight property owners, and it may also
require the relocation of the Newpark Environmental facility to another location since
much of the useable workspace in their facility is needed for the road right-of-way.



                                        87
   There are no known issues that could affect the implementation of the project.

   Project Justification: The traffic improvement proposed here will be utilized for
   trucks that carry oil and gas industry service goods. They commute from fabrication
   yards and related industries. The new bypass will provide much-needed relief to the
   residential areas.

   Project Cost Share: $335,000 (Capital Outlay)

11) Project Title: Orleans Land Bridge Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: City of New Orleans Mayor’s Office of
   Environmental Affairs

   Contact Information:      Ms. Wynecta Fisher, Deputy Director
                             City of New Orleans Mayor’s Office of Environmental
                             Affairs
                             1300 Perdido Street, Suite 8E06
                             New Orleans, LA 70112
                             (504) 658-4070
                             wmfisher@cityofno.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $42,400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $15,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $27,400,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in the Pontchartrain
   Basin, in eastern Orleans Parish along the Lake Borgne shoreline between Bayou
   Bienvenue and Alligator Point. The project will require approximately 50,000 feet of
   rock breakwater and several inland marsh creation activities where ponding has
   occurred. The project is located in the Pontchartrain Basin, in eastern Orleans Parish
   along the Lake Borgne shoreline between Bayou Bienvenue and Alligator Point.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification High wave energy, sea level rise, and subsidence levels are
   impacting wetland shorelines and inland marshes of Lakes Pontchartrain, Borgne. and
   St. Catherine, and connecting waterways Chef Pass and the Rigolets. These water
   bodies all outline the East Orleans Land Bridge and are located in the Pontchartrain
   Basin. Identified in both Coast 2050 and the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Plan,
   this critical land bridge forms a barrier between Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Borgne,



                                           88
   an eventual passage to the Gulf of Mexico. Along Lake Borgne between Bayou
   Bienvenue and Alligator Point, there has been continued loss of shoreline and inland
   ponds have widened. The proposed project will benefit 220 acres and protect 1,400
   acres by reducing the shoreline erosion rate by 100%. The project would maintain
   part of the East Orleans Land Bridge shoreline and protect Orleans and St. Bernard
   parish infrastructure and communities. Shoreline protection features would maintain
   structural components of the coastal ecosystem in the Pontchartrain Basin. Marsh
   creation features would enhance wetland habitat. Loss of this marshland threatens
   not only wetland habitat, but also the safety of some of the most densely developed
   portions of New Orleans.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

12) Project Title: Trosclair Road Repairs

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337)905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,958,600

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,558,600

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $400,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $2,800,600

   Description and Location of Project: Trosclair Road is a parish road that is used by
   heavy oilfield traffic. This road is approximately 8 miles long and connects State
   Highway 27/82 from Cameron to State Highway 82 to Oak Grove.

   Project Type: Mitigation of the impacts of OCS activities through funding of
   onshore infrastructure projects and public service needs.

   Project Justification: The development of the OCS and the oil and gas industry in
   Louisiana has caused rapid deterioration of Cameron Parish roads. Many of the
   truckers think this road is a part of the State highway system and travel from Texas
   through Cameron to Vermilion Parish. This road is in dire need of an overlay.

   Project Cost Share: N/A




                                            89
13) Project Title: Project Name: Violet Diversion

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Will Norman

   Contact Information: Will Norman
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225)342-9432
                        charles.norman@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $49,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,250,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $47,350,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Region 1,
   Pontchartrain Basin, St. Bernard Parish

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The Central Wetlands formerly contained an extensive
   cypress swamp. Re-growth has been hindered by lack of fresh water, nutrients, and
   sediments. The larger estuary, including the Biloxi Marsh, continues to convert to
   more-saline habitat due to saltwater intrusion. Wetland loss is expected to accelerate
   if reintroductions are not constructed to increase productivity. Historical habitats
   when the estuary was more sustainable have shifted substantially. Oyster productivity
   declined dramatically after construction of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet
   (MRGO). Lack of the natural overbank flow of the river lowers productivity and
   allows salt stress. Similar issues have also been identified along the Mississippi
   coastline and Mississippi Sound.

   Proposed Project Features:
      • Several box culverts should be added for controlled river discharge into the
        Violet Canal or other conveyance canals (max 5,000 cfs).
      • Sediment enrichment should be considered to accelerate mineral accretion in the
        Central Wetlands.

  Project Cost Share: N/A

Parish-Funded Tier 1 Projects


                                           90
Assumption Parish

1) Project Title: Attakapas Canal Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:       John Boudreaux
                              P.O. Box 520
                              Napoleonville, LA 70390
                              (985) 369-7386
                              johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: None

   Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
   portion of Assumption Parish. Many of the tributaries to the Lake carry significant
   amounts of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides that are having an adverse effect on
   water quality both within the canals and in Lake Verret itself. Historically, the reach
   of the Attakapas Canal extended up to Napoleonville, where heavy loads of sediment
   and nutrients moved southward, out of the sugarcane fields into the Lake. Today,
   Attakapas Canal is little more than a small stream, feeding into Lake Verret. With a
   total length of roughly 2,400 feet, and accretion reducing the flows both into and out
   of the canal, Attakapas Canal is fast becoming a dead zone in terms of aquatic habitat.
   The proposed Attakapas Canal Hydrologic Restoration Project would include:

       •   Dredging Attakapas Canal from its intersection with Lake Verret, for a
           distance approximately 2,000 feet inland, as well as dredging an area of the
           lake near the public boat launch.

       •   The hydraulically dredged material is to be used beneficially to improve
           shoreline stabilization, and create forested habitat on the lake’s edge near the
           canal entrance and to the east and west of the canal.

       •   Bald cypress will be planted, 302 trees to the acre, to recreate 12 acres of bald
           cypress swamp habitat that historically existed in this area.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.



                                            91
   Project Justification: In general, aquatic habitat lost to sediment accretion is typical
   in a basin where agricultural runoff has historically dominated the inputs to the
   system. In a freshwater lake system, as is the case with Lake Verret, high levels of
   such agricultural runoff means that a degradation of water quality (low dissolved
   oxygen) is to be expected. Impaired ecosystem function occurs when water is
   impounded and drainage routes become blocked by sediment deposition. There have
   been numerous reports of water quality problems, fish kills, and accelerated sediment
   accretion, indicating that there are water quality problems within the Lake Verret
   system. The USGS has documented the rate of sediment accretion in the lake to be
   very high. Restoring the hydrology, and ultimately the water quality, within
   Attakapas Canal will improve water quality, fisheries habitat, and sport fishing access
   within the canal itself, in addition to bringing these same improvements to Lake
   Verret.

   Delivering the water to the aquatic environment is the first step, but adequately
   circulating it throughout the swamp is equally important. For this reason, the
   sediment used to recreate the bald cypress swamp habitat historically found along the
   shoreline will be placed at an elevation and in such a way as to not impede the sheet
   flow of water into and out of the swamp once the project is completed.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): N/A

2) Project Title: Bayou Crab and Cancienne Canal Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:      John Boudreaux
                             P.O. Box 520
                             Napoleonville, LA 70390
                             (985) 369-7386
                             johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

  Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: None

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed None

   Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
   portion of Assumption Parish. Many of the tributaries to the lake carry significant
   amounts of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides that are having an adverse effect on
   water quality in Lake Verret. The proposed Bayou Crab and Cancienne Canal
   Hydrologic Restoration Project would include:




                                           92
       a. Establishing “filter strips” (on easements acquired from willing landowners)
          on the agricultural land immediately bordering the Cancienne Canal.

       b. Dredging of Cancienne Canal, with the dredged material to be used
          beneficially as sediment added to the filter strips, which are to be vegetated
          with native plants. Dredging will stop at the interface between swamp and
          agricultural land.

       c. Gapping the northern section of Bayou Crab to promote introduction of fresh
          water, nutrients, and sediment into the adjacent swamp.

       d. Creation of an inline sediment trap in the canal to reduce the sediment load
          currently flowing into Lake Verret.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.

   Project Justification: Cancienne Canal and Bayou Crab have been identified as
   major sources of suspended and dissolved sediments that have, over time, led to
   significant shallowing of portions of the lake, in addition to being a source of high
   nutrient concentrations shown to be responsible for eutrophication in the southern end
   of Lake Verret.

   Dredging Cancienne Canal will allow for a more efficient hydrologic exchange with
   Bayou Lafourche, providing a more consistent source of fresh water to the cypress
   swamps bordering Lake Verret, as well as providing a suitable substrate for the
   establishment of filter strips along both banks of the canal.

   The filter strips will aid in reducing the loading of sediment, nutrients, and
   agricultural pesticides that drain into Cancienne Canal and then flow into Lake
   Verret.

   Gapping the northern section of Bayou Crab will act to divert waters (agricultural
   runoff) into the adjacent swamp, facilitating removal of sediment, excess nutrients,
   and pesticides, thereby reducing the non-point source pollutants moving into Lake
   Verret during heavy rain, flooding, and storm events.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): None

3) Project Title: Brule Canal Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:       John Boudreaux
                              P.O. Box 520
                              Napoleonville, LA 70390



                                            93
                          (985) 369-7386
                          johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
portion of Assumption Parish. Many of the tributaries to Lake Verret carry significant
amounts of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides that are having an adverse effect on
water quality in the lake. The proposed Brule Canal Hydrologic Restoration Project
would include:

   a. Establishing “filter strips” (on easements acquired from willing landowners)
      on the agricultural land immediately bordering Brule Canal.

   b. Dredging of the northern section of Brule Canal, with the dredged material to
      be used beneficially as sediment added to the filter strips; which are to be
      vegetated with native plants. Dredging will stop at the interface between
      swamp and agricultural land.

   c. Gapping the southern section of Brule Canal to promote introduction of fresh
      water, nutrients, and sediment into the adjacent swamp.

   d. Creation of an inline sediment trap constructed in the southern section of
      Brule Canal to reduce the sediment load currently flowing into Lake Verret.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetlands.

Project Justification: Brule Canal has been identified as a source of suspended and
dissolved sediments that have, over time, led to significant shallowing of portions of
the lake, in addition to being a source of high nutrient concentrations shown to be
responsible for eutrophication in Lake Verret.

Dredging of the northern section of Brule Canal will provide a more consistent source
of fresh water to the cypress swamps bordering Lake Verret, as well as provide a
suitable substrate for the establishment of filter strips along both banks of the canal.

The filter strips will aid in reducing the loading of sediment, nutrients, and
agricultural pesticides that drain into Brule Canal and then flow into Lake Verret.




                                        94
   Gapping the southern section of Brule Canal will act to divert waters (agricultural
   runoff) into the adjacent swamp, facilitating removal of sediment, excess nutrients,
   and pesticides, thereby reducing the non-point source pollutants moving into Lake
   Verret during heavy rain, flooding, and storm events.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): None

4) Project Title: Elm Hall Canal Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:      John Boudreaux
                             P.O. Box 520
                             Napoleonville, LA 70390
                             (985) 369-7386
                             johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
   portion of Assumption Parish. Many of the tributaries to Lake Verret carry significant
   amounts of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides that are having an adverse effect on
   water quality in the lake. The proposed Elm Hall Canal Hydrologic Restoration
   Project would include:

          a. Establishing “filter strips” (on easements acquired from willing
             landowners) on the agricultural land immediately bordering the Elm Hall
             Canal.

          b. Dredging of Elm Hall Canal, with the dredged material to be used
             beneficially as sediment added to the filter strips; which are to be
             vegetated with native plants. Dredging will stop at the interface between
             swamp and agricultural land.

          c. Gapping the western section of Elm Hall Canal to promote introduction of
             fresh water, nutrients, and sediment into the adjacent swamp.

          d. Creation of an inline sediment trap constructed in the canal to reduce the
             sediment load currently flowing into Lake Verret.




                                           95
   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.

   Project Justification: Elm Hall Canal has been identified as a major source of
   suspended and dissolved sediments that have, over time, led to significant shallowing
   of portions of the lake, in addition to being a source of high nutrient concentrations
   shown to be responsible for eutrophication in Lake Verret.

   Dredging of the eastern section of Elm Hall Canal will provide a more consistent
   source of fresh water to the cypress swamps bordering Lake Verret, as well as
   provide a suitable substrate for the establishment of filter strips along both banks of
   the canal.

   The filter strips will aid in reducing the loading of sediment, nutrients, and
   agricultural pesticides that drain into Elm Hall Canal and then flow into Lake Verret.

   Gapping the western section of Elm Hall Canal will act to divert waters (agricultural
   runoff) into the adjacent swamp, facilitating removal of sediment, excess nutrients,
   and pesticides, thereby reducing the non-point source pollutants moving into Lake
   Verret during heavy rain, flooding, and storm events.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): N/A

5) Project Title: Himalaya Canal Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:       John Boudreaux
                              P.O. Box 520
                              Napoleonville, LA 70390
                              (985) 369-7386
                              johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
   portion of Assumption Parish. Many of the tributaries to Lake Verret carry significant
   amounts of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides that are having an adverse effect on
   water quality in the lake. The proposed Himalaya Canal Hydrologic Restoration
   Project would include:



                                            96
          a. Establishing “filter strips” (on easements acquired from willing
             landowners) on the agricultural land immediately bordering Himalaya
             Canal.

          b. Dredging of the eastern section of Himalaya Canal, with the dredged
             material to be used beneficially as sediment added to the filter strips,
             which are to be vegetated with native plants. Dredging will stop at the
             interface between swamp and agricultural land.

          c. Gapping the western section of Himalaya Canal to promote introduction of
             fresh water, nutrients, and sediment into the adjacent swamp.

          d. Creation of an inline sediment trap constructed in the western section of
             Himalaya Canal to reduce the sediment load currently flowing into Lake
             Verret.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.

   Project Justification: Himalaya Canal has been identified as a source of suspended
   and dissolved sediments that have, over time, led to significant shallowing of portions
   of the lake, in addition to being a source of high nutrient concentrations shown to be
   responsible for eutrophication in Lake Verret.

   Dredging of the eastern section of Himalaya Canal will provide a more consistent
   source of fresh water to the cypress swamps bordering Lake Verret, as well as
   provide a suitable substrate for the establishment of filter strips along both banks of
   the canal.

   The filter strips will aid in reducing the loading of sediment, nutrients, and
   agricultural pesticides that drain into Himalaya Canal and then flow into Lake Verret.

   Gapping the western section of Himalaya Canal will act to divert waters (agricultural
   runoff) into the adjacent swamp, facilitating removal of sediment, excess nutrients,
   and pesticides, thereby reducing the non-point source pollutants moving into Lake
   Verret during heavy rain, flooding, and storm events.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): None

6) Project Title: Lake Verret Swamp and Lake Rim Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:       John Boudreaux
                              P.O. Box 520



                                            97
                             Napoleonville, LA 70390
                             (985) 369-7386
                             johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,650,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,650,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
   portion of Assumption Parish. The proposed project will beneficially use material
   dredged from shallow areas of Lake Verret and place the material in key areas
   experiencing lake rim and swamp erosion.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands

   Project Justification: This problem can be locally remedied by careful placement of
   dredged material. Impaired ecosystem function occurs when water is impounded and
   drainage routes become blocked by sediment deposition. There have been numerous
   reports of water quality problems, fish kills, and accelerated sediment accretion,
   indicating that there are water quality problems within the Lake Verret system. The
   USGS has documented the rate of sediment accretion in the lake to be very high.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): None

7) Project Title: Shell Beach Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:      John Boudreaux
                             P.O. Box 520
                             Napoleonville, LA 70390
                             (985) 369-7386
                             johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,650,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,650,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0



                                            98
   Description and Location of Project: The goal of the Shell Beach Restoration
   project is to restore the shoreline on the northwestern corner of Lake Verret and to
   provide access to a historical public recreation area. The project would use sediment
   from Lake Verret to reclaim a portion of the eroded shoreline at Shell Beach and
   would bring in sand to cover the shoreline area at Shell Beach. Shell Beach has
   historically been a public recreation area, but due to an administrative mistake the
   public lease was lost on this area and the landowner had not maintained the area and
   had not allowed public access. The project is located in Lake Verret in Assumption
   Parish, in COAST 2050 Region 2.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.

   Project Justification: The Shell Beach project is needed to restore the area’s eroded
   shoreline. Additionally, this project will provide public access to natural resources at
   this historical recreation area.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): None

8) Project Title: Whitmel Canal, Bayou St. Vincent, and Company Canal Hydrologic
   Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Assumption Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:       John Boudreaux
                              P.O. Box 520
                              Napoleonville, LA 70390
                              (985) 369-7386
                              johnboudreaux@assumptionoep.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $318,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Lake Verret is located in the west central
   portion of Assumption Parish. Many of the tributaries to Lake Verret carry significant
   amounts of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides that are having an adverse effect on
   water quality in the lake. The proposed Whitmel Canal, Bayou St. Vincent, and
   Company Canal Hydrologic Restoration Project would include:




                                            99
          a. Establishing “filter strips” (on easements acquired from willing
             landowners) on the agricultural land immediately bordering the Whitmel
             Canal.

          b. Dredging of the eastern section of Whitmel Canal, Bayou St. Vincent, and
             Company Canal, with the dredged material to be used beneficially as
             sediment added to the filter strips, which are to be vegetated with native
             plants. Dredging will stop at the interface between swamp and
             agricultural land.

          c. Gapping the western section of Whitmel Canal to promote introduction of
             fresh water, nutrients, and sediment into the adjacent swamp.

          d. Creation of an inline sediment trap constructed in the western section of
             Whitmel Canal to reduce the sediment load currently flowing into Lake
             Verret.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.

   Project Justification: Whitmel Canal, Bayou St. Vincent, and Company Canal have
   been identified as major sources of suspended and dissolved sediments that have,
   over time, led to significant shallowing of portions of the lake, in addition to being a
   source of high nutrient concentrations shown to be responsible for eutrophication in
   Lake Verret.

   Dredging of the eastern section of Whitmel Canal, Bayou St. Vincent, and Company
   Canal will provide a more consistent source of fresh water to the cypress swamps
   bordering Lake Verret, as well as provide a suitable substrate for the establishment of
   filter strips along both banks of the canal.

   The filter strips will aid in reducing the loading of sediment, nutrients, and
   agricultural pesticides that drain into Whitmel Canal, Bayou St. Vincent, and
   Company Canal, and then flow into Lake Verret.

   Gapping the western section of Whitmel Canal will act to divert waters (agricultural
   runoff) into the adjacent swamp, facilitating removal of sediment, excess nutrients,
   and pesticides, thereby reducing the non-point source pollutants moving into Lake
   Verret during heavy rain, flooding, and storm events.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): None

Calcasieu Parish

1) Project Title: Rabbit Island West Cove Calcasieu Lake Beneficial Use/Marsh
   Creation


                                           100
   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and
   Stream Wetland Services, LLC

   Contact Information: Grant Bush, Coastal Zone Administrator
                        Division of Planning and Development
                        P.O. Box 3287
                        Lake Charles, LA 70602
                        (337) 721-3600 (phone)
                        (337) 437-3586 (fax)
                        gbush@cppj.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,500,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Calcasieu-Sabine Basin, located at Rabbit
   Island, West Cove Calcasieu Lake, in the southwestern portion of Calcasieu Lake

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: Rabbit Island has subsided over time, partially due to
   increased tidal amplitudes from the Calcasieu Ship Channel. It is a vital shorebird
   nesting colony. Nesting attempts are often destroyed due to the increased flooding of
   the island. The first brown pelicans were seen there in 2001 or 2002 and they are
   now nesting annually.

   The goal of the project is to assist in restoring land loss and marsh habitat to Rabbit
   Island by adding sediment and revetment to Rabbit Island, building it into a higher
   island suitable for nesting birds. It is a natural habitat for the Louisiana state bird, the
   brown pelican. Storm surge waters inundated the island during Hurricane Rita and
   some land loss occurred.

   Project Cost Share: $2,000,000 Local CIAP Funding, $500,000 Cameron Parish
   CIAP Funding

2) Project Title: Clear Marais Bank Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and
        Stream Wetland Services, LLC

   Contact Information: Grant Bush, Coastal Zone Administrator


                                             101
                           Division of Planning and Development
                           P.O. Box 3287
                           (337) 721-3600 (phone)
                           (337) 437-3586 (fax)
                           Email: gbush@cppj.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located north of the Gulf
   Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) approximately 10 miles northwest of Hackberry in
   Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. It protects 500 acres of fresh marsh and 25 acres of open
   water.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: The goal of this project is to couple with Cameron Parish to
   extend stabilization of the Clear Marais Bank of the GIWW with a rock armored
   breakwater. A 35,000-foot limestone breakwater was constructed in 1997 to prevent
   continued erosion of the levee and to prevent encroachment of the GIWW into the
   project area. Vegetation plantings were used to enhance the bank protection and
   promote sediment trapping. A continuation of this project is needed to protect and
   conserve further. Breaches in the GIWW have led to marsh loss in the Clear Marais
   area because of its increased exposure to saltwater intrusion, boat wakes, and tidal
   scour. As a result, erosion of the north bank of the GIWW threatens not only the
   water management levees to its north but also the marshes protected by the levees.
   Project Cost Share: N/A

3) Project Title: Horseshoe Lake Marsh Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and
   Stream Wetland Services, LLC

   Contact Information: Grant Bush, Coastal Zone Administrator
                        Division of Planning and Development
                        P.O. Box 3287
                        Lake Charles, LA 70602
                        (337) 721-3600 (phone)
                        (337) 437-3586 (fax)
                        gbush@cppj.net



                                          102
Total CIAP Funds Proposed $2,000,000

Total Parish Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

Total State Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: None

Description and Location of Project: The project is a 1200-acre marsh
restoration/protection project located in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, approximately
3.0 miles northwest of Hackberry. The entire area is almost completely enclosed with
an existing levee system. This area is “fast lands” and does not require Section 404
permitting. The entire system of levees was severely degraded and in some places, on
adjoining property, was completely breached by the storm surge of Hurricane Rita.
This project area contained a freshwater marsh that has been managed as such for
many years.

This project proposes four different components:
           1. One water control structure on the GIWW;
           2. Four miles of new levee construction;
           3. Repair of 1 mile of existing levee on the eastern and western
               boundaries; and
           4. Placement of rip rap rock dike along the GIWW

This area has been maintained as a managed freshwater marsh area for many years
and sustained significant populations of freshwater fish (largemouth bass, perch, gar,
etc.) and wildlife species. The emergent marsh vegetation was a mixture of Spartina
patens, cattail, bulrush, etc. Most of the open water areas contained extensive
populations of aquatic vegetation such as coontail, milfoil, pond weed, water lily,
lotus, etc.

Hurricane Rita’s storm surge flooded over this entire area, causing levee erosion and
breaches. Therefore this project proposes repair of the existing levees, which make up
the western and eastern boundaries, establishing new levees along the southern side,
installing a freshwater/sediment introduction structure, and installing a rock dike
along the banks of the GIWW from the salt ditch to the western property line. The
freshwater introduction structure will allow for better water level management,
introduction of fresh/sediment water from the GIWW, and reestablishment of
freshwater vegetative and wildlife species. The new levee will divide the marsh into
an independent management unit that will allow for greater ease in water level
management and reduce the amount of wind fetch across the open water areas. The
majority of the existing open water areas is very shallow and has filmy bottoms;
therefore, with these water management tools these areas can become emergent
marsh. Finally, the rock dike along the G1WW will protect the existing northern
levee from erosion.

Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1



                                       103
   Project Justification: This project area is very important to the entire Black Lake
   basin. This area has been severely impacted by oil and gas exploration and contains
   few areas of healthy marsh. These types of managed units are the only healthy areas.
   This project area will play a vital role in protecting the Black Lake oil fields and the
   Hackberry Strategic Oil Reserve from becoming a part of the GIWW or Calcasieu
   Lake. The GIWW is continuously eroding the areas along the southern banks and at
   times conveys salt water from the Calcasieu Ship Channel to these areas. Without
   protection of these marshes from the dynamic effects of ship traffic on the GIWW,
   these marshes will degrade quickly and expose the entire basin to the effects of storm
   surge, wind fetch, and saltwater intrusion.

   This project area is vital to the adjacent marsh impoundments to the south, west, and
   southwest of this area. This marsh unit is helping to protect over 3000 acres of
   fresh/intermediate marsh from intrusion by the Calcasieu Ship Channel via the salt
   ditch and GIWW.

   Project Cost Share: None

4) Project Title: Shoreline Protection at Intracoastal Park

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and
   Stream Wetland Services, LLC

   Contact Information: Grant Bush, Coastal Zone Administrator
                        Division of Planning and Development
                        P.O. Box 3287
                        Lake Charles, LA 70602
                        (337) 721-3600 (phone)
                        (337) 437-3586 (fax)
                        gbush@cppj.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $800,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $800,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Region 4, Calcasieu-South side of the Gulf
   Intracoastal Water Way at LA Hwy 27 South

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: The project will be one of maintenance. The shoreline on the
   south side of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) is eroding. This is also the
   north property boundary of the Intracoastal Park of Calcasieu Parish. The project


                                           104
   consists of replenishing the shoreline that has been lost to erosion and protection
   measures put in place to assist in retaining the shoreline maintenance.
   Project Cost Share: N/A

5) Project Title: Reclamation of Sand Mines on Cameron Parish Cheniers

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and
   Stream Wetland Services, LLC

   Contact Information: Grant Bush, Coastal Zone Administrator
                        Division of Planning and Development
                        P.O. Box 3287
                        Lake Charles, LA 70602
                        (337) 721-3600 (phone)
                        (337) 437-3586 (fax)
                        gbush@cppj.net


   Total CIAP Funds Requested: $1,000,000

   Total Parish Funds Requested: $1,000,000

   Total State Funds Requested: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: N/A

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in existing sand mines
   on cheniers in Cameron Parish

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: The project will fill in existing sand mines on the cheniers
   with the wood and herbaceous debris that resulted from Hurricane Rita. The full
   landfills would then be capped with clean native material and reforested with live oak
   trees. The result will be a reduction in the amount of land subsidence due to sand
   mining, and the reduction of storm surge heights restoring chenier ridge functions and
   elevations.

   The project will eliminate the wood debris piles located in southern Cameron Parish
   through their beneficial use in landfills that were created by the mining of sand. This
   beneficial use of organic material to reclaim the land will reduce the subsidence
   potential and reduce the debris removal costs to FEMA and to the parish. The live
   oak trees on the capped landfill will serve as a natural mechanism for reducing the
   height of the initial storm surge during future hurricanes.

   Project Cost Share: N/A


                                           105
6) Project Title: Black Lake Ecosystem Restoration (Port of Lake Charles)
   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and the
   Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District (Port)

   Contact Information:      Grant Bush, Coastal Zone Administrator
                             Division of Planning and Development
                             P.O. Box 3287
                             Lake Charles, LA 70602
                             (337) 721-3600
                             (337) 437-3586
                             gbush@cppj.net


   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,530,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $1,530,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project focuses on marsh building in the
   Black Lake area (Dr. Hinton property) just south and adjacent to the GIWW,
   restoring approximately 220 acres of subsided marsh at an estimated cost of $4.7
   million. This site is protected by natural boundaries and is similar in construction to
   the Site “H” project. This project will provide additional barrier protection during
   storm events to the GIWW. The location of this site is such that it will utilize the
   newly created marsh as a protection barrier filling a narrowing strip of land,
   preventing a possible breech to the GIWW. Calcasieu Parish is proposing to assist in
   cost sharing with the sum of up to $1 million.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: Regional subsidence has caused approximately 30,000 acres to
   be lost in the Calcasieu Lake area. The bay bottom substrate has dropped such that
   water column heights no longer support marsh plant species. Prior to the loss of
   marsh habitat, wave energy was attenuated by marsh vegetation, thus protecting
   nearby shorelines from erosion. Although subsidence rates have decreased to near
   background rates, exposed shorelines continue to experience some subsidence.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

Cameron Parish

1) Project Title: Bank Stabilization from Dugas Cut to Kelso Bayou


                                           106
   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project will continue construction of rip
   rap from Dugas Landing to Kelso Bayou and reclaim eroded channel bank utilizing
   spoil material from dredging activities.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: This project will result in the protection and reclamation of
   property along the Calcasieu Ship Channel. This channel is used for OCS activities
   that directly contribute to the erosion along the channel.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

2) Project Title: Dreary Island Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $220,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $220,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0



                                          107
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, East St. John’s bayou mapping unit.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the replacement of existing water control structures that are
   currently not functioning as designed and the refurbishment of adjacent levees. The
   new structures will reduce saltwater intrusion into the project area and restore historic
   salinity and hydrologic regimes. Without this project the area will experience
   extensive interior marsh loss.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver
   the features identified in this proposal. Also, through the partnership between the
   Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
   Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Ducks Unlimited’s Louisiana
   Waterfowl Project, the water control structures included in this project could be cost
   shared through this program upon successful acceptance. If these CIAP Parish funds
   are determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to
   compete for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with
   this effort on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

3) Project Title: East Little Pecan Bayou Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)



                                           108
                            (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                            cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $200,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $200,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, Little Pecan mapping unit.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the installation of water control structures into an existing
   plug. The purpose of the structures is to restore flow into Little Pecan Bayou and
   reestablish historic hydrologic regimes to the Little Pecan Bayou system.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver
   The features identified in this proposal. Additionally, if these CIAP Parish funds are
   determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to compete
   for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with this effort
   on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

4) Project Title: Little Chenier Road

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280



                                            109
                           Cameron, LA 70631
                           (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                           (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                           cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $250,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $250,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project is located on the east end of
   Little Chenier Road and south of the Big Burn Marsh, commonly referred to as the
   “Horseshoe”. This area of roadway needs to be raised four foot to prevent excessive
   flooding south of the Little Chenier Road.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: The project area is located in the Middle Marsh Mapping
   Unit, which is expected to lose 1,570 acres of marsh between 1990 and 2050 due to
   altered hydrology. The Coast 2050 plan identifies “improving drainage within the
   area to relieve the effects of impoundment” as a mapping unit strategy for the area.
   Water moving over Little Chenier Road during storm events is impounding the
   marshes to the south. Increasing the drainage south of the road would alleviate the
   flooding; however, it would dry out the marshes during normal times. The continued
   water control facilitated by this roadway refurbishment will enable the historical
   wetland diversity to be maintained and improved and stop flooding south of the Little
   Chenier Road.

   Project Cost Share: $250,000

5) Project Title: Little Florida to Martin Beach – Coastal Erosion Bank Stabilization

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:      Earnestine T. Horn
                             P.O. Box 1280
                             Cameron, LA 70631
                             (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                             (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                             cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,600,000




                                          110
   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $2,600,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project entails the stabilization and
   erosion mitigation for the shoreline in Cameron Parish west of the breakwaters from
   Little Florida Beach and running west towards Martin Beach. The project will utilize
   a comprehensive scientific understanding of the local shoreline, including the impacts
   of the updrift breakwaters. The resulting analysis will produce the design and
   implementation of a long-term soft solution utilizing low-profile geo-textile
   stabilization systems. The overall project will be performed in five distinct phases:
   (1) scientifically based data acquisition process; (2) data analysis and system design;
   (3) permitting coordination and approval; (4) construction; and (5) annual system
   monitoring.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: This project will be designed to stabilize and assist in the
   control of erosion for the shoreline in Cameron Parish not protected and potentially
   impacted by the breakwater system. It will provide protection for property and road
   systems that run along the shoreline. In addition, this system will help minimize the
   potentially negative down-drift impacts of the breakwater system and eliminate the
   possible continuation of an expensive hard structure system into the existing beach
   environment. Additionally, the system will minimize the long-term impact of erosion
   that results from damaging storms and tidal influences.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

6) Project Title: South Little Pecan Bayou Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0



                                          111
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, Little Pecan mapping unit

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the replacement of existing water control structures that are
   currently not functioning as designed, installation of earthen plugs, and the
   refurbishment of existing levees. The new structures and plugs will reduce saltwater
   intrusion into the project area and restore historic salinity and hydrologic regimes.
   Without this project the area will experience extensive interior marsh loss.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver
   The features identified in this proposal. Additionally, if these CIAP Parish funds are
   determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to compete
   for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with this effort
   on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

7) Project Title: Mermentau Ship Channel Sediment By-Pass Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information:       Earnestine T. Horn
                              P.O. Box 1280
                              Cameron, LA 70631
                              (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                              (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                              cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,500,000



                                            112
   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $1,500,000

   Total State Funds Proposed:      $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project proposes to restore longshore
   sediment flow across the mouth of the Mermentau Ship Channel. The project area is
   located at the mouth of the Mermentau Ship Channel and the Gulf of Mexico, south
   of Grand Chenier.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: Sand is building on the Gulf of Mexico shore on the east side
   of the Mermentau Ship Channel jetties. West of the jetties there continues to be high
   erosion (>50 ft/year) along Hackberry Beach. This area west of Mermentau Cut has
   the highest gulf shore erosion along the Cameron Parish shoreline.

   The project proposes to move sediment from the east side of Calcasieu Pass to the
   west via a hydraulic dredge placed on the east side. Recent USACE Beneficial Use
   projects from maintenance dredging of the Mermentau Ship Channel have been
   successful in placing material west of the jetties to reduce erosion.

   The goal is to reduce gulf shoreline erosion on the west of the Mermentau Ship
   Channel jetties by transporting sediment from the east jetty area.

