Docstoc

MOHAVE COUNTY NEEDS ASSESSMENT dui phoenix arizona

Document Sample
MOHAVE COUNTY NEEDS ASSESSMENT dui phoenix arizona Powered By Docstoc
					                                                    
        MOHAVE COUNTY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 




                                                                                           
                                   31 DECEMBER 2010 
                                                    

                                          Prepared By 

                                            MSTEPP 
       Mohave Substance Treatment, Education and Prevention Partnership 
                           1660 Lakeside Drive #388 
                      Bullhead City, Arizona 86442‐6544 
                          e‐mail:  info@mstepp.com 
                     website:  http://www.mstepp.com 
                                         
                                         
This document may be copied and transmitted freely.  No deletions, additions or alterations of contents 
                are permitted without the expressed, written consent of MSTEPP. 
                              Table of Contents 
Acknowledgements ……………………………………………………………………………………………….                           i 
Sponsors & Supporters ……….…………………………………………………………………………………                        iii 
2010 MSTEPP Board of Directors …………………………………………………………………………..                    iii 
Forward by Sheriff Tom Sheahan …………………………………………………………………………..                    v 
Executive Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………….                          1 
1.0    Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………                         2 
       1.1    Mohave County Characteristic s and Demographics ..……………………….       2 
       1.2    Closing Remarks ………………………………………………………………………………                     6 
2.0    Law Enforcement ………………………………………………………………………………………..                       7 
       2.1    Bullhead City Police Department ……………………………………………………..             8 
       2.2    Lake Havasu City Police Department ………………………………………………..            11 
       2.3    Kingman Police Department …………………………………………………………….                 16 
       2.4    MAGNET …………………………………………………………………………………………..                        23 
       2.5    Hualapai Nation Police Department ………………………………………………….             26 
       2.6    Fort Mojave Tribe Police Department ……………………………………………….            27 
       2.7    Mohave County Sheriff’s Office …………………………………………………………              29 
       2.8    Crime in Arizona Report (2006, 2007, 2008, 2009) …………………………….      33 
       2.9    Arizona Motor Vehicle Crash Facts (2006, 2007, 2008) ……………………..    35 
       2.10  Closing Remarks ………………………………………………………………………………..                    36 
3.0    Courts, Child Welfare and Probation …………………………………………………………….              38 
       3.1    Courts ……………………………………………………………………………………………….                       38 
       3.2    Arizona Criminal Justice Commission ………………………………………………..           43 
       3.3    Mohave County Child Dependency Statistics …………………………………….          45 
       3.4    Child Welfare Reports (Oct 2005 – Sep 2009) ……………………………………         49 
       3.5    Probation ………………………………………………………………………………………….                      53 
       3.6    Closing Remarks ………………………………………………………………………………..                   55 
4.0    Mohave County Treatment Services and Substance Abuse Surveys ……………….      57 
       4.1    SAMHSA …………………………………………………………………………………………….                        57 
              4.1.1  NSDUH …………………………………………………………………………………..                     58 
              4.1.2  N‐SSATS ………………………………………………………………………………….                    69 
       4.2    Arizona Families F.I.R.S.T. …………………………………………………………………..            80 
       4.3    Arizona Dept of Health Services – Division of Behavioral  
              Health Services (ADHS DBHS) ………………………………………………………………               82 
              4.3.1  Performance Audit, Substance Abuse Treatment Programs, 
                      Report No. 09‐07, July 2009……………………………………………………..          82 
              4.3.2  Annual Report of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs, 
                           State Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010 ……………………………………………..          83 
                    4.3.3  Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity Report, April 2008 ……….    86 
            4.4     Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant (SAPT) ……….     89 
            4.5     Arizona Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile ………………………………….          92 
                    4.5.1  Tobacco ………………………………………………………………………………….                      92 
                    4.5.2  Alcohol ……………………………………………………………………………………                      93 
                    4.5.3  Illicit Drugs ………………………………………………………………………………                  93 
                    4.5.4  Substance Abuse in Critical Populations ………………………………….        94 
            4.6     Mohave County Treatment Services ………………………………………………….                94 
                    4.6.1  Mohave Mental Health Clinic (MMHC) ……………………………………             94 
                    4.6.2  Treatment Assessment Screening Center (TASC) …………………….        95 
                    4.6.3  Hospital Discharge Data ………………………………………………………….               96 
                    4.6.4  Fort Mojave Tribe Behavioral Health ………………………………………           97 
                    4.6.5  Mohave County Tobacco Use Prevention Program …………………          100 
            4.7     Closing Remarks ………………………………………………………………………………..                     106 
5.0         Discussion and Recommendations ………………………………………………………………..                    109 
            5.1     Discussion ………………………………………………………………………………………….                       109 
            5.2     Recommendations …………………………………………………………………………….                       112 
6.0         Bibliography ………………………………………………………………………………………………….                          113 
 
List of Appendices 
       A.   Monthly AHCCCS Enrollment by County 
       B.   Bullhead City Police Department Statistics 
       C.   Lake Havasu City Police Department Statistics 
       D.   Mohave County Sheriff’s Office Data  
       E.   Mohave County Courts Data 
       F.   Mohave County Dependency Statistics 
       G.   N‐SSATS Data Sets 
       H.   Letters from Arizona Department of Health Services 
       I.   TASC Drug Test Results 
       J.   Kingman Needs Assessment 
       K.   Bullhead City Needs Assessment 
       L.   Lake Havasu City Needs Assessment 
 
List of Tables 
Chapter One 
1‐1   2008 Projected Populations in Mohave County ……………………………………………                      2 
1‐2        Arizona Commerce Population Projections ………………………………………………….             3 
1‐3        Ethnic Break Down, 2009 ……………………………………………………………………………..                  4 
1‐4        Arizona Median Household Income by County …………………………………………….             4 
1‐5        Arizona Persons Below Poverty Level by County …………………………………………..         5 
1‐6        AHCCCS Enrollment by County ……………………………………………………………………..                 6 
 
Chapter Two 
2‐1        Bullhead City Police Arrests ………………………………………………………………………….               9 
2‐2  Bullhead City Drug Arrests by Drug Type ………………………………………………………                  10 
2‐3  UCR Drug Related Arrests – Lake Havasu City Police Dept …………………………….           11 
2‐4  Lake Havasu City UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type …………………………………………                13 
2‐5  Lake Havasu City Police Department Drug Arrest Charges ……………………………             14 
2‐6  Lake Havasu City Police Department DUI Charges ………………………………………..               16 
2‐7  Kingman Police Department Calls for Service ……………………………………………….                16 
2‐8  Kingman School Resource Officer Activity …………………………………………………….                 18 
2‐9  Kingman Flex Squad Drug Arrests …………………………………………………………………                      19 
2‐10  Kingman Flex Squad Drug Seizures ……………………………………………………………….                    19 
2‐11  Kingman Police Department UCR Drug Arrests ……………………………………………..                20 
2‐12  KPD UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type (Adult & Juvenile) …………………………………            22 
2‐13  MAGNET Drug Related Arrests …………………………………………………………………….                       24 
2‐14  MAGNET Drug Seizures ………………………………………………………………………………..                         25 
2‐15  Hualapai Law Enforcement Drug Related Incidents ………………………………………               26 
2‐16  Fort Mojave Tribe Drug Related Charges ………………………………………………………                  27 
2‐17  Mohave County Jail Drug Related Bookings  by Agency (not including MCSO)..    29 
2‐18  Drug Related Bookings as a Percentage of Total Jail Bookings ……………………….       30 
2‐19  Arrests per 10,000 Residents – Synthetic Narcotics (includes meth) ……………..    33 
2‐20  Arrests per 10,000 Residents – Other Dangerous Drugs ………………………………..           34 
2‐21  Arrests per 10,000 Residents – Marijuana …………………………………………………….                34 
2‐22  Arrests per 10,000 Residents – Opium Cocaine, Derivatives ………………………….         35 
2‐23  2006 Alcohol Related Crashes ……………………………………………………………………….                     35 
2‐24  2007 Alcohol Related Crashes ……………………………………………………………………….                     35 
2‐25  2008 Alcohol Related Crashes ……………………………………………………………………….                     36 
2‐26  Percentage of Drug Related Crashes ……………………………………………………………...                 36 
 
Chapter Three 
3‐1  Drug Cases Filed in Municipal Courts ………………………………………………………………                  40 
3‐2  Drug Cases Filed in Justice Courts …………………………………………………………………..                 40 
3‐3  Drug Cases Filed in Superior Court ………………………………………………………………….                  41 
3‐4  Guilty Drug Convictions in Municipal Courts …………………………………………………...                42 
3‐5  Guilty Drug Convictions in Justice Courts ………………………………………………………..                 42 
3‐6  Guilty Drug Convictions in Superior Court ………………………………………………………                   43 
3‐7  Drug Cases per 1000 Residents ………………………………………………………………………                         44 
3‐8  Conviction by Drug Type in Mohave County …………………………………………………..                    45 
3‐9  Mohave County Dependency Statistics …………………………………………………………..                      46 
3‐10  Child Welfare Reports per 10,000 County Residents ………………………………………                50 
3‐11  Investigations per 10,000 County Residents …………………………………………………..                 51 
3‐12  Children in Voluntary Out‐of‐Home Placement per 10,000 County Residents…         52 
3‐13  Mohave County Probation Drug Test Results …………………………………………………                    54 
 
Chapter Four 
4‐1  Illicit Drug Use in Past Month, Ages 12‐17 ……………………………………………………..                 60 
4‐2  Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past Month, Ages 12‐17 …………………..         60 
4‐3  Cocaine Use in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 ……………………………………………………………..                    60 
4‐4  Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 …………………………….            61 
4‐5  Marijuana Use in Past Month, Ages 12‐17 ………………………………………………………                     61 
4‐6  Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use in Rural North, Ages 12‐17 ……………………          61 
4‐7  Dependence On or Abuse of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 ….    62 
4‐8  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year, 
      Ages 12‐17 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..                              62 
4‐9  Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past Month, Ages 18‐25 …………………           63 
4‐10  Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 ………………………….            63 
4‐11  Alcohol Dependence in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 ………………………………………………                   63 
4‐12  Illicit Drug Dependence or Abuse in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 ……………………………            63 
4‐13  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past Year, 
      Ages 18‐25 …………………………………………………………………………………………………….                               64 
4‐14  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year, 
      Ages 18‐25 …………………………………………………………………………………………………….                               64 
4‐15  Cocaine Use in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 ……………………………………………………………                     64 
4‐16  Illicit Drug Dependence in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 …………………………………………..              65 
4‐17  Alcohol Dependence in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 ……………………………………………….                  65 
4‐18  Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use, Ages 18‐25 ………………………………………….               65 
4‐19  Illicit Drug Use in Past Month, Ages 26 or Older ……………………………………………..             66 
4‐20  Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past Month, Ages 26 or Older ………….      66 
4‐21  Cocaine Use in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older …………………………………………………….                 66 
4‐22  Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older ……………………         66 
4‐23  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year, 
        Ages 26 or Older …………………………………………………………………………………………….                          67 
4‐24    Alcohol Dependence or Abuse in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older ………………………..         67 
4‐25    Dependence On or Abuse of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in Past Year, Ages 26 or 
        Older ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..                              67 
4‐26    Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past Year, Ages 26 
        or Older …………………………………………………………………………………………………………                              68 
4‐27    Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use, Ages 26 or Older ………………………………..          68 
4‐28    2009 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services ……………………………………………..              70 
4‐29    2008 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services ……………………………………………..              71 
4‐30    2007 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services ……………………………………………..              72 
4‐31    2006 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services ……………………………………………..              73 
4‐32    2009 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services ………………………………………………..              75 
4‐33    2008 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services ………………………………………………..              76 
4‐34    2007 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services ………………………………………………..              77 
4‐35    2006 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services ………………………………………………..              78 
4‐36    Utilization Rate of Designated Substance Abuse Treatment Beds …………………          79 
4‐37    Mohave County Referrals to AFF ………………………………………………………………….                      80 
4‐38    Number of Referrals to AFF Program ……………………………………………………………                     81 
4‐39    Number of Referrals to AFF Program Per 1000 Residents ……………………………..            81 
4‐40    2008 Substance Abuse Treatment Enrollees …………………………………………………                   84 
4‐41    2009 Substance Abuse Treatment Enrollees …………………………………………………                   84 
4‐42    2009 Involuntary Substance Abuse Participants …………………………………………....             85 
4‐43    Statewide Availability of Adult Substance Abuse Treatment Service Providers 
        By Type and GSA, March 2008 ………………………………………………………………………..                      87 
4‐44    Statewide Availability of Adult Substance Abuse Treatment Service Providers 
        By Type and GSA per 100,000 Adults, March 2008 ………………………………………….               88 
4‐45    TASC Client Drug Test Results ………………………………………………………………………….                    96 
4‐46    Admissions Due To Alcohol or Drug Related Disorders ……………………………………             97 
4‐47    Substance Abused by Adults …………………………………………………………………………..                      98 
4‐48    Substance Abuse by Juveniles …………………………………………………………………………                      99 
4‐49    Type of Treatment for Adults ………………………………………………………………………….                     99 
4‐50    Type o Treatment for Juveniles ……………………………………………………………………….                    100 
 
List of Figures 
Chapter Two 

2‐1     Bullhead City Drug Arrests as a Percentage of Total Criminal Arrests ………………    9 
2‐2     Bullhead City Percentage of Drug Arrests by Category …………………………………….           10 
2‐3  Bullhead City Police Department DUI Arrests ………………………………………………….            11 
2‐4  Lake Havasu City UCR Drug Related Juvenile Arrests ……………………………………….         12 
2‐5  Lake Havasu City UCR Drug Related Adult Arrests …………………………………………..          12 
2‐6  Lake Havasu City Percentage of UCR Drug Arrests by Drug ……………………………..       13 
2‐7  Lake Havasu Police Department Juvenile Drug Related Charges ……………………..      14 
2‐8  Lake Havasu Police Department Adult Drug Related Charges ………………………….        15 
2‐9  Lake Havasu City Police Department DUI Charges …………………………………………...          15 
2‐10  Kingman Police Department Drug Related Calls for Service ……………………………..     17 
2‐11  Kingman Police Department Calls for Service …………………………………………………..          17 
2‐12  Kingman SRO Drug Related Arrests ………………………………………………………………….                18 
2‐13  Kingman Police Department % Drug Arrests/Total Arrests ………………………………        19 
2‐14  Kingman Flex Squad Drug Seizures …………………………………………………………………..               20 
2‐15  KPD UCR Drug Arrests ………………………………………………………………………………………                     21 
2‐16  KPD UCR Drug Arrests by Gender …………………………………………………………………….                 21 
2‐17  Percentage UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type (Adult & Juvenile) ………………………..    22 
2‐18  Kingman Police Department DUI Calls for Service ……………………………………………          23 
2‐19  MAGNET Drug Related Arrests ………………………………………………………………………..                  24 
2‐20  Arizona County Comparison – Meth Seizures (grams) ……………………………………..         25 
2‐21  Arizona County Comparison – 2009 Meth Seizures (grams) ……………………………         26 
2‐22  Hualapai Law Enforcement Drug Related Incidents ………………………………………..          27 
2‐23  Fort Mojave Tribe Drug Related Charges ………………………………………………………..             28 
2‐24  Fort Mojave Drug Arrests by Gender and Age ………………………………………………..            28 
2‐25  Mohave County Jail Drug Related Bookings ……………………………………………………              30 
2‐26  MCSO Drug Related Arrests ……………………………………………………………………………                    31 
2‐27  MCSO Adult Percentage of Drug Arrests …………………………………………………………               31 
2‐28  Mohave County Sheriff Juvenile Percentage of Drug Arrests …………………………..     32 
2‐29  Mohave County Sheriff’s Department DUI Jail Bookings …………………………………         32 
 
Chapter Three 
3‐1  Drug Cases Filed in Mohave County Court System ………………………………………….            39 
3‐2  Guilty Drug Convictions in Mohave County …………………………………………………….              41 
3‐3  Guilty Drug Convictions in Justice Courts ………………………………………………………..           43 
3‐4  Drug Cases per 1000 Residents ……………………………………………………………………….                  44 
3‐5  Mohave County Dependency Statistics …………………………………………………………..                47 
3‐6  Bullhead City Dependency Statistics ……………………………………………………………….               48 
3‐7  Lake Havasu City Dependency Statistics ………………………………………………………….              48 
3‐8  Kingman Dependency Statistics ……………………………………………………………………….                  49 
3‐9  Child Welfare Reports Per 10,000 County Residents ………………………………………..         50 
3‐10  Child Welfare Investigations Per 10,000 County Residents ………………………………         51 
3‐11  Children in Voluntary Out‐of‐Home Placement per 10,000 County Residents ….    52 
3‐12  Mohave County Probationers on Drug Charges ……………………………………………….                54 
3‐13  Mohave County Probation Drug Test Results …………………………………………………..               55 
 
Chapter Four 
4‐1  Treatment Planning Areas within Arizona ……………………………………………………….                 58 
4‐2  Adults Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment …………………………………………………                 97 
4‐3  Juveniles Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment …………………………………………...              98 
4‐4  Adult Smoking Prevalence (with 95% CI) – Mohave & Maricopa County, 
      2000‐2008 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………                             101 
4‐5  Adult Smoking Rates – Mohave & Maricopa County, 1997‐2008 …………………….            102 
4‐6  Percentage of Youth Indicating Smoking Past 30 Days ……………………………………             103 
4‐7  Use Tobacco in Last 30 Days – 2008 Mohave County Arizona Youth Survey …..      103 
4‐8  Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking & Smokeless Tobacco Use ………………………….            105 
 
 
                                ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 
This document is the result of the diligent efforts of volunteers who gave up weekends and evenings to 
find, collect, review and analyze raw data, read reports, create tables and figures, and write the report 
itself.  Many people stepped forward to assist in preparing this document.  MSTEPP is grateful for all 
who shared in this endeavor.   

Our respect and thanks go to Sheriff Tom Sheahan who wrote the forward for this Needs Assessment 
and has supported MSTEPP and its efforts to develop a residential treatment center in Mohave County 
since day one.  He has offered assistance and advice, attended meetings, and strengthened the board of 
directors by appointing a Deputy Sheriff to work with MSTEPP.  The value of Sheriff Sheahan’s help and 
encouragement cannot be overstated.     

Captain Scott Wright of the Kingman Police Department deserves a special note of appreciation, not 
only for providing valuable data and insight on the Law Enforcement chapter, but also for being the 
driving force in the creation of MSTEPP itself.  Captain Wright, along with Kingman Police Chief Robert 
DeVries, was among the first to recognize the need for a county wide substance abuse coalition.  It is 
largely through Captain Wright’s efforts, and Chief DeVries encouragement, that MSTEPP exists today. 

The Law Enforcement chapter assembled raw data from departments throughout Mohave County.  
MSTEPP is indebted to the following individuals who worked closely with us to provide the data we 
requested and helped verify our presentation was correct: Chief Rodney Head and Angie Abbott of 
Bullhead City Police Department, Jill Pellaton and Captain Carl Pederson of Lake Havasu City Police 
Department, Jennifer Sochocki of Kingman Police Department, Chief Francis Bradley of Hualapai Nation 
Police Department, Leslie DeSantis of Mohave County Sheriff’s Office, Karen Shaw of Kingman Unified 
School District and Collette Lewis of Fort Mojave Indian Tribe Behavioral Health.  

A heartfelt thanks goes to Judge John Taylor who provided critical assistance and insight in developing 
the Courts, Child Welfare and Probation chapter, as well as Judge Richard Weiss for his contribution to 
the discussion on child welfare in Mohave County.  MSTEPP is also grateful to the following people who 
provided valuable assistance and content to this chapter:  Susan Hensler, Assistant Program Manager for 
District IV, DES Division of Children, Youth and Families, Lorraine Back and Kyle Rimel of Mohave County 
Superior Court, Jon Potts of Arizona Department of Economic Security, Bridget Long from Mohave 
County Probation, and Nancy McBride from Mohave County’s Court Appointed Special Advocates 
program. 

The chapter on Treatment Services and Substance Abuse Surveys was substantially improved with the 
help of Ron French of Mohave Mental Health Clinics, Lauren Lauder of NARBHA, Susan Williams of 
Mohave County Tobacco Use Prevention Program, and Dr. Cathie Alderks, SAMHSA’s N‐SSATS Specialist.  
Their contributions to this chapter were exceptional.  A number of people have our deepest 
appreciation for assisting with and providing valuable data for this comprehensive chapter.  They 
include: Tom Baughman of TASC, Jamie Taylor and Erma Lorion of Kingman Regional Medical Center 
(KRMC), Lance Ross of Valley View Medical Center, Susan Chamberlain of Lake Havasu City Medical 

                                                     i 
 
Center, Collette Lewis of Fort Mojave Indian Tribe Behavioral Health, Kim Mitchell of Westcare Arizona, 
Shana Malone of the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, and Tammany McDaniel of Arizona Youth 
Partnership. 

