Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Child with microscopic hematuria February Case mother

VIEWS: 10 PAGES: 2

									                                               Child with microscopic hematuria 
                                                       February 7, 2011 
                                                                
Case:  A mother brings her 2 year old son to your office for increased fussiness and side pain. He had history of seizures 
that are managed with a ketogenic diet.  A UA reveals sp. Gr 1.020, pH 6, 3+ ketones, 2+ blood, negative for protein, 
glucose, nitrite, LE.  Microscopic analysis reveals 5‐10 eumorphic RBC/hpf and fewer than 5 WBC.  What is the most likely 
associated urinary findings in this patient?  What do you recommend for treatment? 
 




                                                                                                                       
 
Definition:  >5 RBCs/hpf on more than 2 occasions over the span of several weeks.   
‐Usually identified on “routine” screening, incidentally when evaluating urinary symptoms, or with gross hematuria 
 
Epidemiology:  Prevalence of 3‐6% of school‐aged children with single‐urine sample 0.5% to 1% with repeat testing 
over subsequent 6‐12 mos. (most hematuria in children is transient) 
 
Differential Diagnosis 
Gross hematuria                                                      UTI, perineal irritation, trauma, coagulopathy, nephrolithiasis, nephritis (PIGN, 
‐56% cause identified                                                SLE, SCD), tumor, hypercalciuria, hyperuricosuria, AVM, RV thrombosis, 
                                                                     hemangioma, hydronephrosis, hemorrhagic cystitis, MPGN, HSP, IgA nephropathy 
Microscopic w/ clinical symptoms                                     Cystitis, HSP, SLE, acute glomerulonephritis, HTN, hypercalciuria,  
Asymptomatic, isolated hematuria                                     Idiopathic, exercise, hemoglobinopathy, hypercalciuria, benign familial hematuria, 
                                                                     Alports (hereditary nephritis), hyperuricosuria, ADPCK, IgA nephropathy, 
                                                                     Infection, stones 
Asymptomatic microscopic                                             Glomerular, idiopathic 
hematuria w/ proteinuria 
Glomerular (dysmorphic RBC)                                          PIAGN (can persist for 6‐12 mos), SLE, IgA nephropathy, HSP, benign familial 
                                                                     MGPN, Alports 
Non‐glomerular (eumorphic RBC)                                       Interstitial (Infections, metabolic, drug),  Vascular (malformations, thrombus, 
                                                                     hemoglobinopathy), Tumor, Developmental (PCKD, MCKD), hypercalciuria, 
                                                                     hyperuricosuria, coagulopathy, nephrolithiasis, exercise/trauma 
 
Clinical Presentation  
History                         Associated symptoms: Fever, malaise, abdominal pain, flank pain, dysuria, frequency ,  joint pain/rash 
                                Early‐morning peri‐orbital edema, weight gain, oliguria, HTN, 
                                Precipitating events: Trauma, recent  (1‐3 wks) sore throat/skin infection (PIGN), concurrent (1‐2 days) 
                                URI (IgA nephropathy) 
                                Any new meds, allergies 
Family History  Deafness, chronic renal insufficiency, hematuria, Alport (XLD), Collagen Vascular Diseases, Urolithiasis, 
                                PCKD, benign familial hematuria (thin basement disease) 
Physical Exam  BP, edema, heart murmurs, skin, joint, abdominal exam (palpable kidneys) 
  
 
 
 
 
Evaluation for microscopic hematuria 
*Symptomatic warrant extensive evaluation  *Asymptomatic‐ up to 25% will have normalization of UA within 5 years 
Dip‐stick  Urinalysis        Blood: False (‐): large amounts of ascorbic acid False (+): Hemoglobin, myoglobin, pigments 
                             (meds, beets).  Urine spec. gravity, pH, protein, LE/nitrites 
Urine microscopy             RBC morphology:  (dysmorphic/eumorphic), Casts, WBC, crystals 
Urine‐ other                 Protein:creatinine >0.2,  Urine culture (if WBC/nitrite) 
                             Ca:Cr >0.8 for <6 mos of age;  >0.6 for 7‐18 mos of age, >0.2 if  >18 mos of age  
Serology                     C3/C4 (glomerular cause‐low in PIGN, SLE, MPGN, endocarditis)  ASO/anti‐DNase B  (recent 
                             strep infection)  ANA (SLE), ANCA (small vessel vasculitis), Hepatitis B/C, HIV 
Laboratory                   Serum chemistries (renal insufficiency),  
                             CBC (petechia, bruising, fatigue, abdominal mass, chronic anemia) 
Radiology                    USG: structural abnormalities, asymmetry, echogenicity, renal mass, renal vein thrombosis 
                             KUB: radioopaque stones (calcium, struvite, cystine)  
                             Spiral helical CT: nephrolithiasis; but high dose radiation 
Renal Biopsy                 Indications: recurrent episodes of gross hematuria, coexisting nephritic syndrome, coexisting 
                             HTN w/ nephritic,renal insufficiency, coexisting symptoms.   
Refer to nephrologist        Symptomatic microscopic hematuria, Persistent asymptomatic hematuria with proteinuria 
          
Treatment 
Reassurance:  long term follow‐up of hematuria does not cause anemia  
Dietary: Low Na for hypercalciuria, low purines for uricosuria 
Drugs: thiazide for hypercalciuria (symptomatic), alkalinizing agents for hyperuricosuria 
Nephritis: specific therapies with specialist (nephrologist, rheumatologist) 
 




                                                                                                           
 
                                                                  
 
References: 
Diven SC, Travis LB. A practical primary care approach to hematuria in children. Pediatric Nephrology. 2000; 14:65‐72. 
Massengill, SF.  Hematuria.  Pediatrics Rev. 2008; 29: 342‐348 
 
Case study points: 
‐Ketogenic diet: increased risk of hypercalciuria (incidence 75% after 6 mos of ketogenic diet) and nephrolithiasis 
(mixed uric/calcium stones) without hyperuricosuria 
‐Eumorphic RBC:  Non‐glomerular cause of hematuria Hypercalciuria, familial hematuria, etc. 
‐Treatment: empiric potassium citrate (decreases incidence of nephrolithiasis to 0.9% from 6.7% w/ ketogenic diet) 
‐Hypercalciuria seen in 1/3 of patients with microscopic hematuria without any other abnormalities 

								
To top