   Approximately 1 to 2 million cubic yards of material can be transported west of the
   Mermentau Ship Channel jetties to rebuild at least 100 to 200 acres of gulf shoreline
   at Hackberry Beach.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

8) Project Title: North Mermentau Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $220,000




                                          113
   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $220,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, Oak Grove and Middle marsh mapping units.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the replacement of existing water control structures that are
   currently not functioning as designed and the refurbishment of adjacent levees. The
   new structures will reduce saltwater intrusion into the project area and restore historic
   salinity and hydrologic regimes. Without this project the area will experience
   extensive interior marsh loss.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver the
   features identified in this proposal. Additionally, if these CIAP Parish funds are
   determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to compete
   for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with this effort
   on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

9) Project Title: Rabbit Island

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish Police Jury

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)



                                            114
                           cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,500,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $500,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project location is the Calcasieu-Sabine
   Basin, located at Rabbit Island, West Cove Calcasieu Lake, in the southwestern
   portion of Calcasieu Lake. The project proposes to add sediment and revetment to
   Rabbit Island, building it into a higher island suitable for nesting birds.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: Rabbit Island has subsided over time, partially due to
   increased tidal amplitudes from the Calcasieu Ship Channel. It is a vital shorebird
   nesting colony. Nesting attempts are often destroyed due to the increased flooding of
   the island. The first brown pelicans were seen there in 2001 or 2002 and they are
   now nesting annually.

   Project Cost Share: $500,000 Local CIAP Funding; $2,000,000 Calcasieu Parish
   Police Jury CIAP Funding

10) Project Title: South GIWW Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $770,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $770,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0




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   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, West Black Lake and Black Lake mapping units.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the replacement of existing water control structures that are
   currently not functioning as designed and the refurbishment of adjacent levees. The
   new structures will reduce saltwater intrusion into the project area and restore historic
   salinity and hydrologic regimes. Without this project the area will experience
   extensive interior marsh loss.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver
   the features identified in this proposal. Also, through the partnership between the
   Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
   Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Ducks Unlimited’s Louisiana
   Waterfowl Project, the water control structures included in this project could be cost
   shared through this program upon successful acceptance. If these CIAP Parish funds
   are determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to
   compete for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with
   this effort on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

11) Project Title: South Johnson’s Bayou Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net




                                           116
   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $120,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $120,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, Johnson’s Bayou Ridge mapping unit.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the replacement of existing water control structures that are
   currently not functioning as designed and the refurbishment of adjacent levees. The
   new structures will reduce saltwater intrusion into the project area and restore historic
   salinity and hydrologic regimes. Without this project the area will experience
   extensive interior marsh loss.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver
   the features identified in this proposal. Also, through the partnership between the
   Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
   Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Ducks Unlimited’s Louisiana
   Waterfowl Project, the water control structures included in this project could be cost
   shared through this program upon successful acceptance. If these CIAP Parish funds
   are determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to
   compete for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with
   this effort on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

12) Project Title: South Oak Grove Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish



                                           117
Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                     P.O. Box 1280
                     Cameron, LA 70631
                     (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                     (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                     cppjury@camtel.net

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $270,000

Total Parish Funds Proposed: $270,000

Total State Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, oak Grove mapping unit.

Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

Project features include the repair/replacement of existing water control structures
that are currently not functioning as designed and the refurbishment of adjacent
levees. The new/repaired structures will reduce saltwater intrusion into the project
area and restore historic salinity and hydrologic regimes. Without this project the
area will experience extensive interior marsh loss.

Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver
the features identified in this proposal. Additionally, if these CIAP Parish funds are
determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to compete
for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with this effort
on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.



                                         118
13) Project Title: West Big Burn Bridge Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Cameron Parish

   Contact Information: Earnestine T. Horn
                        P.O. Box 1280
                        Cameron, LA 70631
                        (337) 905-1189 (phone)
                        (337) 905-1191 (fax)
                        cppjury@camtel.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $600,000

   Total Parish Funds Proposed: $600,000

   Total State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This proposal refers to the Chenier Plain
   portion of Coast 2050, Region 4, Big Burn mapping unit.

   Project Type (from CIAP fund uses): 1

   Project Justification: As stated in Coast 2050 under coastal historic land loss, major
   navigation/ship channels and exploration canals altered the hydrology and are
   responsible for most of the marsh loss in Regions 3 and 4. The majority of the coastal
   acres in Regions 3 and 4 are within management units that were established due to the
   impacts of man made channels, and it is clear that restoration and maintenance of
   those sites is critical to prevent future loss of interior marsh. The need for long term
   sustainability of the Chenier Plain has been well identified in Region 4 under local
   and common strategies, hydrologic restoration is a local strategy recommended for
   nearly all region 4 mapping units. This proposal includes the restoration features to
   achieve those goals. It has been well identified that in the Chenier Plain there are
   limited opportunities to use sediment-laden water to increase marsh elevation. The
   restoration features in this proposal will ensure that the Chenier Plain maintains the
   features to sustain vertical accumulation through organic production and retention.

   Project features include the replacement of existing water control structures that are
   currently not functioning as designed. The new structures will reduce saltwater
   intrusion into the project area and restore historic salinity and hydrologic regimes.
   Without this project the area will experience extensive interior marsh loss.

   Project Cost Share: Ducks Unlimited is available upon request to deliver




                                           119
   the features identified in this proposal. Additionally, if these CIAP Parish funds are
   determined to be of non-Federal origin, DU will explore the opportunity to compete
   for additional federal dollars to deliver coastal restoration consistent with this effort
   on locations mutually agreed upon by the partners.

Iberia Parish

1) Project Title: Acadiana Regional Airport Street Improvements – LA 3212 to end of
   Four Lane Section

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:       Jim Anderson
                              Director
                              Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                              Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                              New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                              (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                              (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                              jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $485,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $485,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $485,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will provide financial assistance to Iberia Parish Government to repair and build a
   road that provides access to Acadiana Regional Airport and the Port of Iberia.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: This project will patch and overlay 5310 feet of road around
   the Acadiana Regional Airport. These facilities provide a substantial amount of
   commerce and support to OCS facilities and access to them by surface roads is vital.
   These facilities also provide benefits to Louisiana in revenue sharing.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Acadiana Regional Airport Street Improvements – Ember Road

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government



                                            120
   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $30,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $30,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $30,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will provide financial assistance to Iberia Parish Government to repair and build a
   road that provides access to Acadiana Regional Airport and the Port of Iberia.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: This project will reconstruct 270 feet of road around the
   Acadiana Regional Airport. These facilities provide a substantial amount of
   commerce and support to OCS facilities and access to them by surface roads is vital.
   These facilities also provide benefits to Louisiana in revenue sharing.

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Iberia Parish Coastal Zone Management, Planning, and Development

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $260,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $260,000



                                          121
   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $260,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will provide financial assistance to Iberia Parish Government to manage and
   implement the CIAP program.

   Project Type: Planning assistance and the administrative costs of CIAP compliance

   Project Justification: This funding will assist in the administration of its CIAP Plan.

   Project Cost Share: This project is proposed to partner with the Iberia Soil and
   Water Conservation District to house and staff this administrative position to give
   access to additional resources and information already available to the District. The
   amount of additional resources consists of boat, vehicle, office space, computer
   equipment, technical assistance and equipment that is already available to the Soil &
   Water Conservation District

4) Project Title: Lake Sand Terracing

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $375,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $375,500

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish on the
   Marsh Island State Wildlife Refuge, and will construct approximately 25,000 linear
   feet of terraces with vegetative planting.




                                          122
   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Lake Sand is a historic pond on Marsh Island that has
   experienced an increase in shoreline erosion over the past couple of decades. This
   area provides an excellent opportunity to build terraces to break wave energy and
   possibly trap loose sediment.

   Project Cost Share: None

5) Project Title: Lake Tom/Lake Michael Terracing

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $375,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $375,500

   State CIAP Funds proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish on the
   Marsh Island State Wildlife Refuge, and will construct approximately 25,000 linear
   feet of terraces with vegetative planting.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Lake Tom/Lake Michael are historic ponds on Marsh Island
   that have experienced an increase in shoreline erosion over the past couple of
   decades. This area provides an excellent opportunity to build terraces to break any
   wave energy and possibly trap loose sediment.

   Project Cost Share: None

6) Project Title: Oyster Lake Terracing



                                          123
   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $223,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $223,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish on the
   Marsh Island State Wildlife Refuge, and will construct approximately 15,000 linear
   feet of terraces with vegetative planting.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Oyster Lake is a historic pond on Marsh Island that has
   experienced an increase in shoreline erosion over the past couple of decades. This
   area provides an excellent opportunity to build terraces to break wave energy and
   possibly trap loose sediment.

   Project Cost Share: None

7) Project Title: Port of Iberia Bridge Replacement – David Dubois Rd. over
   Commercial Canal

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)



                                          124
                            jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $450,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $450,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $450,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will aid the Port of Iberia in its day to day operations.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: This project will replace the bridge on David Dubois Rd. over
   Commercial Canal. The Port of Iberia handles a substantial amount of OCS-
   produced products and the large equipment used in transporting these products takes a
   major toll on the port’s bridges and roadways.
   Project Cost Share: None

8) Project Title: Port of Iberia Bridge Replacement – Port Rd. over Commercial Canal

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:     Jim Anderson
                            Director
                            Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                            Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                            New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                            (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                            (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                            jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $420,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $420,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $420,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will aid the Port of Iberia in its day to day operations.

   Project Type: 5



                                         125
   Project Justification: This project will replace the bridge on Port Road over
   Commercial Canal. The Port of Iberia handles a substantial amount of OCS produced
   products and the large equipment used in transporting these products take a major toll
   on the ports bridges and roadways.

   Project Cost Share: None

9) Project Title: Port of Iberia Bridge Replacement – Port Road over Rodere Lateral

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $317,500

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $317,500

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $317,500

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will aid the Port of Iberia in its day-to-day operations.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: This project will replace the bridge on Port Road over Rodere
   Lateral. The Port of Iberia handles a substantial amount of OCS produced products
   and the large equipment used in transporting these products take a major toll on the
   port’s bridges and roadways.

   Project Cost Share: None

10) Project Title: Port of Iberia Street Improvements – Unifab Road

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson



                                          126
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $40,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $40,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $40,000

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Iberia Parish, and
   will aid the Port of Iberia in its day-to-day operations.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: This project will patch and overlay 850 feet of Unifab Road.
   The Port of Iberia handles a substantial amount of OCS-produced products and the
   large equipment used in transporting these products takes a major toll on the port’s
   bridges and roadways.

   Project Cost Share: None

11) Project Title: Shark Island Shoreline Restoration Demo

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Jim Anderson
                             Director
                             Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                             Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                             New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                             (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                             (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                             jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0



                                          127
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Trial of methods of shoreline protection on
   actively eroding shoreline to lead into the project of protecting 4.5 miles of along
   Vermilion Bay.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Maintain shoreline integrity and stabilize critical areas of the
   actively eroding Vermilion Bay System.

   Project Cost Share: None

12) Project Title: Vegetative Plantings

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:       Jim Anderson
                              Director
                              Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                              Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                              New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                              (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                              (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                              jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $400, 000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $400,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Conduct annual vegetative plantings on
   shorelines in Vermilion Bay, and other areas, that have proven to be sites where
   plantings might help establish and solidify the shoreline.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: Maintain shoreline integrity and stabilize critical areas of the
   actively eroding Vermilion Bay System.




                                           128
   Project Cost Share: None

13) Project Title: Vermilion Bay Shoreline Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:       Jim Anderson
                              Director
                              Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                              Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                              New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                              (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                              (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                              jla@cox-internet.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,800,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,800,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Restore 6-mile section of marsh rim with
   vegetative plantings and maintenance and a hard structure south of Tigre Lagoon.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Maintain shoreline integrity and stabilize critical areas of the
   actively eroding Vermilion Bay System.

   Project Cost Share: None

14) Project Title: Weeks Bay/Commercial Canal Marsh Creation and Shoreline
                   Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Iberia Parish Government

   Contact Information:       Jim Anderson
                              Director
                              Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
                              Courthouse Building, Suite B-130, 300 Iberia Street
                              New Iberia, LA 70560-4587
                              (337) 369-4427 (phone)
                              (337) 369-9956 (fax)
                              jla@cox-internet.com



                                           129
   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Demonstration of trial methods of marsh
   creation to build landmass and create vegetated wetlands. Project will utilize various
   methods to create sediment deposition field to enhance natural processes to create
   landmass between Weeks Bay and the GIWW.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Maintain shoreline integrity and stabilize critical areas of the
   actively eroding Vermilion Bay System.

   Project Cost Share: None

Jefferson Parish
1) Project Title: Bayside Segmented Breakwaters at Grand Isle

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Marnie Winter, Director
                              Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                              1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                              Jefferson, LA 70123
                              (504) 736-6440
                              mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed:        $3,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed:        $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Jefferson Parish,
   Louisiana, along the bay side of Grand Isle, Louisiana.




                                           130
The purpose of this project is to reduce erosion on the bay side of Grand Isle.
Twenty-four 300-foot breakwaters (approximately 1.5 miles) will be constructed on
the back-bay side of Grand Isle. The proposed project will connect existing
breakwaters to the east and west and complete back-bay side protection on the only
inhabited barrier island in Louisiana.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: The back-bay side of Grand Isle is subject to wave action from
strong north winds during winter cold fronts and when tropical storms and hurricanes
make landfall east of the island. Breakwaters have been constructed on the north side
of the island to the east and west of the proposed project site to protect residential and
commercial development. This project will provide a continuous line of protection
on the north side of the island from the Grand Isle Bridge to Fifi Island, and provide
critical protection for the marsh remaining on the back side of the island and
infrastructure that supports the offshore oil and gas industry.

The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

Coastwide Strategy:

   Maintenance of Bay and Lake Shoreline Integrity
   Maintain or Restore Ridge Function

Regional Strategy:

   #20. Construct wave absorbers at the head of bays
   #22. Restore/maintain barrier headlines, islands, and shorelines

LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION STUDY (LCA):

Initial Near-Term Critical Restoration Features:

   3. Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline Restoration

COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

   Protect critical infrastructure


Project Cost Share:        State = 0 %
                           Parish = 0 %




                                          131
2) Project Title: Fifi Island Restoration Extension
   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Marnie Winter, Director
                              Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                              1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                              Jefferson, LA 70123
                              (504) 736-6440
                              mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed:         $3,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed:         $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0
   Description and Location of Project: The project is located at the eastern
   tip of Fifi Island, adjacent to Bayou Rigaud, on the northern side of Grand Isle in
   Jefferson Parish, Louisiana.

   The project would provide for marsh creation through dedicated dredging and
   vegetative plantings. The project would extend eastward from the existing U-shaped
   rock rip-rap in an elongated V-shape for approximately 1,000 linear feet with a head
   width of 200 feet, slightly north of the USACE-maintained Bayou Rigaud navigation
   channel. The interior of V-shaped rock revetment would be filled with beneficial use
   dredge material from Bayou Rigaud. Dredge material would be stacked to marsh
   elevation and then planted with appropriate marsh vegetation.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: The project would provide approximately 2,200 linear feet of
   rock dike protection and create approximately 6 acres of marsh. Additionally, it
   would add another restoration component to the ongoing conservation efforts being
   implemented on Fifi Island, protect the bay side of Grand Isle (Louisiana’s only
   inhabited barrier island) from assault from northerly winds, and protect important
   infrastructure important to the economy of Jefferson Parish and the nation, including:
   Bayou Rigaud navigation channel, the U.S. Coast Guard station, the Louisiana
   Wildlife and Fisheries boat dock, the largest recreational and commercial marina on
   Grand Isle, and facilities associated with the Grand Isle Tarpon Rodeo.

   The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

   COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:


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   Coastwide Strategy:

       Beneficial Use of Dredged Material from Maintenance Operations
       Dedicated Dredging for Marsh Creation
       Maintenance of Bay and Lake Shorelines
       Maintain or Restore Ridge Functions


   Regional Strategy:

       #17. Dedicated delivery of sediment for marsh building marsh in Caminada Bay
       #22. Restore/Maintain barrier headlands, islands, and shorelines

 LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION STUDY (LCA):

 Initial Near-Term Critical Restoration Features:

       3. Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline Restoration

 Strategies:

       Create a marsh platform for habitat in areas near existing navigational channels
       through beneficial use of maintenance dredging materials.

 COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

       Protect critical infrastructure

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Goose Bayou Ridge Creation and Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:        Marnie Winter, Director
                               Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                               1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                               Jefferson, LA 70123
                               (504) 736-6440
                               mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000



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State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: N/A

Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Lafitte, Jefferson
Parish, Louisiana, along the northwestern shore of The Pen, at the outlet of Goose
Bayou, thence northward to its intersection with Cypress Bayou (DD 90.08439,
29.70569).

This project would involve shoreline protection, dedicated dredging, and vegetative
planting. Approximately 8,000 linear feet of additional shoreline protection would be
added along the west side of Goose Bayou to its intersection with Cypress Bayou. A
dedicated dredge would then move sediment from the bottom of The Pen (or from the
Mississippi River) to the area behind the rock revetment used to construct the
shoreline protection. The deposited material would be built into a topographic ridge
approximately 3.5 feet MSL to restore the historical function of ridges in the project
area. The artificial ridge would be planted with woody vegetation to create
approximately 50 acres of wooded ridge. The added shoreline protection would
benefit approximately 1200 acres of freshwater marsh between Goose Bayou and the
inhabited area of lower Lafitte.
Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: The project would enhance tidal surge protection to residents
of the Lafitte area, protect approximately 1200 acres of freshwater marsh, and create
much-needed woody ridge habitat for native species of flora and fauna. Shoreline
protection was installed along 1,650 feet of Goose Bayou, which is on the
northwestern perimeter of The Pen, under a previous restoration project. The
opportunity now exists to extend this protection northward along the western
shoreline of Goose Bayou to Cypress Bayou.

The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

Coastwide Strategy:

   Dedicated dredging for wetland creation
   Maintenance of bay and lake shoreline integrity
   Vegetative planting
   Maintain or restore ridge functions

COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

   Protect critical infrastructure



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   Project Cost Share: N/A

4.) Project Title: Lower Lafitte Shoreline Stabilization at Bayou Rigolettes
    (Grand Isle Water Tank) and Barataria Bay Waterway

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Marnie Winter, Director
                              Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                              1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                              Jefferson, LA 70123
                              (504) 736-6440
                              mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed:        $4,053,300

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,053,300

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0
   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Lafitte, Louisiana, at
   the intersection of Bayou Rigolettes and Bayou Barataria, and extends south along
   Bayou Barataria for approximately 1.5 miles and west along Bayou Rigolettes
   approximately 0.25 miles. It also includes the area directly adjacent to the water tank
   that services Grand Isle, Louisiana, which is located at the end of Privateer
   Boulevard, along the north shoreline of Bayou Rigolettes at the right-descending bank
   of Bayou Barataria.

   10,600 linear feet of foreshore rock dike is to be constructed on the west bank of
   Bayou Barataria and the southern edge of Bayou Rigolettes to protect the bank of
   Barataria Waterway and adjacent interior marshes. A water control structure will be
   installed to limit saltwater intrusion into the marsh area, optimize water levels for
   wintering waterfowl, and prevent ponding of storm waters. The preliminary structure
   concept and design for the water control feature consists of three, 48-inch-diameter,
   30-foot-long, 12-gauge corrugated aluminum pipes, each fitted with a 6-foot-high,
   10-foot-wide, stop-log riser.

   Features adjacent to the water tank would include furnishing and installation of
   precast concrete barrier wall panels, consisting of vertical pre-stressed concrete
   sheetpiles, approximately 6 inches thick x 8 feet wide x 20 LF long. These sheetpile
   slabs would be supported along each length by 60-foot-long precast concrete piles
   having an "H" - Pile configuration for the top 20 feet, and driven at 8.5 ft, center to
   center, along the wall alignment. The barrier wall segments would be driven
   approximately 12 feet from the bank, and the area between the structures and the
   shore would be back-filled using hauled-in or dedicated dredging material. The



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embankments would then be capped off with cement/concrete pavement to eliminate
further erosion.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: This project would protect the integrity of the western bank of
the Barataria Bay Waterway and the north shoreline of Bayou Rigolettes at its
intersection with Bayou Barataria, near Lafitte, Louisiana, and would provide
protection for the foundation and site of an existing water tank facility that provides
potable drinking water to the coastal community of Grand Isle, Louisiana. The project
would also eliminate further erosion of the north bank of Bayou Rigolettes directly at
its intersection with Bayou Barataria, cease the widening of the channel, and reduce
saltwater intrusion and deterioration of the interior marshes.

The project area is experiencing extreme degradation, mainly due to wave action
induced in part by marine industry activity. As a consequence of bankline erosion, the
foundation for the Grand Isle water tank is in jeopardy. Many ships and barges
servicing the oil and gas industry utilize the Port of Grand Isle, Louisiana, as a source
for potable water. This particular water tank facility is considered critical
infrastructure that directly supports OCS activity. Barriers in the form of concrete
sheetpile walls would be utilized to stabilize the bankline. The project also reclaims
some area that has been lost, and provides a concrete apron which may be utilized to
maximize docking space at the site.

This project will also protect the shoreline of the Bayou Barataria Waterway, an
important navigational route for the transportation of offshore oil and gas supplies
and products, which protects approximately 670 acres of marsh habitat on the
Barataria Land Bridge, and enhances storm surge protection for residents of lower
Lafitte, Louisiana. This project would provide synergy with previously constructed
CWPPRA projects in the area, which include: Barataria Bay Waterway West Side
Shoreline Protection (BA-23); Barataria Basin Land Bridge Shoreline Protection,
Phase 4 (BA-27d); and Jonathan Davis Wetland Restoration (BA-20).

The water control structure will limit saltwater intrusion, prevent impoundment of
high-salinity waters following extreme tidal effects such as occurred with Hurricane
Rita in 2005, and promote marsh health in this area of the Barataria Land Bridge.

The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

Coastwide Strategy:

   Stabilization of Major Navigational Channels
   Maintain or Restore Ridge Functions



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   Regional Strategy:

       # 2. Restore natural drainage patterns
       #24. Build entire Breaux Act land bridge shore protection project
       #25. Preserve bay and lake shoreline integrity on the land bridge
       #26. Dedicated dredging to create marsh on the land bridge

   Previously Proposed Strategies:

           •   Preserving the ridge along the Barataria Waterway
           •   Stabilizing the banks of the Barataria Waterway
           •   Protecting the shorelines of the large lakes
           •   Managing hydrology by preventing increase in tidal scour and salinity
               intrusion
           •   Maintain or Restore Ridge Functions

   COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

       Protect critical infrastructure

   Project Cost Share: None

Lafourche Parish

1) Project Title: Maritime Forest Ridge and Marsh Restoration at
   Fourchon, LA

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary
   Program (BTNEP)

   Contact Information: Kerry St. Pé
                        or Richard DeMay
                        BTNEP
                        P. O. Box 2663, Nicholls State University
                        Thibodaux, LA 70310
                        (985) 477-0608
                         kerry@btnep.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed:            $700,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $700,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0


                                             137
Description and Location of Project: Since 2000, the Barataria-Terrebonne
National Estuary Program (BTNEP) has developed a close partnership with the
Greater Lafourche Port Commission in the restoration of a maritime forest ridge and
marsh habitats north of Fourchon, Louisiana. This project is a true restoration project
in that it does not serve as mitigation for any of the port’s activities. To date, many
thousands of cubic yards of earthen material have been pumped to the desired
location, resulting in an approximately +4-foot platform 400 feet wide by 6,000 feet
long. Last year, BTNEP funded the shaping of 2,000 feet of that platform to the
desired geometry of a +8-foot ridge and +1.6-foot marsh platform. Additionally,
BTNEP developed a partnership with the Natural Resources Conservation Service
(NRCS) Plant Materials Center and entered into an agreement with them to conduct
vegetative trials/demonstrations of both herbaceous and woody plants on the 2,000-
foot site.

Additionally, BTNEP has developed a volunteer program in order to engage citizens,
both State and national, and provide them a “hands on” opportunity to help in coastal
Louisiana’s plight. Within 18 months of its initiation, this program has already
brought hundreds of people out to the maritime forest ridge/marsh restoration site to
help with vegetative plantings. Participants have included school children, college
youth, corporate volunteers, and concerned citizens from all walks of life, many of
whom have come from beyond Louisiana’s borders.

Future Intent: During the summer of 2006, the Greater Lafourche Port Commission
pumped more earthen material to the remaining unshaped 4,000 feet to gain more
elevation to meet project specifications. Once the site dries, the project will begin the
shaping of the remaining 4,000 feet in 2,000-foot increments. The funding requested
through the CIAP program will be used to shape the site to the desired ridge/marsh
geometry, provide for a part of the vegetative component, and fund part of the site
monitoring. Other funding will come from BTNEP in future workplan years, and
through other private/public partners. These funds will help in the restoration of over
60 acres of salt marsh and 60 acres of maritime forest ridge habitat.

Many of the aspects of this project will continue to be evaluated so that lessons
learned here can be transferred to other like projects. They include many different
vegetative trials, soil monitoring, soil amendments, avian use, subsidence rates, etc.
These efforts will result in written reports that can be provided to both the restoration
community and private sector alike.

In particular, this project allows for the implementation of several action plans of the
BTNEP Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan, including EM-15
“Protection of Habitat for Migratory and Resident Birds,” which calls for
“…restoration of important habitats”; SR-3 “Citizens Involvement Programs and
Activities,” which calls for ”…development of avenues to help citizens become more
knowledgeable and committed to protecting the estuary”; and EG-6 “New




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Technology Research and Development,” which calls for “…research and
development of new coastal restoration technologies.”

Project Type: 4

Project Justification: Many of Louisiana’s coastal forests that fringe the distributary
ridges comprise the Chenier ridges or encompass maritime forests of barrier islands
have suffered effects from many anthropogenic and natural actions. In particular,
dredging of navigation channels to support onshore and offshore oil and gas
exploration has caused the direct loss of these habitats as well as coastal wetlands,
while the construction of infrastructure to support these activities has had similar
consequences. In addition, the increased subsidence rates associated with the
subsurface withdrawal of mineral deposits have also taken their toll. And more
recently, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita had devastating effects on all coastal habitats.

If Louisiana expects to continue its push for the restoration of its coastal habitats, it is
imperative that this project continue. The results from this effort would provide
valuable insight to like projects that are now being considered seriously, especially
since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

To meet the growing demand for both practical applied knowledge and restoration,
this project proposes to continue the ongoing work to not only conduct coastal
restoration but to also evaluate a suite of parameters and how they affect plant
growth. While these evaluations are not true scientific investigations, they do include
an evaluative component of site parameters that help to steer future direction on the
next phases of this project.

Project Cost Share: The BTNEP Program has developed past agreements with both
government and the private sector to help fund this effort. These partnerships have
provided hundreds of thousands of dollars that were used during the initial 2,000 feet
of ridge/marsh restoration. The BTNEP program has allocated some if its own funds
toward this effort, as well as provided enormous amount of personnel time. The
BTNEP program will continue to develop new partnerships as opportunities arise:

BTNEP partners and contributions for the initial 2,000 feet of ridge/marsh restoration
include:
LDNR                                             $100,000
Gulf of Mexico Program                           $101,700
Gulf of Mexico Foundation                        $90,000
NOAA                                             $5,000
Shell                                            $100,000
BTNEP                                            $30,000 + personnel time
NRCS Plant Material Center                       personnel time
Volunteers                                       $ thousands in volunteer time
Greater Lafourche Port Commission                $ hundreds of thousands




                                          139
2) Project Title: Northwest Little Lake Marsh Creation and Enhancement

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Lafourche Parish Government

   Contact Information: Windell Curole
                        P.O. Box 426
                        Galliano, LA 70354
                        (985) 632-7554
                        slld@mobiletel.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project is located in Lafourche Parish,
   Northwest Shoreline of Little Lake (Clovelly Canal to Tennessee Gas Pipeline
   Canal). The project proposes dedicated dredging to create, restore, or protect
   wetlands along a highly eroded bank line of Little Lake.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The project goals are to reduce shoreline erosion rates, create
   marsh in interior open water bodies that are threatened by potential Little Lake
   shoreline breaches, and enhance a band of marsh along the Little Lake shoreline to
   maintain shoreline integrity.

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Small Dredge “Program”

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Lafourche Parish Government

   Contact Information: Windell Curole
                        P.O. Box 426,
                        Galliano, LA 70354
                        (985) 632-7554
                        slld@mobiletel.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,270,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,270,000




                                          140
   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This program involves the possible purchase
   of a small dredge, which would be operated by the Lafourche Parish Public Works
   Department in coordination with the Coastal Zone Management office to
   hydraulically dredge borrow canals and other open water areas to create and maintain
   marsh areas in Lafourche with critical attention paid to wetland areas that protect
   infrastructure and the Catfish Bay area, or enter into a contract with a dredge
   company to accomplish the same task.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Lafourche Parish has one of the highest rates of land loss in
   the United States. The wetlands along the South Lafourche Levee System have
   disappeared at an alarming rate over the past years. This project is needed to protect
   that critical infrastructure as well as the homes and properties inside the levee system.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

Livingston Parish

1) Project Title: Bald cypress/Tupelo Coastal Forest Protection, Pontchartrain Basin

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Livingston Parish Government

   Contact Information: Karla Cormier
                        30259 Eden Church Rd
                        Denham Springs, LA 70726
                        (225) 571-0324 (cell)
                        (225) 665-9779 (fax)
                        karlacormier@cox.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: N/A

   Description and Location of Project: The project location is 1,762 contiguous acres
   of coastal wetland forest, specifically bald cypress-tupelo forest, with roughly 200
   acres fronting the western edge of Lake Maurepas. The area is identified as Tract #44
   and lies within the Pontchartrain Basin and within the Louisiana Coastal and


                                           141
   Estuarine Land Conservation Program (CELCP) Plan Area. Lakes Maurepas,
   Pontchartrain, and Borgne are brackish water lakes that together form a receiving
   basin for the fresh waters of the Amite, Tickfaw, Blind, Tangipahoa, Tchefuncte, and
   Pearl Rivers. The target area is within Livingston Parish, State of Louisiana, and is
   situated in the Maurepas Basin, southeast Louisiana.

   Project Problem: Louisiana’s coastal forested wetlands quickly become the last
   geographic barrier that serves to protect the coastal communities against devastating
   swamp storms and hurricanes. Without this project and preservation of the targeted
   1,762 acres of bald cypress-tupelo, this land will be converted, logged, and lost.

   Project Goals: 1) Conserve the 1,762 acres of pristine wetland habitat while working
   to conserve the natural heritage of the area; 2) manage the coastal resource for the
   public to enjoy and cherish as an aesthetic area for recreation; 3) protect the habitat
   against future logging developments.

   Project Solution: Purchase 1,762 acres from an interested landowner who is
   committed to this project. Negotiations are underway with the landowner; however,
   no purchase agreement has been signed, nor is there an appraisal or title opinion. By
   purchasing this acreage, this project will preserve the bald cypress/tupelo within this
   coastal area. The partners in this project are LDNR, the Louisiana Department of
   Wildlife & Fisheries (responsible for management, conservation, and protection of
   land and all its intrinsic qualities for the public), The Nature Conservancy, the
   Department of Agriculture and Forestry, and the Office of State Lands. This project
   has also been submitted to the Louisiana CELCP Plan.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland, and mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources.

   Project Justification: This project is supported by the Livingston Parish Waterway
   Commission. It has been a Louisiana CELCP candidate. The owner of this land has
   timbering rights and is committed to this project; however, if this project is not
   funded, then the owner may consider the many offers to sell the timbering rights to
   timber companies who will destroy the habitat. The Coastal Zone Management Plan
   promotes purchasing land that will serve to protect, conserve, and enhance the
   resource. Managing the area for the public would ensure that the natural resources
   found within this unique ecosystem could be shared by all.

   Project Cost Share: This project requires 100% CIAP funding at the parish level,
   with any difference in funding being requested through a State CIAP partnership.

2) Project Title: Hydrologic Restoration in Swamps West of Lake Maurepas

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Livingston Parish Government

   Contact Information: Karla Cormier



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                        30259 Eden Church Rd
                        Denham Springs, LA 70726
                        (225) 571-0324 (cell)
                        (225) 665-9779 (fax)
                        karlacormier@cox.net

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The project is to take place in Region 1—
Lake Pontchartrain Basin, Livingston Parish, in cypress/tupelo swamps west of Lake
Maurepas, north and south of the Amite River Diversion Canal.

Project Problem: Swamps north and south of the Amite River Diversion Canal are
highly stressed by a lack of Mississippi River inflow and the impounding effects of
the spoil bank along the canal. The Amite River Diversion Canal could compensate
for the lack of Mississippi River water, but the spoil banks prohibit input of sediment-
laden and nutrient-laden water from the canal into the swamps during high water, and
they prohibit drainage of the swamps during low water periods.

Project Goals: Increase productivity and regeneration of cypress and tupelo swamp;
increase sediment accretion and nutrient loading in the swamp; decrease frequency,
intensity, and duration of salinity spikes in the swamp; increase water flows through
the swamp; increase the frequency and duration of periods when the swamp surface is
not flooded to promote regeneration; increase frequency and duration of periods when
water depths in the swamp are <1 ft to support survival of new cypress and tupelo
recruits; decrease nutrient loading into Lake Maurepas from Amite River.

Project Solution: Constructing four 40-foot-wide cuts in the spoil banks on each side
(north and south) of the Amite River Diversion Canal to facilitate water exchange.
Each cut will be approximately 250 feet long, to a depth of -1.0-foot NAVD. Gaps in
the old railroad grade, which traverse north-south across the project boundary, would
be cut to facilitate better hydrologic connectivity within the project area. The project
is expected to benefit 6,458 acres of cypress-tupelo swamp; however, it is not
expected to directly create additional forested wetland acreage.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland, and mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources.