Within MSTEPP, people who made special efforts in organizing and leading the effort to prepare this 
document include Jon Longoria, Annie Meredith and Laura Jackson.  Mohave Community College faculty 
member Lori Howell had the great idea of getting MCC’s chemical dependency interns, Debbie Jennings 
and Joshua Wyatt, involved with the report as part of their internship.  The remaining MSTEPP board of 
directors provided the valuable role of conducting the final review of the document. 

 

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                   ii 
 
           MSTEPP Thanks Our Sponsors & Supporters! 
                                                  
                  MSTEPP NEEDS ASSESSMENT SPONSORS 
                                        Mr. Robert Phelps 

                                 Kingman Regional Medical Center 

                                                  

                MSTEPP NEEDS ASSESSMENT SUPPORTERS 
Lake Havasu City Medical Center       Dr. Barbara Dorf, D.C.        Westcare Arizona 

H & H Printers, Inc.                  Aaction Automotive            Jackson Digital Imaging Corp. 

Carpenters Local 897                  Mohave State Bank 

                                                  

                        MSTEPP 2010 BOARD OF DIRECTORS  
                                    Jon Longoria, Chairperson 

                                         Debby Jennings 

                                           Lori Howell 

                                         Annie Meredith 

                                           Diane Pelzer 

                                         John Slaughter 

                                          Larry Tunforss 

                                          Laurie DeVries 

                                         Melissa Temple 

                                           Kelli Truver 


                                                iii 
 
      

      

      




    iv 
 
                                                FORWARD 
 

One of the biggest challenges a parent faces today is preventing their children from beginning a life of 
substance abuse.  We all know, either directly or indirectly, someone who is facing these challenges.   

Substance abuse destroys not only the lives of the abusers, but also the lives of family members, with 
little hope of treatment or rehabilitation unless you are living in or near a metropolitan area where help 
is available. 

Substance  abuse  is  generational.    Over  the  years  I  have  observed  that  parents  who  were  involved  in 
substance abuse in the 1980’s were also, many times, involved in acts of domestic violence.  These acts 
occurred in the presence of their children.  With little to no availability of treatment in Mohave County, 
this  trait  has  been  passed  on  to  their  children.    Now,  in  2010,  those  who  grew  up  with  parents  as 
substance  abusers  are  substance  abusers  themselves.    Almost  weekly  I  recognize  the  names  of  the 
young arrestees who are the children of those we in law enforcement arrested in the 1980’s.  There will 
be  no  end  to  this  cycle  of  tragedy  unless  residential  substance  abuse  treatment  becomes  readily 
available in Mohave County.   

Many hardworking individuals are trying their best to bring the badly needed services to our county to 
break  this  cycle.    Unless  we  move  forward  and  finally  obtain  a  residential  treatment  facility  that  will 
handle the substance abuse problem in Mohave County, the problem will most certainly get worse.  This 
is not a problem that will disappear if ignored.  In fact, the problem has been ignored too long.  It is time 
for all of us to do what is necessary in all of our communities to make a much needed substance abuse 
treatment facility a reality. 

Within this document are the facts that tell the story. 

 

Tom Sheahan 
Sheriff 
Mohave County, Arizona 
16 November 2010 

                                                            




                                                           v 
 
                                   Executive Summary 
This document evaluates the severity of substance abuse in Mohave County and assesses the chemical 
dependency treatment resources available to those people who must rely on publicly funded services.  
An objective review of statistics, empirical data, SAMHSA surveys and relevant reports indicates Mohave 
County has a need for additional treatment resources; specifically, residential treatment services and 
detoxification services.  Mohave County is the largest county in Arizona in both size and population 
which does not offer any type of publicly funded residential treatment or detoxification/stabilization 
services within the county limits.   

Substance abuse indicators suggest Mohave County has one of the worst substance abuse problems in 
the state, particularly with respect to methamphetamines.  The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission 
reports Mohave County had more methamphetamine related arrests than any other Arizona County 
from 2006 to 2008.  Arrest records from local law enforcement agencies indicate marijuana and 
methamphetamine are the two drugs most often associated with drug related arrests.  The number of 
children in the child welfare system has increased steadily for four years with methamphetamine being 
the predominate drug associated with dependency cases.  From 2006 through 2008, Mohave County 
had the highest percentage of alcohol related crashes in the state.  These indicators, and many others 
reviewed in this report, imply there is a substantial chemical dependency problem in Mohave County.  
Furthermore, in light of Mohave County having the largest population in northern Arizona on AHCCCS 
(Arizona’s Medicare program), it is clear that the need for timely, comprehensive, publicly funded 
treatment services is substantial. 

The current availability of residential and detoxification services in Mohave County is inadequate.  Using 
the state average utilization rate for residential treatment, at least 137 Mohave County residents are 
estimated to have needed publicly funded residential treatment in 2008.  Due, in large part, to the lack 
of availability of residential beds, approximately 60 people actually received residential treatment.  This 
disparity, which is a conservative estimate, is unacceptable.  Moreover, evidence‐based treatment 
practices require family involvement in the recovery process.  Due to the large geographic size of the 
county and the lower economic status of the clientele, a residential treatment program needs to be 
within the county to realistically expect family participation.  The wait time of up to two weeks for 
Mohave County residents to enter a residential facility is also unacceptable.  A local facility would create 
an environment where local clients could have timely access to a residential bed.  Furthermore, with the 
current residential facility roughly 200 miles away from their home, many people in need of residential 
treatment are hesitant, or simply refuse, to enter into a facility due to the great distance from home.  A 
facility within familiar territory, close to family and friends, would relieve people from the anxiety of 
travelling great distances to receive the treatment they need. 

Prior to entering residential treatment, all clients must first undergo detoxification.  Just as residential 
treatment services need to be developed within Mohave County, so do detoxification services.  These 
treatment interventions operate in tandem and are essential to a comprehensive treatment program.     

                                                                                                                 
1.0  INTRODUCTION 

Mohave County residents recognize the detrimental consequences of alcohol and drug abuse 
throughout their communities.  The impact of substance abuse is seen within the family, the workplace, 
and the neighborhood.  Many believe substance abuse is worse in Mohave County than in other areas of 
the state.  They believe drugs are readily available for those who seek them and that getting high or 
drunk is more socially acceptable here than elsewhere.  Furthermore, they believe the lack of a local 
residential treatment center, particularly for those who can’t afford a private treatment facility, results 
in addicts not getting the treatment they need to become sober.  To date, these beliefs have never been 
empirically tested.  Is the problem worse here?  How does Mohave County rank against other Arizona 
counties in the severity of our substance abuse problem and our available treatment options?  Would a 
residential treatment center be viable in Mohave County?  For the health of our families, our neighbors 
and our work force, it is time to answer these questions.  

The purpose of this report was to:  1) define the scope and severity of the county’s substance abuse 
problem using statistical data from local, state‐wide, and federal sources, 2) assess the county’s 
treatment resources, and 3) use this data to identify treatment objectives based on true need.  The 
primary focus of this report is substance abuse and treatment resources for the adult population.  
However, youth are considered throughout the report and addressed alongside the statistics for adults.  
Likewise, data on the tribes is considered throughout the report along with the other county data. 

1.1     Mohave County Characteristics and Demographics 
At 13,479 square miles, Mohave County is geographically larger than nine U.S. states and is the fifth 
largest county in the contiguous United States.  It has three incorporated cities:  Kingman, Bullhead City 
and Lake Havasu City.  The majority of the county’s population resides in or near these cities, but lesser 
populations exist throughout Mohave County in unincorporated towns and outlaying areas (Table 1‐1). 
Three tribes reside within Mohave County: the Hualapai, Fort Mohave and Kaibab‐Pauite Tribes.  Vast 
areas of sparsely populated desert accurately describe most of the county.  Several of the smaller desert 
communities have reputations of heavy substance abuse within their population.  Providing substance 
abuse education and locally convenient treatment services to these remote locations is challenging and 
results in many of Mohave County’s rural populations being underserved in this capacity. 

Table 1‐1:  2008 Projected Populations in Mohave County (Arizona Commerce Projections) 

    Arizona                                            6,500,194 
    Mohave County                                      208,372 
    Lake Havasu City                                   55,263 
    Bullhead City                                      41,000 
    Kingman                                            28,635 
 


                                                    [2] 

 
In the northeast, the Grand Canyon cuts through Mohave County.  This feature creates a physical barrier 
through the land which effectively separates the (Colorado Strip) communities north of the canyon, such 
as Colorado City and the Kaibab‐Pauite Tribe, from the rest of the county’s population.  Due to the 
isolated nature of the Colorado Strip and the relatively small population of this region compared to the 
rest of Mohave County, the treatment resources used in this area are different than the rest of Mohave 
County.  Consequently, their concerns regarding treatment resources are fundamentally different than 
the rest of the county.  Albeit important, these concerns will not be addressed in this Needs Assessment. 

Within Arizona, Mohave County competes with Yuma County as the fifth largest population in the state.  
Arizona Commerce projections estimate Mohave County surpassing Yuma County in population in 2007.  
Table 1‐2 presents the population projections from 2006 through 2009.  These are the population 
figures used throughout this report when determining per capita figures and presenting data in terms of 
the percentage of population. 

Table 1‐2:  Arizona Commerce Population Projections (Arizona Commerce Authority) 


             Arizona Commerce Population Projections 
                                  2006           2007           2008           2009         % Change
    Greenlee County              8,281          8,259          8,238          8,220          -0.74%
    La Paz County                21,489         21,779         22,062         22,347          3.99%
    Graham County                35,873         36,271         36,666         37,054          3.29%
    Santa Cruz County            45,303         46,545         47,777         48,998          8.16%
    Gila County                  55,102         55,769         56,427         57,092          3.61%
    Apache County                74,691         75,597         76,486         77,361          3.57%
    Navajo County               112,672        115,331        117,971         120,591          7.03%
    Coconino County             132,826        135,070        137,261        139,388           4.94%
    Conchise County             134,789        137,708        140,560        143,346           6.35%
    Mohave County               194,920        201,693        208,372        214,949          10.28%
    Yuma County                 195,499        201,435        207,305        213,086           9.00%
    Yavapai County              212,722        220,170        227,468        234,626          10.30%
    Pinal County                269,892        293,312        316,899        340,660          26.22%
    Pima County                 980,977       1,003,918      1,026,506      1,048,796          6.91%
    Maricopa County            3,764,446      3,879,150      3,992,887      4,105,623          9.06%
    TOTAL                      6,239,482      6,432,007      6,622,885      6,812,137          9.18%
 

Eighty percent of Mohave County residents consider themselves white persons of non Hispanic origin.  
Those of Hispanic origin constitute 14.1% of the population.  Native Americans are 2.6%, African 
Americans are 1.5% and Asian Americans are 1.2% of the population (Table 1‐3). 

 


                                                   [3] 

 
Table 1‐3:  Ethnic Break Down, 2009 (U.S. Census Bureau) 

      White                                           80% 
      Hispanic                                        14.1% 
      Native American                                 2.6% 
      African American                                1.5% 
      Asian American                                  1.2% 
      Other                                           0.6% 
 

In 2009, persons under 18 years of age consisted of 21.8% of the population.  Persons 65 years and older 
were 22.4% of the population.  High school graduates were 77.5% of the population and those persons 
having a bachelor’s degree or higher were 9.9% of the population. 

Mohave County ranks fifth lowest in the state in Median Household Income.  All counties ranking lower 
than Mohave County have significantly smaller populations.  Mohave County was one of four Arizona 
counties to suffer a drop in Median Household Income between 2007 and 2008. 

Table 1‐4:  Arizona Median Household Income by County (U.S. Census Bureau) 


                    Arizona Median Household Income by County 
                              2005              2006             2007            2008         % Change
    Apache County            $26,308           $27,600          $29,976         $31,728        20.60%
    La Paz County            $29,015           $29,534          $29,912         $32,973        13.64%
    Santa Cruz County        $33,491           $34,620          $35,661         $38,490        14.93%
    Gila County              $33,862           $35,716          $34,761         $38,405         13.42%
    Mohave County            $35,320           $36,320          $39,669         $38,641         9.40%
    Yuma County              $35,739           $37,154          $39,781         $39,063         9.30%
    Navajo County            $31,532           $35,824          $38,871         $39,416         25.00%
    Graham County            $33,558           $34,618          $38,798         $40,902         21.88%
    Yavapai County           $40,382           $40,923          $44,268         $42,311         4.78%
    Conchise County          $36,296           $38,825          $42,995         $44,000         21.23%
    Pima County              $41,484           $43,002          $43,721         $46,653         12.46%
    Coconino County          $41,446           $43,683          $48,549         $47,933         15.65%
    Pinal County             $41,177           $43,627          $49,906         $50,208         21.93%
    Greenlee County          $43,338           $46,728          $50,195         $53,654         23.80%
    Maricopa County          $48,752           $52,522          $54,733         $56,511         15.92%
    State Average            $44,402           $47,315          $49,923         $51,009         14.88%
 

Mohave County is one of six Arizona counties which had an increase in level of poverty since 2005 (Table 
1‐5).  Its 2008 poverty level was 16.8%, which is the seventh highest level of poverty in the state.  With 
the exception of Greenlee County, poverty appears to be less prevalent in the counties which have large 
                                                   [4] 

 
urban populations.  The Federal Poverty Thresholds for 2008 which were used to determine the 
percentage of people in poverty considered one person to be in poverty if their annual earnings was 
under $10,991;  two persons (in a family unit) were considered to be at poverty level if their combined 
annual income was under $14,051. 

Table 1‐5:  Arizona Persons Below Poverty Level by County (U.S. Census Bureau) 


                               Arizona In Poverty by County 
                                         2005       2006        2007       2008        % Change
    Apache County                       41.7%       34.5%      33.4%      33.2%         -20.38%
    La Paz County                       21.6%       21.0%      23.8%      26.1%          20.83%
    Navajo County                       28.8%       24.4%      23.4%      23.1%         -19.79%
    Yuma County                         19.1%       19.0%      17.8%      21.5%          12.57%
    Graham County                       23.7%       23.4%      22.4%      21.4%          -9.70%
    Santa Cruz County                   20.4%       21.8%      20.1%      18.5%          -9.31%
    Mohave County                       15.6%       16.0%      13.5%      16.8%           7.69%
    Gila County                         19.9%       20.0%      18.2%      16.1%         -19.10%
    Coconino County                     18.0%       16.8%      16.2%      16.0%         -11.11%
    Conchise County                     16.9%       18.0%      16.3%      16.0%          -5.33%
    Pinal County                        15.7%       15.2%      12.5%      14.0%         -10.83%
    Pima County                         14.9%       15.3%      14.9%      15.4%          3.36%
    Maricopa County                     12.6%       12.5%      12.9%      13.4%          6.35%
    Yavapai County                      12.8%       12.4%      12.6%      12.9%           0.78%
    Greenlee County                     12.8%       10.9%      11.2%      11.3%         -11.72%
    TOTAL                               14.4%       14.2%      14.1%      14.7%          2.08%
 

In light of the population figures and the county‐level economic data, it is not surprising to find that 
Mohave County has the largest number of people enrolled in AHCCCS in northern Arizona (Table 1‐6).  
AHCCCS is Arizona’s Medicaid program.  In 2009, twenty‐two percent of Mohave County’s population 
was enrolled in AHCCCS.  Similar to every county in Arizona, AHCCCS enrollment in Mohave County 
increased between 2008 and 2009. A monthly breakdown of AHCCCS enrollment by county is provided 
in Appendix A. 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                   [5] 

 
      Table 1‐6:  AHCCCS Enrollment by County (Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System) 



                                        AHCCCS ENROLLMENT BY COUNTY 
               2006 Average Monthly                  2007 Average                2008 Average               2009 Average 
                    Enrollment                     Monthly Enrollment          Monthly Enrollment         Monthly Enrollment 
                                    Percent of                   Percent of                 Percent of                 Percent of 
     County      Number                            Number                      Number                     Number 
                                    Population                   Population                 Population                 Population
APACHE            31,648               42%          30,867          41%         30,656         40%         32,354         42% 
NAVAHO                 36,251          32%          35,920          31%         37,026         31%         40,765         34% 
SANTA 
CRUZ                   14,029          31%          13,643          29%         13,888         29%         15,406         31% 
GILA                   13,659          25%          13,280          24%         13,674         24%         14,950         26% 
GRAHAM                 8,455           24%          7,818           22%          7,811         21%          8,929         24% 
YUMA                   45,250          23%          46,104          23%         46,903         23%         50,224         24% 
MOHAVE                 37,950          19%          38,081          19%         41,311         20%         46,399         22% 
LA PAZ                    4,470        21%          4,527           21%          4,565         21%          4,802         21% 
COCONINO          27,105               20%          25,795          19%         26,512         19%         29,455         21% 
COCHISE                25,871          19%          24,668          18%         25,091         18%         26,664         19% 
PIMA                168,700            17%         170,045          17%        179,453         17%        197,508         19% 
MARICOPA       567,775                 15%         572,418          15%        611,579         15%        706,585         17% 
GREENLEE                  1,385        17%          1,061           13%          965           12%          1,283         16% 
YAVAPAI                30,125          14%          30,117          14%         31,740         14%         36,781         16% 
PINAL                  37,202          14%          39,481          13%         42,005         13%         48,254         14% 
ARIZONA           1,049,874            17%          1,053,824       16%        1,113,178       17%        1,260,359       19% 
       

      1.2      Closing Remarks on Characteristics and Demographics of Mohave County 
      It is important to consider the characteristics and demographics of Mohave County when assessing the 
      scope of the county’s substance abuse problem and its treatment resources.   Although low income 
      levels aren’t necessarily associated with higher levels of substance abuse, a lack of education/prevention 
      programs and resources in outlaying areas results in populations less informed of the dangers of 
      substance abuse than populations in the cities.  Low income families also frequently have limited 
      accessibility and affordability for psychological and family support services.  In addition, travel to the 
      cities where treatment services are available may be prohibitively expensive, or otherwise impractical, 
      for low income families living in rural areas.  In fact, many people in Mohave County rarely leave the 
      county, or even their local area, due to the driving distances and the costs associated with travel.  

       



                                                                    [6] 

       
2.0  LAW ENFORCEMENT 
 

An examination of law enforcement statistics provides useful information about how much criminal 
activity is associated with substance abuse as well as providing an indicator of the drugs types being 
used in the community.  When statistical data is considered within an agency, an increase/decrease in 
drug arrests or drug related incidents or calls is commonly considered an indicator of an 
increase/decrease in illegal drug use within a community.  Local law enforcement agencies in Mohave 
County that provided data for this report include:   

Bullhead City Police Department,  

Lake Havasu City Police Department,  

Kingman Police Department,  

M.A.G.N.E.T.  (Mohave Area General Narcotics Enforcement Team)  

Hualapai Nation Police Department,  

Fort Mojave Police Department,  

Mohave County Sheriff’s Office.   

These agencies provided three or more years of historical data through 2009.  Each agency or 
department collects arrest and charge data according to inner‐department methodology, therefore the 
data from each source should be considered stand alone and should not be compared against each 
other.     

Arrest data compiled as part of the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program was also provided by 
Bullhead, Lake Havasu and Kingman Police Departments.  The UCR Program is a voluntary nationwide 
program which collects data from local city, county, and state law enforcement agencies to serve as a 
national clearinghouse for statistical information on crime.  Federal agencies and tribal police agencies 
do not report to the UCR program.  This program classifies each arrest by the charge which is considered 
most serious per UCR guidelines (some exceptions exist but are not relevant for this report).  
Consequently, if a person was arrested for a drug related offense in addition to a more serious charge 
(such as murder, rape, assault, burglary, arson, etc.), the drug related offense would not be the primary 
reason for arrest and therefore this charge would not be included in the UCR data.  For this reason, UCR 
data should be considered incomplete.  The UCR Program defines “Drug‐Related Arrests” as an arrest 
due to the sale, manufacturing or possession of illegal drugs.  




                                                   [7] 

 
It should be kept in mind that variations in the number of arrests and/or charges may be influenced by 
factors unrelated to the volume of crime actually occurring.  Many factors affect the volume and type of 
crime occurring from place to place, among which are: 

Population density and degree of urbanization. 

Number of officers on the street.   

Crime reporting practices of the citizenry. 

Citizens’ attitudes toward crime. 

Economic conditions, including median income, poverty level, and job availability. 

Stability of population with respect to residents’ mobility, commuting patterns, and transient factors. 

Administrative and investigative emphases of the law enforcement agency. 

 

A very important factor which may directly impact the number of arrests in a given year is an increase or 
decrease in funding within a law enforcement agency.  Cuts in funding may result in cuts in manpower 
and consequently a reduction in arrests. 

These community specific influences should be considered along with an understanding that the total 
number of arrests does not represent the total number of people being arrested since the same person 
may be arrested more than once in any given year.  Likewise, multiple charges are commonly applied to 
a single person so charge data is an inappropriate indicator of the number of people being charged with 
a crime.  Valid conclusions based on the data presented herein are possible only with careful study and 
analysis of the range of unique conditions affecting each local law enforcement jurisdiction. 

In addition to local law enforcement statistics, MSTEPP reviewed the Crime in Arizona Reports and 
Arizona Motor Vehicle Crash Facts Reports back through 2006.  The relevant data from these reports is 
presented here.  

