DNA Science DNA Science Candy DNA Model by nyut545e2

VIEWS: 140 PAGES: 6

									                                                                                                       Candy DNA
DNA Science                                                                                               Page 1


                                 DNA Science:  Candy DNA Model  
    
   OVERVIEW 
   The purpose of this activity is to construct a DNA model using candy pieces. It will contain all of the 
   parts of real DNA. This activity will provide a foundation for further study of DNA and molecular biology 
   concepts. 
    
   GRADE LEVEL: 7‐12 
    
   OBJECTIVES 
   The students will: 
       • Describe the structure of the DNA molecule. 
       • Explain the rules of base pairing. 
       • Represent the structure of DNA in a candy model using different candies and colors of candies 
           to accurately represent the sugar phosphate backbone and the nucleotide base pairs. 
    
   TIME ESTIMATE: 45 minutes 
    
   NEW GENERATION FLORIDA STATE SCIENCE STANDARDS 
   Grade 7 
   Big Idea 3: The Role of Theories, Laws, Hypotheses, and Models 
       • Benchmark (SC.7.N.3.1):  Identify the benefits and limitations of the use of scientific models 
   Big Idea 16: Heredity and Reproduction 
       • Benchmark (SC.7.L.16.1):  Understand and explain that every organism requires a set of 
           instructions that specifies its traits, that this hereditary information (DNA) contains genes 
           located in the chromosomes of each cell, and that heredity is the passage of these instructions 
           from one generation to another. 
   Grade 9‐12 
   Standard 3:  The Role of Theories, Laws, Hypotheses, and Models 
       • Benchmark (SC.912.N.3.5):  Describe the function of models in science, and identify the wide 
           range of models used in science. 
   Standard 16:  Heredity and Reproduction 
       • Benchmark (SC.912.L.16.3):  Describe the basic process of DNA replication and how it relates to 
           the transmission and conservation of the genetic information. 
       • Benchmark (SC.912.L.16.9):  Explain how and why the genetic code is universal and is common 
           to almost all organisms  
        
   NATIONAL STANDARDS 
   Content Standard C: Life Science 5‐8 
       • Reproduction and Heredity: Every organism requires a set of instructions for specifying its 
           traits. Heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another. 
    


                                                                           Developed by Julie Bokor   jbokor@ufl.edu
                                                                                                          Candy DNA
DNA Science                                                                                                 Page 2

   Content Standard C: Life Science 9‐12: 
       • The Cell: Cells store and use information to guide their functions. The genetic information 
           stored in DNA is used to direct the synthesis of the thousands of proteins that each cell 
           requires.  
       • The Molecular Basis of Heredity: In all organisms, the instructions for specifying the 
           characteristics of the organism are carried in DNA, a large polymer formed from subunits of 
           four kinds (adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T), with uracil (U) in place of T in 
           RNA). The chemical and structural properties of DNA explain how the genetic information that 
           underlines heredity is both encoded in genes (as a string of molecular ‘letters’) and replicated 
           (by a templating mechanism). Each DNA molecule in a cell forms a single chromosome. 
    
   KEY TERMS 
   Base pair: two nucleotides on opposite complementary DNA strands that are connected via hydrogen 
   bonds (abbreviated bp). The size of an individual gene or an organism's entire genome is often 
   measured in base pairs because DNA is usually double‐stranded. The human genome is estimated to 
   be about 3 billion base pairs long and to contain 20,000‐25,000 distinct genes. 
   Deoxyribose: A sugar (C5H10O4) that is a constituent of DNA.  It is ribose (found in RNA) missing an 
   oxygen in the 2’ position. 
   Gene: A hereditary unit consisting of a sequence of DNA that occupies a specific location on a 
   chromosome and determines a particular characteristic in an organism. 
   Nucleotide: A nucleotide is composed of a nitrogenous base and a five‐carbon sugar (either ribose in 
   the case of RNA or 2'‐deoxyribose in the case of DNA), and a phosphate group. 
   Phosphate ion: consists of one central phosphorus atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a 
   tetrahedral arrangement. The phosphate ion carries a negative three charge and confers an overall 
   negative charge to the DNA molecule. 
   Protein: Any of a group of complex organic macromolecules that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, 
   nitrogen, and usually sulfur and are composed of one or more chains of amino acids. Proteins are 
   fundamental components of all living cells and include many substances, such as enzymes, hormones, 
   and antibodies that are necessary for the proper functioning of an organism.  
    