Project Justification: This project is supported by EPA Region 6 and the Livingston
Parish Waterway Commission. It has been a CWPPRA candidate under PPL12 and



                                        143
   PPL16. This project is designed to not require land acquisition and has been
   redesigned to not need bridges. This environmental project does have over 11 months
   of gage data in the project area to support the project’s assumptions. The project is
   expected to continue providing wetland benefits 30-40 years after construction
   because project features are simple and should be durable over time.

   Project Cost Share: None


Orleans Parish
   No Parish-Funded Tier One Projects

Plaquemines Parish

1) Project Title: Baptiste Collette Channel Deepening/Beneficial Use

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Benny Rousselle, Plaquemines Parish
   President; Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Administrator;
   Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information:      Andrew MacInnes
                             106 Avenue G
                             Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                             (504) 297-5320
                             andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,417,080

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,417,080

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $708,540

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project seeks to deepen and
   widen two passes of the Mississippi River: Baptiste Collette and Tiger Pass. All
   dredged material from the passes would be strategically pumped into open water cells
   along each of the passes for marsh creation. Both channels are located in the Venice
   vicinity on either side of the Mississippi River.

   Currently, the USACE maintains a channel depth of 12 feet for each channel. Each
   channel is essential for navigational and recreational use, and the deepening of the
   channels would help to lure oil and gas activity back to the Venice area, as the current
   authorized dredging depths are insufficient for some of the larger draft vessels used
   by the oil and gas industry. Each channel would be dredged to a depth of 24 feet,


                                           144
   resulting in a massive amount of spoil material that could be utilized for direct marsh
   creation on either side of each pass. Estimates of the amount of material that will be
   dredged to achieve the desired depth are in the neighborhood of 9 million cubic yards.

   Project Type: 1 and 5

  Project Justification:
             1. Sediment delivery is the most effective way to rebuild/recreate marsh.
             2. The two passes constantly accumulate new sediment, thus the need for
             continuous dredging.
             3. Dredging to an increased depth will result in increased economic and
             commercial activity for Plaquemines Parish.
             4. A potential cost-share agreement could be reached with the USACE,
             who currently maintains the two channels.

   Project Cost Share: The project could be separated into two project areas for
   planning, design, and construction implementation.

2) Project Title: Jump Basin Dredging and Marsh Creation

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish
   Coastal Zone Administrator; Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information:       Andrew MacInnes
                              106 Avenue G
                              Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                              (504) 297-5320
                              andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

    Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $800,000

    Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $800,000

    State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

    Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project is located in the Venice
   area of Plaquemines Parish, and more specifically in the Jump Basin marina and
   along the west side of Tidewater Road. The Plaquemines Parish Government owns
   and leases the existing marina and also assumes maintenance of Tidewater Road.
   PPG Industries and LDNR had discussed a cost share agreement two years ago
   whereby Plaquemines Parish would pay for the dredging of the marina and LDNR
   would pay for the pumping of the material over Tidewater Road in an effort to create
   marsh in the target area. Due to budget limitations, the project was never realized.
   The Parish wishes to propose the project again with funding under the CIAP program.



                                          145
   An initial survey was completed and it was predicted that approximately 65,000 cubic
   yards of material could be dredged from the marina. Based on water depths in the
   target area, an initial estimate of 4-7 acres of marsh could be created.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands; mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife and natural resources; and planning
   assistance and administrative costs of CIAP compliance.

    Project Justification:
      1. The borrow site and target marsh creation area are relatively close
      together (<1/2 mile).
      2. There is ample dredge material to create marsh.
      3. Marsh creation would help in the protection of Tidewater Road from flooding.

    Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Tidewater Road Flood Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Andrew MacInnes, Plaquemines Parish
   Coastal Zone Administrator; Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Advisory Committee

   Contact Information: Andrew MacInnes
                        106 Avenue G
                        Belle Chasse, LA 70037
                        (504) 297-5320
                        andrew_macinnes@cmaaccess.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project is located on the west
   bank of Plaquemines Parish in the Venice area. Tidewater Road extends beyond the
   end of Highway 23 and is entirely outside of levee protection. Tidewater Road allows
   access to many of the oil and gas, fishing, industry, government, and private
   developments in Venice. It is the last stretch of road before reaching the Gulf of
   Mexico and it serves as a staging area for the mentioned industries to prosper.

   Tidewater Road is subject to heavy inundation from directional winds that elevate
   tides over the roadway. Wetland loss in the area is severe and along much of
   Tidewater Road’s length, there is open water in canals and ponds that abut the road
   shoulder. Due to the importance of Tidewater Road as an access point for the oil and



                                          146
   gas industry, Plaquemines Parish feels this project is best handled as an infrastructure
   project, as mitigation of OCS activities will result from the construction of this public
   service need.

   This project proposes to create flood protection along the entire length of Tidewater
   Road (approx. 3 miles). Several proposals have been suggested, including raising the
   road to a higher elevation, installing earthen berms or sheetpiles along one or both
   sides of the road, and also installing pump stations to drain standing water. The
   method determined to be the most cost effective and efficient at protecting the
   roadway from standing water will be utilized. Since this is an infrastructure project
   and subject to the 23% cap on spending CIAP money, the parish’s allocation will also
   determine which method is utilized. Anticipated spending for this project is estimated
   in the $3-4M range.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands; mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources; planning
   assistance and administrative costs of CIAP compliance; and mitigation of impacts of
   OCS activities through funding of onshore infrastructure projects and public service
   needs.

   Project Justification:
      1. The road is a major staging area and thoroughfare for industry and recreation
      for all of Louisiana.
      2. The roadway is often subject to inundation from elevated tides and wind-driven
      waves.
      3. Protecting the roadway will help to ensure the long-term viability of the oil and
      gas, industrial, recreational, and private business interests that the road grants
      access to.

   Project Cost Share: None

St. Bernard Parish

1) Project Title: Lake Lery Lake Rim Reestablishment and Marsh Creation

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Henry “Junior” Rodriguez
                              Parish President
                              8201 West Judge Perez Drive
                              Chalmette, LA 70043
                              (504) 278-4227
                              hrodriguez@sbpg.net

                              Dr. Mohan Menon, Shaw E&I
                              (225) 987-7154


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                          mohan.menon@shawgrp.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,700,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,700,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0
Description and Location of Project: The project is located approximately 4 miles
northwest of Delacroix, Louisiana, in Lake Lery and in the marshes north and east of
Lake Lery. Hurricane Katrina impacts included filling of the navigational channel
and extreme scouring in the interior marsh areas north and east of the lake.

The project proposes to dredge an existing historical navigational waterway through
Lake Lery, located approximately along the St. Bernard and Plaquemines Parish line,
and utilize the dredge material to create marsh in the open water areas north and east
of the lake. Borrow areas in Lake Lery will be utilized for dredge material to create
marsh in open water areas north and east of the lake. Additionally, the project
proposes to reestablish the lake rim by armoring the northern and eastern shoreline of
Lake Lery through utilizing a rock dike placed in the nearshore area, thus providing
protection to the interior marshes north and east of the lake.

The proposed project features are:
• Dredging the existing historical navigational waterway along the St.
   Bernard/Plaquemines Parish line through Lake Lery.
• Utilizing the material from dredging the waterway and additional borrow areas
   identified in Lake Lery to create and nourish marshes north and east of Lake Lery.
• Lake rim reestablishment by placement of a rock dike along the northern and
   eastern shoreline of Lake Lery.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification:

Coast 2050:
Common Coastwide Strategies
• Beneficial Use of Dredged Material from Maintenance Operations
• Dedicated Dredging for Wetland Creation
• Maintenance of Bay and Lake Shoreline Integrity
• Maintain or Restore Ridge Function
• Vegetative Plantings

Region 1:
Regional Ecosystem Strategies
• Restore/Sustain Marshes


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               #9- Dedicated delivery of sediment for marsh building
   •   Protect Bay/Lake Shorelines
   •   Maintain Critical Landforms- Protect Ridge function of Bayou Terre aux Boeuf
       Ridge

   Region 2:
   Regional Ecosystem Strategies:
   • Restore/Sustain Marshes
             #5- Manage outfalls of existing diversions
             #6- Enrich existing diversions with sediment
   • Protect Bay and Lake Shorelines
   • Maintain Critical Landforms

   Mapping Unit Strategies:
   • Caernarvon
            #40- Evaluate Diversion of Greater than 4,000 cfs from Caernarvon;
            Monitoring Existing Diversion and Evaluate to Derive Maximum Benefits

   LCA
   Modification of Caernarvon Diversion
   • Reestablishing the historical navigational channel through Lake Lery would
     enhance distribution of freshwater flow from the Caernarvon Diversion.

   Project Cost Share: None

St. Charles Parish
1) Project Title: East LaBranche Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Charles Parish (Earl Matherne)

   Contact Information: St. Charles Parish
                        Coastal Zone Management Section
                        Earl Matherne
                        P.O. Box 302
                        Hahnville, LA 70057
                        (985) 783-5060
                        ematherne@stcharlesgov.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0


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   Description and Location of Project: This project involves the continuation of rock
   shoreline protection project on the south shore of Lake Pontchartrain in St. Charles
   Parish. The project will consist of installing approximately 15,300 linear feet of rock
   dike at or near the +1.0’ NAVD 88 contour on the existing shoreline. Construction
   access will be via flotation channels excavated to -6.0 NAVD 88.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: The Lake Pontchartrain shoreline is susceptible to erosion
   because of the long fetch across the lake, the vulnerable shoreline configuration, and
   the highly unconsolidated sediment base. These factors are responsible for the high
   shoreline erosion rate in the Lake Pontchartrain area. This chronic erosion has
   breached the lake shoreline in several locations, exposing fragile, highly organic
   marsh substrates to increased wave and tidal energy and resulting in large, shallow
   pond formation in the interior marsh. The existing shoreline protection projects,
   installed in 1987 and 1993, protect approximately 8700 feet of the fragile shoreline.
   This proposed CIAP funded project would extend the current project east to the
   Jefferson Parish line and their existing seawall.

2) Project Title: West LaBranche Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Charles Parish (Earl Matherne)

   Contact Information: St. Charles Parish
                        Coastal Zone Management Section
                        Earl Matherne
                        P.O. Box 302
                        Hahnville, LA 70057
                        (985) 783-5060
                        ematherne@stcharlesgov.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,600,000

   State CIAP Funds Pequested: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project involves the continuation of the
   rock shoreline protection project on the south shore of Lake Pontchartrain in St.
   Charles Parish. The project will consist of installing approximately 2150 linear feet
   of rock dike at or near the +1.0’ NAVD 88 contour on the existing shoreline.
   Construction access will be via flotation channels excavated to -6.0 NAVD 88 or



                                           150
   direct placement using an access bridge from the stabilized shoreline south of Bayou
   LaBranche at the eastern extent of this project.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: The Lake Pontchartrain shoreline is susceptible to erosion
   because of the long fetch across the lake, the vulnerable shoreline configuration, and
   the highly unconsolidated sediment base. These factors are responsible for the high
   shoreline erosion rate in the Lake Pontchartrain area. This chronic erosion has
   breached the lake shoreline in several locations, exposing fragile, highly organic
   marsh substrates to increased wave and tidal energy and resulting in large, shallow
   pond formation in the interior marsh. The existing shoreline protection projects,
   installed in 1987 and 1993, protect approximately 8700 feet of the fragile shoreline.
   This proposed CIAP funded project would extend the current project west to the
   stabilized shoreline south of Bayou LaBranche at the eastern extent of the project.

St. James Parish

1) Project Title: Baytree Freshwater Diversion Property Purchase

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $440,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $440,000

   State CIAP Funds Requested: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council intends to
   purchase a tract of land extending from the Mississippi River to the Parish Canal in
   order to secure the required property for a future freshwater diversion. This project is
   proposed to purchase approximately 63 acres of existing agriculture and wetland
   areas in order to accommodate a proposed freshwater siphon project.

   The tract of land would allow a siphon and depository canal to be built at the
   Mississippi River at Section 47 and continue through Section 49, located in T-11-S,


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   R-16-E. The canal would allow a freshwater river siphon to discharge fresh water
   from the Mississippi River to the parish cross-cut canal, then into Bayou Chevreuil
   and, finally, Lac Des Allemands. The purchase of this tract will provide a straight-line
   canal to feed fresh water into the upper Barataria Basin system. The fresh water will
   provide needed nutrients and sediments that would enhance wetland restoration and
   improve water quality. The diversion will take advantage of natural topographic and
   hydrologic features to reestablish input of basic resources and circulation.

   This area would target the upper section of the Barataria Basin, which continues to
   experience wetland destruction due to poor water quality and lack of the fresh
   nutrients needed to sustain an existing wetland area. This area’s freshwater source
   was cut off when the Mississippi River levees were constructed in the 1940s;
   consequently, the existing wetland continued to deteriorate and subside.

   Project Type: Mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources.

   Project Justification: The purpose of this project is to purchase the necessary
   property to construct a small freshwater diversion approximately 200-400 cfs into the
   Bayou Chevreuil wetlands area. The project is to address the wetland loss and poor
   water quality that plagues this area due to its isolation from a continual freshwater
   source. The project will improve habitat for wildlife and fisheries by increasing the
   flow of freshwater into the wetland areas through a managed outfall system. One of
   the issues that complicate the development of such a system is land rights and
   availability of property. St. James Parish plans to use these funds to purchase the
   necessary tract of land needed to allow the project to be constructed without future
   delays due to land and property issues. The proposed project was part of the Coast
   2050 initiative and was included in the State’s master plan of restoration strategies for
   the Louisiana coast. Once the property is owned by St. James Parish, the parish is
   prepared to team up with the State to proceed with designs and construction for a
   small siphon system for this area.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will use its own
   equipment and labor to clear the agriculture property and install property markers for
   future land use. Additionally, the parish will work to secure the necessary permits to
   clear the remaining wooded areas needed to proceed with design and construction
   drawings to expedite the construction of the siphon system. It is estimated to take
   approximately 28 days to clean and clear the property once purchased. The equipment
   cost associated with the work is estimated to be $40,000 and would be provided by
   the parish through in-kind labor and equipment.

2) Project Title: Blind River Freshwater Diversion Property Purchase

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council



                                           152
                             P. O. Box 106
                             Convent, LA 70723
                             (225) 562-2262
                             jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $455,700

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $455,700

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council intends to
purchase a tract of land extending from the Mississippi River to the Parish Canal in
order to secure the required property for a future freshwater diversion. This project is
proposed to purchase approximately 68 acres of existing agriculture and wetland
areas in order to accommodate a proposed freshwater siphon project.

The tract of land would allow a siphon and depository canal to be built at the
Mississippi River in Section 11 and continue through Section 31, located in T-11-S,
R-4-E. The canal would allow a freshwater river siphon to discharge fresh water from
the Mississippi River to the parish cross-cut canal, then into Blind River, and, finally,
Lake Maurepas. The purchase of this tract will provide a straight-line canal to feed
fresh water into the Blind River system. The fresh water will provide needed nutrients
and sediments that would enhance wetland restoration and improve water quality. The
diversion will take advantage of natural topographic and hydrologic features to re-
establish input of basic resources and circulation.

This area would target the upper section of Blind River, which continues to
experience wetland destruction due to poor water quality and lack of the fresh
nutrients needed to sustain an existing wetland area. This area’s freshwater source
was cut off when the Mississippi River levees were constructed in the 1940s;
consequently, the existing wetland continued to deteriorate and subside.

Project Type: Mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources.

Project Justification: The purpose of this project is to purchase the necessary
property needed to construct a small freshwater diversion approximately 200-400 cfs
into the Blind River system. The project seeks to address the wetland loss and poor
water quality that plagues this area due to its isolation from a continual freshwater
source. The project will improve habitat for wildlife and fisheries by increasing the
flow of fresh water into the wetland areas through a managed outfall system. One of
the issues that complicate the development of such a system is land rights and
availability of property. St. James Parish plans to use these funds to purchase the
necessary tract of land needed to allow the project to be constructed without future



                                        153
   delays due to land and property issues. The proposed project was part of the Coast
   2050 initiative and was included in the State’s master plan of restoration strategies for
   the Louisiana coast. Once the property is owned by St. James Parish, the parish is
   prepared to team up with the State to proceed with designs and construction for a
   small siphon system for this area.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will use its own
   equipment and labor to clear the agriculture property and install property markers for
   future land use. Additionally, the parish will work to secure the necessary permits to
   clear the remaining wooded areas needed to proceed with design and construction
   drawings to expedite the construction of the siphon system. It is estimated to take
   approximately 28 days to clean and clear the property once purchased. The equipment
   cost associated with the work is estimated to be $35,900.

3) Project Title: East Bank Wastewater Assimilation Plant

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,623,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,623,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council plans to
   purchase property and construct a wetland assimilation treatment plant in Grand
   Point, La. The plant will collect wastewater from secondary treatment modules and
   pump the wastewater to the pond area. The pond will discharge into forested wetland
   areas that will directly affect the swamp land composition and structure. The effluent
   discharge will be controlled to maximize sediment discharge and improve water
   quality. The project will use proven scientific research and analysis to provide a
   wetland wastewater strategy to promote wetland growth and survival. The project will
   deliver low cost benefits to Parish residents and businesses and improve water quality
   and enhance deteriorating wetland areas. Unlike conventional tertiary treatment and
   filterization, the wetland assimilation process reduces the need for chemical treatment
   and reduces maintenance cost such as electricity and labor. A wetland treatment
   process allows for a more natural system and provides for value added wetland



                                           154
production and absorption. Additionally, the use of a wetland assimilation process
will provide a wetland fertilization source, as well as, the removal of excess nutrients,
especially nitrogen and phosphorus. The wetland treatment process provides needed
sediment and nutrients for the protection of wetlands, wildlife habitat, and forest re-
generation. The Parish will match existing sewerage construction funds to develop a
sewer line system to connect all of the surrounding (Grand Point) area into this
wetland enhancement project. The project will provide a means to fully integrate the
sewerage treatment needs of all businesses and residents within the project target
area.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas.
Within the target area, there are no treatment ponds or municipal sewerage treatment
systems. Presently, all residential and commercial structures discharge into open
ditches from individual sewerage treatment plants. The development of a waste water
assimilation plant to collect and properly treat sewerage before discharging into
wetland areas would provide a beneficial wetland use. This project would not only
eliminate neighborhood discharges in waterways, but would provide beneficial use of
their wastewater to restore and protect wetland areas. Additionally, within the project
area, there are several industrial fabrication shops that manufacture and repair pumps,
motors, and steel components that are used in the production of offshore gas and oil.

Project Justification: Poor water quality and water stagnation is a serious threat to
wetland habitat. Because swamps in the Pontchartrain Basin have been isolated from
the Mississippi River, which was their primary source of water sediments and
nutrients, the wetland areas continue to decline. The use of a wetland assimilation
process will provide for increase productivity and regeneration of cypress and tupelo
swamps, increase in sediment accretion, increase in dissolved oxygen, as well as, a
reduction of concentration of nutrients in river water. The proposed project would
directly create wetland habitat and reduce wetland loss rates in this area.

The treatment of wastewater through the wetlands’ beneficial use process helps
mitigate the impact of outer continental shelf activities due to the number of machine
and fabrication facilities in the area. These facilities work and manufacture pumps,
pipes, oil field accessories, and drilling components that are needed in the oil
exploration process. The construction of a wastewater facility within the areas of
these fabrication facilities addresses a direct impact of offshore production activities.
Additionally, residents who live in close proximity to these facilities will also have
the benefits of this type of wastewater treatment. The project will be designed to
maximize the amount of influent wastewater that can be discharged into the wetland
area to enhance wetland productivity and growth. The Parish is prepared to construct
the sewer lines needed to utilize the plant and use the CIAP funds to develop the
wetland wastewater assimilation process and sediment pond facility.

Presently, the Grand Point area wastewater and water quality management plan calls
for all discharges to go into the Mississippi River. The use of CIAP funds to develop




                                         155
   a wastewater wetland assimilation plant will provide a long-term beneficial use of
   those wastewater discharges.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): The Parish will pay for the material and
   secondary treatment plants needed to treat the residential and commercial wastewater.
   Through the approval of a municipal sewerage tax, the Parish is proposing to spend
   $13.2 million to install the needed collection and transportation systems. The Parish
   would then require a full treatment implementation program towards the elimination
   of discharges into the Mississippi River and other water bodies within the Parish.

4) Project Title: West Bank Wastewater Assimilation Plant

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,400,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council plans to
   construct a wetland assimilation treatment plant on property owned by the Parish
   Council in Vacherie, Louisiana. The plant will collect wastewater from secondary
   treatment modules and pump the wastewater to a sediment pond area. The pond will
   discharge into forested wetland areas that will directly affect the swampland
   composition and structure. The effluent discharge will be controlled to maximize
   sediment discharge and improve water quality. The project will use proven scientific
   research and analysis to provide a wetland wastewater strategy to promote wetland
   growth and survival. The project will provide low-cost benefits to St. James Parish
   residents and businesses while improving water quality and enhancing deteriorating
   wetland areas. Unlike conventional tertiary treatment and filterization, the wetland
   assimilation process reduces the need for chemical treatment and allows for a more
   natural system, which provides for value-added wetland production and absorption.
   Additionally, the use of a wetland assimilation process will provide a wetland
   fertilization source, as well as the removal of excess nutrients, especially nitrogen and
   phosphorus. The wetland treatment process provides needed sediment and nutrients
   for the protection of wetlands, wildlife habitat, and forest regeneration. Presently,



                                           156
little or no cypress regeneration occurs, leaving poorly developing relics.
Additionally, areas where there were once dense stands of cypress and tupelo are
becoming open areas lacking trees. St. James Parish will match existing sewerage
construction funds to develop a sewer line system to connect all of the surrounding
(Vacherie) area into this wetland enhancement project. The project will provide a
means to fully integrate the sewerage treatment needs of all businesses and residents
in the surrounding area.

Project Type: This project addresses conservation, restoration, and protection of
coastal areas. Within the target area, there are no treatment ponds or municipal
sewerage treatment systems. Presently, all residential and commercial structures
discharge into open ditches from individual sewerage treatment plants. The
development of a wastewater assimilation plant to collect and properly treat sewerage
before discharging into wetland areas would provide a beneficial wetland use. This
project would not only eliminate neighborhood discharges in waterways, but would
provide beneficial use of their wastewater to restore and protect wetland areas.
Additionally, within the project area, there are several industrial fabrication shops that
manufacture and repair pumps, motors, and steel components that are used in the
production of offshore gas and oil.

Project Justification: Poor water quality and water stagnation is a serious threat to
wetland habitat. Because swamps in the Barataria Basin have been isolated from the
Mississippi River, which was their primary source of water sediments and nutrients,
the wetland areas continue to decline. The use of a wetland assimilation process will
provide for increased productivity and regeneration of cypress and tupelo swamps, an
increase in sediment accretion, and an increase in dissolved oxygen, as well as a
reduction of nutrient concentrations in river water. The proposed project would
directly create wetland habitat, reduce wetland loss rates in this area, and provide
sustainability to the swamps in the face of long-term subsidence.

The treatment of wastewater through the wetlands’ beneficial use process helps
mitigate the impact of OCS activities due to the number of machine and fabrication
facilities in the area. These facilities manufacture pumps, pipes, oil field accessories,
and drilling components that are needed in the oil exploration process. The
construction of a wastewater facility within the areas of these fabrication facilities
addresses a direct impact of offshore production activities. Additionally, residents
who live in close proximity to these facilities will also have the benefits of this type
of wastewater treatment. The project will be designed to maximize the amount of
influent wastewater that can be discharged into the wetland area to enhance wetland
productivity and growth. St. James Parish is prepared to construct the sewer lines
needed to utilize the plant and use the CIAP funds to develop the wetland wastewater
assimilation process and sediment pond facility. Further, as the swamps die, the
communities lining the Mississippi River are increasingly vulnerable to local and
storm surge flooding.




                                         157
   Presently, the Vacherie area wastewater and water quality management plan calls for
   all discharges to go into the Mississippi River. The use of CIAP funds to construct a
   wastewater wetland assimilation plant will provide a long-term beneficial use of those
   wastewater discharges and help restore the wetland areas.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will pay for the material
   and secondary treatment plants needed to treat the residential and commercial
   wastewater. Through the approval of a municipal sewerage tax, the parish is
   proposing to spend $16.9 million to install the needed collection and transportation
   systems. The parish would then require a full treatment implementation program
   towards the elimination of discharges into the Mississippi River and other water
   bodies within the parish.

5) Project Title: St. James Parish Waterline Booster Pump Station, West Bank

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $201,020

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $201,020

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $201,020

   Description and Location of Project: Due to the substantial increase in oil and gas
   activities within St. James Parish, it is necessary for the parish to construct a waterline
   booster pump on the west bank of the parish. Though a similar system is being
   proposed on the east bank of the Mississippi River, the river divides the parish in half,
   requiring the parish to have two separate waterline systems. The parish is, therefore,
   proposing to construct a waterline booster pump station in Welcome, Louisiana. The
   proposed site is located near Section 43, T-11-S, R-3-E, along LA Highway 18. The
   proposed construction includes the installation of a 40-hp electric motor with an
   1,100-gpm high-service pump. The pump is designed to be able to overcome a
   dynamic head pressure condition of 80 feet. The booster pump will be built along the
   existing waterline and be tied in at two places in order to establish a loop and by-pass
   system with 10-inch in-line valves. The station will a have metal building with a
   concrete floor to fully enclose and protect the pump and electrical equipment.




                                            158
   Project Type: Mitigation of the impacts of OCS activities through funding of
   onshore infrastructure projects and public service needs.

   Project Justification: Because of the increase in oil and gas production activities,
   especially at the oil storage facilities in St. James and the Chevron Phillips facility, an
   increase in water pressure is needed to meet the extra potable water requirements to
   maintain the chemical plant’s and storage facilities’ demands. The west bank of St.
   James Parish has one of the largest aboveground storage tank networks in the country,
   which now exceeds 16 million barrels. Additionally, in the event of a fire at one of
   the plants or storage facilities, the parish will not have enough water pressure to
   adequately respond to the incident. Therefore, the parish needs to construct this high-
   pressure water booster pump. Also, due to the number of pipelines located throughout
   the parish that carry products from offshore drilling operations, it is extremely
   necessary that high water pressure be maintained in the water supply system in the
   event of a fire or pipeline rupture.

   Within the project area, there are several industrial fabrication shops that manufacture
   and repair pumps, motors, and steel components that are needed in the production of
   offshore gas and oil. These facilities require adequate water supply and pressure. The
   project is designed to maximize the booster pump’s ability to meet and exceed peak
   flow demands from businesses and industries in the area. The use of CIAP funds to
   construct the booster pump station will provide a long-term beneficial use of the
   water supply system. St. James Parish has already paid the cost to design and
   engineer the project and will use the CIAP funds to complete the project’s
   construction.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): $22,000 St. James Parish has already hired
   an engineering consultant to develop plans and specifications for the waterline
   booster pump station. The cost for the plans, $7,900, was paid by the Parish Council.
   The parish is prepared to pay any additional costs associated with this project above
   the amount requested from CIAP funds. Additionally, the remaining costs of bidding,
   construction representation, surveying, and right-of-way permits are estimated to be
   $14,100 and will be paid by the parish. Therefore, all of the requested CIAP funds
   will be used toward the actual construction cost of the project.

6) Project Title: St. James Parish West Bank Wetland Conservation and Protection

   Entity Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com




                                            159
Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $718,620

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $718,620

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council would like to
purchase several large tracts of existing wetlands to prohibit the destruction of, and
aid in the protection of, the parish’s coastal wetland areas. This project proposes to
purchase approximately 615 acres of existing wetlands from the Bayou Chevreuil
Land Co., LLC. The areas the parish would like to purchase and protect adjoin a
major state highway that links the communities of South Vacherie in St. James Parish
to Chackbay in Lafourche Parish. The purchase of these tracts will eliminate any
future development from along this 1.8-mile stretch of LA Highway 20.

The purchase of these tracts will provide for the protection of 242 acres of healthy
cypress swamp and 373 acres of bottomland hardwood forests in St. James Parish. It
is the intention of the St. James Parish Council to create a Louisiana Conservation
Servitude on the entire 615 acres. The Bayou Chevreuil Land Co., LLC, is the legal
owner of the proposed land to be purchased. There are no liens, encumbrances,
easements, or restrictions on the property proposed under this project.

The soil survey of the site as depicted in the “Soil Survey of St. James and St. John
the Baptist Parishes, La.” (1973) shows the soil types to be Barbary association (Ba),
Barbary-Fausse association (BB) Commerce silt loam (Cm), Commerce silty clay
loam (Cn), Convent complex (Cr), and Sharkey association, frequently flooded (Sm).
Elevations on the site range from 0.5 to 5.0 feet above NGVD for mean sea level. The
majority of the site remains saturated or inundated for most of the year.

The site is dominated primarily by facultative-wetland and obligate-wetland plant
species. The dominant species include bald cypress, water tupelo, Drummond red
maple, American elm, alligator weed, and water hyacinth. Some upland species grow
on the spoil banks of the highway borrow canal and the Dredge Boat Canal. These
include sweetgum, water oak, overcup oak, nuttall oak, willow oak, bitter pecan, and
green ash.

The proposed project is located in St. James Parish, in Sections 22 and 27, Township-
13-South, and Range-17-East, South Vacherie, Louisiana.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Approximately 615 acres of cypress swamp and bottomland
hardwoods will be preserved once purchased from this land owner. The property is



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   vital to prevent commercial and residential development along this existing state
   highway. The conservation and protection of these wetlands would make significant
   progress towards sustaining a coastal ecosystem that can support and protect the
   environment, economy, and wetlands of southern Louisiana. The benefits from
   purchasing this property include hurricane protection, flood control, control of
   wetland impacts due to development, and protection of a critical ecological system.
   The program provides both near-term and long-term benefits and, at a cost of less
   than $1,200 per acre, is considered highly cost effective in addressing the protection
   of coastal and wetland areas. This project addresses the goal of the Louisiana Coastal
   Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration Plan towards the reversing of the current trend of
   degradation of the coastal ecosystem and destruction of critical wetland habitats. The
   purchase of the property coupled with the reestablishment of natural hydraulic water
   flow through the removal of existing continuous spoil banks will enhance the entire
   site. This plan will reintroduce natural flood flows along the drainage canals that are
   now cut off from needed nutrients and sediments. The project not only provides
   multiple benefits for wetland preservation and enhancement, but also allows for flood
   protection by providing a large natural water reservoir and hurricane protection from
   wind and storm surge.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will use its own
   equipment and labor to cut slits in the existing spoil banks. The existing spoil banks
   will be breached to allow water to move in and out of the swampland areas. Natural
   and man-made ditches that are presently full of sediment will be dredged to restore
   natural drainage through the impounded swamps. It is estimated to take
   approximately 60 days to complete the opening and creation of slits in the existing
   spoil banks. The parish cost associated with the project includes equipment, $39,500,
   and labor, $17,400. Therefore, the parish is prepared to match the CIAP monies with
   in-kind contributions of $56,900.

7) Project Title: St. James Parish West Bank Wetland Conservation and Protection,
     Phase II

   Entity Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:        Mr. Jody Chenier
                               St. James Parish Council
                               P. O. Box 106
                               Convent, LA 70723
                               (225) 562-2262
                               jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $350,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $350,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0



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Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council would like to
purchase several large tracts of existing wetlands to prohibit the destruction of, and
aid in the protection of, the parish’s coastal wetland areas. This project proposes to
purchase approximately 235 acres of existing wetlands from the Bayou Chevreuil
Land Co., LLC. The areas the parish would like to purchase and protect adjoin a
major state highway that links the communities of South Vacherie in St. James Parish
to Chackbay in Lafourche Parish. The purchase of these tracts will eliminate any
future development along this 1.8-mile stretch of LA Highway 20.

The purchase of these tracts will provide for the protection of 235 acres of healthy
cypress swamp in St. James Parish. It is the intention of the St. James Parish Council
to create a Louisiana Conservation Servitude on the entire 235 acres. The Bayou
Chevreuil Land Co., LLC is the legal owner of the proposed land to be purchased.
There are no liens, encumbrances, easements, or restrictions on the property proposed
under this project.

The soil survey of the site as depicted in the “Soil Survey of St. James and St. John
the Baptist Parishes, La.” (1973) show the soil types to be Barbary association (Ba),
Barbary-Fausse association (BB), Commerce silt loam (Cm), Commerce silty clay
loam (Cn), Convent complex (Cr), and Sharkey association, frequently flooded (Sm).
Elevations on the site range from 0.5 to 5.0 feet above NGVD for mean sea level. The
majority of the site remains saturated or inundated for most of the year.

The site is dominated primarily by facultative-wetland and obligate-wetland plant
species. The dominant species include bald cypress, water tupelo, Drummond red
maple, American elm, alligator weed, and water hyacinth. Some upland species grow
on the spoil banks of the highway borrow canal and the Dredge Boat Canal. These
include sweetgum, water oak, overcup oak, nuttall oak, willow oak, bitter pecan, and
green ash.