 

2.1     Bullhead City Police Department 
Bullhead City Police Department provided enhanced UCR data for 2004 through 2009 (Appendix B).  The 
data was enhanced by including not only arrests in which the primary charge was drug related, but also 
arrests where any drug related offense was charged.  Therefore, the Bullhead City Police Department 
data presented here is a complete listing of all drug related arrests.  Table 2‐1 and Figure 2‐1 present 
this data.   

 

                                                    [8] 

 
Table 2‐1:  Bullhead City Police Arrests 

                                  Bullhead City Police Arrests 
                                                  Total 
                              Drug‐Related 
                      Year                       Criminal      % Drug Arrests 
                                 Arrests 
                                                 Arrests 
                      2004         737             3398               22% 
                      2005         778             3546               22% 
                      2006         715             3735               19% 
                      2007         520             3213               16% 
                      2008         459             2768               17% 
                      2009         398             2674               15% 
 

Drug‐related arrests compared to total criminal arrests ranged from 22% to 15% over the five year span.   
A decreasing trend in the percentage of drug‐related arrests began in 2006 with 2009 being a six year 
low. 

Figure 2‐1:  Bullhead City Drug Arrests as a Percentage of Total Criminal Arrests 




                                                                                               

                                                      

A comparison of  drug‐related arrests according to the type of illegal drug involved indicates marijuana 
related arrests were more freqent than all other drugs, except for the year 2005 which had 
methamphetamine as the drug most often involved in drug‐related arrests.  

 

                                                   [9] 

 
Table 2‐2:  Bullhead City Drug Arrests by Drug Type 

                                  Drug Arrests by Drug Type 
                        Year        Meth            Marijuana           Other 
                        2004       43.00%            50.00%            7.00% 
                        2005       48.00%            46.00%            6.00% 
                        2006       37.90%            52.60%            9.50% 
                        2007       20.00%            69.00%            11.00% 
                        2008       37.00%            57.00%            6.00% 
                        2009       33.00%            60.00%            7.00% 
                                                      

Figure 2‐2 suggests marijuana and methamphetamine have remained the illegal drugs of choice over the 
past five years in Bullhead City. 

 

 

Figure 2‐2:  Bullhead City Percentage of Drug Arrests by Catagory 




                                                                                                          

 

DUI arrests for the past six years have remained fairly steady in Bullhead City with an 18% variation 
across this time span and showing no decisive trends. 

                                                   [10] 

 
Figure 2‐3:  Bullhead City Police Department DUI Arrests 




                                                                                             

 

2.2     Lake Havasu City Police Department 
Lake Havasu City Police Department (LHCPD) provided UCR drug‐related arrest data and all records of 
drug related charges for 2004 through 2009 (Appendix C).  The UCR data strictly follows the UCR 
guidelines and therefore only includes arrests where the drug‐related offense was the primary charge. 

Table 2‐3:  UCR Drug Related Arrests ‐ Lake Havasu City Police Dept. 


                        UCR Drug Related Arrests ‐ Lake Havasu City P.D. 

                                                                 Drug‐Related 
                     Year      Juvenile          Adult 
                                                                    Arrests 
                    2004          63              322                   385  
                    2005          55              266                   321  
                    2006          68              300                   368  
                    2007          75              360                   435  
                    2008          34              277                   311  
                    2009          61              227                   288  
 

Figure 2‐4 shows that UCR juvenile arrests have been variable since 2004, with a low in 2008 which 
rebounded in 2009. 


                                                  [11] 

 
Figure 2‐4:  Lake Havasu City UCR Drug Related Juvenile Arrests 




                                                                                               

 

Figure 2‐5 shows UCR adult arrest data fluctuating over the past six years with arrests declining over the 
past two years. 

Figure 2‐5:  Lake Havasu City UCR Drug Related Adult Arrests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                   [12] 

 
LHCPD provided arrest data by drug type for 2004 through 2008.  A comparison of  drug‐related arrests 
according to the type of illegal drug involved indicates there is normally two to three times the number 
of marijuana related arrests compared to synthetics/meth related arrests.  Likewise, synthetics/meth 
arrests are two to four times more freqent than arrests due to all remaining illegals drugs.   

Table 2‐4:  Lake Havasu City UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type 

                               UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type 
                                 Synthetics i.e. 
                      Year           Meth               Marijuana        Other 
                      2004          28.00%                  65.00%       7.00% 
                      2005          31.00%                  58.00%      11.00% 
                      2006          24.00%                  68.00%       8.00% 
                      2007          27.00%                  62.00%      11.00% 
                      2008          32.00%                  57.00%      11.00% 
 

The following graph illustrates the disparity between marijuana related arrests, synthetics/meth related 
arrests and all other drug related arrests. 

Figure 2‐6:  Lake Havasu City Percentage of UCR Drug Arrests by Drug 




                                                                                                        
                                                    [13] 

 
In a review of records of drug related charges by the LHCPD, adult and juvenile trends are different than 
the UCR data trends.  Table 2‐5 lists all drug related charges associated with arrests for the years 2004‐
2009.  Multiple charges may be applied in a single arrest.  These statistics are more comprehensive than 
the UCR arrest data so provide a better picture of drug related crime occurring in Lake Havasu City.  

Table 2‐5:  Lake Havasu P.D. Drug Charges 

                           Lake Havasu P.D. Drug Arrest Charges 
                          Year         Adult           Juvenile           Total 
                          2004          755              107               862 
                          2005          674               88               762 
                          2006          685              119               804 
                          2007          782              127               909 
                          2008          544               62               606 
                          2009          464              106               570 
 

Figures 2‐7 and 2‐8 graphically illustrate the data in Table 2‐5.  For juveniles, the trend mirrors the UCR 
data quite well.  There were 106 charges in 2009 which is midrange for juvenile charges over the past six 
years.   

 

Figure 2‐7:  Lake Havasu P.D. Juvenile Drug Related Charges 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



                                                   [14] 

 
For adults, there is a steady reduction in drug related charges since 2007 with 2009 having the lowest 
number of adult drug related charges in the six year historical record.  As with juveniles, the trend for 
charge data mirrors the trend for UCR data. 

Figure 2‐8:  Lake Havasu P.D. Adult Drug Related Charges 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A bar graph of DUI charges in Lake Havasu City show DUIs peaking in 2006, declining for two years and 
bumping up again in 2009.   

Figure 2‐9:  Lake Havasu City P.D. DUI Charges 




                                                                                                   

                                                    [15] 

 
Table 2‐6 shows the breakdown of DUI charges according to charges applied to adults and juveniles.  It 
should be kept in mind these are total charges and not the total arrests.   

Table 2‐6:  Lake Havasu City PD DUI Charges 

                                  LHCPD DUI Arrests (Charges) 
                          Year       Total DUI Charges      Adult     Juvenile 
                          2004              410              407          3 
                          2005              505              503          2 
                          2006              729              720          9 
                          2007              533              523         10 
                          2008              473              468          5 
                          2009              505              496          9 
 

2.3     Kingman Police Department 
Kingman Police Department (KPD) publishes an Annual Report each year which is posted on‐line 
(www.kingmanpolice.com) and provides statistics on law enforcement activities.  Reports from 2005 
through 2009 were reviewed for this document and relevant drug related data include Calls for Service, 
School Resource Officer arrests, and Flex Squad activity.  Mohave Area General Narcotics Enforcement 
Team (MAGNET) statistics are also presented in KPD’s Annual Report since KPD is the “lead agency” for 
MAGNET.   

Table 2‐7 lists for the years 2002 through 2009 KPD’s Calls for Service related to Drugs, DUIs, Domestic 
Violence and Burglary.  A call for service is a call which an officer or KPD employee responds to. 

Table 2‐7:  Kingman Police Department Calls For Service 

 
                                             CALLS FOR SERVICE 
 
                                                                    Domestic 
                      Year        Drugs            DUIs             Violence       Burglary 
                      2002         313             100                1000           753 
                      2003         305              61                1009           737 
                      2004         399              86                1143           555 
 
                      2005         405             116                1259           810 
                      2006         390              68                1231           879 
                      2007         306             144                1053           750 
                      2008         287             148                940            529 
                      2009         289             125                946            695 
  

                                                   [16] 

 
A bar graph of all Drug Related Calls depicts a bell curve that peaked in 2005 (Figure 2‐10).  The last two 
years, 2008 and 2009, had the lowest number of Drug Related Calls for Service in this time frame. 

Figure 2‐10:  Kingman Police Department Drug Related Calls for Service 




                                                                                                        

Figure 2‐11 charts the Calls for Service in a line graph.  A review of this chart shows a rough 
correspondence between the number of Drug Related Calls for Service and the number of Domestic 
Violence and Burglary Calls for Service.  A distinct hump is observed between 2003 and 2008 for all three 
of these call types.  This suggests a direct relationship between the amount of substance abuse, burglary 
and domestic violence.  DUI Calls for Service are also plotted in this graph. 

Figure 2‐11:  Kingman Police Department Calls for Service 

 

 

 

 

 

     

     

     

 


                                                    [17] 

 
School Resource Officers (SRO’s) handle calls at the nine (9) local Kingman school campuses.  The past 
five years of drug related arrests by SRO’s are listed in Table 2‐8 and plotted in Figure 2‐12. 

Table 2‐8:  Kingman School Resource Officer Activity 


                              Kingman SRO Drug Related Arrests 
                                                       Drug Related Arrests as 
                                    Drug Related        a Percentage of Total 
                           Year       Arrests                  Arrests 
                           2005          18                    18.37% 
                           2006          21                    20.79% 
                           2007          19                    14.50% 
                           2008          13                    12.87% 
                           2009          38                    39.58% 
 

According to KPD’s annual report, the striking increase in drug related arrests in 2009 is largely 
attributed to a dramatic increase in prescription drug abuse in the schools and the involvement of 
multiple students in association with these investigations.  The school district superintendent has 
publically recognized that prescription drug abuse became a significant problem in 2009 and continued 
in 2010. 

 

Figure 2‐12:  Kingman SRO Drug Related Arrests 




                                                                                                              

The KPD Flex Team was created to combat street level narcotics and other issues affecting quality of life 
in the City of Kingman.  The data provided in Table 2‐9 and plotted in Figure 2‐13 show that drug arrests 
were between 42% and 67% of total arrests made by the Flex Team in the last four years.   

                                                    [18] 

 
Table 2‐9:  Kingman Flex Squad Drug Arrests 

 
                                FLEX SQUAD DRUG ARRESTS 
                                                                  % Drug/Total 
                    Year     Drug Arrests        Total Arrests      Arrests 
                    2006         192                 289             66.44 
                    2007          55                 130             42.31 
 
                    2008          50                  96             52.08 
                    2009         107                 208             51.44 

 

Figure 2‐13:  Kingman Police Department % Drug Arrests/Total Arrests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Flex Team has seized marijuana and methamphetamine annually since 2006.  Table 2‐10 lists the 
quantities of marijuana and methamphetamine seized.  The amount of marijuana seized in the past two 
years increased significantly from previous years.  More methamphetamine was seized by the Flex Team 
in 2009 than any other year reviewed. 

Table 2‐10:  Kingman Flex Squad Drug Seizures 

                                FLEX SQUAD DRUG SEIZURES 
                                 Marijuana            Methamphetamine 
                        Year     Seized (lbs)            Seized (lbs) 
                        2006          1                       2 
                        2007         0.5                      1 
                        2008         11                      0.5 
                        2009         18                      2.5 
 


                                                  [19] 

 
Figure 2‐14:  Kingman Flex Squad Drug Seizures 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2‐11 and Figure 2‐15 provide KPD’s UCR drug arrest data for 2005 through 2009. 

Table 2‐11:  KPD UCR Drug Arrests 

                                         UCR Drug Arrests 
                         Year          Adult            Juvenile            Total 

                        2005            152                 26               178 
                        2006            151                 21               172 
                        2007            106                 22               128 
                        2008            115                 33               148 
                        2009            91                  26               117 
 

The number of adult UCR drug arrests have declined since 2005 to a five year low in 2009.  Juvenile UCR 
drug arrests have remained fairly level for the past five years.  It is interesting to note the UCR juvenile 
data does not look anything like the SRO data, which shows a sharp increase in drug related arrests for 
2009. 

                                                    [20] 

 
Figure 2‐15:  KPD UCR Drug Arrests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An analysis of the drug arrests by gender (Figure 2‐16) generally reflect the drug arrest data (Figure 2‐
15), with highs and lows for both males and females increasing and decreasing in kind.  The UCR data for 
2005 – 2009 is similar to the calls for service data with highs in 2005 and 2006 followed by lower 
numbers in 2007 through 2009. 

Figure 2‐16:  KPD UCR Drug Arrests by Gender 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When arrests are classified according to drug type, marijuana related arrests are most common followed 
by methamphetamine related arrests.  The UCR data by drug type is modified from the data submitted 
to the state and FBI by the KPD.  KPD originally submitted their statistics with methamphetamine arrests 
                                                  [21] 

 
classified under “Other Dangerous Nonnarcotics”.  Other law enforcement agencies submitted 
methamphetamine arrests under the “Synthetic Narcotics” classification.  The KPD statistics have been 
adjusted in this report so methamphetamine arrests are classified as “Synthetic Narcotics”. 

Table 2‐12:  KPD UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type (Adult & Juvenile) 

                                 UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type  
                                      (Adult & Juvenile) 
                                    Synthetics i.e. 
                         Year                                  Marijuana    Other 
                                        Meth 
                         2005            81                        93         4 
                         2006            68                       100         4 
                         2007            44                        75         9 
                         2008            44                        89        15 
                         2009            40                        68         9 
 

If we look at the percentage of arrests according to drug type (Figure 2‐17), we see that marijuana has 
been the drug most often related to arrests throughout the past five years, consistently constituting 
58% to 60% of arrests in recent years.  Synthetic drugs, which includes methamphetamine, is secondary.  
The percentage of synthetic drug‐related arrests had been decreasing since 2005, but an increasing 
percentage was observed in 2009 despite the total number of arrests being lower.  Arrests associated 
with other drugs have increased in recent years.  Although these arrest figures are at 10% or under, 
there exists a concern in Kingman law enforcement that heroin related criminal activity is on the rise. 

Figure 2‐17:  Percentage UCR Drug Arrests by Drug Type (Adult & Juvenile)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


                                                       [22] 

 
Kingman DUI Calls for Service shows no discernable trends over the past six years, although the last two 
years, 2008 and 2009, had the highest number DUI Calls for Service within this time frame. 

Figure 2‐18:  Kingman P.D. DUI Calls for Service 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.4     MAGNET 
MAGNET (Mohave Area General Narcotics Enforcement Team) is a specialized team of narcotics 
enforcement officers who conduct drug searches, seizures and arrests in the Mohave County area.  In 
addition to inner county activities, MAGNET also collaborates with outside law enforcement agencies 
investigating interstate and international drug trafficking operations.  MAGNET is composed of seven 
agencies:   Kingman Police Department, Bullhead City Police Department, Lake Havasu City Police 
Department, Mohave County Sheriff’s Office, Arizona Department of Public Safety, U.S. Department of 
Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Mohave County Attorney’s Office.  Their mission is to 
facilitate federal, state and local multi‐agency partnerships to substantially reduce drug related crime 
and violence.  

MAGNET’s arrest statistics presented in Table 2‐13 and Figure 2‐19 are for the fiscal years (July 31 – June 
30) from 2005 through 2009.  These figures were obtained from Arizona Criminal Justice Commission’s 
Enhanced Drug and Gang Enforcement (EDGE) Report.  MAGNET Drug Related Arrests have increased 
each year since FY2007.  FY2009 had the highest number of arrests since 2005.   

 

 
                                                    [23] 

 
Table 2‐13:  MAGNET Drug Related Arrests 

                                    MAGNET Drug Arrests 
                                 Year          Drug Related Arrests 
                                FY2005                 425 
                                FY2006                 415 
                                FY2007                 357 
                                FY2008                 399 
                                FY2009                 445 
 

Figure 2‐19:  MAGNET Drug Related Arrests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2‐14 shows MAGNET’s drug seizures from FY2005 through FY2009. The quantity of 
methamphetamine seized in FY2009 was nearly double the amount seized in FY2008 and the highest 
quantity since FY2005 (Figure 2‐20).  When evaluating methamphetamine seizures in Mohave County, it 
should be kept in mind that most methamphetamine seized by MAGNET is a result of highway 
interdictions.  The large quantity of methamphetamine seized in FY2009 is contributed to one such 
interdiction; in this case the drug was being transported to Hawaii. 

For heroin and cocaine, FY2009 was a five year low in quantities seized.  Marijuana seizures dropped 
significantly in FY2009, however it remained above the FY2005 and FY2006 levels.  

 

 

 
                                                  [24] 

 
Table 2‐14:  MAGNET Drug Seizures 

                                                  MAGNET DRUG SEIZURES 
              Methamphetamine  Heroin Seizures                         Marijuana                                    Other Drugs 
     Year      Seizures (grams)               (grams)                 Seizures (lbs.)           Cocaine (grams)    (dosage units) 
                                                                                               
    FY2005          24,550                       10                        296                     373,406            178,328 
                                                                                               
    FY2006          16,637                     1,002                       325                      12,069              179 
                                                                                               
    FY2007          14,180                     2,356                       413                     197,891            85,764 
                                                                                               
    FY2008           8,625                       48                        692                      37,278            37,276 
                                                                                               
    FY2009          16,813                        2                        381                       6,514             1,894 
 

Figure 2‐20:  Arizona County Comparison – Meth Seizures (grams) 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

Figure 2‐21 shows a comparison of meth seized by MAGNET in 2009 to six other Arizona Counties.  
Among this group MAGNET ranks second in quantity seized. 

 

 

 

                                                                  [25] 

 
Figure 2‐21:  Arizona County Comparison – 2009 Meth Seizures (grams) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.5     Hualapai Nation Police Department 
The Hualapai Nation Police Department provided a listing of drug related incidents which occurred for 
the years 2004 through 2009.  The data is presented in Table 2‐15 and Figure 2‐22, which shows an 
increase in drug related incidents since 2007.  

Table 2‐15:  Hualapai Law Enforcement Drug Related Incidents 

                                 Hualapai Law Enforcement 
                                  Drug Related Incidents 
                               Year     Adult      Juvenile      Total 
                               2004      15           5           20 
                               2005      15           2           17 
                               2006       7           4           11 
                               2007       8           1            9 
                               2008      10           2           12 
                               2009      12           1           13 




                                                  [26] 

 
Figure 2‐22:  Hualapai Law Enforcement Drug Related Incidents 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.6     Fort Mojave Tribe Police Department 
The Fort Mojave Tribe Police Department provided a listing of drug related incidents which occurred for 
the years 2006 through 2009.  However, the format of their drug report changed in 2009 so that 
information on the type of drugs associated with the charges was not presented.  The data for 2006 – 
2008 presented in Table 2‐16 and Figure 2‐23 is consistent with other agency statistics indicating 
marijuana is the most common illegal drug associated with crime, followed by methamphetamine.     

Table 2‐16:  Fort Mojave Tribe Drug Related Charges 

                                       Fort Mohave Tribe 
                                          Drug Arrests 
                                                          2006    2007     2008 
                                 Meth                      76      24       12 
                               Marijuana                   87      44       24 
                              Other Drugs                  14      8        6 
                           Total Drug Arrests             177      76       42 
                             Paraphenalia                 105      68       39 
 

 


                                                  [27] 

 
Figure 2‐23:  Fort Mojave Tribe Drug Related Charges 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2‐24 shows a significant decrease in the number of drug related incidents since 2006, although in 
2009 they saw a bump in arrests of all demographics except juvenile males.  Arrests of juvenile males 
dropped from eleven (11) to two (2) in 2009.   

Figure 2‐24:  Fort Mojave Drug Arrests by Gender and Age 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                  [28] 

 
2.7         Mohave County Sheriff’s Office 
Mohave County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) provided arrest data for 2005 through 2009.  This data included 
drug related jail bookings for all agencies as well as arrests made by MCSO.  Table 2‐17 presents the 
number of jail bookings made by each agency (excluding MCSO) and the total drug related bookings for 
those agencies.  Overall drug related arrests have decreased over the past five years.  The exception to 
this is bookings due to court commitments which increased through 2008 and then dropped in 2009.    

Table 2‐17:  Mohave County Jail Drug Related Bookings by Agency (not including MCSO) 

                   Mohave County Jail Drug Related Bookings by Agency 
              Total Drug 
               Related                                     Lake Havasu       Court 
    Year       Arrests        KPD        Bullhead PD           PD         Commitments           DPS 
    2005        1189          241            394               297            109               148 
    2006        1165          256            410               255            116               128 
    2007        1106          250            264               273            166               153 
    2008         900          180            252               203            171                94 
    2009         833          166            226               173            153               115 
 

Not every arrest in Mohave County results in a jail booking.  Arrests may be a summons to court or a 
citation rather than a booking into jail. After that person appears in court (on a summons or a citation) 
the court may then order them to report to jail for fingerprints and photo. 

