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Tulane University rheology

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                                            Tulane University
                                EENS 340 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
                                         Spring Semester 2009
Dr. Nancye Dawers - ndawers@tulane.edu
 Office: 202 Blessey Hall; 862-3200; Office Hours: TBA & by appt.
 Lectures: MWF 10:00-10:50, 219 Science & Eng. Lab Complex (formerly Mech. Services Bldg.)
 Lab: M 2:00-4:00 pm, 225 Science & Eng. Lab Complex (formerly Mech. Services Bldg.), on 2 nd
    floor hallway connecting Blessey and Stanley Thomas Halls
 Websites: http://tulane.blackboard.com/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp
                http://tulane.edu/sse/eens/faculty/ndawers/eens-340.cfm

Goals of this course:
 to acquire a basic understanding of the processes and manifestations of rock deformation;
 to gain an understanding of how these processes relate to tectonics;
 to learn how to apply structural analyses in interpreting tectonically deformed terranes.

Learning Outcomes:
 Student should be able to relate stress-strain plots, creep curves (strain versus time), and the
   mathematical forms of flow laws to the underlying rock rheology
 Student should be able to describe the effects of varying temperature, confining pressure, fluid
   pressure, stress state, and strain rate on rock deformation
 Given a photograph, sketch, map or cross-section, student should be able to explain mechanically
   how any geological structures present formed
 Student should be able to relate styles of tectonic deformation to plate tectonic environment

Geology Degree Program Learning Outcomes that are Addressed by this Course:
This course addresses the following learning outcomes of the Geology undergraduate program:
 solve a wide variety of scientific problems (by focused discussions in lecture followed up by labs on
    solving geological problems)
 analyze and interpret scientific data (though numerous examples of structural geology datasets
    discussed in lecture and lab)
 use and interpret geologic maps in cross-sections in terms of the geologic and tectonic history of any
    region (assigned lab problem sets)
 construct a geologic map based on field studies (using data collected on the field trip)

Textbook(s)
Lecture: Earth Structure: An Introduction to Structural Geology and Tectonics, 2nd edition, by
   Ben A. van der Pluijm and Stephen Marshak, W.W. Norton & Co.
Lab: Structural Analysis and Synthesis: A Laboratory Course in Structural Geology, 3rd edition, by
   Rowland, Duebendorfer and Schiefelbein, Blackwell. Do not buy this used.

Some lectures will incorporate material from:
   Structural Geology, by Twiss and Moores
                                                                                               2


   Tectonics, by Moores and Twiss
   Tectonic Geomorphology, by Burbank and Anderson
   Fundamentals of Structural Geology, by Pollard & Fletcher
Some labs may incorporate material from Basic Methods of Structural Geology, by Stephen Marshak
   and Gautam Mitra, Prentice-Hall.
A variety of textbooks will be on the bookshelf in the lab.

Prerequisites
 Physical Geology Lecture (EENS111) & Lab (EENS113)
 Mineralogy (EENS 211, formerly known as Earth Materials)
 Physics to meet the Geology BS Degree Program recommended

Course Grading
 Labs: Lab Exercises 35%
 Lecture Mid-term Exam 30% (Lecture + Lab material)
 Final Exam 35% (Non-cumulative, Lecture + Lab material)

Policies
 We will abide by the LAS Honor Code (http://college.tulane.edu/code.htm).
 Please see me about any absences.
 No make-up exams (see Dean’s Office about extreme family emergencies).

Fieldtrip
 Appalachian Mountains, NE Alabama field area. Friday-Sunday in early April.
 Plan to camp, of course. See info on web; more details later.


                             Tentative Schedule of Lecture Topics

Date                              Topic                   Reading
(M) Jan 12    What is Structural Geology?                 See Ch. 1-2
(W) Jan 14    Forces                                      Ch. 3
(F) Jan 16    Stress in the Lithosphere                   Ch. 3; TBA from Pollard & Fletcher
(M) Jan 19             Martin Luther King Day
(W) Jan 21    Strain                                      Ch. 4
(F) Jan 23    Rheology                                    Ch. 5
(M) Jan 26    Rheology continued                          Ch. 5
(W) Jan 28    Brittle Deformation                         Ch. 6
(F) Jan 30    Brittle Deformation                         Ch. 6
(M) Feb 2     Fracture                                    Ch. 7; TBA from Twiss & Moores
(W) Feb 4     Fracture continued                          Ch. 7; TBA from Twiss & Moores
(F) Feb 6     Faulting                                    Ch. 8
                                                                                                        3