The proposed project is located in St. James Parish, in Sections 34 and 27, Township-
13-South, and Range-17-East, South Vacherie, Louisiana.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Approximately 235 acres of cypress swamp will be preserved
once purchased from this land owner. The property is vital to prevent commercial and
residential development along this existing state highway. The conservation and
protection of these wetlands would make significant progress towards sustaining a
coastal ecosystem that can support and protect the environment, economy, and
wetlands of southern Louisiana. The benefits from purchasing this property include
hurricane protection, flood control, control of wetland impacts due to development,



                                       162
   and protection of a critical ecological system. The program provides both near-term
   and long-term benefits and, at a cost of less than $1,600 per acre, is considered highly
   cost effective in addressing the protection of coastal and wetland areas. This project
   addresses the goal of the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration Plan
   towards the reversing of the current trend of degradation of the coastal ecosystem and
   destruction of critical wetland habitats. The purchase of the property coupled with the
   reestablishment of natural hydraulic water flow through the removal of existing
   continuous spoil banks will enhance the entire site. This plan will reintroduce natural
   flood flows along the drainage canals that are now cut off from needed nutrients and
   sediments. The project not only provides multiple benefits for wetland preservation
   and enhancement, but also allows for flood protection by providing a large natural
   water reservoir and hurricane protection from wind and storm surge.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will use its own
   equipment and labor to cut slits in the existing spoil banks. The existing spoil banks
   will be breached to allow water to move in and out of the swamp areas. Natural and
   man-made ditches that are presently full of sediment will be dredged to restore
   natural drainage through the impounded swamps. It is estimated to take
   approximately 30 days to complete the opening and creation of slits in the existing
   spoil banks. The parish cost associated with the project includes equipment, $29,000,
   and labor, $10,100. Therefore, St. James Parish is prepared to match the CIAP monies
   with in-kind contributions of $39,100.

8) Project Title: Wetland Wastewater Assimilation Process Planning

   Entity Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:        Mr. Jody Chenier
                               St. James Parish Council
                               P. O. Box 106
                               Convent, LA 70723
                               (225) 562-2262
                               jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $50,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $50,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council will hire a
   consulting company to conduct a preliminary analysis to determine the feasibility of
   the application of wastewater effluent into wetlands. The study will be parishwide
   and will develop a plan to allow wetland assimilation to provide tertiary treatment to



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   wastewater while improving wetland quality. The study will analyze potential sites
   and set project goals. The wetland areas will be characterized by their ecological
   condition and capacity to assimilate wastewater. The study will include interaction
   with engineers to provide cost estimates to improve existing systems, as well as the
   construction of new systems needed to meet regulatory standards. The final report
   will provide preliminary characterizations of the parish’s wetland systems, their
   suitability for wastewater assimilation, an analysis of loading and assimilation
   capacity, and capabilities of the wetlands and preliminary engineering and cost
   analyses.

   The use of wetlands provides a dual benefit for wastewater treatment. Using a
   wetland treatment approach allows for the development of a system than can function
   for long periods of time; and because of the natural processes, the wetlands will
   achieve water quality improvements. The use of wetlands nets an ecosystem that is
   healthy and results in greatly improved nutrients needed to sustain a growing wetland
   area. The added nutrients have shown a significant increase in net productivity, litter
   fall, and wood production.

   Project Type: Planning assistance.

   Project Justification: Several studies and reports have been completed that explain
   and demonstrate the improved wetland quality from similar wastewater projects.
   St. James Parish will use an experienced environmental consultant to evaluate and
   make recommendations for beneficial use through wetland assimilation. The project
   will help in the design of wastewater treatment systems that will meet regulatory
   requirements, improve water quality, enhance wetland areas, and reduce maintenance
   and operational costs of traditional systems. Past studies have shown the quick
   response and revegetation of forested wetlands resulting from the addition of
   secondarily treated wastewater. By inducing accretion through the deposition of
   suspended solids, wastewater applications have produced positive wetland habitat
   increases. The addition of discharges into forested wetland areas have positively
   affected forest species composition, density, and structure by causing changes in
   hydrology, sediment deposition, and nutrient status. The implementation of these
   types of systems throughout the parish will provide a cost effective and beneficial use
   of wastewater, as well as help to enhance and maintain the parish’s wetland areas.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will develop and provide
   digitized maps of the site areas. All mapping and photography needed for the
   development and implementation of this project will be undertaken by the St. James
   Parish Council. The estimated value of this task is approximately $10,000, which will
   be provided by the parish through in-kind labor and materials.

St. John the Baptist Parish

1) Project Title: West Lac des Allemands Shoreline Protection



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   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. John the Baptist Parish

   Contact Information: Adrienne Labat
                        102 E. Airline Highway
                        LaPlace, LA 70068
                        (985) 651-5565
                        a.labat@sjbparish.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,400,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project would consist of 7,535
   feet of shoreline protection, extending from “Pleasure Bend” westward to Pointe Aux
   Herbes, along the western shore of Lac des Allemands, St. John the Baptist Parish,
   Louisiana. The proposed feature consists of foreshore rock dike with gaps for fishery
   and public access to the lake shoreline.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: USGS has determined that the subject shoreline is eroding at
   an average rate of 17 feet per year or approximately 4.3 acres per year.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Manchac Shoreline Protection Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. John the Baptist Parish

   Contact Information: Adrienne Labat
                        102 E. Airline Highway
                        LaPlace, LA 70068
                        (985) 651-5565
                        a.labat@sjbparish.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,700,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,700,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0




                                          165
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project would consist of
   capping 21,500 linear feet of USACE existing breakwaters and filling in the gaps to
   create a continuous structure. The project is located in St. John the Baptist Parish
   near the town of Manchac, near the Manchac Wildlife Management area and
   Manchac Pass.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: The breakwaters were built in 1995 by the USACE. The
   length was approximately 25,400 linear feet. Since its construction, the breakwaters
   have settled approximately 2.5 feet and now barely protrude above the water.

   Project Cost Share: $1,000,000 NAWCA Grant, $6,770,260 Tangipahoa Parish

3) Project Title: Reserve Relief Canal Shoreline Protection Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. John the Baptist Parish

   Contact Information: Adrienne Labat
                        102 E. Airline Highway
                        LaPlace, LA 70068
                        (985) 651-5565
                        a.labat@sjbparish.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $389,400

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $389,400

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project would consist of
   approximately 1400 linear feet of shoreline protection extending in an easterly and
   westerly direction in St. John the Baptist Parish, where the Reserve Relieve Canal
   enters Lake Maurepas. This would also include entrance protection lining. The
   proposed feature consists of foreshore rock dike with gaps for fishery and public
   access to the lake shoreline.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The subject shoreline has eroded approximately 15 acres of
   land to date and is continuing at an increasing rate.



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   Project Cost Share: None

St Martin Parish
1) Project Title: Bayou Amy Canoe Trail Access and Education Pavilion

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Martin Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:      Guy Cormier
                             Parish President
                             301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                             St. Martinville, LA 70582
                             (337) 394-2200
                             parishpresident@bellsouth.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $387,200

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $387,200

   State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Bayou Amy is located along the toe of the
   West Guideline Levee for the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System, St. Martin Parish.
   Bayou Amy provides a hydrologic connection between Bayou Berard and Lake
   Catahoula, which flows into Lakes Dauterive and Fausse Point, and ultimately into
   the bays of Louisiana’s central coastal area. The proposed project is to be constructed
   on the eastern shoreline of Bayou Amy, in Henderson, Louisiana, and includes:

          a. The donation of 2.5 acres of land along Bayou Amy.

          b. Construction of a boat launch facility for public use. Construction features
          would include a bulkhead and parking area for 25–30 vehicles for public
          access to the Atchafalaya Basin Program wilderness canoe trail.

          c. Construction of an open pavilion for public use dedicated to promoting and
          conducting classes on conservation and education of the natural resources.

          d. Purchase and placement of a self-contained concrete bathroom facility.

   Project Type: Implementation of a project as part of a Federally Approved Plan.

   Project Justification: In 1986, Congress authorized $250 million to preserve and
   enhance the Atchafalaya Basin through the USACE by expanding public access,


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   environmental easements, water management, and recreation. In 1999, the Louisiana
   Legislature voted unanimously for the State Master Plan of the Atchafalaya Basin
   (Act 920), authorizing $85 million to be spent over a 15-year period, in order to
   match the Federal dollars.

   The objective of this project is to create an educational center, boat launch, and
   parking area that will allow for public access into a unique bottomland
   hardwood/cypress-tupelo swamp setting in which a canoe trail has already been
   established. A small pavilion will be constructed for use as an environmental
   education center to teach visitors (and locals) about conservation and protection of the
   ecology of the area. Henderson, Louisiana, has been named “The Gateway to the
   Atchafalaya Basin” and, as such, should have public access to surrounding
   waterways.

   Construction of the a public launch facility will provide public access from the
   northern reaches of the Henderson/Lakes Catahoula, Dauterive, and Fausse Pointe
   Waterways. This project will ultimately tie into Lake Fausse Point State Park, a
   premier 5,000-acre state park, thereby increasing the public’s opportunity to learn
   about conservation, protection, and enjoyment of the natural resources associated
   with the area lakes, bayous, swamps, and streams, including fish, birds, and swamp
   forests along with their functions and associated values.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Beau Bayou Swamp Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Martin Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:      Guy Cormier
                             Parish President
                             301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                             St. Martinville, LA 70582
                             (337) 394-2200
                             parishpresident@bellsouth.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

   State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Beau Bayou Swamp is located in the west
   central region of the Atchafalaya Basin, St. Martin Parish. Once known as a highly
   productive fisheries area, hydrologic manipulation within the Atchafalaya Basin from


                                           168
   levee construction, pipeline canal spoil banks, sediment diversions, and
   channelization of the Atchafalaya River led to hypoxic conditions within Beau Bayou
   Swamp, along with many of the basin’s other interior swamps. Most of the natural
   bayous and man-made canals flowing into Beau Bayou Swamp carry significant
   amounts of sediment adding to the already degraded condition of the swamp. The
   proposed Beau Bayou hydrologic restoration project would include:

          Dredging of Beau Bayou through the center of the swamp, along with
          dredging of some of the natural waterways. Dredged material is to be used
          beneficially to address subsidence problems within the adjacent swamp. Any
          exposed spoil is to be vegetated with native plants.

          Gapping of the natural levee along the northeast section of Bayou L’Embarras
          to allow for the exchange of freshwater and nutrients into the swamp.

          Creation of inline sediment traps to reduce the sediment load currently
          flowing into Beau Bayou Swamp.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: For years, there have been reports of water quality problems,
   fish kills, accelerated sediment accretion, and other ecological aberrations that
   indicate problems with the Beau Bayou area. Although limited scientific information
   has been collected within the boundaries of the unit, it does confirm public reports
   and concerns about the future of the area. The USGS has documented the rate of
   sediment accretion in the southern portion of the Beau Bayou area to be very high
   relative to other areas of the Atchafalaya Basin.

   It has been determined that failure to act soon with restoration efforts may result in
   limited options for managing the Beau Bayou Swamp ecosystem in the future. Poor
   water quality in Beau Bayou has been deemed significant enough to merit
   endorsement for some type of water management project, with pre- and post-
   construction monitoring. Such action is required in order to restore the ecology of the
   area.

   Based on a historical study in which engineers described the hydrological and
   siltation history of Beau Bayou Swamp. USGS synoptic (time synchronized) data,
   sedimentation patterns near Bayou Darby and Alligator Bayou, permanent stage
   recorder information, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) data,
   and local fishermen’s anecdotal information, water quality and sedimentation
   problems were determined to exist in the Beau Bayou area.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

3) Project Title: Upgrade of Stephensville Sanitation System and Wastewater


                                           169
Assimilation into Wetlands

Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Stephenville, St. Martin Parish,
Louisiana

Contact Information:      Guy Cormier
                          Parish President
                          301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                          St. Martinville, LA 70582
                          (337) 394-2200
                          parishpresident@bellsouth.net

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,200,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,200,000

State Funds Proposed: $ 0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: Wetlands can act as nutrient sinks that
improve water quality by assimilating nutrients and filtering suspended solids and
organics. The town of Stephensville, Louisiana, employs an innovative tertiary
biological wastewater treatment system to utilize the assimilative functions of
adjacent wetlands to improve water quality. Treated effluent from the town’s
municipal treatment facility is released into the adjacent wetlands. The effluent
contains low concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorous, and other essential nutrients
that can be assimilated by the wetlands. The benefits of this technique include
increased primary and secondary productivity, vigorous growth of submerged aquatic
vegetation, and emergent vegetation and increased edge habitat and cover for
waterfowl and wildlife. The effluent release also acts as a diversion to increase the
quantity of fresh water into the system and will provide a freshwater source during
drought conditions.

This project would include an upgrade of the existing wastewater treatment plant
infrastructure and construction of discharge structure and piping system into the
adjacent wetlands for wetland assimilation. Stephensville’s wastewater facility is
located at 1073 Tower Tank RD in Morgan City, Louisiana.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: The upgrade of the Stephensville Sanitation System, part of
the St. Martin Parish Water and Sewer Department, will alleviate the current
problems associated with water infiltration into the system’s intake pipes and
structures. Upgrading the system will allow St. Martin Parish to continue to provide
high-quality sanitary services to the surrounding communities while enhancing local
wetlands. The proposed project will also provide increased treatment capacity that


                                       170
   will allow the system to accept flows from new developments in the area. The process
   of wetland assimilation of nutrients will stimulate growth and productivity of flora
   and fauna in the adjacent wetlands, and will further improve water quality and
   fisheries habitat in the Belle River, Milhomme Bayou, and Lake Palourde areas.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

St. Mary Parish

1) Project Title: Burns Point Recreation Park Improvements

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:               Henry “Bo” Lagrange
                                      Chief Administrative Officer
                                      Fifth Floor Courthouse Building
                                      Franklin, LA 70538-6198.
                                      (337) 828-4100
                                      hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

                                      Dr. Mohan Menon, Shaw E&I
                                      (225) 987-7154
                                      mohan.menon@shawgrp.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,010,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,010,000

   State Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in the Burns Point
   Recreation Park, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana.

   The Burns Point Recreation Park, classified as a Special Use Park, is an 8.5-acre park
   located along the coast at the end of Highway 317. The park includes camper hook
   ups, a boat ramp, picnic area, and bank fishing opportunities. The existing features of
   the park are a timber bulkhead, a concrete boat ramp, a timber wharf, and a parking
   area.

   Continued enhancement and ongoing maintenance of existing facilities are essential
   to ensure that parks and recreation facilities are an asset to the region. All facilities
   will require routine maintenance and repairs. As increased demand is placed on the
   park system, facilities and equipment will need to be replaced and refurbished. As



                                            171
   improvements are made, there will be opportunities to enhance the appearance and
   attractiveness of the facilities and structures.

   The proposed project features are an approximately 600-foot steel sheet bulkhead
   with a 4-inch x 6-foot concrete walkway and an approximately ±400-foot steel sheet
   bulkhead with a 4-inch x 6-foot concrete walkway, a 35-foot x 30-foot concrete apron
   in the existing limestone launch area, a 250-foot x 7-foot timber wharf on the other
   side of the boat ramp, and a new 250-foot x 175-foot parking area. The proposed fill
   material for the bulkhead and walkway will be clay soil from commercial pits. The
   existing timber bulkhead will be cut below proposed elevation and backfilled. Stone
   dikes will be used for the parking area and the proposed fill material for the parking
   area will be clay soil from commercial pits.

   The project goal is to improve the boat launch and replace the bulkhead for shoreline
   protection.

   The preliminary project benefit is to maintain and enhance the existing park and
   recreation grounds, facilities, and improvement.

   Project Type: 1

   A comprehensive and integrated system of parks and recreation opportunities that
   responds to the needs and values of the region’s residents, a large percentage of
   whom are employed in OCS support businesses, is an essential part of a quality living
   environment. A well-planned, funded, and managed system of parks and recreation
   facilities will help St. Mary Parish to attract and sustain quality development,
   contribute to improved community health, and provide a variety of active and passive
   recreational activities, and will help to preserve and enhance the quality of the natural
   environment. Parks and recreation facilities are also a significant attraction for
   visitors who contribute to local tourism and economic development.

   There are no known issues that could affect the implementation of the project.

   Project Justification:
      Regional Strategy:   #10-Maintain shoreline integrity including gulf/lake/bay
      Mapping Unit Strategy:     East Cote Blanche Bay (69) - Protect Bay/Lake
      Shorelines

   Project Cost Share: $ 490,000

2) Project Title: Deer Island Pass Realignment

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Henry “Bo” Lagrange
                              Chief Administrative Officer



                                           172
                         Fifth Floor Courthouse Building
                         Franklin, LA 70538-6198.
                         (337) 828-4100
                         hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

                         Dr. Mohan Menon, Shaw E&I
                         (225) 987-7154
                         mohan.menon@shawgrp.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

State Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The project is located on the northern portion
of the Lower Atchafalaya River Delta near the mouth of Deer Island Bayou. The
proposed marsh creation aspect of the project would help to reduce shoreline erosion
along the Lower Atchafalaya River. The proposed dredging would increase delta
growth in the extreme northeast corner of Atchafalaya Bay. This in turn would
decrease shore erosion rates along that section of bay shoreline.

A GIS comparison of 1998 and 2004 shoreline positions reveals that along the Lower
Atchafalaya River, erosion rates during that period have ranged from 5 feet per year
to a maximum of 16 feet per year. Along the northeast shore of Atchafalaya Bay,
shoreline erosion rates vary with location. Maximum erosion rates are approximately
5 feet per year.

The proposed project consists of dredging a 5,280-foot-long, 280-foot-wide, and 12-
foot-deep channel across the shallow flat at the mouth of Deer Island Bayou to
improve water and sediment flow into northeast Atchafalaya Bay through the existing
Deer Island Pass. Dredged material would be placed along the eastern shore of the
Lower Atchafalaya River to reduce shoreline erosion and to create a protected
backwater area. The exterior face of that marsh creation area may require rip-rap to
protect it against erosion from boat wakes. Exact size and depth of the channel would
be determined with the aid of hydrologic modeling. Maintenance dredging of the pass
would be included as project maintenance activity.

The project goal is to accelerate deltaic land-building in the northeast portion of
Atchafalaya Bay and reduce shoreline erosion there and along portions of the Lower
Atchafalaya River shoreline. Additionally, the project would create roughly 30 acres
of marsh with the dredged material (a more exact estimate would be made later, after
modeling and engineering).




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   The preliminary project benefits are:
   1) The total acreage created would be approximately 30 acres of marsh. Reduced
   shoreline erosion would result in additional direct benefits.
   2) Indirect benefits would occur through increased delta growth. Modeling would be
   used to estimate those benefits.
   3) The project would help to protect structural components of the coastal ecosystem
   such as the natural rim of Atchafalaya Bay.
   4) The project would not protect critical or non-critical infrastructure; however, if
   successful, it would help to impede northward transmission of storm surge.
   5) The proposed project would provide a synergistic effect with other beneficial use
   of dredged material projects in the area by accelerating deltaic growth, which would
   reduce physical erosion of those existing marsh creation areas. Otherwise, there are
   no nearby protection/restoration projects in that portion of the Lower Atchafalaya
   River Delta with which the proposed project would interact.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   The greatest potential difficulty associated with the proposed project would be
   induced sedimentation of the USACE navigation channel. That issue would be
   resolved through hydrologic modeling and associated consultations with the USACE.

   Project Justification:
   Coastwide: Maintenance of gulf, bay, and lake shoreline integrity; maintain, protect
               or restore ridge functions.
   Regional Strategy: # 2 Increase deltaic land building where feasible
                      # 8 Dedicated dredging and/or beneficial use of sediment for marsh
                      building

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Planning Assistance and Administration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:      Henry “Bo” Lagrange
                             Chief Administrative Officer
                             Fifth Floor Courthouse Building
                             Franklin, LA 70538-6198.
                             (337) 828-4100
                             hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $25,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $25,000




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   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project will provide financial assistance
   to St. Mary Parish Government to manage and implement the CIAP program.

   Project Type: Planning assistance and the administrative costs of CIAP compliance.

   Project Coast Share: None

4) Project Title: Point Chevreuil Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information: Henry “Bo” Lagrange
                        Chief Administrative Officer
                        Fifth Floor Courthouse Building
                        Franklin, LA 70538-6198.
                        (337) 828-4100
                        hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

                           Dr. Mohan Menon, Shaw E&I
                           (225) 987-7154
                           mohan.menon@shawgrp.com

   Total CIAP Funds Requested: $2,048,468

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,048,468

   State Funds Requested: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Region 3,
   Atchafalaya River Basin, St. Mary Parish, along the southeastern shoreline of East
   Cote Blanche Bay, around Point Chevreuil and the northwestern shoreline of
   Atchafalaya Bay.

   Eroding shoreline was caused by the open water fetch and resulting wave energy
   from East Cote Blanche and Atchafalaya Bays. The retreating shoreline has resulted
   in a substantial loss of emergent wetlands and critical habitat used by a multitude of
   wildlife and fish species. Project features will protect the natural ridge functions of
   the Bayou Sale Ridge and protect the adjacent marshes. Shoreline erosion rates have
   been estimated by the USGS at 13.5 LF/year.




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   The proposed project features are construction of a foreshore rock dike or rock
   revetment parallel to the existing eastern shoreline of East Cote Blanche Bay around
   Point Chevreuil. The linear footage of shoreline is approximately 4,250. It is possible
   that marsh can be created with the fill material from dredging of an access channel to
   accommodate construction equipment where needed. This created area will be built
   from the existing shoreline out to the rock dike. The confluence of east and west
   shorelines is vulnerable to erosion and needs protection. The area east of the project
   could benefit from the Wax Lake Outlet influence in terms of sediments and
   nutrients.

   The goal is to reduce and/or reverse shoreline erosion rates and protect natural ridge
   and marsh habitat, as well as maintain the existing hydrology of the area by
   preventing the Atachaflaya Bay shoreline from intercepting an oilfield and pipeline
   canal. The ridge and marsh area provides important habitat for black bears, neo-
   tropical migrants, wintering migratory waterfowl, etc.

   The preliminary project benefit is to directly protect approximately 25 acres of
   forested wetlands and intermediate marshes by reducing the current erosion rate of
   13.5 ft/year by 75-100%. Project features will provide protection to and maintain the
   small remnant of natural ridge/Chenier function that currently exists along the eastern
   bank of the once-defined Bayou Sale channel.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland. No significant potential issues are expected from project implementation.
   Adjacent land owners are in full support of the project.

   Project Justification:
   Coastwide: Maintenance of gulf, bay and lake shoreline integrity; maintain, protect or
             restore ridge functions.
   Regional Strategy: #10. Protect, restore and maintain ridge functions;
                       #11. Maintain shoreline integrity and stabilize critical shoreline
                       areas.
   Mapping Unit Strategy: East Cote Blanche Bay (71) – Protect Bay/Lake Shorelines
                             Wax Lake Wetlands (60) – Protect Bay/Lake Shorelines

   Project Cost Share: None

5) Project Title: Thorguson Road Improvements Project

   Entity/Individual nominating the project: St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:      Henry “Bo” Lagrange
                             Chief Administrative Officer
                             Fifth Floor Courthouse Building
                             Franklin, Louisiana 70538-6198.
                             (337) 828-4100



                                           176
                          hlagrange@parish.st-mary.la.us

                          Dr. Mohan Menon, Shaw E&I
                          (225) 987-7154
                          mohan.menon@shawgrp.com


Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,232,572

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,232,572

State Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $1,232,572

Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Berwick and extends
to Morgan City in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana.

Thorguson Road, located in Berwick, LA, runs north-south and connects LA Hwy
182 with River Road. The roadway crosses US 90. Thorguson Road is the only road
that provides a direct access route from the industrial and commercial zones located
on the Lower Atchafalaya River and the GIWW to US 90. It is a major route for
industrial and commercial vehicles. The intersection at US 90 and Thorguson Road
faces the highest volume of traffic in the Berwick area, with nearly 3,200 vehicles and
a delay of 80 seconds per vehicle during the morning rush hour. The existing
Thorguson roadway does not adequately accommodate the local and regional
transportation demand. As industry continues to expand in St. Mary Parish, the
traffic congestion found on Thorguson Road will continue to grow. This will further
stress the existing infrastructure and lead to increased traffic delays.

The proposed project feature (upgrading Thorguson Road from Hwy 90 to the River
Road) is to increase capacity, and to improve safety and efficiency during normal
operations. The road improvement feature includes the widening of the existing road.
The preliminary project benefit is to provide improved traffic flow and safety while
increasing roadway access to the industrial and commercial facilities located in
Berwick, Louisiana. A USACE 404 permit with mitigation may be required for this
proposed project.

Project Type: Mitigation of the impacts of OCS activities through funding of
onshore infrastructure projects and public service needs.

There are no known issues which could affect the implementation of the project.

Project Justification: The traffic improvement proposed here will be utilized for
vehicles that carry oil and gas industry service goods. They commute from
fabrication yards and related industries. The road improvement will provide much-



                                       177
   needed relief to the residential areas in the local area while providing greater access to
   the industrial and commercial facilities located on the River Road, the GIWW, and
   the Lower Atchafalaya River.

   Project Cost Share: $38,428

St. Tammany Parish

1) Project Title: French Property Preservation Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        21490 Koop Drive, Suite 400
                        Mandeville, LA 70471
                        (985) 898-2535 (phone)
                        (985) 898-2523 (fax)
                        gordo@stpgov.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: St. Tammany Parish Government seeks to
   acquire a 39.5-acre parcel (herein referred to as the French property) owned by Mr.
   James Fenner and Mrs. Flora French. Composed of pine trees and mixed hardwoods
   with inclusional savannas, the property lies between the I-12 Service Road and Bayou
   Liberty in Slidell, Louisiana. A Gulf South natural gas pipeline is within the
   boundaries of the property. The pipeline runs parallel to the western margin of the
   property and crosses Bayou Liberty. The St. Tammany Parish Government will grant
   easements for increased access to this critical natural resource.

   One of the St. Tammany Parish Government’s missions is to educate the public about
   the value of wetlands. To accomplish this goal, a series of interpretive signs that
   display native fauna and flora, the rate of wetland loss, and unique features of native
   Louisiana habitats will be placed along a network of trails. Additionally, parish
   workers and volunteers will remove invasive plant species and install nest boxes
   within the property to increase native vegetative cover and enhance the number of
   cavity-nesting birds.




                                            178
The St. Tammany Parish Government has applied for property acquisition funds from
the Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program (CELCP). Should the parish
government receive these funds, the grant will be utilized to implement this project.
If St. Tammany Parish is not successful in securing CELCP funding, the CIAP grant
will then be utilized to acquire the French property, as well as implement selected
portions of the project.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: At St. Tammany Parish Government’s request, the Trust for
Public Land has entered into an option agreement with the French family to acquire
the property and hold it for the parish under a lease-purchase agreement until funding
is secured and the obligation is met. Because the acquisition logistics have been
ironed out, the parish feels the project is free of issues that may impact a timely
implementation.


The St. Tammany Parish Government has implemented a conservation program that
includes the acquisition of critical and sensitive parcels within a wildlife corridor. On
a larger scale, a riparian corridor will extend the entire length of Bayou Liberty and
Bayou Lacombe, thus connecting Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge with
the Abita Creek Flatwoods (The Nature Conservancy) and the Bogue Chitto National
Wildlife Refuge core reserves. This corridor will expand approximately 38 miles and
cover a vast array of habitats, from brackish marsh to upland pine savannas.

The proposed project has a high degree of certainty of benefits. Acquisition of the
French property will generate important ecological and educational benefits. The St.
Tammany Parish Government will educate the public about conservation practices
through a series of interpretive programs that emphasize native Louisiana habitats.
Terrestrial and aquatic wildlife will benefit through improved species dispersal and
foraging area within the corridor. Furthermore, native vegetative cover will
proliferate after invasive plants are removed.

Moreover, the owner of the natural gas pipeline will be granted increased access to
this natural resource.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, St. Tammany Parish is the fifth largest parish
in the State and has been the fastest growing parish in Louisiana since the 1970s.
Currently, the Bayou Liberty and Bayou Lacombe Watersheds are under increasing
pressure from residential and commercial development. In 2002, the Lake
Pontchartrain Basin Foundation reported that urbanization in St. Tammany Parish has
occurred at a rate of 2,699 acres a year. At this growth rate, urban areas will occupy
over 138,000 acres or one-fifth of the parish by 2025 and almost one-third of St.
Tammany Parish by 2050. During the study period, more than 52,000 acres of
wetland habitat were lost. In response, the parish developed a regional conservation



                                        179
   plan that includes the acquisition of critical and sensitive parcels within the Bayou
   Liberty and Bayou Lacombe riparian habitat zones

   The wetlands of St. Tammany Parish suffered a devastating blow from Hurricane
   Katrina on August 29, 2005. The hurricane caused massive tree damage and soil
   erosion, and increased the transport of non-point source pollutants into the parish’s
   many bayous and streams. Recent satellite imagery illustrates that nearly 40 square
   miles of wetlands within the Lake Pontchartrain Basin were lost during the storm
   event. The Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry has estimated that over
   60% of the standing timber within the parish was severely damaged, and the
   Louisiana State University Hurricane Center reported that the forest canopy opened to
   at least 50% of its former tree cover. This one-day event exceeded the amount of
   wetlands the Lake Pontchartrain Basin lost to natural erosion processes from 1990 to
   2000. As wetlands provide the first line of defense for hurricane storm surges and
   help to minimize flooding, St. Tammany Parish is committed to restoring these
   critical coastal resources and protecting the wetlands that remain. The acquisition
   and maintenance of land within these critical wildlife corridors will prevent further
   urbanization within this high-growth region.

   Wildlife must utilize the bayous and streams to move through the watersheds, from
   the pine uplands to the coastal marshes along the shore of Lake Pontchartrain,
   assessing different habitats for food sources and cover. Bayou Liberty is a rare
   “blackwater” tannic forested habitat that is home to a number of species of concern,
   including two endangered species, the red-cockaded woodpecker and Louisiana
   quillwort. The pristine habitat of Bayou Liberty merits protection for its wildlife.

   Project Cost Share: The St. Tammany Parish Government will administer all
   phases of planning, which includes recruiting local volunteers (i.e., Friends of
   Louisiana Wildlife Refuges) to help install nest boxes and plant native vegetation.
   Moreover, the Parish Department of Public Works and volunteers (i.e., Boy Scouts)
   will conduct all necessary maintenance.

2) Project Name: Fritchie Marsh Creation/Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government
                                             P.O. Box 628
                                             Covington, LA 70434
                                             (985) 898-2552

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        21490 Koop Drive, Suite 400
                        Mandeville, LA 70471
                        (985) 898-2535 (phone)
                        (985) 898-2523 (fax)
                        gordo@stpgov.org



                                           180
Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,300,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,300,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: None

Description and Location of Project: The project focuses on the Pontchartrain
Basin, St. Tammany Parish. The project area is located in the Fritchie Marsh,
generally southeast of the city of Slidell. The marsh is bounded by Highway 90 to the
east, Highway 433 to the west and south, and the natural high lands to the north. The
project boundaries will be the same as PO-06 Fritchie Marsh Project.

Problem: This area is located along the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain and
contributes to the integrity of the Lake Pontchartrain/Lake Borgne system. Over
3,600 acres of marsh were lost on the north shore in the past 50 years, and another
15% is expected to be lost over the next 50 years. This area was also in the direct
path of Hurricane Katrina, which removed approximately 1200-1500 acres of marsh
and wildlife habitat from this area. In order to minimize the adverse habitat and water
quality impacts from Hurricane Katrina, it is imperative that marsh restoration occur
as soon as possible. St. Tammany Parish Government estimates a loss of between
1200 and 1500 acres of intermediate marsh as a result of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
Salt Bayou, dredged as a component of PO-06, was almost entirely filled with marsh
grass and sediment dislodged by the storm.

Proposed Project Features: Project features include approximately 200-300 acres of
marsh creation via hydraulic dredging and placement of 3/4 million cubic yards of
material. The likely borrow locations are Salt Bayou and the West Pearl River.
Containment will be semi-confined (bayou banks are still largely intact). Marsh
vegetation is expected to emerge naturally upon settlement. Approximately 3 miles of
Salt Bayou will need to be dredged to remove sediment and grass deposited in its
channel by Katrina. This will reestablish the freshwater flow from the West Pearl
River.

Goals:
1. Create approximately 200-300 acres of intermediate marsh.
2. Reduce erosion of adjacent interior marshes.
3. Maintain and support the integrity of the Lake Pontchartrain Estuarine System.

Identification of Potential Issues:
There are no known state-issued oyster leases in the immediate project area. The
project is supported by the parish. The project is partially located on the Big Branch
Marsh National Wildlife Refuge and the owner is the Department of the Interior,
USFWS. That agency has expressed support for the project.




                                        181
   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Green Property Preservation Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        21490 Koop Drive, Suite 400
                        Mandeville, LA 70471
                        (985) 898-2535 (phone)
                        (985) 898-2523 (fax)
                        gordo@stpgov.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: St. Tammany Parish Government seeks to
   purchase a 27.2-acre parcel owned by Mr. Haywood Green (herein referred to as the
   Green property). The property is situated between Bayou Lacombe and the
   Tammany Trace linear park south of U.S. 190 in Lacombe, Louisiana. Located
   within the Bayou Lacombe watershed, the land is composed of pristine cypress
   swamp and bottomland hardwoods. Within the Lacombe watershed, many species of
   birds utilize the habitat to nest and forage. Especially abundant are migratory
   waterfowl and neotropical migrants unique to the Mississippi Flyway.