Figure 2‐25 is a line graph representing the data from Table 2‐17 which depicts the number of drug 
related bookings through time for each agency.  MAGNET is not differentiated because the MAGNET 
officer who does the booking normally uses his or her agency of employment as the arresting agency for 
purposes of the jail booking. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                   [29] 

 
Figure 2‐25:  Mohave County Jail Drug Related Bookings 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A view of drug related bookings as a percentage of total bookings (by agency) shows that the number of 
drug related bookings as compared to total jail bookings have decreased through time for all agencies, 
except for Court Commitments, which have increased since 2005.   

Table 2‐18:  Drug Related Bookings as a Percentage of Total Jail Bookings 

             Drug Related Bookings as a Percentage of Total Jail Bookings 
                                                             Lake               Court 
    Year      TOTAL        Kingman PD      Bullhead PD     Havasu PD         Commitments        DPS
    2005       12%             17%             25%           18%                  7%            31%
    2006       11%             16%             23%           16%                  9%            25%
    2007       10%             13%             15%           20%                 11%            25%
    2008       8%              11%             18%           16%                 11%            16%
    2009       8%              10%             15%           13%                 10%            20%
 

For drug related arrests by MCSO, we were provided with arrest data which included custody arrests, 
cite and release arrests, and long form complaint charges.  The arrest data was subdivided into adult 
male, adult female, juvenile male and juvenile female.  The total number of drug related arrests by 
MCSO peaked in 2006 with 647 arrests.  Year 2008 had the lowest number of arrests.  This is graphically 
illustrated in Figure 2‐26. 




                                                  [30] 

 
Figure 2‐26:  MCSO Drug Related Arrests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2‐27 illustrates the trends of male and female adult drug arrests.  We see that male drug arrests 
have gradually declined in five years with 2009 having the lowest percentage of adult drug related male 
arrests in a five year history.   The percentage of female adult drug arrests increased in 2006, stabilized 
for two years, and dropped again in 2009.  

Figure 2‐27:  MCSO Adult Percentage of Drug Arrests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                    [31] 

 
Drug arrests for youth show a different trend than adults.  Arrests of juvenile males increased gradually 
since 2005 and sharply increased in 2009.  Juvenile female arrests have been generally consistent over 
the five years reviewed. 

Figure 2‐28:  Mohave County Sheriff Juvenile Percentage of Drug Arrests 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mohave County jail bookings for DUI’s steadily increased between 2005 and 2008, then dropped in 2009 
(Figure 2‐29). 

Figure 2‐29:  Mohave County Sheriff’s Department DUI Jail Bookings 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



                                                   [32] 

 
 

2.8     Crime in Arizona Report (2006, 2007, 2008, 2009) 
The “Crime in Arizona” Reports include all UCR data which is reported throughout the state of Arizona.  
This compilation is produced by the Arizona Department of Public Safety each year and is available to 
the public online at www.azdps.gov.  This report facilitates assessment of Mohave County as a whole as 
well as providing a convenient way to compare Mohave County’s drug arrest data to other counties.  As 
discussed previously, UCR data is incomplete and does not include all drug related arrests.  Therefore, 
the data should be reviewed as an indicator only.  All UCR data includes both adults and juveniles.  The 
UCR program classifies drugs into four categories:  

 

Opium, Cocaine, Derivatives 

Marijuana 

Synthetic Narcotics (includes Methamphetamine) 

Other Dangerous Nonnarcotics 

 

We organized the UCR arrest data by dividing the number of arrests in a county by each county’s 
population to provide per capita data.  The figures in Tables 2‐19 through 2‐21 show the number of 
arrests per 10,000 county residents.  Therefore, it may be inferred that the higher the number is; the 
more serious the problem is.  For example, in Mohave County in 2008, there were 17.85 synthetic 
narcotics arrests for every 10,000 Mohave County residents.  In contrast, in Maricopa County in 2008, 
there were 3.66 synthetic narcotics arrests for every 10,000 Maricopa County residents.  Therefore, 
according to UCR data, Mohave County had 4.9 times the arrests of Maricopa County per capita for 
synthetic narcotics that year.  This database has been adjusted to reflect the corrections to KPD’s UCR 
drug arrest records (previously discussed). 

Table 2‐19:  Arrests Per 10,000 Residents – Synthetic Narcotics (includes Methamphetamine) 

                           Arrests Per Capita ‐ Synthetic Narcotics 
                 Mohave        Coconino      Yuma          Yavapai    Pinal    Pima     Maricopa 
        2009      12.61          1.79         4.41           9.38     1.35     12.99     3.43 
        2008      17.85          0.95         2.22          13.89     2.05     13.93     3.66 
        2007      16.46          2.00         5.56           6.31     2.52     13.43     5.37 
        2006      25.09          1.81         7.77           8.27     3.89     14.88     7.23 
 

                                                   [33] 

 
When compared to six of the most populous counties in Arizona, UCR arrest data indicates Mohave 
County consistently ranked first for arrests related to synthetic narcotics (i.e. methamphetamines) until 
2009 when Pima County surpassed Mohave County in arrests. 

For UCR arrests related to other dangerous narcotics, Mohave County ranked 2nd for having the most 
arrests per capita for 2009. 

Table 2‐20:  Arizona Counties Arrests Per 10,000 Residents  – Other Dangerous Nonnarcotics 

                      Arrests Per Capita ‐ Other Dangerous Narcotics 
                 Mohave        Coconino      Yuma          Yavapai    Pinal    Pima     Maricopa 
        2009      11.16          4.16         2.16           7.07      3.4     31.46      4.6 
        2008      4.46           3.93         1.74           6.95     4.29     34.14     4.53 
        2007      7.44           4.00         3.77          13.99     3.82     40.47     6.23 
        2006      7.23           6.47         3.43          17.53     6.08     44.63     6.83 
 

Table 2‐21 shows per capita arrests for marijuana related offenses in seven of the most populous 
counties in Arizona.   Although this table shows Mohave County ranks 5th among these counties for the 
years reviewed, it’s important to note there were more than twice as many arrests related to marijuana 
in Mohave County than arrests related to synthetic narcotics. 

Table 2‐21:  Arizona Counties Arrests Per 10,000 Residents ‐ Marijuana 

                                 Arrests Per Capita ‐ Marijuana 
                 Mohave        Coconino      Yuma      Yavapai        Pinal    Pima     Maricopa 
        2009      24.66         62.34        23.46      50.93         18.55    51.26     27.11 
        2008      24.86         64.84        21.66      47.26         20.42    47.33     25.83 
        2007      28.56         66.85        29.44      38.61         20.01    46.76     25.96 
        2006      30.06         69.72        32.12      33.89         20.97    44.04     24.90 
 

For UCR arrests related to opium, cocaine and their derivatives, Mohave County ranked 6th for 2007 
through 2009, with the exception of 2006 in which it ranked 7th.  Based on UCR arrest data alone, it 
appears that use of opium, cocaine and their derivatives in Mohave County may not be as prevalent as 
marijuana, synthetic narcotics and other dangerous nonnarcotics. 

 

 

 

 
                                                   [34] 

 
Table 2‐22:  Arizona Counties Arrests Per 10,000 Residents – Opium, Cocaine, Derivatives 

                        Arrests Per Capita ‐ Opium, Cocaine, Derivatives 
                      Mohave         Coconino      Yuma           Yavapai      Pinal  Pima           Maricopa 
              2009     0.98            3.51         1.03           2.51        0.94  6.43             7.17 
              2008     1.54            4.74         0.53           3.69        2.15  6.59             8.37 
              2007     1.69            4.29         1.24           4.68        3.34  7.00             9.60 
              2006     0.92            3.16         1.48           4.32        3.26  6.51             8.65 
 

 

2.9        Arizona Motor Vehicle Crash Facts 
Each year the Arizona Department of Transportation releases a report on Motor Vehicle Crash Facts for 
the State of Arizona.  Included among this information are statistics on crashes involving alcohol and 
drugs.  Tables 2‐23 through 2‐25 show the percentage of alcohol related crashes in seven of the most 
populous counties in Arizona, including Mohave County, for the years 2006 through 2008.  Among these 
counties Mohave County has the consistently highest percentage of alcohol related crashes for all years. 

Table 2‐23:  2006 Alcohol Related Crashes 

                                    2006 Alcohol Related Crashes 
                      MARICOPA        PIMA       MOHAVE           YAVAPAI  PINAL             COCONINO          YUMA
    Total # of 
    Crashes            94,159        20,353       3,656            4,082        3,948          4,295           3,130 
    # Alcohol Rel. 
    Crashes             5,048          957         292              269             232            248          176 
    % Alcohol 
    Rel. Crashes       5.36%          4.70%       7.99%            6.59%       5.88%           5.77%           5.62% 
 

Table 2‐24:  2007 Alcohol Related Crashes 

                                        2007 Alcohol Related Crashes 
                        MARICOPA         PIMA       MOHAVE             YAVAPAI             PINAL          COCONINO      YUMA 
    Total # of 
                          93,734         20767        3517                  3974           3755             4277        3117 
    Crashes 
    # Alcohol Rel. 
                           5,055          1047            307                299            235              226         201 
    Crashes 
    % Alcohol Rel. 
                          5.39%          5.04%        8.73%                7.52%           6.26%            5.28%       6.45% 
    Crashes 

                                                          [35] 

 
Table 2‐25:  2008 Alcohol Related Crashes 

                                         2008 Alcohol Related Crashes 
                          MARICOPA         PIMA        MOHAVE        YAVAPAI       PINAL      COCONINO         YUMA 

    Total # of Crashes      78,034         18218         3025          3479        3249          4211          2879 

      # Alcohol Rel. 
                            4,240              984       257           223          201           197           197 
         Crashes 
     % Alcohol Rel. 
                            5.43%          5.40%        8.50%         6.41%        6.19%         4.68%         6.84% 
        Crashes 
 

Table 2‐26 shows the percentage of drug related crashes for Mohave County and five other Arizona 
counties for 2006 through 2008.  Mohave County ranks between 3rd through 5th for drug related crashes 
for the counties considered.  In Mohave County, testing for drugs at crash sites occurs only if alcohol is 
ruled out as a cause of impairment or another indicator is present that suggests drugs may be a factor. 

Table 2‐26:  Percentage of Drug Related Crashes 

                              Percentage of Drug Related Crashes 
          Year      Maricopa          Pima        Mohave         Yavapai       Pinal        Coconino 
          2006           0.37%         0.30%        0.46%           0.78%       0.61%            0.35%
          2007           0.36%         0.32%        0.33%           0.93%       0.91%            0.42%
         2008             0.27%       0.32%           0.38%        0.71%       0.79%            0.40%
 

 

2.10  Closing Remarks on Law Enforcement 
Mohave County has been a focus for drug control and enforcement on the national stage since 1990 
when the federal government established it would be part of the High‐Intensity Drug Trafficking Area 
Program (HIDTA).  Several attributes of the county combine to make it a hot spot for drug trafficking; it 
is a rural region, geographically located between Phoenix, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, and a major 
interstate highway, I‐40, traverses through it.  As a nexus for drug trafficking, it is unsurprising that a 
significant percentage of Mohave County’s criminal activity is related to or involved with illegal drugs. 

Throughout all the statistics, two drugs rise to the top as being ubiquitous in Mohave County arrests; 
marijuana and methamphetamine.  Marijuana‐related arrests are the most common of the drug‐related 
arrests for all law enforcement agencies followed by methamphetamine‐related arrests.  A notable 
exception occurred in 2005 when methamphetamine related arrests surpassed marijuana related 
arrests in Bullhead City.  According to UCR data from 2006 through 2009, Mohave County ranks first in 

                                                       [36] 

 
Arizona (among the seven most populous counties) in arrests per capita for synthetic narcotics (which 
include methamphetamine).  The Kingman Flex Squad reported seizures of marijuana and 
methamphetamine in 2009 which are their largest quantities seized in four years.  MAGNET also seized 
large quantities of methamphetamine in 2009. 

Mohave County Jail reports several years of decline in drug related jail bookings for all law enforcement 
agencies with the exception of court commitments which has had a modest increase since 2005.  Adult 
males are arrested most often on drug related charges, followed by adult females and juvenile males.  
MCSO reports the percentage of juvenile male drug arrests has doubled in the past five years.  Kingman 
observed a striking increase in drug related arrest activity in their schools in 2009 which was attributed 
to an increase in prescription drug abuse among students. 

The Hualapai Nation Police Department reported an increase in drug related incidents since 2007 
although the amount of juvenile involvement has generally decreased since then.  The Fort Mojave 
Police Department saw an increase in drug related charges between 2008 and 2009 after a three year 
decline.  In contrast to the increasing number of drug related arrests for adults and juvenile females, 
arrests of juvenile males in drug related incidents declined significantly between 2008 and 2009. 

Although DUI bookings at Mohave County jail decreased in 2009 after increasing for four straight years, 
it is important to note that Mohave County had the highest percentage of alcohol related crashes from 
2006 through 2008 among seven of the most populous counties in Arizona.   

In summary, it should be noted that due to the economic climate, budgets have decreased for most, if 
not all, local law enforcement agencies in the past few years.  This decrease in funding may have 
impacted levels in manpower which resulted in fewer arrests.  Two observations support this 
hypothesis.  First, MAGNET, which has supplemental funding provided by the state as well as grants, had 
a record number of arrests in 2009.  Second, a review of arrests per capita in other counties, as observed 
in the Crime in Arizona Reports, shows that all the counties have generally decreased their arrest rates 
in the past four years.  We can therefore conclude that the decline in drug related arrests observed 
throughout Mohave County probably has more to do with a decline in funding than with a decline in 
drug related criminal activity. 

 




                                                   [37] 

 
                                                       


3.0  COURTS, CHILD WELFARE AND PROBATION 
The Mohave County court system deals with drug‐related violations regularly.  Considering the high 
number of drug related arrests (see Law Enforcement chapter), it is unsurprising that drug related court 
cases are common.  The court data discussed here includes all drug related cases for 2004 through 2009 
for Mohave County Superior Court, Justice Courts and Municipal Courts for Bullhead City, Lake Havasu 
City and Kingman.   

Drug related cases in Mohave County were compared to other Arizona counties to provide an 
understanding of where Mohave County ranks within the state for prosecution of drug related crimes.  
Statewide statistics were only available for cases which were prosecuted using funds from the Drug and 
Gang Enforcement Account.  The Drug and Gang Enforcement Account is administered through the 
Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) who releases an annual report on activities funded by this 
account.  In Mohave County, these cases are for arrests conducted by MAGNET. 

A summary of drug test results was provided by the Probation Department for this report.  These test 
results provide a useful indicator of the types of drugs being used in Mohave County.   

In addition to cases brought about by drug related arrests, the court also oversees child welfare cases.  
When children are removed from their home by the Department of Economic Services (DES) due to 
abuse and neglect concerns, these children may become wards of the state.   These dependency cases 
are managed by Child Protective Services and under the jurisdiction of Mohave County Family Court.  It 
is estimated that approximately 90% of all children removed from their homes by the court come from 
families having substance abuse problems.  For this reason, a review of child welfare reports and child 
dependency cases is valuable in assessing substance abuse in families in Mohave County. 

3.1     Courts 
For the purpose of this report, court cases for Bullhead City, Lake Havasu City and Kingman courts were 
reviewed.  Moccasin Justice Court and Colorado City Municipal Court were not considered since these 
courts are located in the Colorado Strip area which is not a target area for this Needs Assessment. The 
original court data which was used to create the following tables and figures is included in Appendix E. 

Figure 3‐1 presents a line graph of all drug cases filed in the municipal courts, justice courts and superior 
courts.  Misdemeanors are filed in either municipal court or justice court; municipal court handling cases 
within city limits and justice court handling cases which occur in county jurisdiction.  All felony cases are 
filed in superior court.  However, drug cases can originally be charged as misdemeanors or felonies, 
depending upon the discretion of law enforcement or the charging agency.  When charged as a felony, 
all defendants have a right to a preliminary hearing before a case goes to superior court.  The practice in 
Mohave County has been to charge a felony case into justice court.  Then, if the case merits felony 

                                                    [38] 

 
prosecution, the matter is presented to the Grand Jury in lieu of a preliminary hearing.  These cases pass 
through the justice court to superior court without a determination of guilt at the justice court level.  
This may explain the differing trends in justice court for the number of cases filed and number of 
convictions (presented below in Figures 3‐1 and 3‐2). 

The justice courts handle the majority of the cases and superior court handles the fewest.  However, the 
felony cases handled in superior court would typically be more complex than the misdemeanor cases 
handled in the lower courts.  Drug case filings have decreased in both the justice courts and municipal 
courts over the past several years.  Though superior court has observed a decrease in drug case filings 
since a peak in 2006, its six year trend is more stable than the other courts. 

Figure 3‐1:  Drug Cases Filed in Mohave County Court System 




                                                                                                      

 

A six year review of drug cases filed in the municipal courts (Table 3‐1) reveals Bullhead City filed the 
most cases, followed by Lake Havasu City and lastly, Kingman.  During this time span, the case load for 
all municipal courts decreased substantially; Kingman by 68%, Lake Havasu City by 56% and Bullhead 
City by 54%. 

 

 

 

 
                                                    [39] 

 
 

Table 3‐1:  Drug Cases Filed in Municipal Courts 

                        DRUG CASES FILED IN MUNICIPAL COURTS 
                   COURT               2004       2005       2006    2007     2008      2009 
                Bullhead City 
                                        439        405       263     285      233       203 
               Municipal Court 
             Kingman Municipal 
                                        253        243       168      66      108        81 
                  Court 
              Lake Havasu City 
                                        433        389       380     318      227       189 
              Municipal Court 

                    TOTAL              1125       1037       811     669      568       473 

 

With respect to justice court, Bullhead City receives the most filings for drug related cases followed by 
Kingman and then Lake Havasu City (Table 3‐2).  It is likely that one factor which contributes to Bullhead 
City’s high number of drug related case filings (in both municipal and justice court) is the city is a 
vacation destination where recreational drug use by tourists is common.  Lake Havasu City is also a 
popular vacation destination where a significant amount of recreational drug use by a transient 
population occurs.  However, the Lake Havasu City Justice Court is a much smaller court which may 
account for its smaller case load.  As with the municipal courts, the case load in justice courts have also 
declined.  Lake Havasu City had the largest decline at 56%, followed by Bullhead City at 35% and 
Kingman at 26%. 

Table 3‐2:  Drug Cases Filed in Justice Courts 


                          DRUG CASES FILED IN JUSTICE COURTS 
                  COURT               2004        2005       2006    2007     2008     2009 
            Bullhead City Justice 
                                      1130        1326       1351    745      845       738 
                   Court 

           Kingman Justice Court       898        887        684     740      672       665 

              Lake Havasu City 
                                       433        389        380     318      227       189 
                Justice Court 

                   TOTAL              2461        2602       2415    1803     1744     1592 

 



                                                     [40] 

 
The number of felony cases filed in Mohave County experienced a six year low in 2008 following a six 
year peak in 2006.  Though felony case filings increased again in 2009 (Table 3‐3), it remained below the 
number of filings received in any given year from 2004 through 2007. 

Table 3‐3:  Drug Cases Filed in Superior Court 

                          DRUG CASES FILED IN SUPERIOR COURT 
                    COURT               2004      2005      2006     2007      2008      2009 

                Superior Court           612       576      755       607       432      513 

 

As with drug related case filings, guilty drug convictions in all courts have shown an overall decline since 
2004.  Whereas convictions in the justice courts and superior court peaked in 2006 and have declined 
since then, municipal court convictions had a steady six year reduction.   

 

 

Figure 3‐2:  Guilty Drug Convictions in Mohave County 




                                                                                                      

 

Guilty drug convictions in municipal courts have reduced substantially in the past six years (Table 3‐4).  
Kingman had the biggest drop with 2009 guilty drug convictions only 23% of what they were in 2004.  
Bullhead City and Lake Havasu City are 29% and 36%, respectively, of what they were in 2004. 

                                                    [41] 

 
 

 

Table 3‐4:  Guilty Drug Convictions in Municipal Courts 

                  GUILTY DRUG CONVICTIONS IN MUNICIPAL COURTS 
                  COURT                 2004      2005       2006      2007      2008       2009 
          Bullhead City Municipal 
                                         223       190       134        118        94        64 
                   Court 
            Kingman Municipal 
                                         169       153        95        35         63        39 
                 Court 
              Lake Havasu City 
                                         338       299       277        221       149       123 
              Municipal Court 

                   TOTAL                 730       642       506        374       306       226 

 

The three justice courts each have their own distinct trends in guilty drug convictions over time.  The 
statistics for each justice court are shown in Table 3‐5 and illustrated in a line graph in Figure 3‐3.  With 
some variation which is unique to each court, Bullhead City and Kingman Justice Courts have had an 
overall decrease in convictions whereas Lake Havasu City Justice Court has had an increase in 
convictions. 

