Docstoc

Brick by Brick (PDF)

Document Sample
Brick by Brick (PDF) Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                                 
 
                                                    Brick by Brick 
             Supporting education and entrepreneurs in Uganda with eco‐friendly brick making 
                                                     
What is Brick by Brick? 
                    Brick by Brick is a Positive Planet program that establishes small‐scale brick manufacturing 
                    businesses in rural Uganda. The program partners with COWESER (Community Welfare Services), a 
                    locally run and operated non‐profit, non‐governmental organization to identify masons. The 
                    program then trains the local masons to use Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSB) technology, an 
                    eco‐friendly, cost effective and materially efficient alternative to the environmentally degrading 
                    process of fire based kiln brick making. Positive Planet runs the program similar to many 
                    microfinance projects in that the costs of the brick presses are recouped in the form of cash or 
                    bricks. The recouped bricks are then used to support educational facilities for primary schools. 
                    Principally, the bricks will be used for the construction of classrooms, sanitation facilities and water 
                    tanks; all to support education for children in Uganda.  
 
What is Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSB) Technology? 
Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSB) is an appropriate technology (meaning that it 
makes sense for and by the local people in Uganda who will be using the technology) that 
utilizes environmentally friendly building materials and construction methods. Instead of 
oven‐fired brick which is the most common method used in East Africa, ISSB are produced 
using a simple and relatively inexpensive device that uses pressure to fabricate bricks of 
varying shapes and sizes. The fact that interlocking bricks can be made in this fashion, 
dramatically reduces the need for cement, thus lowering the cost, as well as the need for 
wood as fuel, saving thousands of trees and reducing the terrible problem of deforestation 
which is ubiquitous throughout sub‐Saharan Africa. 
                   
                  What is the Environmental Impact of the Project? 
                  The traditional method for burning bricks in Uganda consists of stacking a large amount of dried bricks    
                  (up to 20,000) into a large pile with a tunnel opening at the bottom into which large quantities of 
                  firewood are introduced and burnt during 24‐hours. The pile is plastered with mud in order to reduce 
                  heat leakage. This process results in unevenly baked bricks and 20% waste as the bricks closest to the 
                  heat source are over burned while those farther away are under‐fired. The large quantities of 
                  firewood needed for firing bricks contributes to deforestation, which affects biodiversity. It 
                  contributes to air pollution, soil erosion and degradation, desertification of the landscape, and 
                  reduces available fuel sources for other human activities. In agricultural regions, these consequences 
                  are especially detrimental and contribute to the food crisis and sometimes fuel conflict over the 
                  limited resources. Currently, there are attempts by organizations to raise awareness on alternative 
                  fuels and kiln construction in order to increase production rates and reduce environmental impact. 
                   
                  With the current reliance on fired brick and other unsustainable technologies, the most basic human 
                  needs such as housing, watertanks, and schools will increase these rates of destruction.  Because 
                  ISSBs are ‘cured’ rather than fired, the need for fuelwood is eliminated.  Moreover, fired brick 
                  creation damages wetland areas, which are vital to the natural filtration of water in an environment.  
                  ISSB Technology provides a realistic alternative to brick construction and in turn helps conserve 
                  woodland areas, wetlands and indigenous eco‐systems.  


                                                www.positiveplanet.net 
                                                                                                                            
 
                                                               Benefits and Fact about ISSB1  
               
        •     Environmental benefits:  
                  o ISSB blocks are “cured” rather then fired, which eliminates the need for firewood and charcoal.   
                  o This helps decrease deforestation of potential fuel sources by protecting local woodlands. 
                  o Increases conservation of local flora and fauna. 
 