   The St. Tammany Parish Government intends to acquire the property to preserve this
   sensitive wetland from future commercial or residential development. The property
   will serve as an educational nature preserve that will allow the parish to educate the
   public about native flora and fauna, the value of wetland conservation, and the
   preservation of native Louisiana habitats. To accomplish this goal, a series of
   interpretive signs that display native fauna and flora, the rate of wetland loss, and
   unique features of native Louisiana habitats will be placed along a network of trails.
   Additionally, parish workers and volunteers will remove invasive plant species and
   install nest boxes within the property to increase native vegetative cover and enhance
   the number of cavity-nesting birds.




                                          182
The St. Tammany Parish Government has applied for property acquisition funds from
the Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program (CELCP). Should the parish
government receive these funds, the grant will be utilized to implement this project.
If the parish is not successful in securing CELCP funding, the CIAP grant will then
be utilized to acquire the Green property, as well as implement selected portions of
the project.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Mr. Haywood Green is a willing seller and a survey and
appraisal are forthcoming. The St. Tammany Parish Government has implemented a
conservation program based on recommendations from sections 2.2 and 3.2 of the
New Directions 2025 Critical and Sensitive Areas Phase I Report that includes the
acquisition of critical and sensitive parcels within a wildlife corridor. On a larger
scale, a riparian corridor will extend the entire length of Bayou Lacombe and Bayou
Liberty, thus connecting Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge with the Abita
Creek Flatwoods (The Nature Conservancy) and the Bogue Chitto National Wildlife
Refuge core reserves. This expansive corridor will extend approximately 38 miles
and cover a vast array of habitats, from brackish marsh to upland pine savannas.

Additionally, this project is part of St. Tammany Parish’s Eco-Tourism Plan
developed by the St. Tammany Parish Government. The design will utilize the
Tammany Trace linear park to connect a network of projects that educate the public
about the value of protecting Louisiana’s native habitats and wildlife.

The proposed project has a high degree of certainty of benefits. Acquisition of the
Green property will generate important ecological and educational benefits. The St.
Tammany Parish Government will educate the public about conservation practices
through a series of interpretive programs that emphasize native Louisiana habitats.
Terrestrial and aquatic wildlife will benefit through improved species dispersal and
foraging area within the corridor. Furthermore, native vegetative cover will
proliferate after invasive plants are removed.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, St. Tammany Parish is the fifth largest parish
in the state and has been the fastest growing parish in Louisiana since the 1970s.
Currently, the Bayou Liberty and Bayou Lacombe Watersheds are under increasing
pressure from residential and commercial development. In 2002, the Lake
Pontchartrain Basin Foundation reported that urbanization in St. Tammany Parish has
occurred at a rate of 2,699 acres a year. At this growth rate, urban areas will occupy
over 138,000 acres or one-fifth of the parish by 2025 and almost one-third of St.
Tammany Parish by 2050. During the study period, more than 52,000 acres of
wetland habitat were lost. In response, the parish developed a regional conservation
plan that includes the acquisition of critical and sensitive parcels within the Bayou
Liberty and Bayou Lacombe riparian habitat zones.




                                       183
   The wetlands of St. Tammany Parish suffered a devastating blow from Hurricane
   Katrina on August 29, 2005. The hurricane caused massive tree damage and soil
   erosion, and increased the transport of non-point source pollutants into the parish’s
   many bayous and streams. Recent satellite imagery illustrates that nearly 40 square
   miles of wetlands within the Lake Pontchartrain Basin were lost during the storm
   event. The Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry has estimated that over
   60% of the standing timber within St. Tammany Parish was severely damaged, and
   the Louisiana State University Hurricane Center reported that the forest canopy
   opened to at least 50% of its former tree cover. This one-day event exceeded the
   amount of wetlands the Lake Pontchartrain Basin lost to natural erosion processes
   from 1990 to 2000. As wetlands provide our first line of defense for hurricane storm
   surges and help to minimize flooding, St. Tammany Parish is committed to restoring
   these critical coastal resources and protecting the wetlands that remain. The
   acquisition and maintenance of land within these critical wildlife corridors will
   prevent further urbanization within this high-growth region.

   Wildlife must utilize the bayous and streams to move through the watersheds, from
   the pine uplands to the coastal marshes along the shore of Lake Pontchartrain,
   assessing different habitats for food sources and cover. Bayou Lacombe is a forested
   habitat that is home to a number of species of concern, including two endangered
   species, the red-cockaded woodpecker and Louisiana quillwort. The pristine habitat
   of Bayou Lacombe merits protection for its wildlife.

   Project Cost Share: The St. Tammany Parish Government will administer all phases
   of planning, which includes recruiting local volunteers (i.e., Friends of Louisiana
   Wildlife Refuges) to help install nest boxes and plant native vegetation. Moreover,
   the St. Tammany Parish Department of Public Works and volunteers (i.e., Boy
   Scouts) will conduct all necessary maintenance.

4) Project Title: Mandeville Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government,
   City of Mandeville

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        21490 Koop Drive, Suite 400
                        Mandeville, LA 70471
                        (985) 898-2535 (phone)
                        (985) 898-2523 (fax)
                        gordo@stpgov.org

                           David deGeneres, Director of Public Works
                           1100 Mandeville High Blvd.
                           Mandeville, LA 70471
                           (985)624-3169 (phone)



                                          184
                         (985)624-3152 (fax)
                         pwdirector@cityofmandeville.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The City of Mandeville utilizes a unique
biological wastewater treatment system. The process of wetland assimilation
involves disbursing nitrogen-enriched treated sewer effluent into marshland. The
beneficial result is increased growth of grass, plants, and trees that provide refuge to
waterfowl and animals. This growth also impedes saltwater intrusion and inhibits
coastal erosion.

This project would include an upgrade of the existing wastewater treatment plant and
construction of a discharge structure and piping system for wetland assimilation.

Mandeville’s wastewater facility is located on Mandeville High Boulevard in
Mandeville, Louisiana, with construction of 2.5 miles of force main for disbursement
of treated effluent into 1.7 square miles of uninhabited wetland adjacent to the
western border of the City of Mandeville.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: The Aquatic Restoration Project will double the City of
Mandeville’s wastewater intake, providing quality sanitary service to the area while
enhancing local marshland. The proposed project will also provide treatment
capacity that will allow Mandeville to accept flows from the new construction and
development resulting from people relocating to the area after Hurricane Katrina.
This area experienced an 8-foot tidal surge during Hurricane Katrina, while Hurricane
Rita inundated the area with another 7-foot tidal surge and consistent tidal motion.
The results of both storms have severely eroded this important floodplain. The
process of wetland assimilation will increase growth of flora and fauna. It impedes
saltwater intrusion and inhibits coastal erosion. Although the waters of Lake
Pontchartrain are brackish, the tidal surge from Hurricane Katrina brought in salt
water from the Gulf of Mexico. The immersion of freshwater plants with high-
salinity water will adversely affect the wildlife in this area.

Project Cost Share: Mandeville has allocated funds in the amount of $330,000.00
for the Phase I retrofit of existing wastewater treatment plant for implementation of




                                         185
   pipeline, as well as all architectural and engineering plans and documentation that
   have been prepared by the City of Mandeville. The project is ready to be bid.

Tangipahoa Parish

1) Project Titles: Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Tangipahoa parish Government

   Contact Information: Maurice Jordan
                        Parish Engineer
                        Post Office Box 215
                        Amite, Louisiana 70434
                        (985) 748-3211 (phone)
                        (985) 748-7050 (fax)
                        tpcroad@i55.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,700,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,700,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Tangipahoa Parish
   between Pass Manchac and the mouth of the Tangipahoa River. The goal of the
   proposed project is the construction of approximately 12,000 linear feet of fore shore
   protection.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The proposed shoreline protection project will protect the
   north rim of Lake Pontchartrain, which has experienced an increased rate of shoreline
   erosion over the past decade.

   Project Cost Share: None

Terrebonne Parish

1.) Project Title: Falgout Canal Freshwater Enhancement – Phase I

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information: Al Levron


                                          186
                        Director of Public Works
                        Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                        P.O. Box 2768
                        Houma, LA 70361
                        985-873-6407
                        985-873- 6409 Fax
                        allevron@tpcg.org

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The proposed project area is located in the
Terrebonne Basin of CWPPRA Region 3, Terrebonne Parish, in the marshes adjacent
to Falgout Canal, between Bayou Dularge and the Houma Navigation Canal

Project Type: 1
The Falgout Canal Freshwater Enhancement Project will be implemented for the
conservation, restoration and protection of coastal areas including wetlands; to
mitigate damage to fish, wildlife and natural resources; and the implementation of a
federally approved marine, coastal or comprehensive conservation management plan.
Specifically, Action Plans EM-1 (Hydrologic Restoration), EM-2 (Freshwater and
Sediment Diversions) and EM-7 (Marsh Management) of the Barataria-Terrebonne
National Estuary Program (BTNEP).

Project Justification: The marshes located in the project area have been
hydrologically isolated from historical flow patterns by construction of various
navigation channels, including the Houma Navigation Canal (HNC) and the Falgout
Canal. Because of these barriers, the prevailing hydrologic influence is confined to
southern tidal flows, which has resulted in elevated salinity and land loss in
historically fresh and intermediate marshes. By reestablishing the historical north-
south flow, the project would expand the zone of beneficial Atchafalaya influence
by modifying water flow patterns to include those marsh area that have suffered
catastrophic loss due to hydrologic isolation and salinity intrusion. The marshes are
expected to benefit from reduced salinity and increased nutrients and sediment. In
addition, Phase II of the project the project will also facilitate creation of new marsh
by terracing large shallow open water areas receiving new freshwater flow.

This project would include construction/modification of a structure at a site located
on the HNC north of Falgout Canal to increase freshwater flow to marshes north of
the canal and to create a freshwater plume to benefit marshes south of the canal.
Three sets of six 36” culverts would be installed through the road separating the



                                        187
    Falgout Canal from the marshes to the south to introduce freshwater, nutrients, and
    sediments. In phase II, approximately 50,000 linear feet of earthen terraces would be
    constructed in the broad shallow open water to facilitate marsh development.

   Project Cost Share: None
Vermilion Parish

1) Project Title: Bird Island

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information:         Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                                Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                                100 North State Street, Suite 200
                                Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                                (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                                (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                                vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $200,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $200,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: None

   Description and Location of Project: The original island would be encircled with
   rock, protecting the remaining island and creating a catch basin for dredge material
   for future oilfield maintenance or for when the State’s small dredge program is in the
   area. This project is similar to Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Restoring the island would afford habitat for numerous
   species of wading birds. This island was a rookery for brown pelicans and colonial
   wading birds.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Chenier au Tigre Cement Bag Extension

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury


                                             188
                            100 North State Street, Suite 200
                            Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                            (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                            (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                            vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $200,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $200,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project would install cement bags as
   shoreline protection to slow erosion and create marsh. This project feature has
   previously been built at this location and is working. This project would expand the
   area of influence.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Extending the project will afford the Chenier au Tigre more
   protection, will buffer storm surge, and will protect the integrity of the marsh behind
   the project feature.

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Four Mile Canal Hydrologic Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $450,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $450,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0



                                           189
   Description and Location of Project: This project would reduce the cross section of
   the Four Mile Canal to the needed navigation width and depth.

   Project Type: Type 1

   Project Justification: This project would help to move fresh water through Onion
   Bayou, the Vermilion River, Schooner Bayou, and Bayou Chene. This project would
   also help to hold a head of fresh water in the Intracoastal City area to buffer salinities,
   helping the adjacent marshes.

   Project Cost Share: None

4) Project Title: Henry Hub Access Improvement – Charlie Field Road Bridge
                     Replacement

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $400,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Charlie Field Road is a vital link between LA
   14 and the Henry Hub. Replacement of this structure is essential to
   maintaining/improving access to the Henry Hub.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: A bridge across a tributary of Bayou Tigre located on Charlie
   Field Road is proposed to be replaced. This bridge is an existing timber structure in
   very poor condition. The existing bridge is located approximately 2300 feet south of
   Louisiana Highway 14 on Charlie Field Road. The existing bridge is in very poor
   condition and it continues to deteriorate.




                                            190
   Project Cost Share: None

5) Project Title: Henry Hub Access Improvements - Charlie Field Road Improvements

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $654,270

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $654,270

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Charlie Field Road is a vital link between LA
   14 and the Henry Hub. Replacement of this structure is essential to
   maintaining/improving access to the Henry Hub.

   Project Type: Type 5

   Project Justification: Louisiana Highway 331 connects Louisiana Highway 14 with
   Parish Roads which then provide access to the Henry Hub. La 331 traverses through
   the Town of Erath until it intersects with Charlie Field Road. Charlie Field Road also
   connects LA 14 with LA 331. Many trucks traveling south on LA 331 use Charlie
   Field Road to access LA 331 from LA 14 since it is a shorter distance than the
   comparable path on LA 331 and also due to the fact that they do not have to travel
   through the populated area of the Town of Erath. This project provides for the
   widening and reconstruction of Charlie Field Road from LA 14 to LA 331. The
   existing roadway is approximately 4100' long by 18' wide and in poor condition.
   Ample shoulders exist to widen the roadway to a 20' surface which would provide
   room for the truck traffic to utilize this stretch of the roadway to access the Henry
   Hub.

   Reconstructing this section of the roadway will improve access to the Henry Hub as
   well as mitigate the damages caused by the many vehicles which service Gulf
   activities terminating at the Henry Hub.

   Project Cost Share: None



                                          191
6) Project Title: Henry Hub Access Improvements – LA Hwy. 331 Realignment

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $400,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Along LA 331 there exists a location in the
   roadway (approximately 3 miles south of LA 14) where the roadway has a reverse
   curve which represents a safety hazard for traffic traveling this highway to the Henry
   Hub.

   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: This project provides for the realignment (flattening) of the
   reverse curve to allow safer driving conditions on this highway which provides vital
   access to the Henry Hub. Approximately 2000 linear feet of the existing roadway is
   proposed to be realigned to provide a safer access to the Henry Hub.

   Project Cost Share: None

7) Project Title: Hydrologic Restoration of Little Bayou Chene

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com



                                          192
   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project would reduce the cross section of
   Little Bayou Chene to the needed navigation depth and width.

   Project Type:

   Project Justification: Reducing the cross section of Little Bayou Chene to the
   needed width and depth for navigation would help to move fresh water through Onion
   Bayou, the Vermilion River, Schooner Bayou, and Bayou Chene. This project would
   also help to hold a head of fresh water in the Intracoastal City area.

   Project Cost Share: None

8) Project Title: Intracoastal City Street Improvements

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $650,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $650,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Intracoastal City provides access to the Gulf
   of Mexico activities for many supply vessels and helicopters. Access to the many
   facilities located in the Intracoastal City area is vital to supporting the oil and gas
   activities in the gulf. This project provides for the reconstruction of several roadways



                                           193
   in the Intracoastal City area to mitigate the damage caused by the heavy truck traffic
   over the years. The streets to be improved along with their linear footage are as
   follows:

              Offshore Road          4,700 linear feet
              M. I. Liquid Road        850 linear feet
              Barge Road             1,450 linear feet
              Teal Road              1,200 linear feet


   Project Type: 5

   Project Justification: Improvement of these roadways will provide improved access
   to the many businesses in Intracoastal City which support the oil and gas activities in
   the Gulf of Mexico.

   Project Cost Share: None

9) Project Title: Northeast White Lake Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project would provide shoreline
   protection engineered for this site.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The bank line at the mouth of Schooner Bayou at White Lake
   has eroded into surrounding marshes, causing marsh loss.




                                           194
   Project Cost Share: N/A

10) Project Title: North Prong Schooner Bayou

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com


   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project will repair numerous breaches
   and weak spots on the east bank of North Prong of Schooner Bayou from the GIWW
   to the Schooner Bayou Locks. With several breaches to contain, the project will
   employ culverts with flap gates to allow the freshwater flow to continue into the
   marshes to the east, while preventing uncontrolled saltwater intrusion into the
   Mermentau Basin.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Numerous breaches in the levee on the east bank of the North
   Prong of Schooner Bayou from the GIWW to the Schooner Bayou Locks threatened
   the integrity of the Mermentau Basin and the future of agriculture and aquaculture in
   Vermilion Parish.

   Project Cost Share: None

11) Project Title: Oyster Reef Parallel to the Coastline at Chenier Au Tigre

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200



                                          195
                           Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                           (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                           (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                           vermilionppj@yahoo.com


   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project would be a base for an oyster
   reef by using approved available materials. Oyster spat are plentiful in this area,
   therefore creating this base will establish a living sustainable reef.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: This project would create one mile of oyster reef 1,300 feet
   from the shoreline. The shoreline is eroding at 10-15 feet per year. The project will
   slow down waver energy, create fisheries habitat, slow coastal erosion and increase
   recreational fishing.

   Project Cost Share: None

12) Project Title: Prien Point Reef Extension

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com


   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0




                                           196
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project consists of the creation of reefs
   by the Louisiana Wetlands Association using clean graded recycled materials at
   selected locations within the Acadiana Bay System.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: This project would extend previous reef restoration efforts in
   the Acadiana Bay System that the Louisiana Wetlands Association has constructed.
   These reefs will afford the shoreline more protection and improve fisheries habitat
   within the Acadiana Bay Region.

   Project Cost Share: None

13) Project Title: Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation at Tiger Point

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $300,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $300,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project would install cement bags as
   shoreline protection to slow erosion and create marsh.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Erosion along this area has diminished the marsh and the
   natural ridge function for hurricane protection.

   Project Cost Share: None




                                          197
14) Project Title: Vermilion Parish Coastal Zone Management, Planning and
   Development

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project will provide financial assistance
   to Vermilion Parish Government to manage and implement the CIAP program.

   Project Type: Planning assistance and the administrative costs of CIAP compliance

   Project Justification: This funding will assist the in the administration of its CIAP
   Plan.

   Project Cost Share: None

15) Project Title: Weeks Bay/Commercial Canal Marsh Creation and Shoreline
                    Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Vermilion Parish

   Contact Information: Clay Menard Secretary/Treasurer
                        Vermilion Parish Police Jury
                        100 North State Street, Suite 200
                        Abbeville, Louisiana 70510
                        (337) 898-6407 (phone)
                        (337) 898-4310 (fax)
                        vermilionppj@yahoo.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000




                                          198
   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $100,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Demonstration of trial methods of marsh
   creation to build landmass and create vegetated wetlands. Project will utilize various
   methods to create sediment deposition field to enhance natural processes to create
   landmass between Weeks Bay and the GIWW.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: Maintain shoreline integrity and stabilize critical areas of the
   actively eroding Vermilion Bay System.

   Project Cost Share: None

State-Only Tier Two Projects

1) Project Title: Central Wetlands Assimilation Project – Phase II

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Sewerage and Water Board of Newleans
   Marcia St. Martin, Executive Director. St. Bernard Parish Government Henry J.
   Rodriguez, Jr., Parish President.

   Contact Information: Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans
                        Gordon Austin, Chief of Environmental Affairs
                        2900 Peoples Ave.
                        New Orleans, LA 70122
                        (504) 858-7305
                        gaustin@swbno.org

                          St. Bernard Parish Department of Public Works
                          Chris Merkl, Director of Public Works
                          8201 W. Judge Perez Dr.
                          Chalmette, LA 70043
                          (504) 278-4317
                          cmerkl@sbpg.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $30,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $30,000,000


                                           199
Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The Sewerage and Water Board of New
Orleans and St. Bernard Parish jointly propose that a regional wetland restoration
project be funded to restore approximately 10,000 acres of critical cypress wetlands
using wetland assimilation of wastewater effluent. The wetland restoration project
would integrate sustainability with mitigation measures. The enhanced wetlands
would protect Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes from future storm vulnerability, while
the environmental improvement would protect the local economy and culture, which
depend on productive wetlands.

The Bayou Bienvenue-Central Wetland Unit to be restored is located between the 40-
Arpent Levee and the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) Levee in Orleans and
St. Bernard Parishes. This area has been determined to be critical for levee protection
against storm surge and storm-generated waves. Wetland loss in this area began
after the construction of the MRGO due to the resulting saltwater intrusion.
Hurricane Katrina exacerbated the damage to the once-productive cypress swamp.
The wetlands now require fresh water and nutrients to restore and maintain the
cypress swamps that protect both parishes. Currently, nutrient-rich effluent from both
parishes is discharged to the Mississippi River, where it contributes to the hypoxia, or
dead zone, in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Rerouting the effluent will allow the
nutrients to be used to replenish the wetlands, rather than increasing damage to the
coastal environment.

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans, East Bank Sewage Treatment Plant
(EBSTP), is located in the Lower Ninth Ward near Bayou Bienvenue. The East Bank
Sewage Treatment Plant provides wastewater treatment for the entire east bank of
Orleans Parish and treats biosolids for both the east and west banks of Orleans Parish.
The treatment facility received approximately $70 million of damage as a result of the
17-foot storm surge created by Hurricane Katrina. St. Bernard Parish received
catastrophic damage to all seven wastewater treatment plants. To mitigate the
damage, the St. Bernard Department of Public Works is planning to implement a
consolidation plan that would allow one discharge line to restore the surrounding
wetlands. The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans and St. Bernard Parish are
jointly seeking funding to implement a phased project that would begin with
distribution of partial flow to wetlands while final design and plant modifications are
completed. Phase I would include engineering design, and installation of a
distribution line for each plant to the wetlands that could utilize existing effluent
pumps. Phase II would extend the distribution line and implement any necessary
plant modifications identified in the Phase I design process. Feasibility and design
will determine whether additional phases could extend the restoration area beyond
10,000 acres. The funding of Phases I and II would result in the restoration of at least
10,000 acres of cypress swamps, mitigation of future storm damages, and creation of
the largest sustainable wastewater infrastructure in the world.




                                        200
   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Research has confirmed that the benefits of wetland
   wastewater treatment include improved surface water quality, increased accretion
   rates to balance a high relative water level rise due mainly to subsidence, improved
   plant productivity and habitat quality, protection against storm surge and storm-
   generated waves, and decreased capital outlays for engineering treatment systems.
   Wetland treatment systems throughout Louisiana have been successfully designed
   and operated to restore deteriorating wetlands.

   Wetland wastewater treatment would replace critical infrastructure that was damaged
   during Hurricane Katrina with sustainable, more economical wastewater treatment.
   Wetland treatment facility capital is roughly one-third the cost of capital for
   conventional wastewater treatment. Furthermore, wetland discharge permits allow
   discharge of higher levels of solids to increase accretion rates. For example, re-
   routing effluent from the Mississippi River to wetlands for the EBSTP would result in
   an annual operation savings of almost two million dollars. More economic
   wastewater treatment will allow for the distressed parishes to continue providing
   sewer service after suffering from severe decreases in revenue.

   Wetland assimilation of wastewater effluent would restore destroyed and rapidly
   disappearing coastal wetlands, which, in addition to their ecological value, protect
   Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes from tropical storm events. Many levees, including
   the 40-Arpent Canal Levee, did not suffer damage where surrounding wetlands acted
   as a buffer against storm surge and storm-generated waves. More recently it has been
   determined that the restoration of the swamps adjacent to the EBSTP, the Bayou
   Bienvenue Central Wetland Unit surrounding the MRGO, and the wetlands near Lake
   Borne are essential to protect Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes from future
   hurricanes. This project would address restoration of all of these deteriorating
   wetlands. Furthermore, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ)
   confirmed after Hurricane Katrina that other municipalities throughout Louisiana that
   utilized wetland treatment sustained less damage due to the hurricane.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Coastal Wetlands Restoration through the Assimilation of Treated
     Sanitary Effluent

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: The Louisiana Department of
   Environmental Quality

   Contact Information: Chris Piehler, Clean Waters Project Director
                        Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality
                        P.O. Box 4312
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70821
                        Phone: (225) 219-3609



                                          201
                        Email: chris.piehler@la.gov

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The projects subject to funding from this
grant will occur coastwide in the Louisiana coastal zone. Recipients of this grant
money will be municipal or parish governments or their authorized representatives to
be used in the planning and implementation of wetlands assimilation of treated
sanitary effluent for the purpose of nourishing coastal wetlands and enhancing their
productivity. Individual wetlands assimilation of treated effluent (WATE) projects
will be evaluated for eligibility for funding by considering the potential for
enhancement of degraded wetland areas, the quantity of available wetlands, the
assimilative capacity of the wetland, the monetary capacity of the municipality, the
wetland purchase or servitude potential, and the infrastructure needed to treat and
uniformly distribute the effluent to the wetland.

Over 15 years of experience with wetland discharges in Louisiana have shown the
benefits of treated sanitary discharges to wetlands. In forested wetlands, it has been
shown that cypress trees in the discharge area had a higher growth rate than those in
the adjacent control area that did not receive effluent. Recent studies have indicated
that levees that had a tree barrier sustained far less damage from Hurricane Katrina
that the levees without trees. The impacts of the subsidence of the wetlands have
been realized in recent years. In addition to the value of accretion and increased
productivity, the addition of fresh water into a wetland will provide a buffer to the
effects of saltwater intrusion events.

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ’s) Municipal Facilities
group will be tasked with the selection of the most beneficial projects and the
oversight during the construction phase of the funded projects. Projects will
encompass all coastal areas impacted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Projects of
various sizes will be selected, with the selection emphasis placed on the restoration
potential and the economic ability of the municipality. The Office of Environmental
Assessment Permits Division of DEQ will set parameters to evaluate the success of
each site, and the Enforcement section will track the monitoring parameters that are
indicators of system functionality and success of the project. Smaller, more indigent
communities with no alternative funding sources may be fully funded through CIAP
funds, and other projects that are partially funded may receive assistance from CIAP
as well.




                                        202
Numerous municipalities in Louisiana and the nation are using this approach
currently, some of which have been functional for approximately 15 years. A multi-
agency strike team, Wetlands Assimilation Strike Team (WAST), is being
coordinated by DEQ for the purpose of identifying hurdles to the regulatory process
affecting wastewater discharges. Rule changes were published to address those
hurdles on August 20, 2006.

Where feasible, these projects stand to improve the quality and quantity of wetlands
within proximity to populated coastal areas, where the benefits wetlands provide in
terms of storm surge buffer are needed. The level of awareness of this approach is
low among potential applicants, but the WAST is currently working diligently to raise
that awareness through the creation of workshops and hurricane recovery workgroup
meetings. This concept has been presented to the Louisiana Recovery Authority,
Environmental Task Force, and was well received as a tool to aid in the recovery of
coastal communities and their associated wetlands. The positive economic and
environmental aspects to this approach demonstrate that, where feasible, wetland
assimilation of treated effluent can provide very long-term solutions to municipal
infrastructure stability as well as protection and enhancement to the wetlands where
many community members live and work.

With initial capital outlay to implement a given project, the long-term economic
benefits include those associated with reduced operation and maintenance of
traditional mechanical treatment works, biosolids handling reductions, and the
alternative to tertiary treatment that otherwise would be necessary for a community to
meet future effluent limit reductions associated with Total Maximum Daily Loading
requirements specified by the Clean Water Act. The certainty of these projects has
been demonstrated within Louisiana sufficiently to enable regulation change within
the Environmental Regulatory Code to categorize suitable projects and wetlands,
resulting in a streamlining of the wastewater discharge permit process.

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: Fifteen years of experience with the assimilation of sanitary
discharges into wetlands have demonstrated that it is a technology that enhances
wetland productivity and results in vertical accretion of wetland soils. These projects
can be used to mitigate the damages of saltwater intrusion to vegetative species. The
enhanced production in forested wetlands will help to lessen the impact of waves and
storm surge on protection levees and coastal communities.




                                        203
   Project Cost Share: The Department of Environmental Quality will provide in-kind
   match in terms of personnel contribution to evaluate the projects, oversee
   construction and implementation, ensure adequate permit coverage that is protective
   of the environment, and track the progress in wetland restoration after
   commencement of discharge. Funds provided by the CIAP will be dispersed to the
   potential applicants, that is the municipal and parish governmental agencies that are
   the responsible entities for wastewater treatment within their respective communities.

3) Project Title: Lake Borgne Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Gregory M. Grandy, Louisiana
   Department of Natural Resources

   Contact Information:      Gregory M. Grandy
                             P.O. Box 44027
                             Baton Rouge, LA 70804-4027
                             (225) 342-6412
                             gregory.grandy@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The goal of the proposed project is the
   implementation of approximately 10,000 linear feet of shoreline protection project
   features between the CIAP Alligator Point to Bayou Bienvenue shoreline protection
   project, which ends at Bayou Bienvenue, and the CWPPRA Shell Beach shoreline
   protection project, which ends at Bayou Dupre. The shoreline protection will protect
   the thin area of marsh that still exists between Lake Borgne and the Mississippi River
   Gulf Outlet (MRGO). The project is located on the southwest shoreline of Lake
   Borgne in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The project is necessary to protect the narrow strip of land that
   remains between Lake Borgne and the MRGO and will work in concert with other
   shoreline protection efforts on either side to maintain the shoreline. The project’s
   objectives include: preventing and reducing Lake Borgne shoreline retreat in the area
   to mitigate further joining of the lake and the MRGO; reestablishing a sustainable
   lake rim; and preventing or reducing conversion of emergent marsh to open water.
   This project is consistent with the Coast 2050 revised strategy of restoring and




                                           204
   maintaining a landbridge between MRGO and Lake Borgne with created marshes and
   shoreline protection.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Will Norman

   Contact Information: Will Norman
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225)342-9432
                        charles.norman@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $14,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $14,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project would consist of
   capping 21,500 linear feet of USACE existing breakwaters and filling in the gaps to
   create a continuous structure, as well as extending this structure north past Pass
   Manchac. The project is located in St. John the Baptist Parish and Tangipahoa
   Parish.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The breakwaters were built in 1995 by the USACE. The
   length was approximately 25,400 linear feet. Since its construction, the breakwaters
   have settled approximately 2.5 feet and now barely protrudes above the water.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

5) Project Title: Marsh Island Terracing

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Gregory M. Grandy, Louisiana
   Department of Natural Resources

   Contact Information:      Gregory M. Grandy



                                           205
                              P.O. Box 44027
                              Baton Rouge, LA 70804-4027
                              (225) 342-6412
                              gregory.grandy@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $ 0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,400,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The goal of the proposed project is to reduce
   shoreline erosion of the lakes and to create marsh in the shallow lakes. The project
   Marsh Island terracing projects are located in Lake Sand, Lake Tom, Lake Michael,
   Oyster Lake and Bayou Platte. All of the projects are located in Iberia Parish on the
   Marsh Island Wildlife Management Area and Game Preserve.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The proposed Marsh Island terracing project will create
   approximately 30,000 linear feet of terracing in Oyster Lake; 50,000 linear feet of
   terracing in Lake Sand; 25,000 linear feet of terracing along Bayou Platte; and 50,000
   linear feet of terracing in Lake Tom and Lake Michael. The terraces would be
   constructed with marsh buggy back hoes and would be vegetated with smooth
   cordgrass immediately following construction completion to reduce erosion of the
   newly constructed terraces. The project is consistent with the revised Coast 2050
   strategy of restoring and maintaining the barrier island and gulf shoreline, such as that
   ased at Isle Dernieres, the Timbalier barrier island chains, Marsh Island , Point au Fer,
   and Chenier au Tigre.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

6) Project Title: Point Au Fer/Lake Chapeau Marsh Creation

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Beau Tate

   Contact Information: Greg Grandy
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225)342-6412
                        gregory.grandy@la.gov



                                           206
   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project will create and nourish
   marsh habitat in the western portion of Point au Fer Island area. Sediment for this
   project would be mined from the previous borrow area that was used on the
   CWPPRA Lake Chapeau Marsh Creation project. The Point au Fer/Lake Chapeau
   Marsh Creation project area is bounded by the Atchafalaya Bay to the West; and the
   Gulf of Mexico to the South, and is generally located around Locust Bayou in
   Terrebonne Parish, Coast 2050 Region 3.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The project area was significantly impacted by the tropical
   storms in 2005 (Hurricanes Katrina and Rita). This project is consistent with the
   revised COAST 2050 strategy of restoring and maintaining the barrier island and gulf
   shoreline. Additionally, this project would prevent accelerated marsh loss in the
   Locust Bayou area from flanking the Gulf of Mexico shoreline along the Point au Fer
   Island.