Table 3‐5:  Guilty Drug Convictions in Justice Courts 


                     GUILTY DRUG CONVICTIONS IN JUSTICE COURTS 
                 COURT                 2004       2005       2006      2007      2008       2009 
           Bullhead City Justice 
                                        249       266        327       177        189       179 
                  Court 

          Kingman Justice Court         439       424        381       397        345       342 

             Lake Havasu City 
                                         98       128        180       181        146       145 
               Justice Court 

                   TOTAL                786       818        888       755        680       666 

 

 

 

                                                     [42] 

 
Figure 3‐3:  Guilty Drug Convictions in Justice Courts 




                                                                                                 

Guilty felony (i.e. superior court) convictions for drug cases have decreased by 25% since 2004 (Table 3‐
6), whereas the number of felony drug case filings have decreased by only 16% (Table 3‐3) in the same 
time span.  Superior court was the only court in Mohave County that had an increase in the number of 
convictions from 2008 and 2009, in accord with the increased number of felony drug case filings. 

Table 3‐6:  Guilty Drug Convictions in Superior Court 


                   GUILTY DRUG CONVICTIONS IN SUPERIOR COURT 
                   COURT               2004      2005      2006     2007      2008      2009 

               Superior Court           364       369      445       378      246       271 

 

3.2     Arizona Criminal Justice Commission 
The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) distributes funds for fifty four programs throughout the 
state which are able to operate in large part due to the Drug and Gang Enforcement Account.  This 
account provides funding for the implementation of the statewide enhanced drug enforcement 
strategy; a strategy which depends on narcotics enforcement agencies in operation throughout the 
state.  In Mohave County, this agency is MAGNET.  In addition to drug apprehension, records 
improvement, drug offender adjudication and detention, drug analysis and drug abuse 
education/prevention, the Drug and Gang Enforcement Account also compensates for prosecution costs 
for criminals that are apprehended through efforts resulting from this program. 



                                                   [43] 

 
Prosecution data from this program is summarized in the Enhanced Drug and Gang Enforcement Report 
(EDGE) each year.  This report may be accessed at www. azcjc.gov.  The prosecution data was reviewed 
for fiscal years 2006 through 2009. 

Mohave County was compared against the seven most populous counties in Arizona.  The number of 
drug cases was divided by the population to derive per capita statistics.  Table 3‐7 provides these 
figures.  Among the counties analyzed, Mohave County ranks among the highest in per capita drug cases 
for all years reviewed.  Mohave County’s data is reported at the time the case is closed out so each case 
is counted only once.  Reporting procedures for other counties may differ and therefore have an impact 
on the statistics presented here. 

Table 3‐7:  Drug Cases Per 1000 Residents 


                             DRUG CASES PER 1000 RESIDENTS 
                         COUNTY        FY2006     FY2007     FY2008     FY2009 
                         Coconino        3.5        4.3        3.0        2.6 
                         Maricopa        4.5        4.4        3.9        2.6 
                         Mohave          5.5        7.9        5.2        3.9 
                          Yavapai        4.2        2.8        3.6        4.0 
                           Pima          6.9        6.9        4.0        3.7 
                           Pinal         1.9        1.7        1.5        1.2 
                           Yuma          4.6        7.9        8.3       10.0 
 

A line graph of the data in Table 3‐7 clearly illustrates Mohave County’s high ranking in per capita drug 
cases (Figure 3‐4). 

Figure 3‐4:  Drug Cases per 1000 Residents 




                                                                                          
                                                   [44] 

 
ACJC also reports on the type of drug(s) affiliated with each conviction.  Table 3‐8 lists the distribution of 
drug types for convictions from FY2007 to FY2009.  Marijuana and methamphetamine stand out as the 
substances most often related to convictions in Mohave County. 

Table 3‐8:  Conviction by Drug Type in Mohave County 

                     CONVICTION BY DRUG TYPE IN MOHAVE COUNTY 
     Year     Paraphernalia  Methamphetamine         Marijuana      Cocaine      Heroin     Other/Unknown 
    FY2007        64%             15%                  18%            1%          0%              2% 
    FY2008        74%             12%                  11%            1%          0%              2% 
    FY2009        74%             11%                  11%            1%          0%              3% 
 

3.3      Mohave County Child Dependency Statistics 
Substance abuse in families which are investigated by Child Protective Services is very common.  In fact, 
the accepted statistic for substance abuse in families of dependent children is usually somewhere 
between 85% and 95%.  In 2006, a survey was done for all active Mohave County dependency cases and 
it was determined that 85% of cases had homes with confirmed substance abuse problems and at least 
another 5% of cases had suspected substance abuse problems in the home.  At that time, the 
distribution of known drugs involved in these cases was 63.5% methamphetamine, 17.3% marijuana, 
5.8% alcohol and 1.9% heroin. 

On 29 July 2009, the Honorable Richard Weiss, the Presiding Juvenile Judge in Mohave County Superior 
Court (at that time) issued the following statement in response to a question about the prevalence of 
substance abuse in dependency cases. 

         My response is not based upon any collected statistics, rather general perceptions from the 
         bench. 

         I would estimate that virtually all of our dependency cases involve the abuse of some 
         substance.  Perhaps we have 5% of all cases where the issues are only mental health or 
         destitution without substance abuse issues.   Mohave County has experienced a substantial 
         increase in filings of dependency cases during the last three years.   Approximately 40% of the 
         cases involve infants and toddlers (0‐5).   Of this group of cases a large proportion are substance 
         exposed newborns (SEN).  Unfortunately for the parents of these children, most children 
         achieve permanence in an adoptive home as the impact of the substances controlling many of 
         these parent’s lives is greater than their ability to achieve behavioral change during the first six 
         to twelve months of the infant’s life.  We may also be seeing inconsistent protocols at the 
         county’s hospitals in effectively determining whether a child is born substance exposed.  We are 
         aware that proper identification at birth, regardless of whether a dependency action is filed, is 
         critically important to understand and when needed develop appropriate mental health 

                                                     [45] 

 
        interventions for these children.  The study of prenatal effects of parental substance abuse is 
        starting to identify areas of concern where early interventions may environmentally assist a 
        child’s development.  In my view this is the area where a community may have its greatest 
        impact in addressing the detrimental influence of substance abuse. 

        For the older children of substance abusing parents in foster care we tend to see the 
        environmental impacts of these abuses on the children, whether it is educational delays or 
        adolescent maturity issues.  Dealing with these issues tend to be more costly compared to 
        earlier interventions. 

Mohave County Family Court provided dependency statistics for 2006 through 2009 (Appendix F).  This 
data included the number of children and the number of case filings for the entire county as well as the 
individual cities of Kingman, Bullhead City and Lake Havasu City.  Each city area includes not only the city 
itself but the surrounding county areas as well.  As Table 3‐9 and Figure 3‐5 show, the number of 
dependency case filings and the number of children in dependencies have steadily increased in the past 
four years. 

According to Su Hensler, Assistant Program Manager for District IV, DES Division of Children, Youth and 
Families, several reasons account for the increase in dependency filings in recent years.  Two factors she 
pointed out as probably being among the most important are 1) the growing population in Mohave 
County and 2) the use of enhanced assessment tools to better evaluate the safety and security of the 
home environment.  Ms. Hensler pointed out that the increased number of dependencies should be 
considered a good thing for Mohave County since it is likely more children are being kept out of harm’s 
way. 

 

Table 3‐9:  Mohave County Dependency Statistics 

                     MOHAVE COUNTY DEPENDENCY STATISTICS 
                    Year       Total Case Filings            Total Children 
                    2006              43                           72 
                    2007              59                          105 
                    2008              76                          134 
                    2009              87                          147 
 

 

 

 

 
                                                     [46] 

 
Figure 3‐5:  Mohave County Dependency Statistics 




                                                                                                    

 

Figures 3‐6 through 3‐8 presents the dependency data for each city area.  Case filings are normally 
equivalent to households, so we shall consider the trends of case filings herein.  Since 2006, all 
communities have observed an increase in cases (i.e. dependent households) with Bullhead City and 
Lake Havasu City having the greatest increase at 59% and 58%, respectively.  Though Kingman has a 
lower rate of increase, at 39%, it has significantly more case filings than the other two cities.  In fact, in 
any given year, Kingman has more case filings than the other two cities combined. 

The reasons for Kingman’s larger number of case filings are not well defined, but are probably related to 
the very large rural area which the Kingman Child Protective Services (CPS) office oversees.  Another 
factor is related to Kingman’s location on Highway I‐40 at the intersection of Highway 93 to Las Vegas. 
This geographic location draws a larger transient population than observed in Bullhead City and Lake 
Havasu City.  Much of this transient population is not considered in census counts, but children in 
transient families are at high risk for dependencies. 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                      [47] 

 
Figure 3‐6:  Bullhead City Dependency Statistics 




                                                             

 

Figure 3‐7:  Lake Havasu City Dependency Statistics 




                                                             

 

 

 


                                                    [48] 

 
Figure 3‐8:  Kingman Dependency Statistics 




                                                                                               

 

3.4     Child Welfare Reports 
Child Welfare Reports are prepared biannually by DES Division of Children, Youth and Families (the 
Division).  Through the Division, the state of Arizona works to ensure safety and promote permanency 
for abused and neglected children.  DES recognizes the prevalence of substance abuse among families of 
children in state custody.  In fact, they consider the provision of substance abuse treatment critical to 
supporting Child Protective Services in making reasonable efforts, as required by federal and state law, 
to reunify families impacted by substance abuse. 

The Child Welfare Reports are posted on DES’s web site, www.azdes.gov.  These reports provide 
statistical information on child abuse and neglect, investigations, shelter and receiving home services, 
foster homes, length of care, and adoptions.  MSTEPP reviewed the reports from October 2005 through 
September 2009.  The per capita statistics for Mohave County were compared to six other of the most 
populous counties in Arizona as well as the state as a whole.  The annual reporting time period is 1 
October through 30 September.  Statistical information presented here from these reports include the 
total number of reports received, the total number of reports assigned for investigation, and the total 
number of children entering out‐of‐home care who do so under Voluntary Placement Agreements.  

Reports of child abuse and neglect are made to the Child Abuse Hotline.  A report must meet DES’s 
criteria for abuse or neglect. In 2009, Mohave County received 56 reports per 10,000 residents (living in 
Mohave County).  This is 15% lower than the number of reports received in 2006, when 66 reports were 
received per 10,000 residents.  Collating this data for four years with the six selected Arizona Counties 

                                                   [49] 

 
(Table 3‐10), indicates Mohave County has ranked among the three highest counties in the number of 
reports received per capita since 2006.   

Table 3‐10:  Child Welfare Reports per 10,000 County Residents 

                                 Reports Per 10,000 Residents 
                       County                  2006       2007      2008      2009 
                       MARICOPA                 52         51        51        49 
                       PIMA                     66         62        63        61 
                       MOHAVE                   66         61        58        56 
                       YAVAPAI                  55         51        46        46 
                       PINAL                    66         68        63        59 
                       YUMA                     45         41        39        35 
                       STATE                    55            54     53        51 
 

Figure 3‐9 charts the county and state reporting data in a line graph.  The state statistics include all 
county statistics in Arizona (not just the seven counties listed).  The line graph clearly shows that the 
number of reports per capita in Mohave County (solid red line) is well above the state average (solid 
black line).  

Figure 3‐9:  Child Welfare Reports Per 10,000 County Residents 




                                                                                                              

                                                      [50] 

 
Each report received by the Child Abuse Hotline must meet the statutory criteria for it to be assigned for 
investigation.  Table 3‐11 lists investigations per 10,000 county residents for Mohave County as well as 
the other selected Arizona counties and the state. 

Table 3‐11:  Investigations per 10,000 County Residents 

    
                             Investigations Per 10,000 Residents 
 
                                               2006        2007    2008     2009 
                       MARICOPA                 52          51      51       49 
                       PIMA                     65          61      62       60 
                       MOHAVE                   66          60      57       56 
                       YAVAPAI                  55          51      45       46 
 
                       PINAL                    64          67      61       57 
                       COCONINO                 55          51      48       46 
                       YUMA                     45          41      39       35 
                       STATE                    55          53      52        50 
 

The pattern for Mohave County investigations is similar to the pattern for Mohave County reports.  As 
with reports, Mohave County has observed a decrease in investigations over time, but remains well 
above the state average.  Among the selected counties, Mohave County ranked 3rd highest in the 
number of investigations per capita for 2007 through 2009, and ranked highest in 2006, equal with two 
other counties. 

Figure 3‐10:  Investigation Per 10,000 County Residents 




                                                                                                 

                                                   [51] 

 
The number of children entering out‐of‐home foster care through Voluntary Placement Agreements 
increased in Mohave County between 2006 and 2007 and has been decreasing since that time (Table 3‐
12).  Voluntary placements into foster care are not entered into the court system and are not 
considered dependencies (which were discussed in the prior section).  Voluntary Placement Agreements 
are offered to parents who willingly place their children into a foster home and grant CPS legal custody 
of their children.  Voluntary Placement Agreements are only offered to families whom CPS believes can 
remedy their situation within 90 days.     

Table 3‐12:  Children in Voluntary Out‐of‐Home Placement per 100,000 County Residents 

 
                                   Kids in Out‐of‐Home Care  
                                      per 100K Residents 
                       County                 2006        2007    2008     2009 
                       MARICOPA               105         103     118      107 
                       PIMA                   179         175     204      191 
                       MOHAVE                  77         104      98       81 
 
                       YAVAPAI                145         117     112       86 
                       PINAL                  179         169     124      109 
                       COCONINO               114         105      82       74 
                       YUMA                    95          95      55       47 
                       STATE                  121         118     125       113 
 

A review of the line graph for children in out‐of‐home placements reveals that Mohave County is below 
the state average in out‐of‐home placements;  ranking 3rd from the bottom (among the selected Arizona 
counties) in 2008 and 2009, 2nd from bottom in 2007, and ranking the lowest in 2006.   

Figure 3‐11:  Children in Voluntary Out‐of‐Home Placement per 10,000 County Residents 




                                                                                                
                                                  [52] 

 
This last graph appears to show an anomaly for Mohave County.  Upon examination of the graphs 
presented above, a pattern is discernable when reports, investigations and out‐of‐home placements are 
compared.  Counties ranking above the state average in reports and investigations also rank above the 
state average in out‐of‐home placements (i.e. Pima, Pinal).  Likewise, counties ranking below the state 
average in reports and investigations, also rank below the state average in out‐of‐home placements (i.e. 
Yuma).  Counties ranking in the mid‐range for reports and investigations were roughly in the mid‐range 
for out‐of‐home placements (Maricopa, Yavapai).  Contrary to this pattern, Mohave County ranks 
consistently above the state average in reports and investigations, but ranks consistently below the 
state average in out‐of‐home placements.  In fact, in 2006 Mohave County was the highest ranking 
county in reports and investigations (among the selected counties reviewed) yet ranked the lowest in 
out‐of‐home placements. 

The Division explains there are multiple reasons for Mohave County’s unusually low out‐of‐home 
placement statistics.  For instance, there are frequently multiple reports on a single family which may 
result in only a single removal.  Also, children may be placed with family members who are not 
considered in DES’s out‐of‐home care statistics.  It was noted that extended families are more likely to 
be available in rural areas like Mohave County than in urban areas.  Another reason for the discrepancy 
may be that Mohave County has more children re‐entering voluntary placement which isn’t reflected in 
the statistics.  DES assures that regardless of the statistics, children will be removed if there is a safety 
risk in the home. 

The Division acknowledges it faces a number of challenges in its efforts to ensure safety and promote 
permanency for abused and neglected children.  These challenges include: 

    1. Retention of trained and qualified staff. 
    2.  Increased expectations for staff to implement new practices and meet new federal 
       requirements without adequate funding.   
    3. Economic factors which create additional stress upon families and increases factors that place 
       children at risk of maltreatment. 
    4.  Funding cuts to the Division have had devastating impacts on services. These impacts have been 
       felt through reduced staffing, severe reductions in the preventative and family support services 
       provided by the Division and large decreases in the amount of in‐home services provided to 
       clients. 

They also indicate that as the economic crisis continues, the prospect of further funding cuts will yield 
yet greater impacts to clients and services. 
 
3.5  Probation 
Mohave County Probation provided statistics for probationers on drug charges and drug testing results.  
Figure 3‐12 is a bar graph showing the number of probationers on drug charges each year for 2007 
through 2009.  This graph shows that 2009 had the highest number of people on probation due to drug 
charges.  There was a total variation of 5.7% over this three year span. 

                                                     [53] 

 
Figure 3‐12:  Mohave County Probationers on Drug Charges 




                                                                                             

                                                     

Drug testing of probationers revealed positive drug test results of 15% to 17% for those tested.  This 
percentage of positive drug tests held steady despite a significant increase in the number of drug tests 
conducted between 2007 and 2009 (from 2866 tests to 5246 tests).  Table 3‐13 and Figure 3‐13 shows 
the percentage and type of drugs with positive test results in 2008 and 2009.  The drug most commonly 
detected was marijuana (34.4% ‐ 36.4%) followed by amphetamine (24.1% ‐ 26.1%) and alcohol (23.0% 0 
25.0%).  

Table 3‐13:  Mohave County Probation Drug Test Results 

                                      DRUG TEST RESULTS 
                                     Drug               2008     2009 
                                  Amphetamine           24.1%    26.1% 
                                    Alcohol             25.0%    23.0% 
                                      THC               34.4%    36.4% 
                                    Opiates             15.2%    13.2% 
                                    Cocaine              0.9%     1.3% 
 

 

 

 

                                                  [54] 

 
Figure 3‐13:  Mohave County Probation Drug Test Results 




                                                                                              

                                                     

3.6     Closing Remarks on Courts, Child Welfare and Probation 
When assessing the number of drug case filings in the court system, it should be kept in mind that the 
volume of cases filed is related to the number of arrests made by law enforcement.   Therefore, it is 
unsurprising that we observe a decrease in drug related case filings since we also have experienced a 
decrease in drug related arrests (as reported by Mohave County jail) since 2005.      

A comparison of drug related cases filed in the municipal and justice courts reveals that Bullhead City 
courts have a greater number of cases filed than either of the other communities.  This is consistent 
with the higher number of arrests out of Bullhead City Police Department.  One likely reason for this is 
that Bullhead City is a vacation destination where recreational drug use by tourists is common.  Though 
the case load in both Bullhead City Municipal and Justice Courts is largest, the number of guilty drug 
convictions in these courts is below Lake Havasu City Municipal Court and Kingman Justice Court.  In 
Mohave County Superior Court the number of felony convictions increased between 2008 and 2009.  
This is the only court in Mohave County that observed an increase in convictions since 2006. 

The per capita number of drug related cases prosecuted under the Drug and Gang Enforcement Account 
in Mohave County (i.e. crimes prosecuted by MAGNET) for the years FY2006 through FY2009 is among 
the highest in Arizona.  Among the seven counties assessed (Coconino, Maricopa, Mohave, Yavapai, 
Pima, Pinal, Yuma) Mohave County has among the highest per capita number of prosecuted drug cases, 
occasionally ranking above both Pima and Yuma County. This is striking considering that Pima and Yuma 
Counties border Mexico and are the front line against drug trafficking from Mexico.  The drugs most 
often related to convictions in Mohave County are marijuana and methamphetamine. 

                                                  [55] 

 
A steady increase in the number of dependency case filings has occurred throughout Mohave County 
since 2006.  Reasons for this increase are many, but include a growing population and the use of 
improved assessment tools at CPS.  The city of Kingman has the lowest rate of increase in case filings 
although, in any given year, it files more dependency cases than Bullhead City and Lake Havasu City 
combined.  The large rural area administered by the Kingman CPS office and the transient population of 
the city help account for Kingman’s high number of dependencies.  Statistics on dependency case filings 
from other Arizona counties were not available for review. 

Although Mohave County ranks above the statewide average in the per capita number of reports and 
investigations, it ranks below the statewide average in per capita number of Voluntary Placement 
Agreements.  This is anomalous with the rest of the state which maintains a fairly consistent ranking in 
number of reports, investigations and Voluntary Placement Agreements.  The reasons for Mohave 
County’s anomaly are not well defined, but DES acknowledges that Mohave County has a long, hard 
history of substance abuse, and agrees there is a strong relationship between substance abuse and child 
abuse and neglect.  In their view, recreational drug use spirals into addiction quickly in Mohave County 
due to the high availability of drugs and the lack of residential and intensive out‐patient treatment 
services.  

Drug tests on Mohave County probationers show that positive test results are most often attributed to 
marijuana, amphetamine and alcohol.  This is consistent with other drug data collected by the courts. 




                                                  [56] 

 
     4.0  MOHAVE COUNTY TREATMENT SERVICES AND 
              SUBSTANCE ABUSE SURVEYS 
A review of the treatment services and substance abuse surveys in Mohave County and Arizona is 
important to identify the types of substances of concern for the region as well as assessing the needs 
and service gaps for treatment.  State level data, sub‐state level data and community data were all 
reviewed.  The state and county level data was retrieved from reports and data sets prepared by 
SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), Arizona Families First, Arizona 
Department of Health Services and Arizona’s Substance Abuse Epidemiology Work Group.  Data from 
local health service providers, such as Fort Mojave Behavioral Health, TASC, and area hospitals, is also 
presented. 