   BACKGROUND INFORMATION 
   DNA provides the instructions for building and operating all living things. The DNA instructions are 
   divided into segments called genes. Each gene provides the information for making a protein, which 
   carries out a specific function in the cell. 
    
   A molecule of DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) is composed of two backbones and four types of chemical 
   bases (nucleotides). A chain of alternating phosphate groups (phosphorous and oxygen) and 
   deoxyribose (sugars) forms the backbone. Each sugar molecule in the backbone provides an 
   attachment site for one of the chemical bases. The four types of chemical bases are: adenine, thymine, 
   cytosine and guanine. They usually are represented by their first letters: A, T, C and G. The bases form 
   pairs in a very specific way: A always pairs with T, and C always pairs with G. A pair of bases is 
   connected by hydrogen bonds; A and T form a double hydrogen bond, and G and C form a triple 
   hydrogen bond.  


                                                                              Developed by Julie Bokor   jbokor@ufl.edu
                                                                                                                      Candy DNA
DNA Science                                                                                                             Page 3

                                             A DNA molecule is often compared to a ladder, with the two 
                                             backbones forming the sides of the ladder and the base pairs 
                                             forming the steps, or rungs. However, instead of a straight ladder, 
                                             DNA looks like a twisted ladder, known as a double helix (“double” 
                                             for the two backbones). The DNA sequence is the consecutive order 
                                             of bases on one side, or strand, of the twisted ladder. The other 
                                             strand has a complementary sequence determined by the base 
                                             pairing rules. 
                                              
                                             The specific matching of the base pairs, A with T and C with G, 
                                             provides a way for exact copies of DNA to be made. This process is 
                                             called DNA replication. In DNA replication, the double helix ladder is 
                                             untwisted and breaking the hydrogen bonds between the base pairs 
                                             separates the two strands. Next, two new strands are made by 
                                             reading each side of the DNA ladder, one step (base) at a time. At 
                                             each step, the matching base fills in (with its associated sugar and 
                                             phosphate) to complete the rung and lengthen the new DNA strand. 
                                             When the process is complete, there are two identical DNA double 
                                             helices, each containing one original and one new strand. 
    
   DNA replication is an important part of the cell division process. Before a cell divides, it first duplicates 
   its DNA so that the new cell will have the same genetic information. The specific base pair matching 
   during replication ensures that exact DNA copies are made. 
    
   MATERIALS 
   For each student (or pair):                                                 For 25 candy DNA sets: 
       • 10 Gummy Savers (preferably the same color)                               • 5 bags (7.7oz) Gummy Savers 
       • 2 Twizzlers (cut into 12 equal pieces)                                    • 1 bag (12.4oz) Rainbow Twizzlers 
           (Note: If regular Twizzlers used, cut ends and discard; if using        • 4 bags (20oz) Spice drops 
           rainbow twizzlers, the entire candy can be used.                        • 50 chenille stems 
           Note:  small round pasta can be substituted)                            • 50 wooden craft sticks 
       • 10 spice/gum drops (or colored marshmallows):                             • 125 toothpicks (round) 
           2 orange, 2 red, 3 green, 3 yellow                                      • 25 plastic Ziploc bags or packaging 
           (Note:  If different colors are substituted, change the                 • 25 student handouts 
           information on the student worksheet accordingly.)                      • Colored pencils (optional) to be shared 
       • 2 chenille stems (pipe cleaners) 
       • 2 wooden craft sticks (or Popsicle sticks) 
       • 5 Toothpicks 
       • Scissors (if students will be cutting the Twizzlers on their 
           own) 
       • Plastic Ziploc bag 
       • Student handout 
       • Colored pencils 
    




                                                                                          Developed by Julie Bokor   jbokor@ufl.edu
                                                                                                      Candy DNA
DNA Science                                                                                             Page 4

   ADVANCE PREPATION 
   1. Cut the Twizzlers into the smaller pieces for the students (most easily done by cutting through 
        many with a large knife) 
   2. Prepare a Ziploc bag for each student or pair or lay out all of the materials the day of the activity 
        and let the students collect them in their Ziploc bag.  
   3. Create your own DNA candy model to use as an example.  
    