   Project Cost Share: None

7) Project Title: Rockefeller Refuge Gulf Shoreline Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Beau Tate

   Contact Information: Beau Tate
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                        (225)342-6736
                        beau.tate@la.gov

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $53,044,992

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: N/A

   State CIAP Funds Requested: $53,044,992



                                         207
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: N/A

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project will restore and protect
   the western 9.2 miles of Rockefeller Refuge. Rockefeller Refuge is located in
   southwestern Louisiana, east of Pecan Island and west of Grand Chenier. The project
   is located along the Rockefeller Refuge Gulf shoreline from Beach Prong to Joseph
   Harbor in Cameron Parish, Coast 2050 Region 4, Mermentau Basin. The center of
   the project area is located at the approximate coordinates 30E 08 '00" N latitude and
   92E 45' 00" W longitude.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: One of the most rapidly eroding portions of the Louisiana
   Gulf shoreline is at the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge. Estimates of long-term shoreline
   retreat range from 30 to 40 ft/year. Short-term events, such as Tropical Storm
   Frances in 1998, can cause more than 50 ft of erosion over a few days. It is well
   recognized that tropical cyclones play a significant role in contributing to this erosion.
   During storms, the deposits of shell that are perched atop the beach along the refuge
   shoreline can be transported landward by waves as washover deposits onto the marsh.
   This process results in an exposed zone of fragmented marsh seaward of the beach
   that is easily eroded by the Gulf of Mexico. The Rockefeller Refuge Gulf Shoreline
   Restoration project proposes to create a sand beach and dune system, which will
   reduce wave energies, thereby helping to reduce land loss along the gulf shoreline,
   strengthen the longshore transport system by adding valuable sand to a sediment-
   starved system, and rebuild the natural structural framework within the coastal
   ecosystem to provide for a separation of the gulf and the estuary.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

8) Project Title: Sand Search - Evaluation of Sand Resources off Terrebonne Bay/Basin

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department Of Natural
   Resources/Syed M. Khalil

   Contact Information: Syed M. Khalil, OCRM
                        Office of Coastal Restoration and Management
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        P.O. Box 44027, Capitol Station
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70804

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,600,000


                                            208
Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: Offshore Terrebonne Bay

Project Type: 1

Project Justification: Following the globally accepted “Soft Option” of
emplacement of sand as a mitigation tool, coastal restoration in Louisiana has placed
sand on various barrier islands in an effort to save the deteriorating coast. The
importance of emplacement of sand for coastal restoration in Louisiana has been
established without doubt. Engineering templates (width, height, and revegetation) for
gulf-side beach nourishment have been developed and are undergoing critical review
and modification as the CWPPRA-funded projects evolve. However, identification of
compatible sand resources to implement these projects is an ongoing challenge. Most
of Louisiana’s shorelines do not have, in their vicinity, suitable sand resources of
sufficient size and quality to be used in restoration efforts. Offshore sand deposited in
Ship Shoal is being explored as a resource for the Isles Dernieres restoration. Sand
deposits at South Pelto Blocks 12 and13 (which are an eastern extension of Ship
Shoal) have been explored for restoration of Caminada Headlands (LCA) and are
about 35 miles out. Obviously, dredging and transporting sand across this far
distance would be expensive. Moreover, the exploration for offshore sand deposits
has been conventionally confined in general to the eastern part of Coastal Louisiana,
especially the Barataria Basin. As a part of the Coast 2050 Study, the area off
Barataria Basin was explored for sand. Not much information is available for the
areas off Terrebonne Basin west of Grand Isle. Geophysical surveys have been
conducted in a few areas but mostly on very widely spaced tracklines, so that they do
not shed much light on the possibilities of other sand deposits. Thus a systematic
exploration for sand in areas off Terrebonne Basin will not only help mitigate quite a
few coastal restoration projects in the immediate future through Caminada Headland
Restoration (LCA), West Belle Pass (PPL16), East Timbalier Restoration (Energy
Bill), but will also be useful for future nourishment and subsequent restorations. It is
important to emphasize that the proposed investigation will accelerate
implementation of future shoreline restoration by identifying sand sources on the
feasibility level and allowing engineering-level investigation to proceed immediately,
saving substantial time. The present intent is to investigate the offshore area between
Grand Isle and the Timbalier Islands by running about 900 line miles (at 1500-foot
spacing) of geophysical survey, collecting bathymetric, seismic, magnetic, and side
scan sonar data. After the analyses of the geophysical data, potential sand targets will
be further probed by about 100 vibracores penetrating to about 20 feet in the seabed.

Project Cost Share: Survey vessel R/V Coastal Profiler, custom-built recently by the
State, will be used for the survey. This boat is fitted with the latest state-of-the-art
geophysical equipment, and is housed at the Coastal Studies Institute of Louisiana
State University. Substantial savings are anticipated in using this survey vessel along
with its equipment.




                                        209
9) Project Title: Sand Search -Evaluation of Sand Resources in Trinity and Tiger
   Shoals

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department Of Natural
   Resources/Syed Khalil

   Contact Information:       Syed M. Khalil, OCRM
                              Office of Coastal restoration and Management
                              Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                              Coastal Engineering Division
                              Baton Rouge, LA 70804

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $870,000


   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Propsoed: $875,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project will affect the areas around
   Trinity and Tiger Shoals.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: The importance of emplacement of sand for coastal
   restoration in Louisiana has been established without doubt. Engineering templates
   (width, height, and re-vegetation) for gulf-side beach nourishment have been
   developed and are undergoing critical review and modification as the CWPPRA-
   funded projects evolve. However, identification of compatible sand resources to
   implement these projects is an ongoing problem. Offshore sand deposited in Ship
   Shoal is being explored as a resource for the Isles Dernieres restoration. However,
   most of Louisiana’s remaining shorelines are left without sand resource of sufficient
   size and quality to be used in restoration efforts. Exploration for offshore sand
   deposits has been conventionally confined to the eastern part of coastal Louisiana.
   Trinity and Tiger Shoals hold promising potential for sand which could be used for
   nourishment of Rockefeller Refuge, other shore protection projects, and other barrier
   islands. This investigation will accelerate implementation of future shoreline
   restoration by identifying sand sources on the feasibility level and allowing
   engineering-level investigation to proceed immediately, saving quite a bit of time.
   The present intent is to investigate both the shoals by running about 450 line miles of
   geophysical survey, collecting bathymetric, seismic, magnetic, and side scan sonar
   data. After the analyses of the geophysical data, potential sand targets will be further
   probed by about 50 vibracores penetrating to about 20 feet in the seabed.



                                           210
   Project Cost Share: Survey vessel R/V Coastal Profiler, custom-built recently by the
   State, will be used for the survey. This boat is fitted with the latest state-of-the-art
   geophysical equipment and is housed at the Coastal Studies Institute of Louisiana
   State University. Substantial savings are anticipated in using this survey vessel along
   with its equipment. Secondly, MMS is funding the environmental studies for Tiger
   and Trinity Shoal through a separate grant.

10) Project Title: Ship Shoal: Whiskey Island West Flank

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Louisiana Department of Natural
   Resources/Will Norman

   Contact Information: Will Norman
                        Coastal Engineering Division
                        Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
                        617 North Third Street
                        Baton Rouge, LA 70804
                        (225)342-9432
                        charles.norman@la.gov


   Total State CIAP Funds Proposed: $45,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $45,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project is in the Terrebonne
   Basin of CWPPRA Region 3, Terrebonne Parish, approximately 18 miles southwest
   of Cocodrie, Louisiana. The island is surrounded by Coupe Colin to the west,
   Whiskey Pass to the east, Lake Pelto, Caillou Boca, and Caillou Bay to the north, and
   the Gulf of Mexico to the south.

   Project Type: 1
   Project Justification: The Isles Dernieres barrier island chain, which is
   consideredone of the most rapidly deteriorating barrier shorelines in the United
   States, is losing its structural functions for the coastal/estuarine ecosystem. Of
   primary concern among these functions is the chain’s storm buffering capacity and
   the protection it provides human populations, oil and gas infrastructure, inland bays,
   estuaries, and wetlands. Chain breakup has resulted from major storm actions, human
   alterations, and the loss of nourishing sediments from the natural system. Whiskey
   Island changes between 1978 and 1988 include an average annual loss of 31.1 acres.




                                           211
  One approach to the problem includes mining and importing offshore Ship Shoal
  sediment into the Louisiana coastal ecosystem to increase sediment supply and
  strengthen island formation. Other approaches involve rebuilding the natural
  structural framework within the coastal ecosystem to provide for separation of the
  gulf and the estuary, creating a continuous protective barrier for back bays and inland
  marshes to reduce wave energy, thereby helping to reduce land loss and restore the
  longshore transport system. If implemented, this project will provide a sustainable
  barrier island habitat for numerous wildlife species, in areas that are presently open
  water.

  The goal of this project is to increase the longevity of the previously restored and
  natural portions of the island by increasing the island’s width. Increasing the island’s
  width will help to retain sand volume as well as elevation. Approximately 300 acres
  of intertidal, back barrier marsh will be created by semiconfined disposal and
  placement of dredged material. This material is expected to come from a sediment
  source near the island.

  This project was presented at the CWPPRA PPL 11 (TE-47) planning round.
  Engineering and design has been completed. The project was a candidate for Phase II
  (construction) funding in December of 2005, but was not selected.

  Project Cost Share: None

State-Parish Cost Shared Tier Two Projects

     No Tier Two Projects

Parish-Funded Tier Two Projects

Assumption

     No Tier Two Projects

Calcasieu

     No Tier Two Projects

Cameron Parish

     No Tier Two projects

Iberia Parish

     No Tier Two Projects


                                          212
Jefferson Parish

1) Project Title: Bayou Dupont Natural Ridge Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information: Marnie Winter, Director
                        Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                        1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                        Jefferson, LA 70123
                           (504) 736-6440
                           mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is sited in Jefferson Parish, below
   Lafitte, Louisiana, and southeast of the Pen, in the vicinity of the Dupre Cut area of
   the Barataria Bay Waterway.

   The project would include approximately 25,000 linear feet of natural ridge
   restoration and stabilization, as well as reforestation of approximately 30 acres of
   restored ridges. Existing banklines will be followed and breaches will be plugged to
   interconnect existing land masses, and would thus create a series of ridges. The ridge
   would be constructed along a portion of the north bank of Bayou Dupont that lies
   between its intersection with oil and gas canals in the Sea Deuce area, westward to its
   intersection with the southeast bank of Chenier Traverse Bayou.
   Features would include earthen embankments to reinforce the existing bank lines and
   interconnect existing spoil deposits, as well as appurtenant canal opening plugs, cut
   closures, and stone rip-rap placements needed to stabilize the earthen embankments
   through open water areas. The restored ridge would be planted with woody tree
   species to provide for future stabilization.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: This project will restore one of the natural ridges that
   historically sustained the area’s complex hydrology. Wetlands in the Myrtle
   Grove/Bayou Dupont area have been adversely impacted by erosion, subsidence, and
   the past construction of oil and gas production canals. The proposed restoration of
   natural bank lines along portions of the north shore of Bayou Dupont will help to


                                          213
   dampen the adverse effects of unchecked tidal exchanges. The reestablished ridge
   will be stabilized by vegetative plantings of woody tree species along the restored
   bank lines. Restoration of the natural ridge will act as a retention feature that will
   effectively ensure that sediments obtained from sources in the Mississippi River
   and/or future LDNR dedicated dredging projects will be successfully distributed into
   the surrounding marshes.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Dedicated Dredging on the Barataria Basin Land Bridge (BA-36)

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:      Marnie Winter, Director
                             Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                             1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                             Jefferson, LA 70123
                             (504) 736-6440
                             mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $33,700,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $33,700,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project area contains 502 acres of
   emergent marsh and 780 acres of open water. It is located along the southeastern side
   of Bayou Rigolettes between the Harvey Cut and Bayou Perot in Jefferson Parish,
   Louisiana.

   The project will create emergent marsh by hydraulically dredging in Bayou
   Rigolettes. Existing marsh will be nourished by the addition of a thin layer of
   sediment. Where necessary, vegetation will be planted to ensure rapid colonization.
   The previously approved Barataria Basin Land Bridge Shoreline Protection Project
   (BBLSPP) will protect the project area from the high wave energy of the Perot and
   Rigolettes bayous, but the interior wetlands will continue to deteriorate from
   subsidence, sea-level rise, and excessive tidal exchange. The Davis Pond Freshwater
   Diversion Project will freshen this area, possibly converting it from brackish to
   intermediate marsh. However, Davis Pond will not add land-building sediments to
   this area, and marsh deterioration will continue even under the freshened conditions.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.



                                          214
   Project Justification: This project's objectives are to fill open water areas in order to
   create new marsh and nourish existing marsh by using hydraulic dredges. Shoreline
   protection features associated with the BBLSPP will be used as containment. In some
   large, open water areas, containment dikes will be necessary. In more isolated areas,
   the existing marsh can be used for containment with small containment dikes only
   necessary to close breaches into bayous, canals, and other channels. The borrow site
   would most likely be Bayou Rigolettes. However, conveyance of Mississippi River
   sediment via pipeline is could also be utilized. Vegetation such as brown top millet
   (Panicum ramosum) and Japanese millet (Echinochloa frumentacea) will be aerially
   seeded on the large marsh creation sites that comprise approximately 55% of the
   created marsh area. The remaining marsh, which consists of smaller isolated areas,
   will vegetate by natural colonization from the surrounding marsh.

   The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

   COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

   Coastwide Strategy:
       Dedicated Dredging for Wetland Creation
       Maintenance of Bay and Lake Shoreline Integrity
       Vegetative Planting
       Maintain or Restore Ridge Function

   Regional Strategy:
       #24. Build entire Breaux Act land bridge shore protection project.
       #25. Preserve bay and lake shoreline integrity on the land bridge.
       #26. Dedicated dredging to create marsh on land bridge

   Mapping Unit Strategies:
       # 12. Maintain ridge function

   COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

       Protect critical infrastructure

   Project Cost Share: N/A

3) Project Title: Lake Salvador Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation at Jean Lafitte
   National Park

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information: Marnie Winter, Director
                        Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs



                                            215
                        1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                        Jefferson, LA 70123
                        (504) 736-6440
                        mwinter@jeffparish.net

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $10,000,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The project site is located along the southeast
portion of Lake Salvador at the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical
Park and Preserve and lands south of Bayou Villars in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana.

The goals of this project are to protect existing shoreline and re-create marsh. Rock
revetment will be used to protect the shoreline in the southeast portion of Lake
Salvador and immediately south of Bayou Villars near the Gulf Intracoastal
Waterway (GIWW). Rocks will be placed offshore and backfilled with dredged
material in order to mimic the historical lake rim. Dredged material will be used to fill
a 55-acre area of open water between Lake Salvador and the Bayou Segnette
Waterway. In areas of degraded marsh, a thin layer of dredged material will be
sprayed over the area to add nourishment.

Approximately 21,000 linear feet of shoreline (15,000 on the Barataria Preserve and
6,000 on private land) will be armored with rock; 130 acres of eroded marsh will be
created using dredged material; and marsh nourishment will be used to enrich 135
acres of degraded marsh. Dredged material will be obtained from a borrow source
located near the project area in Lake Salvador.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Within the past 50 years, the project area has undergone a
remarkable transformation, including the loss of more than 620 acres of wetlands.
Since the late 1950s, annual shoreline erosion rates at the Barataria Preserve averaged
21 linear feet, with a high exceeding 90 feet. An astonishing shoreline retreat of
approximately 2,400 feet has occurred at the southern end of the Pipeline Canal since
1958. Shoreline retreat and wetland loss were accelerated by the powerful winds and
storm surge caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Within the project area, these
storms caused 100 feet of shoreline retreat and the interior marsh was compacted or
torn apart, creating open water ponds. The high loss of wetlands that has occurred is
also responsible for flooding of the neighboring communities of Crown Point, Jean
Lafitte, and Barataria. Shoreline stabilization and marsh restoration will ensure



                                        216
   protection of natural resources and infrastructure, including two federally maintained
   navigation channels: Bayou Segnette Waterway and the GIWW.

   Direct benefits of this project include stabilizing 21,000 linear feet of shoreline,
   creating 130 acres of marsh, and providing nourishment to 135 acres. Approximately
   350-400 acres will be directly impacted and over 1,000 acres will be indirectly
   affected. This project will protect a large portion of the southeastern rim of Lake
   Salvador and is synergistic with existing shoreline protection projects that have been
   constructed on the Barataria Preserve. Completion of this project will complete
   armament of the southeastern portion of Lake Salvador.

   One key feature of this project is the storm surge protection for local communities
   and infrastructure. The project site is located in a critical area 15 miles south of New
   Orleans that provides the last line of defense against storm surge coming from Lake
   Salvador and the Barataria Bay. In addition, oil and gas infrastructure in the areas will
   be protected from destructive storm surges.

   The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

   COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:
   Coastwide Strategy:

       Dedicated dredging for wetland creation
       Stabilization of major navigation channels
       Maintenance of bay and lake shoreline integrity

   Regional Strategy:

       Restore and Sustain Marshes
       Protect Bay and Lake Shorelines

   COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

       Protect critical infrastructure

   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: South Shore of the Pen Shoreline Protection and Marsh Restoration
   (BA-41)

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:        Marnie Winter, Director
                               Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                               1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                               Jefferson, LA 70123



                                            217
                              (504) 736-6440
                              mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $17,500,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $17,500,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Region 2, Barataria
   Basin, Jefferson Parish, South Shore of the Pen, Bayou Dupont, Barataria Bay
   Waterway.

   The triangular landmass bounded by the southern shoreline of The Pen, the Barataria
   Bay Waterway (Dupre Cut), and the Pipeline Canal is deteriorating due to shoreline
   erosion (ranging from 4 to 27 feet per year) and interior marsh loss. Loss of this
   protective landmass would provide a more direct connection between the marine/tidal
   processes of the lower Barataria Basin and the freshwater-dominated upper basin.
   The goals of this project are to stop shoreline erosion and to create 74 acres and
   nourish 107 acres of marsh located between The Pen and Barataria Bay.
   Approximately 1,000 feet of concrete pile and panel wall and 10,900 feet of rock
   revetment would be constructed along the south shore of The Pen and Bayou Dupont.
   Two existing bayous will remain open and a site-specific opening to The Pen will be
   incorporated at the eastern marsh creation site. Dedicated dredging would be used to
   create approximately 74 acres of marsh, and nourish an additional 107 acres of marsh,
   within the triangular area bounded by the south shore of The Pen, the Barataria Bay
   Waterway (Dupre Cut) and the Creole Gas Pipeline Canal. Containment dikes
   constructed for marsh creation and nourishment will be degraded upon completion of
   construction.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland


   Project Justification: This project serves as the eastern extension of the CWPPRA
   Central Barataria Basin Land Bridge project and will provide synergy with previously
   constructed projects which include: Barataria Bay Waterway East Side Shoreline
   Protection (BA-26) and Naomi Outfall Management (BA-03c).

   The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

Coastwide Strategy:



                                            218
       Dedicated Dredging for Wetland Creation
       Maintenance of Bay and Lake Shoreline Integrity
       Vegetative Planting
       Maintain or Restore Ridge Function
       Stabilization of major navigation channels

Regional Strategy:
       #24. Build entire Breaux Act land bridge shore protection project.
       #25. Preserve bay and lake shoreline integrity on the land bridge.
       #26. Dedicated dredging to create marsh on land bridge.

Mapping Unit Strategies:
       #12. Maintain ridge function.
       #13. Restore ridge function of Bayou Barataria.
       #14. Restore hydrology.

COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

       Protect critical infrastructure

   Project Cost Share: N/A

5) Project Title: Marsh Restoration via Management of Rosethorne Municipal Effluent

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:           Marnie Winter, Director
                                  Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                                  1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                                  Jefferson, LA 70123
                                  (504) 736-6440
                                  mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $700,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $700,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0
   Description and Location of Project: The existing wetlands to be restored are located South
   of Louisiana Highway 45 (Jean Lafitte Blvd.). The Town of Jean Lafitte Rosethorne treatment facility
   is located approx. 1000 feet from Louisiana Highway 45 and west of Louisiana Highway 3134(Leo
   Kerner Blvd.) bridge. The existing Rosethorne treatment facility provides sewer treatment to the entire
   Town of Jean Lafitte.




                                                  219
   The existing Fleming wetlands has suffered great losses due lost of coastal wetlands resulting in
   saltwater intrusion. These wetlands require fresh water and nutrients to restore and maintain cypress
   swamps, which originally existed in the area. The necessity for wetlands in these areas are critical for
   the protection of the levees that suffer damage from incoming storm surge and especially due to storm
   generated waves. This project will also reduce nutrient loading in the Lower Mississippi River Basin,
   which will prevent further hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Instead of discharging effluent into
   Bayou Barataria and its waterways ecosystem, the effluent will be used as a nutrient source for
   replenishing wetlands. The hypoxia, or dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico affects the environment and
   the local economy, which is dependent on commercial and recreational fishing.

   The existing Rosethorne treatment facility serves the entire Town of Jean Lafitte. The treatment plant
   is an oxidation pond. The nearest treatment facility, which is the Marrero treatment plant, is
   approximately 9 miles away with the closest sewer system that ties into the Marrero treatment plant
   approximately 5 miles away. Based on this information, if the Rosethorne treatment facility were to
   undergo extensive damage, the Town of Jean Lafitte would have no way of treating it’s raw sewerage.
   Based on similar wetland assimilations that other municipalities throughout Louisiana have
   constructed, those treatment plants have sustained less damage due to the hurricane. It has also helped
   prevent the extended interruption of service to citizens and businesses that occurred and are occurring
   to other municipalities following Hurricane Katrina.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland


   Project Justification: The project goal is two-fold. First, this project would restore destroyed and
   rapidly disappearing coastal wetlands that, in addition to their ecological value, originally protected the
   metropolitan New Orleans area from tropical storm events. Secondly, this project would repair
   damaged critical infrastructure as well as reduce the cost of future operation, maintenance and permit
   compliance monitoring. It will also help reduce costs from the results of future tropical storm events as
   explained above.

   Jefferson Parish believes that discharging treated effluent into neighboring wetlands will provide water
   quality improvement, solids handling, wetland mitigation, hazard mitigation and the ability to restore
   up to 300-500 acres of cypress wetlands.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

6.) Project Title: Tidal Restrictions at Barataria Bay Waterway, Harvey Cut and Little
    Lake

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information: Marnie Winter, Director
                        Jefferson Parish Department of Environmental Affairs
                        1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Suite 1006
                        Jefferson, LA 70123
                        (504) 736-6440
                        mwinter@jeffparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $11,000,000



                                                   220
Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $11,000,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The project is sited in Jefferson Parish, on the
portion of the Barataria Bay Waterway that is south of Bayou Dupont and north of
Goose Bayou, and at the southern ends of Bayou Perot and Bayou Rigolettes, near
their confluence, just northeast of Little Lake.

This project would restore hydrologic conditions at the critical Land Bridge area by
restricting channel dimensions at Harvey Cut and at the Bayou Perot/Little Lake
intersection. Additionally, four sheetpile barriers would be strategically placed in the
Barataria Bay Waterway as a means of reestablishing historical levels of hydrologic
exchange within the area. This project would help protect the integrity of the
shorelines of the Dupre Cut portion of the Barataria Bay Waterway. The project
would also restrict channel dimensions to limit saltwater intrusion, tidal prism, and
enhance freshwater retention.

Features would include a barrier wall structure with a 500-foot-wide x 12-foot-deep
barge bay opening (to be optimized) would be constructed to constrict Bayou Perot to
its historical 1956 opening; another barrier wall structure with a 56-foot-wide x 12-
foot-deep barge bay opening would be constructed to constrict flows through Harvey
Cut; and, construction of four strategically placed barrier wall structures across the
Dupre Cut, with appropriately sized openings for marine transportation and barge
traffic (125-foot-wide x 12-foot-deep barge bay openings, typically). These structures
would be built so as to constrict the flows experienced in this area of the Barataria
Bay Waterway. These barrier walls would consist of vertical pre-stressed concrete
sheetpiles, approximately 6 inches thick x 8 feet wide x 20 linear feet long. These
sheetpile slabs would be supported along each length by 60-feet long precast concrete
piles having an “H”-Pile configuration for the top 20 feet, and driven at 8.5 feet,
center to center, along the wall alignment. Along the edge of the channel, the barrier
walls would be reinforced along each side with stone aggregate berms.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland

Project Justification: The project is located in a rapidly deteriorating area of the
Barataria Land Bridge. Due to bankline erosion, the historical openings, which once
allowed limited tidal exchange with the freshwater and intermediate marshes north of
the project, have been enlarged to such a degree that a catastrophic change in the
basic hydrology of the wetlands is being experienced. Barriers, in the form of
channel restriction, are proposed to reestablish the historical levels of hydrologic
exchange within the channels. The project will limit tidal inflows from Little Lake
and Turtle Bay and enhance the retention of fresh water in the marshes north of the
proposed structures.


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   Additionally, the historical width of the Dupre Cut portion of the Barataria Bay
   Waterway has enlarged to such a degree that a catastrophic change in the basic
   hydrology of the wetlands has occurred. These hydrologic changes have accelerated
   saltwater intrusion, increased the tidal prism, and reduced up-gradient freshwater and
   sediment retention. As a result, significant losses are occurring in adjacent wetland
   areas. Sheet pile barriers are proposed to limit the tidal and storm-driven forces of
   erosion and enhance freshwater retention in the adjacent marshes north of the
   proposed structures.

   Restoration of original area-wide hydrology and increased retention of fresh water in
   marsh areas north of the project would help conserve these critical wetlands along the
   Barataria Land Bridge. During hurricane and extra-tropical storm events, the barrier
   walls constructed by this project will help to dampen and reduce storm surge
   amplitudes that may be experienced along the upper reaches of the Barataria Bay
   Waterway in the Lafitte and Bayou Villars areas of Jefferson Parish, and would
   protect oil and gas infrastructure within the direct vicinity.

   The project is consistent with the following coastal restoration initiatives:

COAST 2050: TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE COASTAL LOUISIANA:

Coastwide Strategy:
  Stabilization of major navigation channels
  Maintain estuarine gradient to achieve diversity

Regional Strategy:
  Restore natural drainage patterns

COASTAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CIAP):

       Protect critical infrastructure

   Project Cost Share: N/A

Lafourche Parish

1) Project Title: East Timbalier Island (Eastern Section) Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Lafourche Parish Government

   Contact Information:        Windell Curole
                               P.O. Box 426
                               Galliano, LA 70354
                               (985) 632-7554


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                             slld@mobiletel.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: N/A

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: N/A

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in Lafourche Parish,
   Louisiana, on East Timbalier Island. The island is part of a barrier island chain that
   separates Terrebonne and Timbalier bays from the Gulf of Mexico. Prior to TE-30
   Project, “East Timbalier Island Sediment Restoration,” that was proposed in 1994, the
   remnants of the island were expected to disintegrate within 11 years. Losing an
   average of 70 ft/year, the island experienced on of the highest gulf coast erosion rates
   in Louisiana in the last century. As a barrier island, East Timbalier not only protects
   Louisiana’s coast from hurricanes and storm surges but also lessens the erosive forces
   of high waves from the Gulf of Mexico as well.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: Hurricane Katrina’s impact eroded the eastern part of the
   island. It is necessary to restore the island to ensure protection of marsh and human
   habitat from hurricanes and erosion. The oil and gas facility on the island is now
   exposed to the Gulf of Mexico. This project is a joint venture with Maritech to re-
   nourish/rebuild East Timbalier Island and the back wetland area that protects critical
   oil and gas infrastructure areas operated by Maritech. Maritech has stated that they
   would assist in the funding of maintenance after the island is restored.

   Project cost share: N/A

2) Project Title: East Caminada Headland Beach/Dune Restoration and Marsh
     Creation
   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Lafourche Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Windell Curole
                             P.O. Box 426, Galliano, LA 70354
                             (985) 632-7554
                             slld@mobiletel.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $78,858,895

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0




                                           223
   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $78,858,895

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project will restore and protect
   the western 7.0 miles of Caminada Headland through restoration of the dune and
   berm as well as marsh creation. The proposed project site is located in Lafourche
   Parish along Caminada Headland, extending from Bay Champagne to Bayou
   Thunder. The center of the project area is located at the approximate coordinates 29°
   08 '47.86" N latitude and 90° 07' 6.62" W longitude. The proposed project comprises
   the central portion Caminada Headland component of the Barataria Basin Barrier
   Shoreline Restoration Project that was identified as a critical near-term restoration
   project in the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration Study.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Over the last 100 years, the Caminada Headland has
   experienced an average shoreline erosion rate of 45 ft/year. The overall goal of this
   project is to maintain the headland reach of the Barataria Shoreline, help sustain
   significant and unique coastal habitats (e.g., back-barrier marshes, Chenier ridges,
   and mangroves), protect threatened and endangered species, and provide a sediment
   source for areas east and west of the headland. Incidental benefits from this
   ecological restoration will protect Port Fourchon, local State highways, and the only
   hurricane evacuation route available to the region. This project helps to addresses
   critical ecological needs and will restore and protect essential geomorphic features to
   help create a sustainable ecosystem in the Barataria Basin. The project is synergistic
   with future restoration by maintaining or restoring the integrity of Louisiana’s
   coastline, upon which all future coastal restoration depends. The draft feasibility
   study and environmental impact statement for the Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline
   Project, of which this proposed project is a part of, is scheduled for August 2006.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

3) Project Title: Hydrologic Restoration of Bayou L’Eau Bleu connections to Grand
     Bayou (south) and the Intracoastal Water Way (north) and St. Louis Canal
     Connections to Bayou Pointe au Chien (south)

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Lafourche Parish Government

   Contact Information:      Windell Curole
                             P.O. Box 426
                             Galliano, LA 70354
                             (985) 632-7554
                             slld@mobiletel.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $15,000,000



                                           224
   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: N/A

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: N/A

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project is located in Lafourche Parish,
   east of the Terrebonne Parish line and west of the South Lafourche Levee System.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: This project involves reintroducing fresh water from the
   Intracoastal and northern fresh water supplies south into the broken marsh between
   the Terrebonne Parish line and the South Lafourche Levee System. This project
   would slow down the salt water reaching the northern wetlands in Lafourche Parish.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: West Caminada Headland Beach/Dune Restoration and Marsh
   Creation

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Fourchon Region Restoration
   Initiative/Cathy Norman

   Contact Information:      Cathy Norman
                             Edward Wisner Donation
                             1300 Perdido Street, Room. 2W86,
                             New Orleans, LA 70112

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $25,011,602

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $25,011,602

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project will restore and protect
   the western 2.3 miles of Caminada Headland through restoration of the dune and
   berm as well as through marsh creation. The proposed project site is located in
   Lafourche Parish along Caminada Headland, extending from the Belle Pass jetties on
   the western terminus of the Headland at the entrance to Port Fourchon to the South
   Pass Fourchon area just east of the Chevron Fourchon Facility. The center of the
   project area is located at the approximate coordinates 29° 06 '3.29" N latitude and 90°
   12' 17.04" W longitude. The proposed project comprises the westernmost end of the



                                          225
   Caminada Headland component of the Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline Restoration
   Project that was identified as a critical near-term restoration project in the LCA
   Ecosystem Restoration Study.

   Project Type: 1

   Project Justification: Over the last 100 years, the Caminada Headland has
   experienced an average shoreline erosion rate of 45 ft/year. The overall goal of this
   project is to maintain the headland reach of the Barataria Shoreline, help sustain
   significant and unique coastal habitats (e.g., back-barrier marshes, Chenier ridges,
   and mangroves), protect threatened and endangered species, and provide a sediment
   source for areas east and west of the headland. Incidental benefits from this ecologic
   restoration will protect Port Fourchon, local state highways and the only hurricane
   evacuation route available to the region. This project helps to addresses critical
   ecological needs and will restore and protect essential geomorphic features to help
   create a sustainable ecosystem in the Barataria Basin. The project is synergistic with
   future restoration by maintaining or restoring the integrity of Louisiana’s coastline,
   upon which all future coastal restoration is dependent. The draft feasibility study and
   environmental impact statement for the Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline Project, of
   which this proposed project is a part of, is scheduled for August 2006.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

Livingston Parish

       No Tier Two Projects

Orleans Parish

1) Project Title: Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection - Hospital Wall

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: City of New Orleans Mayor’s Office of
   Environmental Affairs

   Contact Information:       Ms. Wynecta Fisher, Deputy Director
                              1300 Perdido Street, Suite 8E06
                              New Orleans, LA 70112
                              (504) 658-4070
                              wmfisher@cityofno.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $900,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $900,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0



                                           226
   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: This project requires approximately 3,000 feet
   of rock breakwater. The project is located in the Pontchartrain Basin, in eastern
   Orleans Parish along the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline at the Rigolets.

   Project Summary: The project is located in the Pontchartrain Basin, at Lake
   Pontchartrain along Hospital Wall. The goals and objectives are: conservation,
   restoration, and protection of coastal area, including wetland.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetlands.

   Project Justification: High wave energy, sea level rise, and subsidence levels are
   impacting the wetland shorelines of Lake Pontchartrain, Chef Pass, the Rigolets, and
   Lake St. Catherine, which were subject to high erosion rates (10–60 ft/year) before
   Hurricane Katrina. Impacts from the passage of the hurricane resulted in accelerated
   shoreline erosion and marsh destruction. Identified in both Coast 2050 and the LCA,
   this area forms a barrier between Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Borgne, an eventual
   passage to the Gulf of Mexico. The proposed project will benefit 300 acres and
   protect 14 acres by reducing the shoreline erosion rate by 100%. The project would
   maintain part of the Pontchartrain shoreline and protect communities and
   infrastructure.

   Project Cost Share: None

2) Project Title: Lake Pontchartrain Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation – Irish
     Bayou to Chef Menteur Pass

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: City of New Orleans Mayor’s Office of
   Environmental Affairs

   Contact Information:      Ms. Wynecta Fisher, Deputy Director
                             1300 Perdido Street, Suite 8E06
                             New Orleans, LA 70112
                             (504) 658-4070
                             wmfisher@cityofno.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $13,252,000

   Total Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $13,252,000

   State CIAP Funds Requested: None

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: None




                                          227
   Description and Location of Project: This project requires approximately 20,700
   feet of rock breakwater along a 2-foot contour extending from Point aux Herbes to
   Chef Menteur Pass. About 46 acres of marsh will be created by hydraulically
   dredging material from the bottom of Lake Pontchartrain, and placing it into confined
   marsh creation sites. The project is located in the Pontchartrain Basin, in eastern
   Orleans Parish along the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline between Point aux Herbes and
   Chef Menteur Pass.