It is common that reports and data sets present their data by Regional Behavioral Health Areas rather 
than County.  Mohave County is included in the Northern Arizona region or NARBHA (Northern Arizona 
Regional Behavioral Health Authority) area.  NARBHA is a private, not‐for‐profit agency responsible for 
funding, monitoring and administering publicly funded behavioral health services in Northern Arizona.   
NARBHA serves over 700,000 people in 62,000 square miles which includes the entire northern half of 
Arizona. 

4.1  SAMHSA 
SAMHSA is the lead Federal Agency which works to promote substance abuse prevention and improve 
access to addiction treatment and mental health services in the United States.  Within SAMHSA, the 
Office of Applied Studies (OAS) collects, analyses and disseminates critical substance abuse health data 
to the public.  A quick web search on the OAS web site provides a tremendous amount of valuable 
information regarding illicit drug and alcohol abuse, treatment, emergency department episodes, and 
medical examiner cases.  However, with a couple of exceptions, most of this information is presented at 
a national and state level so that trends within a state cannot be analyzed.  The exceptions to this are 
two annual surveys conducted by OAS called NSDUH and N‐SSATS. 

NSDUH (National Survey on Drug Use and Health) is a nationwide survey which collects information on 
alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and other drug abuse.  The NSDUH data is made available in sub‐state areas 
for the express purpose of illustrating the geographic distribution of substance use prevalence so that 
states may appropriately plan for treatment services.  The other survey which provides data at a sub‐
state level is the N‐SSATS (National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services).  This annual survey 
collects information from substance abuse treatment facilities, both public and private, that provide 
outpatient, residential and hospital treatment services.   

 

 
                                                   [57] 

 
4.1.1  NSDUH 

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health is an annual survey which has been conducted on the 
civilian, non‐institutionalized population aged 12 or older at a sub‐state level since 1999.  Approximately 
362 sub‐state regions, also called Treatment Planning Areas, are evaluated in the 50 States plus the 
District of Columbia (there are minor variations in the number of sub‐state regions from year to year).  
The results of this survey provide estimates of substance dependence, abuse, and treatment.  All 
estimates available to the public meet the criteria for statistical reliability (defined in SAMSHA’s full 
reports on the survey results accessible at http://oas.samhsa.gov).  Estimates that do not meet these 
criteria are suppressed. 

Treatment Planning Areas are defined by officials from each State.  In Arizona, four areas have been 
defined by the Arizona Division of Behavioral Health Services:  Maricopa, Pima, Rural North, and Rural 
South (Figure 4‐1).   

Figure 4‐1:  Treatment Planning Areas within Arizona 




                                                                                                     

Rural North is equivalent to the area of Arizona covered by NARBHA and includes Mohave, Apache, 
Coconino, Navajo and Yavapai Counties . The sampling size for each state and Treatment Planning Area 
varies based on the population.  Arizona’s sample size is about nine hundred.  Youths and young adults 


                                                   [58] 

 
are oversampled so that the sampling is approximately equally distributed among three age groups: 12 
to 17 years, 18 to 25 years, and 26 years or older. 

Respondents are selected randomly.  Surveys are conducted in person using an audio computer‐assisted 
self‐interviewing (ACASI) method.  The respondent wears headphones, listens to the questions, and 
answers using a laptop computer.  This highly private and confidential mode for responding to questions 
increases the level of honest reporting of illicit drug use and other sensitive behaviors.  Answers are 
non‐traceable.  Less sensitive items are administered by interviewers using an computer‐assisted 
personal interviewing (CAPI) method.  

Three NSDUH data sets were reviewed for this report.  The first data set was an annual average based 
on surveys conducted in 2002, 2003 and 2004.  The second data set was an annual average based on 
surveys conducted in 2004, 2005 and 2006.  The last data set was an annual average based on surveys 
conducted in 2006, 2007 and 2008.  Each data set was reviewed according to age groups: 12‐17, 18‐25, 
26 or older. 

NSDUH measures substance use in five broad areas: illicit drug use, alcohol use, tobacco use, substance 
dependence and abuse, substance use treatment need, and serious psychological distress (SPD).  
Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the U.S. and its use in Northern Arizona ranks in the 
medium to high range in the United States.  Illicit drugs other than marijuana include cocaine (and 
crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription‐type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically.   

Explanation of Ranking/Tables 

For this report, the rate of substance use or perception of risk for the Rural North (NARBHA) was 
compared to the other Treatment Planning Areas in Arizona and given a rank within the state.  The 
ranking range is from one through four (for each of the Treatment Planning Areas in Arizona).  A rank of 
one indicates that the Rural North is estimated as having the highest rate of substance use in the state.  
A rank of four is the lowest rate in the state.  In the case of perceptions of risk, a rank of one indicates 
that sub‐state region has the lowest perception of risk, meaning that it may be most likely to participate 
in the risky behavior.  When considering the relative ranking within the state, it should be kept in mind 
that differences in rank may be a very small difference, such as a fraction of a percent.  The original 
NSDUH data sets (www.oas.samhsa.gov) should be evaluated for more detailed information on the 
inner‐state survey results.  

In addition to showing the rank of the Rural North substance use/dependence within the state, we have 
also shown substance use/dependence as an estimated percentage of the population.   We show this for 
the Rural North, the state, and the country.  We believe this provides the most straight forward 
assessment of how the Rural North’s substance abuse problem compares to the state as whole as well 
as the country as a whole. 

 


                                                    [59] 

 
 Ages 12‐17 

NSDUH estimates for ages 12 through 17 indicate illicit drug use among youth in the Rural North has 
decreased steadily between 2002 and 2008 (Tables 4‐1 and 4‐2).  Estimates from earlier years showed 
the Rural North as having among the highest rates of use in the entire country.  Though the percentage 
of illicit drug use among youth in the Rural North have decreased substantially, it is still above the 
national average.   

Table 4‐1: Illicit Drug Use in Past Month, Ages 12‐17 

                                                Table 4‐1 
      Illicit Drug Use in Past Month        Rank in AZ           % in Rural North     % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
                 2002‐2004                      1                      16.12           11.97        11.19 
                 2004‐2006                      1                      12.43           11.02        10.08 
                 2006‐2008                      3                      10.22           10.43        9.54 
 

Table 4‐2:  Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past Month, Ages 12‐17 

                                                Table 4‐2 
     Illicit Drug Use Other Than 
      Marijuana in Past Month           Rank in AZ            % in Rural North       % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
               2002‐2004                    1                       8.09              6.67          5.57 
               2004‐2006                    1                       6.69              5.54          5.03 
               2006‐2008                    2                       5.71               6.1          4.66 
 

The use of cocaine among youth has demonstrated the same decrease over time as other illicit drugs 
(Table 4‐3).  Likewise, the percentage of youth using cocaine in the Rural North is also above the 
national average.   

Table 4‐3:  Cocaine Use in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 

                                                Table 4‐3 
      Cocaine Use in Past Year          Rank in AZ            % in Rural North       % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
            2002‐2004                       1                       3.44              2.87          1.81 
            2004‐2006                       3                       2.11              2.37          1.64 
            2006‐2008                       4                       1.91              2.31          1.45 
 

Nonmedical use of pain relievers by youth took a dip in 2004‐2006 throughout Arizona, but resurged in 
2006‐2008.  The country as a whole has shown a steady decline between 2002 and 2008.  The Rural 
North ranks second within Arizona and is well above the national average. 
                                                      [60] 

 
Table 4‐4:  Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 

                                                  Table 4‐4 
        Nonmedical Use of Pain 
         Relievers in Past Year        Rank in AZ            % in Rural North        % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
              2002‐2004                    1                       10.07              8.73          7.53 
              2004‐2006                    3                        7.49              7.78          7.14 
              2006‐2008                    2                        8.96              8.93          6.75 
 

Within the state, marijuana use in the past month for the Rural North consistently ranks first or second 
(Table 4‐5).  However, there is a decreasing trend in this category for all areas, the Rural North, the 
state, as well as the country.  The 2006‐2008 survey shows the percentage of use in the Rural North 
equal to the national average.  The state of Arizona is below the national average.   

Table 4‐5:  Marijuana Use in Past Month, Ages 12‐17 

                                                  Table 4‐5 
       Marijuana Use in Past Month         Rank in AZ           % in Rural North      % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
               2002‐2004                       1                      10.61            7.73         7.89 
               2004‐2006                       2                       8.33             7.6         6.99 
               2006‐2008                       2                       6.68            6.55         6.68 
 

A review of Rural North youth on their perception of the risk associated with smoking marijuana, 
drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes shows a poorer perception of risk in 2008 than in 2002.  Within 
Arizona, the Rural North ranks first or second in the state in NSDUH’s most recent “Perceptions of Risk” 
surveys (Table 4‐6)  

Table 4‐6:  Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use in Rural North, Ages 12‐17 

                                               Table 4‐6 
          Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use                2002‐2004          2004‐2006       2006‐2008 
    Perceptions of Great Risk of Smoking Marijuana                1                  1               * 
    Once Per Month 
    Perceptions of Great Risk of Having Five or More 
    Drinks of an Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a               4                  3               2 
    Week 
    Perceptions of Great Risk of Smoking One or                   3                  2               1 
    More Packs of Cigarettes Per Day 
 



                                                     [61] 

 
In the past, youth in the Rural North have ranked among the highest in the country for “Dependence On 
or Abuse Of Alcohol And Illicit Drugs In The Past Year”, as well as “Needing and Not Receiving Treatment 
for Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use In The Past Year”.  However, the most recent surveys indicate 
improvements in these areas have occurred (Tables 4‐7 and 4‐8). 

Table 4‐7:  Dependence On or Abuse of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 

                                                  Table 4‐7 
     Dependence on or Abuse of 
    Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in Past    Rank in AZ            % in Rural North    % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
                  Year 

              2002‐2004                      1                      12.63          10.7         8.87 

              2004‐2006                      4                      9.74           9.27         8.27 

              2006‐2008                      3                      7.92           8.27         7.78 

 

Table 4‐8:  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year, Ages 12‐17 

                                                  Table 4‐8 
     Needing But Not Receiving 
    Treatment for Illicit Drug Use      Rank in AZ            % in Rural North    % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
           in Past Year 

              2002‐2004                     2                       6.75           6.76         5.01 

              2004‐2006                     4                       4.81           5.46         4.53 

              2006‐2008                     4                       4.04           4.36         4.21 

 

Though the survey question of “Having at Least One Major Depressive Episode in Past Year” was only 
asked for the first time to this age group in the last NSDUH report, the results are noteworthy.  Rural 
North youth ranked among the highest in the country.  They also ranked first in Arizona. 

Ages 18‐25 

For all NSDUH reports reviewed, the age group of 18‐25 in the Rural North has consistently ranked first 
or second in Arizona for illicit drug use and dependence, nonmedical use of pain relievers, alcohol 
dependence and abuse, and needing but not receiving treatment for drugs and/or alcohol. Though 
several years worth of surveys on various questions were not statistically reliable enough to be 

                                                      [62] 

 
presented in the data sets, those that were reliable clearly show that substance use for this age group in 
the Rural North is significantly higher than the state as a whole or the country (Table 4‐9 through 4‐14). 

 

Table 4‐9:  Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past Month, Ages 18‐25 

                                                Table 4‐9 
       Illicit Drug Use Other Than 
        Marijuana in Past Month          Rank in AZ         % in Rural North    % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
                 2002‐2004                   2                    8.49           7.93          8.15 
                 2004‐2006                   1                    9.04           8.10          8.53 
                 2006‐2008                   1                    10.58          10.25         8.25 
 

Table 4‐10:  Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                               Table 4‐10 
    Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers 
             in Past Year                 Rank in AZ        % in Rural North    % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
              2002‐2004                       2                   12.19          12.48         11.76 
              2004‐2006                       2                     *            15.03         13.64 
              2006‐2008                       1                   15.82          14.16         12.21 
 

Table 4‐11:  Alcohol Dependence in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                               Table 4‐11 
    Alcohol Dependence in Past Year       Rank in AZ        % in Rural North    % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
              2002‐2004                       2                   9.07           8.59          6.92 
              2004‐2006                       1                   10.1            8.1          7.28 
              2006‐2008                       2                   7.93           7.41          7.37 
 

Table 4‐12:  Illicit Drug Dependence or Abuse in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                               Table 4‐12 
    Illicit Drug Dependence or Abuse 
                                          Rank in AZ        % in Rural North    % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
                 in Past Year 
               2002‐2004                       2                  8.5             7.73          8.1 
               2004‐2006                       1                  8.45            6.91         8.17 
               2006‐2008                       2                  8.85            8.17         7.88 
 
                                                    [63] 

 
Table 4‐13:  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                                 Table 4‐13 
       Needing But Not Receiving 
    Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past      Rank in AZ         % in Rural North    % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
                  Year 
               2002‐2004                        1                   19.59          18.75        16.74 
               2004‐2006                        2                   18.19          16.81        16.79 
               2006‐2008                        2                   17.22          16.31        16.58 
 

Table 4‐14:  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                                 Table 4‐14 
       Needing But Not Receiving 
     Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in     Rank in AZ         % in Rural North    % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
               Past Year 
              2002‐2004                         1                   8.18            7.25        7.52 
              2004‐2006                         1                   7.48            6.44        7.55 
              2006‐2008                         2                   7.7             7.32        7.32 
 

When compared to the rest of the country, the Rural North and Arizona is consistently at or above the 
national average for substance use and dependence for ages 18‐25.  For cocaine use in the past year, 
Arizona has among the highest rates in the country (Table 4‐15).  For illicit drug dependence in the past 
year, Arizona is pretty close to the national average, but the rates in the Rural North are among the 
United States’ highest figures in this category (Table 4‐16).   The same is true for alcohol dependence in 
the past year (Table 4‐17).   

Table 4‐15:  Cocaine Use in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                                 Table 4‐15 
        Cocaine Use in Past Year          Rank in AZ         % in Rural North     % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
              2002‐2004                       3                    8.12            8.59         6.66 
              2004‐2006                       3                    7.65            8.35         6.75 
              2006‐2008                       4                    7.43            8.55         6.26 
 

 

 

 


                                                     [64] 

 
Table 4‐16:  Illicit Drug Dependence in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                                  Table 4‐16 
                                                       Rank in                            % in        % in 
          Illicit Drug Dependence in Past Year           AZ          % in Rural North      AZ        U.S.A. 
                        2002‐2004                        1                  6.5           5.74        5.42 
                        2004‐2006                        1                 6.58           4.84        5.58 
                        2006‐2008                        2                 6.27           5.62        5.51 
 

Table 4‐17:  Alcohol Dependence in Past Year, Ages 18‐25 

                                                  Table 4‐17 
      Alcohol Dependence or Abuse in 
                 Past Year                  Rank in AZ       % in Rural North         % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
                2002‐2004                       *                    *                 19.18         17.31 
                2004‐2006                       1                  20.71               17.18         17.34 
                2006‐2008                       1                  19.14                17           17.19 
 

As with the youth, perceptions of the risk associated with smoking marijuana, smoking cigarettes and 
drinking alcohol were among the worst in the state (Table 4‐18). 

Table 4‐18:  Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use 

                                                  Table 4‐18 
                                                                             2002‐         2004‐        2006‐
                   Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use 
                                                                             2004          2006         2008 

    Perceptions of Great Risk of Smoking Marijuana Once Per Month                2           2            2 
    Perceptions of Great Risk of Having Five or More Drinks of an                2           2            1 
    Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a Week 
    Perceptions of Great Risk of Smoking One or More Packs of                    1           1            1 
    Cigarettes Per Day 
 

Ages 26 or Older 

Estimates for ages 26 and older in Arizona (and consequently, the Rural North) rank well above the 
national average for “Illicit Drug Use in Past Month”, “Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past 
Month”, “Cocaine Use in Past Year”, “Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year” and “Needing but 
Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year” (Tables 4‐19 through 4‐23).      

 
                                                     [65] 

 
Table 4‐19:  Illicit Drug Use in Past Month, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐19 
    Illicit Drug Use in Past Month         Rank in AZ           % in Rural North     % in AZ    % in U.S.A. 
               2002‐2004                       1                      7.01            6.27         5.67 
               2004‐2006                       3                      5.91            5.95         5.87 
               2006‐2008                       3                      6.81            7.09         5.96 
 

Table 4‐20:  Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Past Month, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐20 
    Illicit Drug Use Other Than 
     Marijuana in Past Month             Rank in AZ           % in Rural North      % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
              2002‐2004                      3                      3.21             3.45          2.59 
              2004‐2006                      3                      3.17             3.37          2.65 
              2006‐2008                      3                      3.49             4.03          2.81 
 

Table 4‐21:  Cocaine Use in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐21 
     Cocaine Use in Past Year           Rank in AZ            % in Rural North      % in Az     % in U.S.A. 
           2002‐2004                        3                       2.06             2.64          1.82 
           2004‐2006                        3                       1.83               2           1.71 
           2006‐2008                        3                       1.95             2.44          1.75 
 

Table 4‐22:  Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐22 
 Nonmedical Use of Pain Relievers in 
            Past Year                    Rank in Az           % in Rural North      % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
            2002‐2004                        4                      3.67             3.94          3.16 
            2004‐2006                        3                      3.67             3.73          3.31 
            2006‐2008                        2                      4.91             4.72          3.53 
 

 

 

 

                                                      [66] 

 
Table 4‐23:  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐23 
      Needing But Not Receiving 
    Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in    Rank in AZ        % in Rural North    % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
              Past Year 
             2002‐2004                       2                    1.8            1.79             1.53 
             2004‐2006                       1                   1.59            1.49             1.49 
             2006‐2008                       3                   1.57            1.78             1.48 
 

Other estimates which still rank the Rural North above the national average but show recent 
improvements which have brought the region more in‐line with the rest of the country include “Alcohol 
Dependence or Abuse in Past Year”, “Dependence on or Abuse of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in Past Year” 
and “Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past Year” (Tables 4‐24 through 4‐26). 

Table 4‐24:  Alcohol Dependence or Abuse in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐24 
    Alcohol Dependence or Abuse in 
               Past Year                 Rank in AZ        % in Rural North     % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
              2002‐2004                      3                   6.88            8.02          6.22 
              2004‐2006                      2                   7.88            7.54          6.29 
              2006‐2008                      3                   6.21            6.62          6.18 
 

Table 4‐25:  Dependence on or Abuse of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐25 
    Dependence on or Abuse of Illicit 
                                         Rank in AZ        % in Rural North     % in AZ     % in U.S.A. 
      Drugs or Alcohol in Past Year 
               2002‐2004                      4                   7.6            8.97             7.26 
               2004‐2006                      2                  8.68            8.43             7.27 
               2006‐2008                      3                  7.32            7.75             7.2 
 

 

 

 

 


                                                   [67] 

 
Table 4‐26:  Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past Year, Ages 26 or Older 

                                               Table 4‐26 
       Needing But Not Receiving 
    Treatment for Alcohol Use in Past    Rank in AZ        % in Rural North         % in AZ       % in U.S.A. 
                  Year 
               2002‐2004                      3                  6.58                7.8             5.84 
               2004‐2006                      1                  7.38                7.13            5.95 
               2006‐2008                      3                  5.95                6.36            5.82 
 

Perception of risk for Rural North adults 26 and over are the worst in the state for smoking cigarettes, 
smoking marijuana, and drinking alcohol (Table 4‐27).  In every data set reviewed and for all ages, the 
understanding of perceived risk for substance use is either maintaining at the same level through the 
years or getting worse in the Rural North.  

Table 4‐27:  Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use, Ages 26 or Older 

                                              Table 4‐27 
               Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use                      2002‐04       2004‐06       2006‐08 
Perceptions of Great Risk of Smoking Marijuana Once Per Month               4             2             1 
Perceptions of Great Risk of Having Five or More Drinks of an                  3             1           1 
Alcoholic Beverage Once or Twice a Week 
Perceptions of Great Risk of Smoking One or More Packs of                      1             1           1 
Cigarettes Per Day 
 

Approximately 94% of the estimates collected in the Rural North for 2002‐2008 are above the national 
average.  The good news is that the percentage of the population using, or depending on, illicit drugs 
and alcohol has decreased for many substances in recent years.  However, there are notable exceptions. 
For instance, increases have occurred in nonmedical use of pain relievers and illicit drug use and/or 
dependence.  All age groups in the Rural North rank well above the national average for abuse of pain 
relievers and illicit drugs, particular illicit drugs other than marijuana. The age group 18‐25 appears to 
have the biggest problem according the NSDUH. This age group also has an exceptionally high 
percentage of people having alcohol dependence and needing, but not receiving, treatment services.   

It is extremely important to note that “Perceptions of Risk” for all ages in the Rural North became 
progressively poorer between 2002 and 2008 for all substances surveyed.  This implies the population as 
a whole does not properly understand the dangers of using cigarettes, marijuana and alcohol.  

 

 
                                                   [68] 

 
4.1.2  N‐SSATS 

The National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N‐SSATS) is an annual census of facilities 
which provide substance abuse treatment in the United States.  Data collected in this survey includes 
the location, characteristics, and use of alcohol and drug abuse treatment facilities and services 
throughout the country.  An analysis of this data is important to see how treatment services in Mohave 
County and NARBHA compare to the rest of the state and country. 