        •     Cost savings and Accessibility/ Transport benefits: 
                  o A cost savings of ISSB versus fired brick is in the range of 20‐30%.  
                  o The presses that create the blocks are affordable. In the long‐term, ISSB technology proves to be cost‐
                      effective as the press contributes to increased sustainability through further building initiatives. 
                  o As blocks are made on site there are no breakages.  It is common for 20% of fired bricks to be damaged 
                      when they reach a site.  
                  o Because of the interlock feature and the uniformity of each block, savings are found in the lower 
                      amounts of cement needed for construction.  Less mortar is needed in between courses and also when 
                      plastering the walls. 
                  o The presses are very easy to transport making them relevant to the rural poor 
                       
        •     Water and Sanitation Benefits: 
                  o Curved ISSBs are ideal for meeting water and sanitation needs.  
                  o ISSB water tanks are approximately half the cost of plastic tanks. 
                  o Above ground tanks can be constructed with capacities from 2,000 Litres to 30,000 Litres. 
                  o Underground tanks can be constructed with capacities of up to 200,000 Litres.  
                  o The Interlock on all 4 sides ensures maximum resistance against water pressure. 
                  o The cylindrical shape means there are no corners, which are weak points against water pressure. 
                  o The technology is equally suited for lining pit latrines and building septic tanks.  
                  o Larger structures built with the technology, such as schools, can take advantage of the large roof surface 
                      area and incorporate water harvesting features into structures. 
         
        •     Increasing Community Capacity and Education: 
                  o Construction using ISSB technology requires lower level masonry skills, which means that necessary 
                      skills can be obtained quickly making technology transfer simple.  This results in reliable and time‐saving 
                      building techniques. 
                  o Because the presses are simple to operate, this can facilitate community participation and mobilization 
                      which has the potential to promote proactive behavior, self‐reliance and encourage a problem‐solving 
                      approach to other issues.  
                  o The technology also has the potential to generate local skills, employment and income. Because of their 
                      utility and low cost, the machines constitute a livelihood resource—through selling them or hiring them 
                      or training others in their use. Access to the machines could easily be incorporated into micro‐finance 
                      schemes or other similar income generation projects. 
                  o Using the technology can stimulate educational dialogue by alerting people to the environmental 
                      benefits obtained in using ISSB.   
 
 
                                                            
1
     Based on a Good Earth Trust’s document, Overview of Interlocking Soil Stabilised Block (ISSB) Technology in Uganda 

  

                                                                    www.positiveplanet.net 
                                                                                                                
 
 
                                               About Positive Planet 
                                                          
                                   Mission 
                                    Positive Planet is a non‐profit organization invested in improving the lives and 
                                   futures of children in Uganda by supporting the delivery of quality education, 
                                   improving the physical infrastructure of school communities and developing 
                                   sustainable economic development. To accomplish this goal, Positive Planet works 
                                   with school communities, local Ugandan and US non‐profits and corporate partners 
                                   to develop sustainable and community based models of change.  
                                   Positive Planet’s Strategy: To address our mission, Positive Planet coordinates 
                                   several programs using different 
                                   models.  

Highlighted programs are:  
       • Sister School Program  
       • School Infrastructure Improvement Program  
       • Teacher Training Series  
       • The Poultry Project  
       • Brick by Brick 
                                                  
                                         Background and Impact 
                                         The geographic area in which Positive Planet works is the Rakai and Masaka 
                                         districts, a rural region in southeastern Uganda. These districts have a 
                                         staggering rate of poverty and have been identified as the birthplace of HIV, the 
                                         virus that causes AIDS. Through all of these difficulties and challenges, Positive 
                                         Planet remains focused on improving the quality of education in our Ugandan 
                                         Sister Schools, which serve the poorest of Uganda's children, many of whom 
                                         are AIDS orphans.  

                                         Universal primary education (U.P.E.) has been adopted by the Government of 
Uganda.   U.P.E schools are government supported and free to all students.  However, limited resources leave most 
schools critically under‐funded, overcrowded, and without sufficient classrooms, books, educational materials or even 
safe drinking water.   

Since its inception, Positive Planet has engaged thousands of children in the US 
and Uganda in its Sister School Program and over $60,000 has been raised to 
fund major school capital improvements. In addition to infrastructure projects, 
Positive Planet supports education through programs and partnerships that 
deliver continuing education to teachers. Positive Planet is investing in local 
economic development in order to support our mission, providing revenue for 
our multiple projects.  By partnering with locally owned and operated 
businesses Positive Planet is investing in the entrepreneurial spirit and know‐
how of the Ugandan people and we believe this is a strategy that will pay 
dividends in the short and long‐term.  

                                                www.positiveplanet.net 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:47
posted:5/17/2011
language:English
pages:3