   Project Summary:
   The project is located in the Pontchartrain Basin, at the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline
   between Point aux Herbes and Chef Menteur Pass.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: The project area consists of a relatively narrow segment of
   marsh and shallow open water between an existing Federal hurricane protection
   levee, Interstate 10, and Lake Pontchartrain. As the shoreline deteriorates and
   retreats, the threat to interior marsh and local infrastructure becomes elevated as they
   are exposed to the high-energy conditions of Lake Pontchartrain. The erosion rate
   along the shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain between Point aux Herbes and Chef
   Menteur Pass, based on an analysis of shoreline change, varies between 5 and 54 feet
   per year. The proposed project will benefit approximately 250 acres of brackish
   marsh and open water.

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: The Rigolets Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation - Grand Coin
    Pocket

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: City of New Orleans Mayor’s Office of
   Environmental Affairs

   Contact Information:       Ms. Wynecta Fisher, Deputy Director
                              1300 Perdido Street, Suite 8E06
                              New Orleans, LA 70112
                              (504) 658-4070
                              wmfisher@cityofno.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $7,400,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $7,400,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0



                                           228
   Description and Location of Project: This project requires approximately 8,000
   linear feet of shoreline protection and approximately 100 acres of marsh creation and
   restoration along the west bank of Rigolets Pass. The project is located in the
   Pontchartrain Basin, in eastern Orleans Parish between the west bank of the Rigolets
   and the northern shore of Lake St. Catherine.

   Project Summary:
   Location - The project is located in the Pontchartrain Basin, between the west bank of
   the Rigolets and the northern shore of Lake St. Catherine.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: High wave energy, sea level rise, and subsidence levels are
   impacting the wetland of Lake Pontchartrain, Chef Pass, the Rigolets, and Lake St.
   Catherine shorelines, exhibited by increasingly high erosion rates dating since the
   1980s. Identified in both Coast 2050 and the LCA, this critical area is defined as a
   land bridge that forms a marsh barrier between Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Borgne,
   a bay of the Gulf of Mexico. The land bridge functions as a natural barrier that
   dampens substantial storm surge during hurricanes and reduces the flow of water into
   Lake Pontchartrain. Grand Coin Pocket, once a small pond, is a section of brackish
   marsh that separates Lake St. Catherine from the Rigolets. The deep and fast-moving
   Rigolets Pass is eroding the northern side of Grand Coin Pocket, while tidal
   influences within Lake St. Catherine affect the southern side. Without this marsh, the
   Rigolets will become part of Lake St. Catherine, further increasing tidal and wave
   impacts on wetland habitat, New Orleans communities, and a hurricane evacuation
   route, U.S. Highway 90.

   Project Cost Share: None

Plaquemines Parish

       No Tier Two Projects

St. Bernard Parish

       No Tier Two Projects

St. Charles Parish

1) Project Title: St. Charles Parish Wetlands Education Center

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Charles Parish (Earl Matherne)




                                          229
   Contact Information:       St. Charles Parish
                              Coastal Zone Management Section
                              Earl Matherne
                              P.O. Box 302
                              Hahnville, LA 70057
                              (985) 783-5060
                              ematherne@stcharlesgov.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

  Description and Location of Project: Construction of the first phase on the St.
  Charles Parish Wetland Education center. This first phase will provide the basis for a
  three-phase education center and will include one classroom, one laboratory, and
  administrative and convenience space (restroom, kitchen). The project is to be located on
  the Shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain near the Bonnet Carre’ Spillway in Norco, Louisiana.
  The site is owned by St. Charles Parish and is already used as an education area, which
  includes a jetty and a nature trail.

   Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
   wetland.

   Project Justification: St. Charles Parish is located in both the Pontchartrain and
   Barataria Basins of Louisiana. The proposed site is centrally located and easily
   accessible to schoolchildren in St. Charles Parish and surrounding parishes. The site
   offers a diversity rarely seen in Louisiana, from freshwater to brackish water
   environments, open water environments, and marsh and forested wetlands, all on 28
   acres. While the site is heavily used by science teachers now, educating over 600 kids
   this year, the lack of permanent facilities limits its potential. Permanent facilities will
   provide safe, clean restrooms and shelter from the elements, specifically the heat. It will
   also allow scientific equipment to be readily accessible at the site and available to more
   teachers, and therefore more students.

   Project Coast Share: None

St. James Parish

1) Project Title: Culvert Installation through Existing Berms and Board Roads

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council



                                            230
Contact Information:        Mr. Jody Chenier
                            St. James Parish Council
                            P. O. Box 106
                            Convent, LA 70723
                            (225) 562-2262
                            jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $185,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $185,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council will install 24-
inch plastic pipe through existing spoil banks and earthen berms to allow water
exchange through these existing man-made barriers. Presently, throughout the west
bank of St. James Parish, there are several old spoil banks that have impounded
thousands of acres of swamps. The parish will open cut several of these obstructions
to allow water flow both into and out of these areas. In several cases, landowners
require access across these berms and roads and will not allow the parish to complete
open cut channels. These areas have been identified, will be cut, and a 24-inch plastic
pipe will be installed through these obstructions to reestablish natural water flow. The
culvert installations will allow present ingress and egress into these areas to continue
and enhance the water quality and nutrient exchange in the project area. St. James
Parish proposes to install these culverts along the St. James Canal beginning at
Latitude 29º54’36” - Longitude 90º43’48” and ending at Latitude 30º03’00” -
Longitude 90º57’00”. It is estimated that approximately 100 sites would need three
sets of culverts to be installed along this 20-mile stretch of canal.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Since humans moved into the marsh and wetland areas, they
have built levees and berms, and dug canals for navigation to provide oil and gas
exploration. Most of those canals were dug without regard to their impacts to the
surrounding wetland areas. The berms that were constructed along swamp and
marshland areas prevent sediments that are needed to sustain a wetland from entering
into those impounded areas. Without sediment and fresh nutrients, subsidence can
overtake wetland growth and lead to swamp deterioration. These berms have
negatively impacted the hydrologic balance, which has led to conditions that kill
wetland vegetation. As wetlands disappear, the wells, pipelines, and roads that are
needed to explore, extract, and produce products that make the oil and natural gas
industry possible will be exposed to open water conditions. These problems can lead
to high replacement costs and increase the likelihood of a spill or pipeline rupture,



                                        231
   which increases the potential damage to wetlands and wetland habitats. The key to
   restoring and protecting our wetland swamps and our ecosystem is to manage and use
   the natural forces. The goals of the Coast 2050 initiative were to create and sustain
   marsh and wetland areas by accumulating sediment and organic matter and maintain
   the exchange of energy and organisms. In the upper Barataria Basin, the lack of
   sediment in conjunction with subsidence and deteriorating wetlands has produced a
   coastal system that is collapsing.

   The gaping of earthen berms and installation of plastic culverts will allow water
   transfer into the wetland areas identified under this proposal. The West St. James
   Canal traverses St. James Parish from one end to the other and is approximately 20
   miles long. Earthen berms that were created when the canal was dug have caused
   impoundments that negatively affect over 100,000 acres. The installation of 24-inch
   culverts at approximately 100 different sites along this canal will provide an
   immediate, non-maintenance solution to the sediment and water isolation problem.
   The parish has the necessary equipment and means to spearhead such a valuable and
   achievable project. The project benefits are easily identified and can be installed and
   maintained without any disruption of existing wetland areas while providing not only
   instantaneous results, but long-term benefits as well.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish has already hired an
   engineering consultant to develop and obtain a permit to dredge the West St. James
   Canal. The permit allows the parish to reestablish and maintain the existing drainage
   canal and deposit the dredged material on the existing spoil bank. Some of the
   property owners have objected to gapping the spoil bank because it would limit their
   access to the property. The installation of plastic pipes will allow the parish to
   reestablish some of the natural hydrology that is so vital to this wetland area. All
   landowners have expressed their willingness to allow the pipes to be installed, thus
   providing a means that is acceptable to all parties involved. The parish is prepared to
   use its own equipment and manpower to install the culverts, thereby reducing the total
   cost of the project. In this effort, St. James Parish will provide in-kind labor
   estimated at $15,000 toward the project. All other work will be provided under force
   account methods and will utilize FEMA rates for equipment and material. The parish
   estimates that all work completed under this proposed project would take
   approximately 100 days to complete and would be completed with minimal impact to
   existing wetland areas, since all work would be completed from inside the existing
   waterways.

2) Project Title: Mini-Siphon into St. James Canal at Baytree Site

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:        Mr. Jody Chenier
                               St. James Parish Council
                               P. O. Box 106
                               Convent, LA 70723



                                           232
                             Ph: (225) 562-2262
                             jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,300,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $800,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,500,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $212,000

Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council plans to team
up with the State to build a mini-siphon over the Mississippi River levee at Baytree,
La. The Parish plans to construct a siphon and drainage canal on a 63 acre tract of
land from the Mississippi River to the St. James West Bank Canal. The siphon would
dump freshwater into the depository canal to be built at the foot of the Mississippi
River levee in Section 47 and continue through Section 49, located in T-11-S, R-16-
E. The siphon and depository canal would allow freshwater into the Bayou Chevreuil
wetland areas. The freshwater would provide needed nutrients and sediments that
would enhance wetland restoration and improve water quality.

The freshwater diversion will take advantage of natural topography and hydrologic
features to re-establish input of basic resources and circulation. This site in the upper
reach of the Barataria Basin was previously examined as a possible CWPPRA site.

The proposed project would consist of two 72” diameter steel pipes that will extend
from the Mississippi River, over the levee, and empty into a discharge pond. From the
discharge pond, a 400 square foot channel will extend approximately 13,500 feet into
the Parish cross-cut canal, which empties into Bayou Chevreuil.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas, including
wetlands.

Project Justification: The siphon project will re-establish the input of freshwater
into the Bayou Chevreuil and Lac Des Allemands areas, which are at the upper region
of the Barataria Basin. Swamps in the upper Barataria Basin have been isolated from
the Mississippi River for many years. The river was historically the primary source
of water sediments and nutrients needed to sustain a healthy wetland area. The
swamps are now dependent upon local rainfall and flooding to provide any of the
nutrients and sediments they receive. Subsidence levels are moderate; and because of
the lack of sediment input and low swamp productivity, there is an accretion deficit,
which results in the loss of wetlands and wetland habitats. The freshwater project will
increase productivity and regeneration of cypress and tupelo swamps. It will suppress
poor water quality and low-dissolved oxygen levels and allow nutrient loading from
the Mississippi River to be deposited in areas needed in the northern end of the Basin.
This will also reduce the excessive nutrient loading from the Mississippi River into



                                         233
   the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, the loss of continual freshwater into Lac Des
   Allemands has resulted in increased salinity levels, which increases the stress of fresh
   water vegetation and the dominant species of bald cypress. The freshwater diversion
   would not only improve water quality in the lakes but would directly affect
   approximately 4,000 acres of cypress and tupelo swamp. This project was listed on
   the CWPPRA project nominee final report for PPL 10.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): The Parish will use its own equipment and
   labor to clear the agriculture property and prepare land for digging of the depositary
   canal. Additionally, the Parish will pay all costs associated with surveying and
   channel engineering design. The total cost of equipment and labor to clear the
   property is estimated at $45,000.

3) Project Title: St. James Parish Waterline Booster Pump Station, East Bank

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                Ph: (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $212,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $212,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $212,000

   Description and Location of Project: Due to the increased activity in oil and gas
   production, St. James Parish is proposing to construct a waterline booster pump
   station in Convent, Louisiana. The proposed site is located along LA Highway 44 in
   R-3-E, T-11-S. The scope of work for the booster pump station includes housing a
   40- hp motor with a 1,100 gallon/minute high-service pump capable of overcoming
   an 80-foot dynamic head condition. The booster pump will tie into the existing 10-
   inch PVC waterline at two locations in order to establish a loop and by-pass system.
   The station will have a metal building with a concrete floor to enclose the pump and
   electrical equipment. The increased oil and gas activity, especially at the Motiva oil
   refinery, requires that the parish increase its water supply capabilities. The increased
   water supply is needed to meet the extra potable water required to maintain the
   refinery’s additional demands. Additionally, in the event of a fire or accident at the
   refinery, the parish does not have an adequate water system to maintain the higher
   water pressure that would be needed. Also, due to the number of pipelines within the



                                           234
   Convent area that transport products from offshore drilling operations, it is necessary
   that high water pressure be maintained in the event of a fire on any of those pipelines.

   Project Type: Mitigation of the impacts of OCS activities through funding of
   onshore infrastructure projects and public service needs.

   Project Justification: The booster pump station benefits the many refineries and
   fabrication facilities in the area. Within the project area, there are several industrial
   fabrication shops that manufacture and repair pumps, motors, and steel components
   that are used in the production of offshore oil and gas. These facilities need water for
   their manufacturing processes and fire protection in the event of an accident or fire.
   The project was designed to maximize the booster pump’s ability to meet and exceed
   peak flow demands from businesses and industries in the area. The use of CIAP funds
   to construct the booster pump station will provide a long-term beneficial use of the
   water supply system. St. James Parish is prepared to pay for the cost of design,
   bidding, surveying, right-of-way acquisitions, and other miscellaneous costs.
   Therefore, the CIAP funds will be used toward the actual construction cost only.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): $25,000
   St. James Parish has already hired an engineering consultant to develop plans and
   specifications for the waterline booster pump station. The cost for the plans, $7,900,
   was paid by the St. James Parish Council. The parish is prepared to fund any
   additional costs associated with this project above the amount requested from CIAP
   funds. Additionally, the remaining costs of bidding, construction representation,
   surveying, and right-of-way acquisitions are estimated to be $17,100 and will be paid
   by the parish.

4) Project Title: St. James Parish West Bank Wetland Conservation and Protection,
   Phase III

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $558,693

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $558,693

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0



                                           235
Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council would like to
purchase several large tracts of existing wetlands to prohibit the destruction and aid in
the protection of our parish’s coastal wetland areas. This project is proposed to
purchase approximately 385 acres of existing wetlands from the Bayou Chevreuil
Land Co., LLC. The areas the parish would like to purchase and protect are wetlands
that adjoin a major state highway that links the communities of South Vacherie in St.
James Parish to Chackbay in Lafourche Parish. The purchase of these tracts will
eliminate any future development along this 1.8-mile stretch of LA Highway 20.

The purchase of these tracts will provide for the protection of 385 acres of healthy
cypress swamp in St. James Parish. It is the intention of the St. James Parish Council
to create a Louisiana Conservation Servitude on the entire 385 acres. The Bayou
Chevreuil Land Co., LLC is the legal owner of the proposed land to be purchased.
There are no liens, encumbrances, easements, or restrictions on the property proposed
under this project.

The soil survey of the site as depicted in the “Soil Survey of St. James and St. John
the Baptist Parishes, La.” (1973) shows the soil types to be Barbary association (Ba),
Barbary-Fausse association (BB), Commerce silt loam (Cm), Commerce silty clay
loam (Cn), Convent complex (Cr), and Sharkey association, frequently flooded (Sm).
Elevations on the site range from 0.5 to 5.0 feet above NGVD for mean sea level. The
majority of the site remains saturated or inundated for most of the year.

The site is dominated primarily by facultative-wetland and obligate-wetland plant
species. The dominant species include bald cypress, water tupelo, Drummond red
maple, American elm, alligator weed, and water hyacinth. Some upland species grow
on the spoil banks of the highway borrow canal and the Dredge Boat Canal. These
include sweetgum, water oak, overcup oak, nuttall oak, willow oak, bitter pecan, and
green ash.

The proposed project is located in St. James Parish, in Sections 33 and 28, Township-
13-South, and Range-17-East, South Vacherie, Louisiana.

Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Approximately 235 acres of cypress swamp will be preserved
once purchased from this land owner. The property is vital to prevent commercial and
residential development along this existing state highway. The conservation and
protection of these wetlands would make significant progress towards sustaining a
coastal ecosystem that can support and protect the environment, economy, and
wetlands of southern Louisiana. The benefits from purchasing this property include
hurricane protection, flood control, control of wetland impacts due to development,
and protection of a critical ecological system. The program provides both near-term
and long-term benefits and, at a cost of less than $1,600 per acre, is considered highly



                                        236
   cost effective in addressing the protection of coastal and wetland areas. This project
   addresses the goal of the LCA Ecosystem Restoration Plan towards the reversing of
   the current trend of degradation of the coastal ecosystem and destruction of critical
   wetland habitats. The purchase of the property coupled with the reestablishment of
   natural hydraulic water flow through the removal of existing continuous spoil banks
   will enhance the entire site. This plan will reintroduce natural flood flows along the
   drainage canals that are now cut off from needed nutrients and sediments. The project
   not only provides multiple benefits for wetland preservation and enhancement, but
   also allows for flood protection by providing a large natural water reservoir and
   hurricane protection from wind and storm surge.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): St. James Parish will use its own
   equipment and labor to cut slits in the existing spoil banks. The existing spoil banks
   will be breached to allow water to move in and out of the swamp areas. Natural and
   man-made ditches that are presently full of sediment will be dredged to restore
   natural drainage through the impounded swamps. It is estimated to take
   approximately 25 days to complete the opening and creation of slits in the existing
   spoil banks. The cost to St. James Parish associated with the project includes
   equipment, $22,500, and labor, $8,000. Therefore, the parish is prepared to match the
   CIAP monies with in-kind contributions of $30,500.

5) Project Title: St. James Parish West Bank Wetland Conservation and Protection,
   Phase IV

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. James Parish Council

   Contact Information:         Mr. Jody Chenier
                                St. James Parish Council
                                P. O. Box 106
                                Convent, LA 70723
                                (225) 562-2262
                                jody.chenier@stjamesla.com

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $351,113

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $351,113

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The St. James Parish Council would like to
   purchase several large tracts of existing wetlands to prohibit the destruction and aid in
   the protection of our Parish’s coastal wetland areas. This project is proposed to
   purchase approximately 194 acres of existing wetlands from the Bayou Chevreuil
   Land Co., LLC. The Parish would like to purchase and protect wetland areas that are



                                           237
adjacent to a major state highway that links the communities of South Vacherie in St.
James Parish to Chackbay in Lafourche Parish. The purchase of these tracts will
protect this important highway from erosion and prevent any future destruction and
development in this cypress swamp area.

The purchase of these tracts will provide for the protection of 194 acres of healthy
cypress swamp in St. James Parish. It is the intention of the St. James Parish Council
to create a Louisiana Conservation Servitude on the entire 194 acres. The Bayou
Chevreuil Land Co., LLC is the legal owner of the proposed land to be purchased.
There are no liens, encumbrances, easements, or restrictions on the property proposed
under this project.

The soil survey of the site as depicted in the “Soil Survey of St. James and St. John
the Baptist Parishes, La.” (1973) show the soil types to be Barbary association (Ba);
Barbary-Fausse association (BB); Commerce silt loam (Cm); Commerce silty clay
loam (Cn); Convent complex (Cr); and Sharkey association, frequently flooded (Sm).
Elevations on the site range from 0.5 to 4.0 feet above NGVD for mean sea level. The
majority of the site remains saturated or inundated for most of the year.

The site is dominated primarily by facultative-wetland and obligate-wetland plant
species. The dominant species include bald cypress, water tupelo, Drummond red
maple, American elm, alligator weed, and water hyacinth. Some upland species grow
on the spoil banks of the highway borrow canal. These include sweetgum, water oak,
overcup oak, nuttall oak, willow oak, bitter pecan, and green ash.

The proposed project is located in St. James Parish, in Sections 33 and 35, Township-
13-South, and Range-17-East, South Vacherie, La.


Project Type: Conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal area, including
wetland.

Project Justification: Approximately 194 acres of cypress swamp and will be
preserved once purchased from this land owner. The property is vital to prevent
commercial and residential development along this existing state highway and protect
the highway from erosion and water damage if the trees were cut for logging. The
conservation and protection of these wetlands would make significant progress
towards sustaining a coastal ecosystem that can support and protect the environment,
economy, and wetlands of southern Louisiana. The benefits from purchasing this
property include hurricane protection, flood control, control of wetland impacts due
to development, and protection of a critical ecological system. The program provides
both near-term and long-term benefits and, at a cost of approximately $1,700 per acre,
is considered highly cost effective in addressing the protection of coastal and wetland
areas. This project addresses the goal of the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA)
Ecosystem Restoration Plan towards the reversing of the current trend of degradation
of the coastal ecosystem and destruction of critical wetland habitats. The purchase of



                                       238
   the property coupled with the re-establishment of natural hydraulic water flow
   through the removal of existing continuous spoil banks will enhance the entire site.
   This plan will reintroduce natural flood flows along the drainage canals that are now
   cut off from needed nutrients and sediments. The project not only provides multiple
   benefits for wetland preservation and enhancement, but also allows for flood
   protection by providing a large natural water reservoir and hurricane protection from
   wind and storm surge.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): The Parish will use its own equipment and
   labor to cut slits in the existing spoil banks. The existing spoil banks will be breached
   to allow water to move in and out of the swamp land areas. Natural and man-made
   ditches that are presently full of sediment will be dredged to restore natural drainage
   through the impounded swamps. It is estimated to complete the opening and creation
   of slits in the existing spoil banks would take approximately 10 days. The Parish cost
   associated with the project includes equipment ($13,000).

St. John the Baptist Parish

       No Tier Two Projects

St. Martin Parish

1) Project Title: Bayou Sorrel Hydrologic Restoration

   Contact Information:       Guy Cormier
                              Parish President
                              P.O. Box 9
                              St. Martinville, LA 70582
                              (337) 394-2200
                              gcormier@stmartinparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,600,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: There are six main waterways that deliver
   water and sediment from the Atchafalaya River into the eastern portion of the
   Atchafalaya River Basin. Sediment traps are proposed for two of the six water
   inputs; Bayou Sorrel and Coon Trap. The size and location of each feature are similar
   to those proposed by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in the 1982 Feasibility Study
   for Atchafalaya Basin environmental management.



                                           239
Project Type: Mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources

Project Justification: In general, aquatic habitat lost to sediment accretion is typical
in a developing delta floodplain. The fact that the Atchafalaya Basin is a swamp also
means that a certain degree of poor water quality (low dissolved oxygen – hypoxia) is
to be expected in the process of assimilating organic material that is a product of
floodplain formation. But ecosystem function is impaired when water is impounded
in the floodplain as drainage routes are blocked by sediment deposition. Hypoxia in
these areas has been shown to be widespread at times, especially if circumstances
present high water levels in the warmer months of late summer. Although the normal
delta-building process was interrupted by flood control levees, and petrochemical
access, production, and transport, the most recent and manageable cause of water
impoundment and insufficient water circulation is sediment accretion. Water flow
patterns have changed and a much smaller percentage of the total water volume that
flows down the Atchafalaya River now flows over floodplain habitat. This represents
a dramatic change from flow patterns during the period when the swamp was formed.
It is the sediment that ultimately determines the physical nature of the habitat and in
turn shapes the ecology of the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System (ABFS), so it is
the sediment that must be managed in order to effect change in the ecology.

In prioritizing management opportunities, it is necessary to find the appropriate
balance between minimizing sedimentation and limiting water. Identifying the
relative importance of both issues at any particular area of the floodplain is not
always straightforward. Completely eliminating sediment from a particular area is
not possible without also eliminating water flow, and neither is the goal of
management. However, there are instances where one or the other (or both) show
obvious instances of causing impairment, either immediate or future, to the
ecosystem. Two such instances are Bayou Sorrel and the Coon Trap. These are also
the main sources of nearly all sediment that now settles in the area south of Bayou
Sorrel and north of Bayou Pigeon. The premise behind the management strategy
described in this proposal is that there can be an effective front-line protection to
guard against further impairment of aquatic habitat and the forested ecosystems of the
ABFS by greatly reducing the volume of sediment that is allowed to enter through
those waterways.

This project proposes a sediment trap at the mouth of each of the two sources of water
to the eastern side of the ABFS. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers has already
specified the size and location of the sediment feature on Bayou Sorrel in the Main
Report and the Environmental Impact Statement of the 1982 Feasibility Study that, in
part, outlined the USACE plans for retaining sediment from the area in question.

There are few tools available for resource managers to use in limiting sediment
accretion that fills critical open-water habitat. The same is true for combating
hypoxia that further impairs that same habitat. The life-source of the floodplain is
Atchafalaya River water and the resources that it provides, one of which is a rich
supply of dissolved oxygen. Delivering the water to the aquatic environment is the



                                        240
   first step, but adequately circulating it throughout the swamp is equally important.
   Since improving the very limited interior water circulation can only be accomplished
   by reconnecting isolated and segmented floodplain areas through the removal of flow
   barriers, the reduction of sediment is a critical component of that management
   strategy so as not to jeopardize aquatic or forested habitats that are targets for
   conservation. So the concept of front-line sediment reduction makes internal
   circulation improvements less risky, and reduces the likelihood that sediment trapped
   at the site of circulation projects will have to be placed on habitat that is intended for
   conservation.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): N/A

2) Project Title: Bayou Pigeon Hydrologic Restoration

   Contact Information:       Guy Cormier
                              Parish President
                              301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                              St. Martinville, LA 70582
                              (337) 394-2200
                              gcormier@stmartinparish.net

   Total CIAP funds Proposed: $2,700,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,700,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Bayou Pigeon is located in the northeastern
   portion of Iberia Parish and is within the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System. That
   bayou provides a hydrologic connection between the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway
   (GIWW), which provides flow from the Atchafalaya River, and the adjacent
   downstream bayous, lakes, and wetlands. Sedimentation has severely reduced water
   flows down Pigeon Bayou, thus the project would dredge that bayou to restore
   channel dimensions that have been reduced by sedimentation. The proposed project
   would consist of acquiring easements for the disposal of dredged material on the
   adjacent bayou banks. The overall length of dredging would be determined by
   surveys but is estimated to be approximately 17,420 linear feet. Approximate
   elevation of the channel bottom and channel width would be determined by surveys
   and additional planning but would likely be -10 feet National Geodetic Vertical
   Datum and between 40 and 60 feet, respectively. Dredged material could be placed
   within canal banks to reduce impacts to adjacent forested areas. Spoil disposal would
   occur on alternating banks to prevent impacts to overbank flows. Shoaled entrances
   to adjacent well location canals along the bayou could be opened to further restore
   water flows, but are not included as project features at this time.



                                            241
   Project Type: Restoration of water flows, water quality, and wetland functions.

   Project Justification: Bayou Pigeon is a main source of fresh water for swamps,
   bayous, and lakes surrounding and connected to that waterway. Sedimentation has
   reduced the flow of water through this bayou and into the adjacent areas. Reduced
   water flows are associated with anoxic conditions, which can lead to decreased
   fishery production and decreased vigor of cypress swamps. Restoration of water
   flows will improve water quality and the productivity of the adjacent swamps.

   Project Cost Share (Non-CIAP Funds): N/A

3) Project Title: Lake Henderson Acquisition for Conservation, Preservation, Water
   Quality Improvement and Fisheries Habitat

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Martin Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:      Guy Cormier
                             Parish President
                             301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                             St. Martinville, LA 70582
                             (337) 394-2200
                             E-Mail: gcormier@stmartinparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,900,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,900,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $ 0

   Description and Location of Project: Louisiana’s Atchafalaya Basin, at 595,000
   acres, is the nation’s largest river swamp, containing nationally significant expanses
   of bottomland hardwoods, swamplands, bayous, and back-water lakes. Fish and
   wildlife values are staggering, with some reporting a fecundity three-and-one-half
   times that of the Everglades. One-half of the migratory species in the North
   American flyway use the area each year. It is an Everglades-scale natural resource
   that deserves the same national attention to its preservation. Yet much of the basin is
   unprotected through State or national park or refuge status–the Atchafalaya National
   Wildlife Refuge is just over 15,000 acres.

   St. Martin Parish plans to increase the number of publicly owned/protected acres in
   the Atchafalaya Basin by purchasing Henderson Lake. The lake is a 4,000-acre
   shallow picturesque water body located within the Atchafalaya Basin in south central
   Louisiana. The lake is one of the premier fishing lakes in the Atchafalaya Basin



                                           242
   portion of the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System (ABFS). The lake is used
   intensively for recreational and commercial purposes. Interstate 10 crosses Henderson
   Lake and provides easy access to many local swamp tours in the area

   St. Martin Parish proposes to purchase Henderson Lake from the owner, the St.
   Martin Land Company, to conserve, restore, and protect the functions and values of
   the Lake Henderson Basin while improving water quality and wildlife and fisheries
   habitat in the region.

   Project Type: Conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: This project will conserve, restore, and protect the functions
   and values of the Lake Henderson region by improving water quality in the area and
   restoring and preserving precious fish and wildlife habitat. Purchasing this property
   will allow St. Martin Parish to conserve this valuable natural resource for the benefit
   of the environment and the recreational use of the people of the State of Louisiana
   and the nation.

   Without conservation and preservation, many areas of the Atchafalaya face these
   threats:

      Logging continues of the remaining cypress and the bottomland hardwoods.
      Lack of public access through private holdings restricts public use and support for
      conservation.
      Dredging has changed natural hydraulics, accelerated siltation, and created
      oxygen-deprived dead zones.
      Increased siltation has created dry land from wetland, and development pressures
      south of I-10 are increasing.
      At least one lake in the basin is polluted with mercury, and a fish advisory has
      been issued.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: Lake Henderson Exotic-Invasive Species Removal

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Martin Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Guy Cormier
                              Parish President
                              301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                              St. Martinville, LA 70582
                              (337) 394-2200
                              gcormier@stmartinparish.net

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000



                                           243
   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Henderson Lake is a 4,000-acre shallow
   picturesque water body located within the Atchafalaya Basin in south central
   Louisiana. The lake is one of the premier fishing lakes in the Atchafalaya Basin
   portion of the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System (ABFS). The lake is used
   intensively for recreational and commercial purposes. Interstate 10 crosses Henderson
   Lake where a major swamp tour industry has developed.

   Hydrilla and water hyacinth, two of Louisiana’s most invasive aquatic plants, have
   choked the waterways of the lake, causing major water quality and access problems in
   Lake Henderson. This has led to limited boat traffic and reduced fishing areas in the
   lake. Hydrilla completely infested the lake over the past decade, causing decreased
   use and economic hardship for service businesses associated with the lake. Attempts
   to control hydrilla with seasonal drawdowns were not successful. These drawdowns
   essentially drained the lake, causing tremendous economic loss for the swamp tour
   industry and other businesses centered there.

   The Henderson Lake project will focus on two primary goals: identifying
   locations/area of invasive species concentration, and removing the invasive species.

   Project Type: Conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: The objective of this project is to reduce the threat of exotic
   invasive species in Lake Henderson.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

5) Project Title: Upgrade of City of St. Martinville Wastewater Treatment Facility and
     Wastewater Assimilation into Wetlands

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Martin Parish Government, St.
   Martin Parish, Louisiana

   Contact Information:       Guy Cormier
                              Parish President
                              301 West Port Street, P.O. Box 9
                              St. Martinville, LA 70582
                              (337) 394-2200
                              gcormier@stmartinparish.net




                                           244
                          Walter S. Comeaux, III, PE, PLS
                          Comeaux Engineering & Consulting, APC
                          (337) 837-2210
                          waltcomeaux@xspedius.net

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,300,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $6,300,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of the Project: The St. Martinville Wetland Wastewater
Assimilation Use Attainability Analysis, prepared by Comite Resources, Inc,.
indicates that the Cypress Island Coulee wetlands are overdrained and well oxidized,
which has led to a high level of soil oxidation and subsidence. This ongoing process
has resulted in 1-2 feet of subsidence as evidenced by exposed roots. Should a major
storm impact the area, it is highly likely that a massive blow-down of the forest would
occur. The likelihood of a major wind event is almost certain. The proposed project
involves constructing a distribution system from the existing City of St. Martinville
Wastewater Treatment Facility to distribute treated effluent to areas of the Cypress
Island Coulee wetlands. This treated effluent from the city’s treatment facility will be
released into the adjacent wetlands and contains low concentrations of nitrogen,
phosphorous, and other essential nutrients in addition to much-needed water that can
be assimilated by the wetlands. The introduction of this effluent will counteract
future subsidence by creating anoxic soil conditions, thus immediately halting
oxidation of the soil surface, and will stimulate vegetative productivity by nutrient
addition, thereby increasing organic matter deposition and raising soil elevations.

This project would include removal of the existing Lemna Treatment system, removal
of the existing UV disinfection unit, construction of a chlorine contact chamber,
construction of de-chlorination facilities if required, installation of high-volume high
head pumps, installation of discharge piping, installation of flow metering equipment,
and levee repair.

The gate coordinates for the City of St. Martinville’s wastewater facility are N 30°
08’ 28”, W 091° 51’ 39”.

Project Type: Conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including
wetland

Project Justification: In the year 2000, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
brought suit against the City of St. Martinville (Civil Action No. CV00-1238 L-O,
U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana) for violations to the city’s
NPDES Permit. The violations triggering the suit involved discharges to U.S.waters
which exceeded discharge parameters prescribed in the discharge permit. The


                                        245
   wetland assimilation process allows for the primary treatment of the sanitary
   wastewater with the wetland itself acting as the final treatment process. Conversion
   of the existing treatment facility to a wetland assimilation process would be beneficial
   to the City of St. Martinville as it represents the most cost effective and
   environmentally responsible method of treating the effluent. The environment of
   course will benefit from the addition of much-needed nutrients and water to this
   distressed wetland area.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

St. Mary Parish

       No Tier Two projects

St. Tammany Parish

1) Project Title: Fritchie Marsh Stormwater Diversion Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        21490 Koop Drive, Suite 400
                        Mandeville, LA 70471
                        Phone: (985) 898-2535
                        Fax: (985) 898-2523
                        e-mail: gordo@stpgov.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $14,350,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,500,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $11,850,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The project is located in the Pontchartrain
   Basin, St. Tammany Parish. The project area is located in the Fritchie Marsh,
   generally southeast of the city of Slidell. The marsh is bounded by Highway 90 to the
   east, Highway 433 to the west and south, and the natural high lands to the north. The
   project boundaries will be the same as those of the PO-06 Fritchie Marsh Project.