(M) Feb 9      Faulting continued                            Ch. 8
(W) Feb 11     Fault Growth, Interaction & Linkage           TBA from Scholz
(F) Feb 13     Fault Evolution continued                     TBA from Scholz
(M) Feb 16     Intro to Stereographic Projections            (see Ch. 5 in lab textbook)
(W) Feb 18     Earthquakes & Active faulting                 TBA
(F) Feb 20     Fault-related Folds                           Ch 8(.3.4); TBA Burbank & Anderson
(M) Feb 23                     Lundi Gras
(W) Feb 25     Review Session                                 -
(F) Feb 27     Mid-term Exam                                 Lecture & Lab Material to Date
(M) Mar 2      Folding                                       Ch. 10
(W) Mar 4      Go over mid-term                              -
(F) Mar 6      Mechanism of Folding                          Ch. 10; TBA Twiss & Moores
(M) Mar 9      Mechanism of Folding continued                Ch. 10; TBA Twiss & Moores
(W) Mar 11     Microstructures                               Ch. 9
(F) Mar 13     Microstructures continued; Fabric             Ch. 9 & 11
(M) Mar 16     Fabric continued; Shear Zones                 Ch. 11 & 12
(W) Mar 18     Shear Zones continued                         Ch. 12
(F) Mar 20     Shear Zones continued                         Ch. 12
(M) Mar 23                    Spring Break
(W) Mar 25                    Spring Break
(F) Mar 27                    Spring Break
(M) Mar 30     Compressional Tectonics                       Ch. 17
(W) Apr 1      Fold-Thrust Belts; Appalachian Trip           Ch. 18; Ch. 22(.4); a few figs. Ch. 17
(F) Apr 3      Fieldtrip to Appalachians                     -
(M) Apr 6      No lecture; lab will meet.
(W) Apr 8       Extensional Tectonics                        Ch. 16
(F) Apr 10                    Good Friday
(M) Apr 13            Monday after Easter Holiday
(W) Apr 15      P-T-t Analyses                               Ch. 13
(F) Apr 17           No class – Petrology Class Trip
(M) Apr 20      TBA
(W) Apr 22      Strike-Slip Tectonics                        Ch. 19
(F) Apr 24      Tectonics of North America                   Ch. 22(.1-2, .6-.7)
(M) Apr 27      Tectonics of North America continued         Ch. 22(.1-2, .6-.7)
(Sat) May       Final Exam                                   Lecture & Lab; Non-Cumulative, i.e.
2nd, a.m.        8:00 to Noon, 219 Blessey Hall              Material Since the Mid-term

“TBA” means that you should look at the sections in the relevant book that I have marked with post-it
notes; they are on the bookshelf in the lab with other textbooks.
                                                                                                        4



                                 Tentative Schedule of Lab Topics

 Dates        Lab Topic                                                       Reading
Jan 12        Lines & Planes; Outcrop Patterns & Structure Contours           Ch. 1 & 2
Jan 19                            Martin Luther King Day
Jan 26        Rheology & Strain                                               Ch. 12 & 14
Feb 2         Analysis of Brittle Deformation                                 Ch. 13
Feb 9         Faulting                                                        Ch. 9 & 10
Feb 16        Stereographic Projection                                        Ch. 5
Feb 23                                  Lundi Gras
Mar 2         Folds                                                           Ch. 6
Mar 9         Folds                                                           Ch. 7 & 8
Mar 16        Ductile Deformation & Microstructures                           Ch. 16
Mar 23                                 Spring Break
Mar 30        Geological Map Interpretation & Structure Sections              Ch. 3 & 4
Apr 6         Stereonet analyses of your field data                           Refer to Ch 7
Apr 13                             Monday after Easter
Apr 20        Structural Synthesis & Report                                   Ch. 11
Apr 27        Balanced Cross Sections                                         Ch. 15


Lab Policies
 Due at the beginning of the following lab meeting.
 Late labs: 5% penalty/day (weekend considered as 1 day).
 Note that we will only be doing selected problems in the chapters listed; these are short chapters.

Learning Outcomes:
 Student should be able to measure strain using appropriate deformation features
 Student should be able to plot and analyze directional data using a stereonet
 Student should be able to interpret tectonic history from a geological map
 Student should be able to construct a valid, balanced geological cross-section

Geology Degree Program Learning Outcomes that are Addressed by this Course:
This course addresses the following learning outcomes of the Geology undergraduate program:
 solve a wide variety of scientific problems (by focused discussions in lecture followed up by labs on
    solving structural geology problems)
 analyze and interpret scientific data (though numerous examples of structural datasets discussed in
    lecture and lab)
 use and interpret geologic maps in cross-sections in terms of the geologic and tectonic history of any
    region (via assigned lab exercises)
 construct a geologic map based on field studies (using data collected on the field trip)
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