At a nationwide level, the 2009 survey results indicate outpatient treatment was offered by 81% of all 
facilities and accounted for 90% of all clients in treatment.  Residential (non‐hospital) treatment was 
offered by 26% of all facilities and accounted for 9% of all clients in treatment.  Hospital inpatient 
treatment was offered by 6% of all facilities and accounted for 1% of all clients in treatment. 

The N‐SSATS data differentiate between three major types of care – outpatient, residential (non‐
hospital), and hospital inpatient.  This data includes all treatment services provided regardless of 
method of payment (private, public, donations or insurance) or if the facility is gender restricted.  
SAMSHA’s N‐SSATS Specialist, Dr. Cathie Alderks, prepared data sets specifically for this Needs 
Assessment that separated the data out for Mohave County, the NARBHA region, and the State of 
Arizona less the NARBHA region.   This enables a comparison of services provided in these areas and 
helps assess treatment service gaps for NARBHA as well as Mohave County (within NARBHA).  Dr. 
Alderks provided annual records since 2000 (2001 was excluded) for treatment services and residential 
utilization rates.  The complete tables provided by Dr. Alderks are included in Appendix G. 

Outpatient Services ‐ The N‐SSATS recognize five different types of outpatient treatment services:  
Regular Outpatient, Intensive Outpatient, Day Treatment/Partial Hospitalization, Detoxification, and 
Methadone/ Buprenorphone.  The number of clients served for each of these outpatient services from 
2006 through 2009 is provided in Tables 4‐28 through 4‐31.   

For each outpatient service type, the number of clients served per area is compared to its estimated 
population (Arizona Department of Commerce Estimates) and shown as clients per 1000 people.  The 
data reveal that for all years reviewed the proportion of the population receiving Outpatient Treatment 
Services in the NARBHA Region exceed the proportion of the population receiving these services in the 
rest of Arizona.  Furthermore, the proportion of Mohave County residents receiving Outpatient 
Treatment Services is significantly higher than the statistic for the NARBHA Region.  Likewise the Median 
Number of Clients per Facility for Mohave County is significantly higher than the rest of the state and 
NARBHA (see Appendix G).  The data indicate that Outpatient Treatment Services in Mohave County is 
probably the most heavily utilized in Arizona. 

An analysis of 2009 data for clients receiving outpatient treatment services (Table 4‐28) shows that 
regular outpatient services in Mohave County are utilized 73% higher than NARBHA as a whole and 
100% higher than the rest of Arizona (all counties in Arizona not in NARBHA).  Intensive outpatient 
services are utilized far less in Mohave County than they are used throughout the rest of NARBHA or the 
state.  This trend holds true for all years reviewed.  It is interesting to note that NARBHA utilizes 
                                                     [69] 

 
intensive outpatient treatment far more than it is used in southern Arizona (approximately 52% higher 
utilization rate).  Methadone/ buprenorphone services are well utilized in Mohave County; in 2009 these 
services were used 47% more than NARBHA in its entirety.  Outpatient services unavailable in Mohave 
County include Daytime Treatment/Partial Hospitalization and Detoxification. This gap in services is 
reflected in all data for years 2006 through 2009. 

Table 4‐28:  2009 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services 

                                         2009 
                      CLIENTS IN OUTPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                                NARBHA Region                      Rest of AZ              
       TYPE OF SERVICE          Mohave County                      (all counties              (All counties in AZ 
                                                               including Mohave)               NOT in NARBHA) 
                                               Per 1000                         Per 1000                        Per 1000 
                             Number                           Number                         Number 
                                               Residents                        Residents                       Residents
                                                                                                          
    Regular Outpatient        1,125              5.23          2,835              3.60        15,562              2.58 
                                                                                                            
    Intensive Outpatient        85               0.40           930               1.18        3,458               0.57 
                                                                                                             
    Day TX/Partial Hosp.         ‐               0.00           108               0.14         159                0.03 
                                                                                                             
    Detoxification               ‐               0.00            14               0.02         352                0.06 
                                                                                                            
    Methadone/Bupren.          150               0.70           289               0.37        4,788               0.79 
                                                                                                          
    ANY OUTPATIENT            1,360              6.33          4,176              5.31        24,319              4.03 
                                                                                                    
    Population               214,949                          786,915                       6,027,231                 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


                                                           [70] 

 
An analysis of 2008 data for clients receiving outpatient treatment services shows that regular 
outpatient services in Mohave County are utilized 160% higher than NARBHA and 97% higher than the 
rest Southern Arizona.  These records indicate regular outpatient service utilization decreased between 
2008 and 2009 from 6.5 persons per thousand to 5.23 persons per thousand.  This is a 19.5% drop in 
utilization. In contrast, NARBHA had only a 0.5% drop in utilization and Southern Arizona had a 22.7% 
drop on utilization.  Meanwhile, intensive outpatient services and methadone/buprenorphone services 
in Mohave County remained fairly consistent between 2008 and 2009. 

 

Table 4‐29:  2008 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services 

                                          2008 
                       CLIENTS IN OUTPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                               NARBHA Region                      Rest of AZ              
       TYPE OF SERVICE          Mohave County                     (all counties              (All counties in AZ 
                                                              including Mohave)               NOT in NARBHA) 
                                               Per 1000                        Per 1000                        Per 1000 
                             Number                          Number                         Number 
                                               Residents                       Residents                       Residents
                                                                                                         
     Regular Outpatient       1,354              6.50         2,779              3.62        19,543              3.34 
                                                                                                           
     Intensive Outpatient       85               0.41          659               0.86        2,217               0.38 
                                                                                                            
     Day TX/Partial Hosp.        ‐               0.00           60               0.08         225                0.04 
                                                                                                            
     Detoxification             1                0.00           3                0.00          64                0.01 
                                                                                                           
     Methadone/Bupren.         151               0.72          274               0.36        3,902               0.67 
                                                                                                         
     ANY OUTPATIENT           1,591              7.64         3,775              4.92        25,951              4.43 
                                                                                                   
     Population              208,352                         767,558                       5,855,327                 
 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                           [71] 

 
The number of outpatient clients in 2007 is unusually low with only 38% the number of the outpatient 
clients in 2006 and 55% the number of outpatient clients in 2008.  The striking contrast to the years on 
either side implies a disparity in data for the number of regular outpatient clients in 2007. It’s 
noteworthy to point out that despite abnormally low figures for regular outpatient clients in Mohave 
County, it still has a significantly higher utilization rate than NARBHA and the State; 23% higher than 
NARBHA and 54% higher than Southern Arizona.  The number of intensive outpatient clients in 2007 is 
also very low at 42 clients for the entire year.  Methadone/buprenorphone clients are consistent with 
later years. 

 

Table 4‐30:  2007 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services 

                                           2007 
                        CLIENTS IN OUTPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                                NARBHA Region                      Rest of AZ              
       TYPE OF SERVICE             Mohave County                   (all counties              (All counties in AZ 
                                                               including Mohave)               NOT in NARBHA) 
                                               Per 1000                         Per 1000                        Per 1000 
                                Number                       Number                          Number 
                                               Residents                        Residents                       Residents
                                                                                                          
     Regular Outpatient       748*               3.71          2,370              3.17        13,750              2.42 
                                                                                                            
     Intensive Outpatient       42               0.21           878               1.17        2,179               0.38 
                                                                                                             
     Day TX/Partial Hosp.        ‐               0.00            72               0.10         188                0.03 
                                                                                                             
     Detoxification             2                0.01            12               0.02         257                0.05 
                                                                                                            
     Methadone/Bupren.        154                0.76           269               0.36        4,804               0.85 
                                                                                                          
     ANY OUTPATIENT           946                4.69          3,601              4.82        21,178              3.73 
                                                                                                    
     Population             201,693                           747,861                       5,684,146                 
        *Adjusted value = 1361 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                           [72] 

 
An analysis of 2006 data for clients receiving outpatient treatment services shows that regular 
outpatient services in Mohave County are utilized 152% higher than NARBHA and 359% higher than 
Southern Arizona.  The unusually high number of outpatient clients served in Mohave County in 2007 
followed by the unusually low number of outpatient clients served in Mohave County in 2008 suggests a 
possible solution to the discrepancy in the data noted in 2007. It appears that a portion of the clients 
served in 2007 may have accidentally been placed with the 2006 client total.  If we add the number of 
regular outpatient clients from 2006 and 2007 together and divide that by two years, we derive an 
average of 1361 clients for each year.  This adjusted number is only slightly higher than the 2008 value 
and appears to be a more reasonable estimate for 2006 and 2007 than the original values provided by 
SAMHSA.  

With just 57 clients, the utilization of intensive outpatient treatment in Mohave County remains far 
lower than the utilization in NARBHA and southern Arizona.  The utilization of 
methaodone/buprenorphone in Mohave County was slightly lower in 2006, but remained at more than 
twice the utilization rate of NARBHA and consistent with the rate for southern Arizona. 

Table 4‐31:  2006 Clients in Outpatient Treatment Services 

                                          2006 
                       CLIENTS IN OUTPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                             NARBHA Region                      Rest of AZ              
       TYPE OF SERVICE           Mohave County                  (all counties              (All counties in AZ 
                                                            including Mohave)               NOT in NARBHA) 
                                             Per 1000                        Per 1000                        Per 1000 
                               Number                      Number                         Number 
                                             Residents                       Residents                       Residents
                                                                                                       
     Regular Outpatient     1,975*            10.13         4,108              5.64        12,402              2.25 
     Intensive                                                                                           
     Outpatient               57               0.29          719               0.99        2,680               0.49 
                                                                                                          
     Day TX/Partial Hosp.      ‐               0.00           63               0.09          95                0.02 
                                                                                                          
     Detoxification            3               0.02           82               0.11         428                0.08 
                                                                                                         
     Methadone/Bupren.       145               0.74          243               0.33        4,138               0.75 
                                                                                                       
     ANY OUTPATIENT         2,180             11.18         5,215              7.17        19,743              3.58 
                                                                                                 
     Population            194,920                         727,831                       5,511,651                 
       *Adjusted value = 1361 

 

 
                                                         [73] 

 
If we use the adjusted values for 2006 and 2007, we observe the number of regular outpatient clients in 
Mohave County decreased between 2006 and 2009.  In contrast, the number of intensive outpatient 
clients has increased and the number of methadone/buprenorphone clients has remained relatively 
steady.  Elsewhere in the state, both in NARBHA and southern Arizona, the utilization rates of outpatient 
services are a bit more erratic through the years, fluctuating up and down (NARBHA values should be 
adjusted for the 2007 Mohave County discrepancy).  Overall, rates between 2006 and 2009 have slightly 
increased in southern Arizona for intensive outpatient and methadone/ buprenorphone.   For regular 
outpatient services, NARBHA rates have decreased while rates in the rest of Arizona have increased. 

Inpatient Services – Inpatient Treatment Services are divided into two broad categories, Residential and 
Hospital, which each have subcategories.  Residential is divided into Short Term, Long Term and 
Detoxification.  Hospital is divided into Rehabilitation and Detoxification.  The number of clients served 
for each of these outpatient services from 2006 through 2009 is provided in Tables 4‐32 through 4‐35.   

As with the Outpatient Treatment Tables, the number of clients served per area is compared to its 
estimated population (Arizona Department of Commerce Estimates) and shown as clients per 1000 
people.  The data reveal the same trends as the Outpatient data.  For all years reviewed the proportion 
of the population receiving Inpatient Treatment Services in the NARBHA Region exceed the proportion 
of the population receiving these services in the rest of Arizona. Mohave County does not have any 
chemical dependency (CD) residential facilities.  People needing residential treatment in Mohave County 
are normally sent a NARBHA location elsewhere in Northern Arizona if they require public funding for 
their treatment.   

In general, the number of people receiving residential treatment throughout Arizona has been 
decreasing since 2007.  However, it is important to note the statistics provided in Tables 4‐32 through 4‐
35 are not exclusive to publicly funded facilities.  Therefore, no conclusions can be made from this data 
regarding publicly funded residential beds.  In fact, private residential treatment facilities in Arizona 
have been closing down in recent times as a result of the difficult economic environment and lack of 
clients who could afford their services. In addition, it should be kept in mind that clients to private pay 
facilities may live outside the region where they are receiving residential treatment service.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                    [74] 

 
An analysis of 2009 data for clients receiving inpatient treatment services on a per capita basis shows 
that in patient treatment services are used more often in the NARBHA region than in the rest of Arizona.  
For example, as the data in Table 4‐32 illustrates, residential detoxification and hospital detoxification in 
the NARBHA Region were used 30% more often than these services were used in the rest of Arizona (all 
counties in Arizona not in NARBHA).  For short term residential, long term residential and hospital 
rehabilitation services, NARBHA’s population used services 104% more often than the rest of Arizona.  It 
should be noted that hospital rehabilitation was not offered in the NARBHA region during 2009. 

 

Table 4‐32:  2009 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services 

                                          2009 
                        CLIENTS IN INPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                                                       Rest of AZ              
     TYPE OF SERVICE         Mohave County              NARBHA Region             (All counties in AZ 
                                                                                   NOT in NARBHA) 
                                       Per 1000                   Per 1000                      Per 1000 
                           Number                    Number                      Number 
                                       Residents                  Residents                     Residents
     Short Term Res.          0            0            105          0.13          195             0.03 
     Long Term Res.           0            0            173          0.22          707             0.12 
     Detoxification           0            0             10          0.01          76              0.01 
     ANY 
                                                        288 
     RESIDENTIAL              0            0                         0.37          978             0.16 
     Hospital Rehab           0            0            0            0.00          140             0.02 
     Hospital Detox           0            0           16            0.02          77              0.01 
     ANY HOSPITAL             0            0           16            0.02          217             0.04 
                                                                                       
     Population            214,949                   786,915                    6,027,231               
 

 

 

 

 

 

 



                                                    [75] 

 
An analysis of 2008 data for clients receiving inpatient treatment services shows that rates of use for 
residential and hospital detoxification in the NARBHA Region were 597% higher than the rest of Arizona.  
For residential and hospital rehabilitation services, the utilization was 63% higher in the NARBHA Region 
than the rest of Arizona.   

 

Table 4‐33:  2008 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services 

                                          2008 
                        CLIENTS IN INPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                                                        Rest of AZ               
     TYPE OF SERVICE        Mohave County            NARBHA Region              (All counties in AZ NOT 
                                                                                      in NARBHA) 
                                     Per 1000                        Per 1000                       Per 1000 
                         Number                    Number                         Number 
                                     Residents                       Residents                      Residents
                                                                                                   
    Short Term Res.          0           0            55               0.07         272               0.05 
                                                                                                   
    Long Term Res.           0           0           193               0.25         782               0.13 
                                                                                                   
    Detoxification           0           0            58               0.08          51               0.01 
    ANY                                                                                           
    RESIDENTIAL              0           0           306               0.40        1,105              0.19 
                                                                                                   
    Hospital Rehab           0           0            9                0.01         145               0.02 
                                                                                                   
    Hospital Detox           0           0           112               0.15         135               0.02 
                                                                                                   
    ANY HOSPITAL            0            0           121               0.16         280               0.05 
                                                                                         
    Population           208,352                   767,558                       5,855,327                
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                  [76] 

 
 

An analysis of 2007 data for clients receiving inpatient treatment services shows that NARBHA’s rate of 
use for detoxification services were 96% below than the rest of Arizona.  The rates of use for residential 
and hospital rehabilitation services were 69% higher in the NARBHA Region than the rest of Arizona. 

 

Table 4‐34:  2007 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services 

                                          2007 
                        CLIENTS IN INPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                                                     Rest of AZ               
     TYPE OF SERVICE         Mohave County            NARBHA Region           (All counties in AZ NOT 
                                                                                    in NARBHA) 
                                      Per 1000                   Per 1000                           Per 1000 
                          Number                    Number                     Number 
                                      Residents                  Residents                          Residents
                                                                                                 
     Short Term Res.          0           0            46          0.06           310                 0.05 
                                                                                                 
     Long Term Res.           0           0           264          0.35           846                 0.15 
                                                                                                 
     Detoxification           0           0             9          0.01            43                 0.01 
     ANY                                                                                        
     RESIDENTIAL              0           0           319          0.43          1,199                0.21 
                                                                                                 
     Hospital Rehab           0           0             0          0.00           237                 0.04 
                                                                                                 
     Hospital Detox           0           0            12          0.02           270                 0.05 
                                                                                                 
     ANY HOSPITAL            0            0           12           0.02           507                 0.09 
                                                              
     Population           201,693                   747,861                      5,684,146                
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                   [77] 

 
 

An analysis of 2006 data for clients receiving inpatient treatment services shows that the rate of use for 
residential and hospital detoxification in the NARBHA Region was 323% below than the rest of Arizona.  
For residential and hospital rehabilitation services, NARBHA’s rate of use was 67% higher in the NARBHA 
Region than the rest of Arizona.   

 

Table 4‐35:  2006 Clients in Inpatient Treatment Services 

                                          2006 
                        CLIENTS IN INPATIENT TREATMENT SERVICES 
                                                                                            Rest of AZ               
     TYPE OF SERVICE        Mohave County              NARBHA Region                 (All counties in AZ NOT 
                                                                                           in NARBHA) 
                                      Per 1000                          Per 1000                          Per 1000 
                          Number                    Number                            Number 
                                      Residents                         Residents                         Residents
                                                                                                       
    Short Term Res.          0            0            40                 0.05          280                 0.05 
                                                                                                       
    Long Term Res.           0            0           259                 0.36          928                 0.17 
                                                                                                       
    Detoxification           0            0            1                  0.00          91                  0.02 
    ANY                                                                                               
    RESIDENTIAL              0            0           300                 0.41         1,299                0.24 
                                                                                                       
    Hospital Rehab           0            0            13                 0.02          204                 0.04 
                                                                                                       
    Hospital Detox           0            0            6                  0.01          133                 0.02 
                                                                                                       
    ANY HOSPITAL             0            0            19                 0.03          337                 0.06 
                                                                                             
    Population            194,920                   727,831                          5,511,651                  
 

Between 2006 and 2008, NARBHA experienced a significant increase in the number of people using 
residential and hospital detoxification services.  This high use rate for detoxification services decreased 
in 2009 but remained significantly above southern Arizona’s rate.   NARBHA’s hospital rehabilitation and 
residential services have maintained consistently high rates of use throughout the four years reviewed, 
outpacing southern Arizona’s use rate for these services by 63% to 104%.  

 


                                                   [78] 

 
Residential Bed Utilization   

In analyzing statistics for residential bed utilization rates, it should be noted that some data may be 
missing if facilities incorrectly responded to the survey.  In order for a facility to be included, they were 
required to respond to all the appropriate questions and respond to client count queries for themselves 
only.  It is possible for some facilities to report combined client counts with another facility, or to have 
their client counts reported by another facility—as in networks.  In these cases, the data from those 
facilities are not considered.    

For 2009, the utilization rate for all residential (non‐hospital) beds in the country was 89%.  In Arizona, 
the residential bed utilization rate was 79.7%.  For hospital inpatient beds designated for substance 
abuse treatment the utilization rate is 84% countrywide and 79.7% in Arizona.  Table 4‐36 presents the 
statistics for utilization rates over the past five years. 

Table 4‐36:  Utilization Rate of Designated Substance Abuse Treatment Beds 

                                 Utilization Rate of Designated Beds 
                                                                     Hospital 
                                 Year    Location    Residential 
                                                                    Inpatient 
                                         Arizona        89%           80% 
                                 2005 
                                          U.S.          92%           90% 
                                         Arizona        84%           121% 
                                 2006 
                                          U.S.          91%           90% 
                                         Arizona        79%           139% 
                                 2007 
                                          U.S.          92%           85% 
                                         Arizona        87%           126% 
                                 2008 
                                          U.S.          92%           85% 
                                         Arizona        80%           80% 
                                 2009 
                                          U.S.          89%           84% 
 

This table shows that, on average, Arizona utilizes their existing residential beds less than the national 
average.  However, since the beds in Table 4‐36 include beds available at for‐profit treatment facilities, 
this table does not accurately portray the utilization rate of publicly funded residential beds, which is the 
concern of this Needs Assessment.   

The number of publicly funded residential treatment beds allocated to Mohave County residents is 
approximately five beds.  None of these beds are exclusive to Mohave County and may be used by 
others if they are available.  Likewise, Mohave County may use more than its allotted five beds if they 
are available when the need is present.  Mohave County keeps its five allocated beds fully occupied and 
often has the need for additional beds.   


                                                      [79] 

 
The wait time for a publicly funded residential bed is up to two weeks for Mohave County clients.  Two 
weeks is an unacceptably long waiting period.  NARBHA indicates the delay for Mohave County residents 
is likely a lack of availability.  For example, NARBHA reported the utilization rate for the first quarter of 
2010 at West Yavapai Guidance Clinic was 108%.  This is the location where nearly all Mohave County 
clients go to for Chemical Dependency (CD) Residential Treatment.  This rate of utilization for CD 
Residential beds at this facility is considered normal by NARBHA.   