   Project Type: Conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including
   wetland




                                           246
   Project Justification: This area is located along the north shore and contributes to
   the integrity of the Lake Pontchartrain/Lake Borgne system. Over 3,600 acres of
   marsh were lost on the north shore in the past 50 years, and another 15% is expected
   to be lost over the next 50 years. This area was also in the direct path of Hurricane
   Katrina, which removed approximately 1200-1500 acres of marsh and wildlife habitat
   from this area. In order to minimize the adverse habitat and water quality impacts
   from Hurricane Katrina, it is imperative that marsh restoration occur as soon as
   possible. St. Tammany Parish Government estimates a loss of 1200 -1500 acres of
   intermediate marsh as a result of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Salt Bayou, dredged as
   a component of PO-06, was almost entirely filled with marsh grass and sediment
   dislodged by the storm.

   Project Cost Share: The St. Tammany Parish Government will assume the cost of
   improvements and maintenance associated with the proposed project’s
   implementation.

2) Project Title: Guste Island Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        21490 Koop Drive, Suite 400
                        Mandeville, LA 70471
                        (985) 898-2535 (phone)
                        (985) 898-2523 (fax)
                        gordo@stpgov.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,200,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,200,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $4,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The Guste Island Utility Company utilizes a
   unique biological wastewater treatment system. The process of wetland assimilation
   involves disbursing nitrogen-enriched treated sewer effluent into marshland. The
   beneficial result is increased growth of grass, plants, and trees providing refuge to
   waterfowl and animals. The system also impedes saltwater intrusion and inhibits
   coastal erosion.

   The project consists of the acquisition of the 352-acre tract of marshland on which the
   Guste Island Utility Company’s operations currently reside and discharge into.




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   Project Type: Conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: The Aquatic Restoration Project at Guste Island is a unique
   project that will allow the St. Tammany Parish Government to accomplish a number
   of goals. Currently the Guste Island Utility Company owns the 352-acre parcel that
   contains a 60-acre oxidation pond with a wastewater treatment capacity of 60,000
   gallons per day. The Guste Island Utility Company utilizes a wetland assimilation
   process involving disbursing nitrogen-enriched treated sewer effluent into the
   marshland that is part of the 352-acre parcel. If the parcel is acquired, St. Tammany
   Parish would, at its expense, make improvements to the existing oxidation pond (as
   well as construct a similar-sized pond next to it in the future) so as to accept
   wastewater flows from the surrounding developments, which use their own separate
   wastewater treatment plants. These actions would increase the flow of enriched
   treated sewer effluent to the tract’s marshland. Further, the parish will execute
   agreements with the Guste Island Utility Company, which owns the surrounding
   3,034 acres of marshland, so as to allow for the enriched effluent to flow over that
   marshland and provide the same aforementioned benefits.

   Project Cost Share: The St. Tammany Parish Government will assume the cost of
   improvements and maintenance associated with the proposed project’s
   implementation.

3) Project Title: Northshore Beach Marsh Creation/Restoration

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: St. Tammany Parish Government

   Contact Information: Greg Gorden
                        Director, Department of Environmental Services
                        St. Tammany Parish Government
                        P.O. Box 628
                        Covington, LA 70434
                        (985) 898-2535
                        gordo@stpgov.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $7,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $2,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project:




                                          248
Project Location: Pontchartrain Basin, St. Tammany Parish. The project area is
located in open water areas along the north shore near the community of Northshore
Beach and east of the mouth of Bayou Liberty, south of Slidell. Boundaries are
generally Bayou Bonfouca to the north and west, Lake Pontchartrain to the south, and
the GMO Railroad to the east.

Problem: This area is located along the north shore and contributes to the integrity of
the Lake Pontchartrain/Lake Borgne system. Over 3,600 acres of marsh were lost on
the north shore in the past 50 years, and another 15% is expected to be lost over the
next 50 years. This area was also in the direct path of Hurricane Katrina, which
removed a tremendous amount of marsh and wildlife habitat from the region. Marsh
grass and sediment stacked over 9 feet high along the tree line north of this site. In
order to minimize the adverse habitat and water quality impacts from Hurricane
Katrina, it is imperative that marsh restoration occur as soon as possible. St.
Tammany Parish Government estimates a loss of between 600 and 900 acres of
intermediate marsh in this area as a result of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Proposed Project Features: Project features include approximately 600 acres of
marsh creation via hydraulic dredging and placement of 2 million cubic yards of
material. The likely borrow location is Lake Pontchartrain, the Highway 11 Canal,
and Bayou Bonfouca and associated canals. Bayou Bonfouca as a borrow site would
be contingent upon a finding of sediment suitability. Containment will be semi-
confined (lake shore and bayou banks are still largely intact), and intermediate
vegetation would be planted upon material compaction and settlement.

Project Goals:
1) Create approximately 600 acres of intermediate marsh.
2) Reduce erosion of adjacent interior marshes.
3) Maintain and support the integrity of the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline.

Preliminary Project Benefits:
1) 600 acres of marsh directly reestablished.
2) 2500 acres of protected or created marsh at the end of 20 years.
3) Loss rate of adjacent interior marsh reduced by 25-49%.
4) Net positive impact on non-critical infrastructure.
5) Contribution to the Coast 2050 and LCA objective to protect the Orleans Land
Bridge. The project also is located near the damaged PO-06 Fritchie Marsh and PO-
13 Bayou Savage Projects, which are working together to reestablish the
Pontchartrain basin marshes. This project will work synergistically with these
projects to provide additional support to the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain and the
Orleans Land Bridge.

Identification of Potential Issues: There are some pipelines in the area that will
require project coordination with the pipeline owners. These pipelines should not
impact the proposed project expansion. There are no known State-issued oyster leases
in the immediate project area. The project is supported by the parish. The property is



                                        249
   partially located on the Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge and the owner is
   the Department of the Interior, USFWS.

   Project Type: Conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including
   wetland

   Project Justification: This project complies with the Restoration and Conservation
   goals of the CIAP by furthering the strategies, goals and objectives of the Coast 2050
   plan, namely conservation and restoration of the Pontchartrain Basin. Additionally,
   all of the Coastal Restoration Project Evaluation Criteria are met.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

4) Project Title: West St. Tammany Parish Coastal Wetland Habitat Acquisition

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Greg Gorden
                                            Director, Department of Environmental
                                            Services
                                            St. Tammany Parish Government
                                            P.O. Box 628
                                            Covington, LA 70434
                                            (985) 898-2535
                                            gordo@stpgov.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $3,000,000

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project:

   Project Location: Lake Pontchartrain shoreline in its natural state is a finite resource
   in St. Tammany Parish. Only about 8.5 miles of forested shoreline remain in this
   parish, excluding Fontainebleau State Park. That resource is likely to be placed under
   enormous development pressure in the near future and it should be the goal of the St.
   Tammany Parish Government to preserve what is left of the cypress-lined shoreline,
   and adjacent fresh marshes, for their historical value as well as their irreplaceable
   habitat, water quality, and otherwise natural value. A significant portion of the
   cypress swamps of the Pontchartrain/Maurepas Basin has been either logged, drained,
   or cleared for development or agriculture. Southwestern St. Tammany Parish is no
   exception. However, the shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain remains in relatively good
   ecological health. As the shoreline slowly migrates backwards, older trees fall into the
   lake, providing shelter for biota and natural breakwaters for energy directed at the



                                           250
shoreline. This creates a strip several hundred yards wide that forms the transition
between inshore wetland habitat and the lake’s deeper water habitat. Despite the
natural rearward movement of the shoreline, however, this fringe habitat still
maintains its integrity and productivity.

In St. Tammany Parish, this particular habitat type exists only between the parish’s
western boundary and the Lewisburg area. The lake shore east of this has been
converted to sterile bulkheads, except for the few hundred feet of Green Fund
property in Mandeville. Beginning at the shoreline east of Mandeville is a fringe
intermediate marsh habitat interspersed with residential bulkheads or other artificial
shoreline structures, all the way to the Mississippi border. The residential
development industry tends to mistakenly view property such as this as appropriate
for upscale development because of its proximity to water. However, the continued
existence of this area in its natural state is crucial to the water quality of Lake
Pontchartrain and the general safety of the populations immediately upland from
storms. This is the first line of defense that low-lying areas have against surges
brought on by tropical storms and hurricanes. Submerged aquatic vegetation that is
crucial as shelter and nursery areas for aquatic species, many commercially
important, is experiencing a comeback since the abatement of shell dredging has
decreased turbidity in the lake, but the dredging and bulkhead work required for
residential development would reverse this trend.

Coast 2050, the State’s blueprint for the next half century of coastal resource
management, has established the preservation of the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline
integrity as both a “coastwide” as well as a “regional” strategy. This project fits
squarely within that intent. It should be noted that the Coast 2050 strategy does not
state only that the location of the shoreline should be maintained, but also its
ecological integrity. To do this, acquisition must play a part.

Project Description: The project will depend on St. Tammany Parish contracting with
an objective firm to identify various funding sources and mechanisms for acquiring
and setting aside natural Lake Pontchartrain shoreline habitat and adjacent fresh
marsh centered around Madisonville, specifically between the westernmost parish
line and Lewisburg. The target acquisition area consists of between 2500 and 3000
acres of shoreline habitat and approximately 1000-1500 acres of freshwater marsh.
That firm will then aggressively coordinate the utilization of those sources and
mechanisms to accomplish just that. It is the intent of St. Tammany Parish to acquire
and otherwise preserve the integrity of the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline where it
exists in its natural, ecologically healthy state.

Project Type: 1

CIAP Goals and Objectives: This project meets the restoration and conservation
goals outlined in the CIAP Goals and Objectives. Preserving the integrity of Lake
Pontchartrain shorelines and the adjacent coastal marshes is squarely within the goals,




                                        251
   objectives and strategies of the Coast 2050 plan. This also fulfills the need for
   conservation of coastal forests and inland wetland and aquatic habitats.

   All of the Coastal Restoration Project Evaluation Criteria are met. The primary issue
   in this project will be landowner negotiations.

   Project Cost Share: None

Tangipahoa Parish

       No Tier Two Projects

Terrebonne Parish

1) Project Title: Beach and Back Barrier Marsh Restoration, East and Trinity Islands

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information: Al Levron
                        Director of Public Works
                        Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                        P.O. Box 2768
                        8026 Main Street
                        Houma, LA 70361
                        (985) 873-6405
                        (985) 873-6409 (fax)
                        Mr. Al Levron
                        allevron@tpcg.org

   Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

   Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $20,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: None

   Description and Location of Project: East and Trinity Islands are two of five
   islands that make up the Isles Dernieres barrier island chain. The proposed project is
   in the Terrebonne Basin of CWPPRA Region 3, Terrebonne Parish, approximately 38
   miles south of Houma, Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico lies to the south.

   Project Type: 1, 2 and 4




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   This project, a Barrier Island Restoration and Marsh Creation Project, meets the
   criteria of CIAP Project Types 1, 2 and 4. It is presented for the conservation,
   restoration, and protection of coastal areas, to mitigate damage to fish, wildlife, and
   natural resources and the implementation of a Federally approved marine, coastal, or
   comprehensive conservation management plan.

   Project Justification: Barrier islands are the first line of defense against storm surge
   and protect the interior wetlands and infrastructure from open ocean wave effects.
   From 1887 to 2002, the documented shoreline change for East Island was a loss of 17
   feet per year, and Trinity Island lost 38.4 feet per year. A breach on the eastern end
   of East Island that developed in 2005 increased to approximately 4,000 feet due to
   Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Although the New Cut restoration (TE-37) CWPPRA
   project will begin construction this year, partial filling of the breach on the eastern
   end of East Island is a contracting additive alternate, and will be accomplished only if
   sufficient project funds are available, which is highly unlikely given the recent spikes
   in constructions costs. Additionally, the TE-37 project does not provide for extensive
   beach and back barrier marsh restoration on the eastern end behind the breach, or for
   back barrier marsh and beach restoration on Trinity Island. This area sustains
   considerable wave action and material movement not only on the gulf shore, but also
   on the backside of the island due to Wine Island Pass.

   The overall project goals are to fortify and extend the lives of these two barrier
   islands and capitalize on the success of previous CWPPRA barrier island restoration
   projects. Specific project goals include the introduction of new sediment into this
   sediment-starved environment; extension of the lives of the barrier islands by
   increasing their width; providing a back barrier platform to enable successful island
   migration; and protecting the Terrebonne estuary and vegetated wetlands against the
   direct exposure to the Gulf of Mexico.

   This project was presented at the CWPPRA Task Force Meeting in January 2006,
   during discussions for Priority Project List 16 proposals, but was not selected for
   continued investigation. No engineering and design funds have been spent on this
   project.

   Project Cost Share: The project cost share is unknown at this time.

2) Project Title: Closure of Breaches along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW)

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information: Al Levron
                        Director of Public Works
                        Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                        P.O. Box 2768
                        Houma, LA 70361



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                        985-873-6407
                        985-873- 6409 (fax)
                        allevron@tpcg.org

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $7,929,035. Total costs are based upon original
NRCS engineering and design costs on the TE-43 CWPPRA project.

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $0

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $7,929,035

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: This proposed CIAP project, Closure of
Breaches Along the GIWW Terrebonne, is located within the same general project
area as CWPPRA Project TE-43 in the Terrebonne Basin, in Terrebonne Parish,
Louisiana, along the south bank line of the GIWW from the Gulf South Pipeline to
the St. Paul Bayou Oilfield. The project will close four breaches along the south bank
of the GIWW, totaling 14,500 linear feet From west to east along the GIWW the
proposed closures are numbered: Segment 1- 1,500 ft, Segment 2a- 500 ft, Segment
2b- 4,500 ft, and Segment 6- 8,000 ft. The breach closures engineered for this bank
line (lightweight aggregate core capped with rock) will provide immediate benefits to
the adjacent thin-mat floating marshes by stopping water movement through these
large breaches where water exchange now occurs.

Project Type: 1 and 4

This proposed project will be implemented for the conservation, restoration, and
protection of coastal area, including wetland, and the implementation of a Federally
approved marine, coastal, or comprehensive conservation management plan.
Specifically, the project implements Action Plan EM-6 – shoreline stabilization and
induced deposition – of the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program.

Project Justification: The width of the GIWW adjacent to the four proposed breach
closures ranges from 700 feet to almost 2,000 feet. This large area of open water
allows for wave fetch from wind, currents, and boat traffic. These four critical
breaches are allowing water flow from the GIWW into and out of the fragile floating
fresh marsh south of the GIWW. These direct hydrologic connections have destroyed
adjacent floating marsh and are accelerating the breakup of thin-mat floats located
south of these breaches and extending at least 6 miles to the south (Figure 5). This
area of thin-mat floating fresh marsh is quite unique and extremely productive,
supporting a wide variety of fish and wildlife species. The thin-mat floats in this area
are 2- 8 inches thick and floating on an unconsolidated organic muck. When
protected from high-velocity turbid water, the floats are usually surrounded by
submerged aquatic vegetation species (SAVs), providing additional protection from
wind and waves. When water is funneled through these breaches with increased



                                        254
   velocity, the floats eventually break into pieces and are exported from the marsh.
   This converts floating fresh marsh into open turbid water subject to increased export
   of unconsolidated organics and increased water depths.

   This proposed project is fully engineered and free of complicating issues. Elimination
   of these hydrologic connections will result in an immediate benefit to a large area of
   floating fresh marsh (approx. 30,000 acres). Maintaining this area as floating fresh
   marsh rather than allowing it to convert to open turbid water will also provide added
   protection to the Bayou Black Ridge located 5 miles north. The size of this proposed
   project has been reduced to closing the four existing breaches (14,500 linear feet)
   with an estimated cost of 28% of the cost for the entire TE-43 project. Although the
   extent of shoreline protection is reduced, the area of floating marsh protected is
   greater than the project size originally calculated. The sole landowner in the project
   area is Continental Land and Fur Company (CL&F). Their land management
   experience indicates that floating marshes are more intact when adjacent to a solid
   bank line than when subjected to water movement through breaches and washouts.
   This has been monitored and demonstrated for many years on CL&F property.

   Closure of these breaches will reduce the high rate of breakup of the adjacent thin-
   mat floating marshes while other sources of funds are sought for long-term shoreline
   protection in between these structures. Status reports from the Mandalay Bank
   Protection Demonstration Project (TE-41) may result in a more economical method to
   protect the remaining banks.

   If these breaches along the GIWW are not closed with this proposed CIAP project,
   the adjacent area of fragile thin-mat floating marshes will continue to deteriorate and
   the area will soon be converted from marsh to open turbid water. This project is
   consistent with the Coast 2050 specific regional ecosystem strategies for protecting
   and sustaining the Terrebonne Basin’s coastal resources: restoring swamps, restoring
   and sustaining marshes, and protecting shorelines.

   Project Cost Share: None

3) Project Title: Mississippi River Long Distance Sediment Pipeline

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information:      Mr. Al Levron, Director of Public Works
                             Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                             P.O. Box 2768
                             8026 Main Street
                             Houma, LA 70361
                             (985) 873-6405
                             (985) 873-6409 (fax)
                             allevron@tpcg.org



                                           255
Total CIAP Funds Requested: Unknown at this time. At least three other parishes
and the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program are expected to present
project proposals for this concept for CIAP consideration. Preliminary cost estimates
for this type of project are available from the “Third Delta and Alternatives” Study.
This report estimated that $161 million would be required to deliver sediments from
the Mississippi River in Plaquemines Parish to the eastern edge of Lake Boudreaux.

Total CIAP Funds Proposed: $33,000,000

Parish CIAP Funds Proposed: $1,000,000

State CIAP Funds Proposed: $30,000,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: The proposed project area would begin in
Plaquemines Parish, and would establish a series of approximately 55 miles of
pipelines with booster pumps and outlets for sediment slurry distribution. Pipelines
would be established in locations to enhance existing and planned levee systems.
Development of 10,000 acres of marsh, wetlands, and ridges is envisioned. Fresh
water from adjacent sources would be used to help distribute sediments and sustain
the newly created marsh.

Project Type: 1 and 4

This project will be implemented for the conservation, restoration, and protection of
coastal areas including wetland, and the implementation of a Federally approved
marine, coastal, or comprehensive conservation management plan. Specifically, the
project implements Action Plans EM-2 (Freshwater and Sediment Diversions), EM-4
(Beneficial Use of Dredged and Non-Indigenous Material) and EM-7 (Marsh
Management) of the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program (BTNEP).

Project Justification: The marshes located in the project area have been
hydrologically isolated from historical flow patterns by construction of various
navigation channels, including the Houma Navigation Canal, and by the closure of
Bayou Terrebonne from Bayou Lafourche. As a result of these interruptions in the
natural deltaic process, Terrebonne Parish has been deprived of the sediments, which
at one time replenished the soils washed away by natural and human processes. As a
result, Terrebonne Parish continues to experience one of the higher average annual
land loss rates in Louisiana, an average of 10 square miles per year.

Project Cost Share: The project cost share is unknown at this time. Plaquemines,
Jefferson, and Lafourche Parishes are also developing proposals. Cost shares
between parishes and the State are possible.




                                       256
4) Project Title: North Lost Lake Marsh Creation/Enhancement Project – Phase 1 and 2

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information: Mr. Al Levron
                        Director of Public Works
                        Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                        P.O. Box 2768
                        8026 Main Street
                        Houma, LA 70361
                        (985) 873-6407
                        (985)-873-6409
                        allevron@tpcg.org

   Total State CIAP Funds Requested:

     Phase 1                  $2,059,680
     Phase 2                  $1,570,800
     Total:                   $3,830,480

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Phase 1 of the North Lost Lake Marsh
   Creation/Enhancement Project consists of the construction of approximately 100
   acres of new marsh in open water and the enhancement of approximately 96 acres of
   highly degraded marsh. Phase 1 is located in Region 3, Terrebonne Basin, Terrebonne
   Parish, Louisiana. Phase 1 is approximately 21,300 feet in length and is situated in
   Section 1, Township 20 South, Range 13 East and Sections 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10,
   Township 20 South, Range 14 East.

   Phase 2 of the North Lost Lake Marsh Creation/Enhancement Project consists of the
   construction of approximately 60 acres of new marsh in open water and the
   enhancement of approximately 53 acres of highly degraded marsh. Phase 2 is also
   located in Region 3, Terrebonne Basin, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, and has two
   sites. The first site is approximately 3,700 feet in length and is located in Section 1,
   Township 20 South, Range 13 East. The second site is approximately 12,800 feet in
   length and is located in Sections 2, 3 and 10, Township 20 South, Range 14 East.

   Project Type: 1 and 4

   The North Lost Lake Marsh Creation/Enhancement Project will be implemented for
   the conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas including wetland, and
   the implementation of a Federally approved marine, coastal, or comprehensive
   conservation management plan. Specifically, the project implements Action Plan EM-




                                            257
1 (Hydrologic Restoration) of the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program
(BTNEP).

Project Justification: The continued deterioration of broken marshes west of Brady
Canal, from Lake Pagie and Lost Lake northward to Carencro Bayou, will expose
fragile (organic and floating) Penchant Basin freshwater marshes to catastrophic
storm-related damage and/or increase tidal exchange and saltwater intrusion problems
during the salty season. The proposed project would create marshes in open water
areas occurring within existing marshes to reduce the wave fetch and decrease wave-
related erosion to the marshes located on the margins of these interior open water
areas. The created marshes, along with proposed vegetative plantings, would also
reduce storm surges and reduce the potential for storm-related marsh breaching.

Additionally, the marsh creation will restore the hydrological regime to its original
condition, thereby allowing “brown” river water to be introduced into an area of
intermediate marshes north of Carencro Bayou in order to stimulate organic
production and reduce the very rapid recent loss of marsh in that area.

Phase 1 of the project consists of approximately 100 acres of new marsh creation in
open water with 96 acres of marsh nourishment along the north shore of Lost Lake
(21,300 feet in length by 300 feet wide). Marsh creation would be conducted along
the submerged Bayou Mauvais Bois ridge west of Voss Canal, along the north shore
of Lost Lake to the mouth of Bayou Decade. Vegetation will be initially planted on
the mashes constructed in open water, but it will not be artificially maintained.
Vegetative plantings may be replaced if initially unsuccessful and if recommended by
the planting experts. Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) plantings are
anticipated. Planting in marsh enhancement areas will not be required.

Phase 2 of the project consists of the construction of approximately 60 acres of new
marsh in open water with approximately 53 acres of marsh nourishment along
Crochet Canal (3,700 feet in length by 300 feet wide) and the west bank of Bayou
Decade (12,800 feet wide by 300 feet wide). Vegetation will be initially planted on
the marshes constructed in open water, but it will not be artificially maintained.
Vegetative plantings may be replaced if initially unsuccessful and if recommended by
the planting experts. Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) plantings are
anticipated. Planting in marsh enhancement areas will not be required.

Project goals include reducing shoreline retreat on the north shore of Lost Lake,
preventing shoreline breaching and thereby restoring the hydrological regime to its
original condition. By creating marsh in interior open water areas, wave generation,
fetch, and associated wave-wind-induced marsh erosion will also be reduced, and
introduction of “brown” water into an intermediate marsh area that has experienced
substantial recent losses will be facilitated.




                                        258
   Project Cost Share: Burlington Resources, LLC, the landowner in the project area,
   has indicated a willingness to share 4% of the estimated project cost. The Terrebonne
   Parish share is unknown at this time.

5) Project Title: Ship Shoal: Whiskey Island West Flank

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information: Mr. Al Levron
                        Director of Public Works
                        Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                        P.O. Box 2768
                        8026 Main Street
                        Houma, LA 70361
                        (985) 873-6405
                        (985) 873-6409 (fax)
                        allevron@tpcg.org

   State CIAP Funds Proposed: $45,000,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: Whiskey Island is one of five islands that
   make up the Isles Dernieres barrier island chain. The proposed project is in the
   Terrebonne Basin of CWPPRA Region 3, Terrebonne Parish, approximately 18 miles
   southwest of Cocodrie, Louisiana. The island is surrounded by Coupe Colin to the
   west, Whiskey Pass to the east, Lake Pelto, Caillou Boca, and Caillou Bay to the
   north, and the Gulf of Mexico to the south. This project will extend from Whiskey
   Island westward.

   Project Type: 1, 2 and 4

   This project, a Barrier Island Restoration and Marsh Creation Project, meets the
   criteria of CIAP Project Types 1, 2 and 4. It is presented for the conservation,
   restoration, and protection of coastal areas, to mitigate damage to fish, wildlife, and
   natural resources and the implementation of a Federally approved marine, coastal, or
   comprehensive conservation management plan.

   Project Justification: The Isles Dernieres barrier island chain, which is considered
   one of the most rapidly deteriorating barrier shorelines in the United States, is losing
   its structural functions for the coastal/estuarine ecosystem. Of primary concern
   among these functions is the chain’s storm buffering capacity and the protection it
   provides human populations, oil and gas infrastructure, inland bays, estuaries, and
   wetlands. Chain breakup has resulted from major storm actions, human alterations,




                                           259
   and the loss of nourishing sediments from the natural system. Whiskey Island
   changes from 1978 to 1988 included an average annual loss of 31.1 acres.

   One approach to the problem includes mining and importing offshore Ship Shoal
   sediment into the Louisiana coastal ecosystem to increase sediment supply and
   strengthen island formation. Other approaches involve rebuilding the natural
   structural framework within the coastal ecosystem to provide for separation of the
   gulf and the estuary, creating a continuous protective barrier for back bays and inland
   marshes to reduce wave energy, thereby helping to reduce land loss and restore the
   longshore transport system. If implemented, this project will provide a unique and
   sustainable barrier island habitat for numerous biological species, several of which
   are endangered, in areas that are presently open water.

   The goal of this project is to increase the longevity of the previously restored and
   natural portions of the island by increasing the island’s width. Increasing the island’s
   width will help to retain sand volume as well as elevation. Approximately 300 acres
   of intertidal, back barrier marsh will be created by semi-confined disposal and
   placement of dredged material. This material is expected to come from a sediment
   source near the island.

   This project (TE-47) was presented at the CWPPRA Task Force meeting where
   funding decisions were made regarding Priority Project List 11 candidates.
   Engineering and design have been completed. The project was a candidate for Phase
   II (construction) funding in December of 2005, but was not selected.

   Project Cost Share: None

6) Project Title: Shoreline Protection of the Houma Navigation Canal, Mile 12 – 31.4

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information:      Mr. Al Levron
                             Director of Public Works
                             Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                             P.O. Box 2768
                             8026 Main Street
                             Houma, LA 70361
                             (985) 873-6407
                             (985)-873-6409 (fax)
                             allevron@tpcg.org

   Total State CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,932,575

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0




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   Description and Location of Project: The Houma Navigation Canal (HNC) is
   located approximately 45 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, in the
   center/lower section of Terrebonne Parish, Region 3, in the Terrebonne Basin. Miles
   12 to 31.4 have been selected for protection in this project.

   Project Type: 1, 2, and 4

   The HNC Shoreline Protection and Stabilization Project will be implemented for the
   conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas including wetland, for
   mitigation of damage to fish and wildlife and natural resources, and the
   implementation of a Federally approved marine, coastal, or comprehensive
   conservation management plan.

   Project Justification: The shoreline of the HNC is suffering from severe erosion
   due to tidal action and wave action caused by vessels navigating the channel. If this
   erosion is allowed to continue, the entire area will be devastated by saltwater
   intrusion. This will eventually lead to the destruction of the entire management area.
   This project proposes placing a rock dike along the most critical reaches of the east
   and west bank lines of the channel from Bayou Plat to Bayou Provost. The rock dike
   would be placed off the bank line to allow for marsh creation behind the dike.

   This project proposes placing a rock dike along a major portion from Mile 28 to 23.5
   of the west bank of the channel and Mile 24.3 to 23.7 on the east bank of the channel.
   These reaches were identified as the most critically in need of bank stabilization. The
   proposed design is the same for all reaches and consists of a foreshore dike with an
   all-rock section (36-inch gradation) placed on a geotextile reinforcement fabric. The
   dike extends 50 feet from bank to toe and is 5 feet NGVD at its highest elevation.
   Flotation dredging is required to access the worksite and will be allowed to elevation
   –8.0 MLG, beginning a minimum of 50 feet from the toe of the dike section proper.
   Approximately 25,000 yards of flotation dredging is required on the west bank and
   60,000 yards on the east bank. The dredged material will be placed behind the rock
   dike.

   Project Cost Share: N/A

7) Project Title: South Lake DeCade Freshwater Introduction and Shoreline Protection
     Project

   Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
   Government

   Contact Information:        Mr. Al Levron
                               Director of Public Works
                               Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                               P.O. Box 2768
                               8026 Main Street



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                             Houma, LA 70361
                             (985) 873-6405
                             (985) 873-6409 (fax)
                             allevron@tpcg.org

   Total State CIAP Funds Proposed: $5,800,000

   Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

   Description and Location of Project: The proposed project area is located in the
   Terrebonne Basin of CWPPRA Region 3, Terrebonne Parish, Sections 25 and 26,
   T19S – R15E, approximately 15 miles southwest of Houma, Louisiana. Project
   components include installation of three control structures along the south rim of
   Lake DeCade and enlarging Lapeyrouse Canal to allow the controlled diversion of
   Atchafalaya River water, nutrients, and sediments south into project area marshes.
   Outfall management structures are planned in the marsh interior to provide better
   distribution of river water. Approximately 1.6 miles of foreshore rock dike is planned
   to protect the critical areas of the South Lake shoreline from breaching.

   Project Type: Type 1, 2 and 4

   The South Lake DeCade Freshwater Introduction and Shoreline Protection Project
   will be implemented for the conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas
   including wetland, to mitigate damage to fish, wildlife, and natural resources; and the
   implementation of a Federally approved marine, coastal, or conservation management
   plan. Specifically, the project implements action plans EM-6 (Shoreline Stabilization)
   and EM-2 (Freshwater and Sediment Diversions) of the Barataria-Terrebonne
   National Estuary Program (BTNEP).

   Project Justification: The project area is experiencing marsh deterioration due to
   subsidence, rapid tidal exchange, and human-induced hydrologic changes that result
   in increased salinities. Saltwater intrusion has caused a shift in marsh type and a
   conversion of over 30% of emergent vegetation to open water habitat. Shoreline
   erosion along the south embankment of Lake DeCade threatens to breach the
   hydrologic barrier between the lake and interior marshes.

   The proposed project components include the installation of three control structures
   along the south rim of Lake DeCade and enlarging Lapeyrouse Canal to allow the
   controlled diversion of Atchafalaya River water, sediments, and nutrients south into
   the marshes of the project area. Outfall management structures are planned in the
   marsh interior to provide better distribution of river water.

   Project Cost Share: None

8) Project Title: Whiskey Island Back Barrier Marsh Creation




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Entity/Individual Nominating the Project: Terrebonne Parish Consolidated
Government

Contact Information:       Mr. Al Levron
                           Director of Public Works
                           Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government
                           P.O. Box 2768
                           8026 Main Street
                           Houma, LA 70361
                           (985) 873-6405
                           (985) 873-6409 (fax)
                           allevron@tpcg.org

Total State CIAP Funds Proposed: $21,800,000

Infrastructure Funds Proposed: $0

Description and Location of Project: Whiskey Island is one of five islands that
make up the Isles Dernieres barrier island chain. The proposed project is in the
Terrebonne Basin of CWPPRA Region 3, Terrebonne Parish, approximately 18 miles
southwest of Cocodrie, Louisiana. The island is surrounded by Coupe Colin to the
west, Whiskey Pass to the east, Lake Pelto, Caillou Boca, and Caillou Bay to the
north, and the Gulf of Mexico to the south.

Project Type: 1, 2 and 4

This project, a Barrier Island Restoration and Marsh Creation Project, is presented for
the conservation, restoration, and protection of coastal areas; to mitigate damage to
fish, wildlife, and natural resources; and the implementation of a marine, coastal, or
comprehensive conservation management plan. Specifically, the project implements
Action Plan EM-5 (Preservation and Restoration of Barrier Islands) of the Barataria-
Terrebonne National Estuary Program (BTNEP).

Project Justification: Gulfside and bayside erosion has resulted in the narrowing of
Whiskey Island as well as the entire Isles Dernieres chain. The migration of the two
shorelines toward each other has resulted in an average decrease in width of 68% for
the Isles Dernieres. Within 100 years, the entire subaerial portion of the Isles
Dernieres barrier island system is expected to disappear, except for small land
fragments associated with the western end of Whiskey Island and the eastern end of
East Island. Some estimates, however, project that the Isles Dernieres will disappear
as early as 2017. Still other projections suggest that, without restoration, the island
will become subaqueous sand shoals between 2007 and 2019.

The goal of this project is to increase the longevity of the previously restored and
natural portions of the island by increasing the island’s width. Increasing the island’s
width will help to retain sand volume as well as elevation. Approximately 300 acres



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  of intertidal, back barrier marsh will be created by semi-confined disposal and
  placement of dredged material. This material is expected to come from a sediment
  source near the island.

  This project was presented at the CWPPRA PPL 13 (TE-50) planning round and was
  selected for Phase I (Engineering and Design) funding. Phase I should be complete
  by the end of 2006, or early in 2007.

  Project Cost Share: None

Vermilion Parish

     No Tier Two Projects




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