   LESSON PROCEDURE 
   1. (20 minutes) Begin lesson with a discussion on the structure and components of DNA. Make sure to 
        cover the ‘backbone,’ base pairs, hydrogen bonds, and the twisted double helix. 
   2. (5 minutes) Discuss what each material in the activity represents in the DNA structure: 
        • Twizzlers (or pasta): phosphate groups  
        • Gummy savers: deoxyribose (sugars, which have ring structure) 
        • Spice/gum drops: nucleotides (chemical bases) 
                o Green‐ G, Yellow‐ C, Red‐ A, and Orange‐ T  (change as needed based on the color 
                    spice/gum drops being used) 
   3. (2 minutes) Hand out student sheets explaining how to assemble the model. 
   4. (10‐15 minutes) Students will create their models 
         
   ASSESSMENT 
   Students should be evaluated on their ability to recall and apply the information gained on the 
   structure of DNA.  
    
   ACCOMODATIONS 
   If a student is unable to assemble the DNA model individually, have students work in pairs. 
   Use the interactive DNA model building at 
   http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/dna/builddna/ 
    
   RESOURCES 
        • http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/  (background information and image) 
        • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page (background information) 
             
   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 
        • http://www.dnai.org/ 
        • http://nobel.scas.bcit.ca/resource/dna/ 
        • http://molvis.sdsc.edu/dna/moredna.htm 
    
   EXTENTION ACTIVITIES 
        • Have Your DNA and Eat It Too:  Another version of a candy DNA model that includes 
            instructions on taking the candy DNA through the process of transcription and translation. 
            http://teach.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/dna/eat_DNA.html and 
            http://teach.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/dna/reading_DNA.html 




                                                                          Developed by Julie Bokor   jbokor@ufl.edu
                                                                                                       Candy DNA
DNA Science                                                                                              Page 5

       •   Have students investigate the process of putting the pieces of DNA together and the scientists 
           who played a part.   
           http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/dna_01 and 
           http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/spl/hi/sci_nat/03/dna50/timeline/html/default.stm 
       •   Use DNA technologies and explore gel electrophoresis either virtually, with a dry lab, or wet lab 
           activity 
    
                                  




                                                                           Developed by Julie Bokor   jbokor@ufl.edu
                                                                                                  Candy DNA
DNA Science                                                                                         Page 6


                           Candy DNA Model:  Student Procedure 
    
   Your task is to construct a DNA model using candy pieces. It will contain all of the parts of real 
   DNA. 
    
   A DNA molecule is often compared to a ladder, with the two backbones forming the sides of 
   the ladder and the base pairs forming the steps, or rungs. To create the two backbones you will 
   need to alternate Twizzler pieces (representing the phosphate groups) and Gummy Savers 
   (representing the deoxyribose) on a pipe cleaner. Leave room at both ends of the pipe cleaner 
   to wrap around the craft sticks at the end (this will hold your model together). 
    
   For this model, we will be using a specific sequence. One strand of the DNA molecule is given in 
   the table below. Fill in the bases that will be paired with the ones given. Remember base 
   pairing: A always pairs with T and G always pairs with C.   
    
   Use the following colors to represent the bases:                 A (adenine)       red
                                                                    T (thymine)       orange
                                                                    C (cytosine)      yellow
                                                                    G (guanine)       green
   Complete the base pairing in the chart below.  You may use colored pencils if you like.  This is 
   the DNA sequence you are to create. 
    
                                          A
                                          G
                                          G
                                          T
                                          C
    
   To create the base pairs, you will place two gumdrops on a toothpick. Because the bases attach 
   to the sugars in the backbone, insert the toothpick into the Gummy Savers on both sides. After 
   you have attached the pipe cleaners to the craft sticks, your model is done! 
    
   Gently twist your model to accurately represent the twisted double helix of a DNA molecule.




                                                                      Developed by Julie Bokor   jbokor@ufl.edu

								
To top