4.2     Arizona Families F.I.R.S.T. 
Arizona Family F.I.R.S.T. (Families in Recovery Succeeding Together – AFF) is a community substance 
abuse prevention and treatment program established by the Arizona Legislature in 2000.  AFF provides 
contracted family‐centered, strengths‐based, substance abuse treatment and recovery support services 
to parents or caregivers whose substance abuse is a significant barrier to maintaining or reunifying the 
family or achieving self‐sufficiency.  AFF emphasizes face‐to‐face outreach and engagement at the 
beginning of treatment, concrete supportive services, transportation, housing, and aftercare services to 
manage relapse occurrences.   

AFF contracts providers locally for treatment services.  All services are either provided through the local 
RBHA (Regional Behavioral Health Authority) if the client is AHCCCS eligible, or via an AFF contracted 
provider who is paid by DES.  In Mohave County, the RBHA is NARBHA and the contracted DES provider 
is Westcare Arizona.  To join the AFF program, clients must either be referred by Child Protective 
Services or the DES Jobs program.  In Mohave County every client is referred to Westcare Arizona who 
then determines if services are to be provided by them or NARBHA.  Westcare was able to provide the 
following summary of the total number of AFF clients in Mohave County for calendar years 2007, 2008 
and 2009 (Table 4‐37). 

Table 4‐37:  Mohave County Referrals to AFF (Westcare Arizona) 

                             Mohave County Referrals to AFF 
                            Calendar         No. of         No. of Referrals per 
                              Year          Referrals        1,000 residents 
                              2007            180                   0.89 
                              2008            173                   0.83 
                              2009            127                   0.59 
 

An annual report on the AFF program is prepared by the Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy 
(CABHP) at Arizona State University.  Up until the 2008‐2009 report when budget cuts precluded the 
presentation of much of the detailed geographical data, the annual report provided much of their data 
per county or DES provider district.  Since Mohave County and La Paz County share the same DES 
Provider, their statistics were presented together.  A request was made to extract the data for Mohave 
                                                    [80] 

 
   County out from La Paz County for analysis purposes.  Unfortunately, cuts in AFF’s budget has resulted 
   in reduced available manpower and MSTEPP’s request could not be granted.  

   The number of referrals to AFF in Mohave and La Paz counties were compared to Yuma County, Yavapai 
   County, Coconino County and the entire state (Table 4‐38).  Table 4‐39 compares these figures per 
   capita.  These figures are for the state fiscal year, beginning July 1st and ending June 30th. 

   Table 4‐38:  Number of Referrals to AFF Program 

                                  Number of Referrals to AFF Program 

 Fiscal Year           Mohave & La Paz               Yuma              Yavapai          Coconino         State 
2004‐05                      145                       69                247               68            3851 
2005‐06                      186                       70                232               78            4705 
2006‐07                      163                      116                240               84            5087 
2007‐08                      147                       72                205               70            4691 
2008‐09                   unavailable              unavailable        unavailable      unavailable       3944 
     

   Table 4‐39:  Number of Referrals to AFF Program Per 1000 Residents 

                 Number of Referrals to AFF Program Per 1000 Residents 
                Mohave & La Paz            Yuma                    Yavapai              Coconino             State
2004‐05*              0.67                  0.35                     1.16                  0.51               0.62 
2005‐06               0.86                  0.36                     1.09                  0.59               0.75 
2006‐07               0.73                  0.58                     1.09                  0.62               0.79 
2007‐08               0.64                  0.35                     0.90                  0.51               0.71 
2008‐09            Unavailable           Unavailable              unavailable           unavailable           0.58 
    

   Since the program began in 2001, approximately 99% of the referrals have been provided by CPS 
   caseworkers.  Very few referrals come from the DES Jobs Program which is a program for individuals 
   who face challenges getting back in the work force.  

   The decrease in referrals which occurred throughout the state between SFY08 and SFY09 was 15.9% 
   according to the AFF report.  This decrease was a continued decline in referrals since SFY07.  It was 
   noted in the AFF report that the decrease in referrals is concomitant with budget reductions in the AFF 
   program.   

   A comparison of the per capita figures for Mohave County alone (Table 4‐37) and Mohave County 
   combined with La Paz County (Table 4‐39) shows that Mohave County alone has a higher number of 

                                                        [81] 

    
referrals per capita than the two counties combined.  Moreover, the per capita referral data for Mohave 
County’s calendar years are consistently above the state averages derived from the CABHP Report. 

 

4.3     Arizona Dept of Health Services –  Division of Behavioral Health Services    
        (ADHS DBHS) 
4.3.1  Performance Audit, Substance Abuse Treatment Programs, Report No. 09‐07, July 
2009 

A performance audit was conducted in response to an October 5, 2006, resolution of the Joint 
Legislative Audit Committee.  The audit analyzed three years of data related to four National Outcome 
Measures (NOMs) which were developed by the federal government and believed to evaluate treatment 
program effectiveness – extent of continuing alcohol or drug use, employment, criminal activity, and 
homelessness.  The analysis found that two factors were strongly associated with successful treatment: 
1) deciding to abstain from using alcohol or drugs before treatment started, and 2) completing 
treatment.   The factors which showed only slight association with treatment outcome were lack of 
recent arrests, employment, and stable housing. 

The report pointed out that drug and alcohol abuse is associated with some of society’s most serious 
and expensive problems.  The costs of these nation‐wide problems are significant and borne by 
taxpayers.  They include: 

    o   More than half of all state prison inmates were under the influence of alcohol or drugs when 
        they were arrested. 
    o   Nearly one in six state inmates committed crimes to support a drug addiction. 
    o   About 20 percent of acute care Medicaid expenditures pay for alcohol‐ or drug‐related medical 
        costs. 
    o   Drunk driving is a major expense for the police, courts, and emergency medical systems. 

Furthermore, SAMHSA reports that people with substance use disorders rely on public sources of 
financing far more than people with other diseases.  Unfortunately, within the past year the most severe 
budget reductions in the history of Arizona’s behavioral health system have been implemented (See 
Appendix H).  The consequence of these reductions is that fewer people will be able to receive publicly 
funded treatment services.  This occurs at a time when the need is increasing.  In fact, from SFY 2001 to 
STY 2008, the number of people receiving some type of state‐provided substance abuse treatment 
increased by nearly 300 percent.  This increase is attributed primarily to expansion in AHCCCS eligibility 
requirements.   

The Audit acknowledged substance abuse is a chronic, relapsing condition that may require multiple 
episodes of care over many years.  Successful treatment retention relies upon an individual’s ability to 

                                                   [82] 

 
change his/her behavior, and ability and motivation to integrate techniques for disease management 
into his/her lifestyle.  Personal, social and cultural factors such as socio‐economic, legal, family and 
employment situations all factor into a person’s ability to manage their symptoms.  Although reduced 
criminal activity and finding gainful employment were determined to be poor indicators in Arizona for 
successful treatment, the report noted NARBHA as the REBA which showed the greatest improvement in 
these areas.  Overall, auditors compared Arizona’s NOMs with those reported by other states and found 
that Arizona’s performance is below that of substance abuse programs in other states. 

In addition to improvements in oversight of substance abuse programs, the Audit also made several 
recommendations for improvement in treatment outcomes.  These are: 

    o   Do more to increase retention, such as adopting goals and incentives related to retention and 
        treatment completion. 
    o   Do more to ensure continuum of care, such as establishing standards to assess the severity of 
        consumers’ substance abuse problems and provide case management with a clear definition of 
        consumers’ expectations. 
    o   Do more to encourage use of evidence‐based practices, such as more extensive monitoring and 
        improved guidance for implementing specific evidence‐based practices. 

The Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (ADHS/DBHS) agreed with all 
recommendations of the Auditor General and is currently implementing them. 

4.3.2  Annual Report of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs, State Fiscal Years 2008 & 
2009 

Each year the ADHS/DBHS conducts an assessment of its substance abuse treatment programs in 
accordance with Arizona Revised Statutes 36‐2023.  This report includes information related to service 
types and geographic locations, funding sources and expenditures, numbers of clients served and their 
corresponding demographic information, and substance use patterns.  Throughout the report 
information is presented by Geographical Service Areas (GSAs).  Mohave County is included in GSA 1, 
which consists of the five Counties whose behavioral health services are provided through NARBHA. 

In SFY 2008, more than $121 million was spent on substance abuse treatment for more than 63,000 
eligible enrollees.  In SFY 2009, approximately $128.5 million was spent providing treatment for over 
69,000 eligible adults and children.  The reports indicated the majority of funding (62%‐69%) is provided 
through Medicaid funding (Title XIX & Proposition 204) and approximately 19% is provided from the 
Federal Block Grant for Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT Grant).  The remaining 
funding is from State appropriated monies, County and City programs, the Arizona Department of 
Corrections and liquor fees. 

The distribution of enrollment into treatment programs throughout the state for both 2008 and 2009 
shows Maricopa County has the highest enrollment, followed by Pima County and GSA 1 (Tables 4‐40 
and 4‐41).  However, when the enrollment figures are compared to the population of these areas, it is 
                                                   [83] 

 
shown that although Maricopa County contains approximately 60% of the states’ population, they only 
have about 39% of the treatment services enrollees. In contrast, Pima County contains 15% of the 
states’ population but about 26 to 28.5% of the enrollees.  GSA 1 contains 11.6% of the population and 
15 to 16% of the enrollees.  The report does not provide how funds are distributed throughout the state. 

Table 4‐40:  2008 Substance Abuse Treatment Enrollees 

                        2008 Substance Abuse Treatment Enrollees 
                             Area                 % Population      % of Enrollees 
                        GSA 1: NARBHA                11.6%              14.8% 
                      GSA 2: La Paz/Yuma              3.5%               4.9% 
                            GSA 3: 
                       Conchise/Graham/                   3.5%           5.8% 
                      Greenlee/Santa Cruz 
                        GSA 4: Gila/Pinal              5.6%               7.3% 
                          GSA 5: Pima                 15.5%              26.3% 
                        GSA 6: Maricopa               60.3%              38.0% 
 

Table 4‐41:  2009 Substance Abuse Treatment Enrollees 

                        2009 Substance Abuse Treatment Enrollees 
                             Area                 % Population      % of Enrollees 
                        GSA 1: NARBHA                11.6%              15.9% 
                      GSA 2: La Paz/Yuma              3.5%               4.9% 
                            GSA 3: 
                       Conchise/Graham/                   3.5%           5.6% 
                      Greenlee/Santa Cruz 
                        GSA 4: Gila/Pinal              5.8%               6.6% 
                          GSA 5: Pima                 15.4%              28.5% 
                        GSA 6: Maricopa               60.3%              39.5% 
 

   

For both years, over 90% of all individuals receiving substance abuse treatment services were adults.  
The age group receiving the majority of services was 25‐44 (49‐50% of enrollees) followed by 45‐64 (27‐
28% of enrollees) and 21‐24 (10.5% of enrollees).   In 2009, more males (56.2%) received substance 
abuse treatment in Arizona than females (43.8%).  Approximately 86% of enrollees were White, 7% 
African American, 5% Native American and 2% Asian, Pacific Islander or Multi‐racial. 



                                                  [84] 

 
In SFY2008, the majority of consumers’ received outpatient treatment (79% of enrollees) which is 
significantly less costly than inpatient services.  Brief or long term residential treatment services were 
provided to 8.6% of the enrollees for that year.  Detoxification services was provided to 2.8% of 
enrollees.  In SFY2009, these services were provided to 78.6% for outpatient treatment, 9.5% for 
residential treatment, and 2.6% for detoxification services.  

In SFY2009, a total of 10,762 individuals received court ordered substance abuse treatment.  
Approximately 19.6% of court ordered enrollees (roughly 2,109 people) were in GSA 1.  Per capita, this is 
2.7 people for every 1,000 persons in GSA 1.  A review of the SFY 2009 figures throughout Arizona 
indicates rural areas tend to have a higher number of involuntary substance abuse treatment 
participants per capita than areas containing large urban populations (Table 4‐42). 

Table 4‐42:  2009 Involuntary Substance Abuse Participants 



                      2009 Involuntary Substance Abuse Participants 

                                                                                   Participants 
                                                               Approx No. of 
                       Area                  Population                             Per 1000 
                                                                Participants 
                                                                                     People 
                GSA 1: NARBHA                  786,915              2109               2.7 
              GSA 2: La Paz/Yuma               235,433              1022               4.3 
                    GSA 3: 
               Conchise/Graham/                237,618              1205                5.1 
              Greenlee/Santa Cruz 
                GSA 4: Gila/Pinal              397,752              1453                3.7 
                  GSA 5: Pima                 1,048,796             1840                1.8 
                GSA 6: Maricopa               4,105,623             3132                0.8 
 

Types of substances abused differ between children/adolescents and adults.  DBHS reports in 2009 that 
alcohol was the leading substance abused by adults with serious mental illness (41%); this is consistent 
with findings from previous years which shows alcohol abuse ranging from 51% to 39% between 2006 
and 2009.  However, in 2009, marijuana overtook stimulants as the second most commonly abused 
substance among adults at 25%.  The use of marijuana among adults in Arizona has shown a steady 
increase since 2006 at which time it was used by 17% of adults.  The use of stimulants among adults 
peaked in 2007 at 28% and has since decreased to 24% in 2009.  Between 2006 and 2009, the use of 
narcotics has steadily increased from 4% to 6% and other substances have steadily decreased from 6% 
to 3%. 

Children and adolescents receiving treatment report that marijuana is the substance most commonly 
used, followed by alcohol.  Marijuana use among children/adolescents increased from 59% in 2006 to 

                                                    [85] 

 
73% in 2009. Meanwhile, alcohol use decreased from 27% in 2006 to 20% in 2009.  Stimulants use has 
also decreased from 11% in 2006 to 3% in 2009.  Narcotics and other substances are reported to be 
minimally abused by children and adolescents with usage between 1% and 2% for years 2006‐2009. 

ADHS/DBHS highlights several programs and specific initiatives using evidenced‐based models in their 
report.  These include:  Methamphetamine Centers of Excellence (COE), Addiction Reduction and 
Recovery Fund, Enhancing Treatment Effectiveness through Peer Support and Family Support Services, 
Services for Families Involved with Child Protective Services, Adolescent Alcohol/Drug Treatment 
Projects, and Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT) Block Grant.  The program which has 
the most visible impact in Mohave County is the Arizona Families F.I.R.S.T. (AFF) program which is part 
of the Services for Families Involved with Child Protective Services.  None of the other programs or 
initiatives are identified as being offered with Mohave County.  The Addiction Reduction and Recovery 
Fund (HB2554) passed in 2006 and provided funding for the development of several Substance Abuse 
Stabilization Centers in rural areas of Arizona.  Mohave County was not one of these areas. 

4.3.3  Substance Abuse Treatment Services Capacity Report, April 2008 

This report was prepared in accordance with Executive Order 2008‐01 and is intended to provide 
Arizona’s capacity to provide substance abuse treatment services to those in need of such treatment.  
This order prioritizes families involved in the child welfare system for access to substance abuse 
treatment services.  Child Protective Services (CPS) reports that when a child is in danger, substance 
abuse is almost always a factor.  They estimate nearly 80% of Arizona families referred to CPS have 
substance abuse issues.  Executive Order 2008‐01 seeks to ensure that the funds spent on treatment in 
Arizona are being spent in the most efficient and coordinated manner, providing treatment first to those 
in great need.  It is intended that the information provided in this report will allow the state of Arizona 
to target substance abuse treatment funding where it is most needed. 

The report highlights a number of findings which it says points to the fact that the need for treatment 
may in some situations exceed the state’s capacity to provide treatment.  These findings include: 

    o   In FY2006, Arizona had the second highest rate of individuals 25 years or older who were in 
        need of, but did not receive, treatment for alcohol abuse. 
    o   In FY2006, Arizona had the second highest rate of individuals ages 12 to 17 who needed, but did 
        not receive, treatment for illicit drugs. 
    o   The 2005 NSDUH estimated that 2.67% of individuals in Arizona needed treatment services for 
        illicit drug use but did not receive such treatment. 
    o   The 2005 NSDUH revealed that approximately one in twelve people in Arizona needed, but did 
        not receive, treatment for alcohol abuse. 

To assess where the treatment service gaps in Arizona are, ADHS/DBHS surveyed the state agencies on 
their substance abuse treatment capacity.  This report provided the results and interpretation of the 
survey.  The same geographic service areas (GSAs) that were described in the Annual Report on 

                                                   [86] 

 
Substance Abuse Treatment Programs were utilized here.  The service provider network within each of 
the GSAs was described.  NARBHA’s description included the following, 

             “Despite enormous geographic distances and sparsely‐populated communities, NARBHA 
             has  established,  and  continues  to  expand  and  enhance,  a  full  continuum  of  covered 
             behavioral health services to meet members’ needs in a timely, culturally‐relevant, and 
             clinically‐appropriate manner.” 

The  survey  divided  Adult  Substance  Abuse  Treatment  Service  Providers  into  eight  categories:  
Contracted Providers, Outpatient Clinics, Specialty Providers, Residential Substance Abuse Beds, 
Detox  Inpatient  Beds,  Detox  Sub‐Acute  Beds,  Stabilization  Services  and  Methadone  Clinics.  
Although  the  number  beds  for  each  residential  facility  was  reported,  the  capacity  of  the  non 
residential facilities was not reported.  This is relevant since a facility with a staff of five would 
have  a  smaller  treatment  capacity  than  a  facility  with  a  staff  of  fifty.    Table  4‐43  presents  the 
number  of  providers  per  GSA.    According  to  the  table,  GSA  1  is  listed  as  having  the  highest 
number  of  stabilization  services,  and  the  second  highest  number  of  contracted  providers, 
specialty  providers  and  outpatient  clinics.    In  contrast,  GSA  1  is  listed  as  having  the  lowest 
number of residential substance abuse beds and detoxification sub‐acute beds, and the second 
lowest number of detoxification inpatient  beds. 

Table 4‐43:  Statewide Availability of Adult Substance Abuse Treatment Service Providers by 
Type and GSA, March 2008 

    Statewide Availability of Adult Substance Abuse Treatment Service Providers by Type and GSA, 
                                             March 2008 
                                                    Residential 
                                                                     Detox        Detox 
             Contracted  Outpatient    Specialty    Substance                                Stabilization  Methadone 
    GSA                                                            Inpatient    Sub‐Acute 
              Providers    Clinics     Providers      Abuse                                    Services      Clinics 
                                                                     Beds         Beds 
                                                       Beds 
      1         42           71           53            38             39          28            24            2 
      2         11           30           13            60             101         32            16            1 
      3         17           23           10           328              8          36             0            1 
      4         17           50           42            57             101         30             0            1 
      5         36           55           53           551             225         36             0            3 
      6         92          179           80           218             44          38             0            10 
    Total       215         408          251           1252            518         200           40            18 
 

Table  4‐43  is  amended  from  a  table  (Table  3)  in  the  Substance  Abuse  Treatment  Services 
Capacity Report which totals the number of services provided as something other than the sum 
of services provided for each category.  Furthermore, it should be noted that a single provider 
may  be  licensed  to  provide  more  than  one  type  of  service.  Lastly,  the  report  advises  that  the 
total  number  of  beds  does  not  equal  the  sum  of  residential  substance  abuse  beds,  detox 

                                                               [87] 

 
    inpatient beds, and detox sub‐acute beds.  They explain that duplicate beds have been identified 
    across GSAs.  

    Table 4‐44 presents the data in Table 4‐43 per 100,000.  This per capita data is important in that 
    it  provides  a  better  picture  of  service  capacity  for  each  GSA.    When  the  availability  of  each 
    service  is  viewed  per  capita,  the  availability  of  services  in  GSA  1  differs  from  the  availability 
    shown  in  Table  4‐43.  The  bottom  line  of  the  table  ranks  NARBHA  against  the  other  GSAs  for 
    service need.  A rank of one indicates having the highest need in the state, a rank of six indicates 
    having the lowest need in the state.  NARBHA has a rank of one for residential substance abuse 
    beds and two for methadone clinics. 

    Table 4‐44:  Statewide Availability of Adult Substance Abuse Treatment Service Providers by 
    Type and GSA per 100,000 Adults, March 2008 

  Statewide Availability of Adult Substance Abuse Treatment Service Providers by Type and GSA per 100,000 
                                             Adults, March 2008 
                                                                    Residential      Detox 
             2008        Contracted    Outpatient    Specialty                                  Detox Sub‐    Stabilization    Methadone 
 GSA                                                                Substance      Inpatient 
           Population     Providers      Clinics     Providers                                  Acute Beds      Services         Clinics 
                                                                    Abuse Beds       Beds 

   1         767558         5.47          9.25         6.91               4.95       5.08          3.65           3.13            0.26 
   2         229397         4.80         13.08         5.67            26.16        44.03         13.95           6.97            0.44 
   3         233241         7.29          9.86         4.29           140.63         3.43         15.43             ‐             0.43 
   4         373326         4.55         13.39         11.25           15.27        27.05          8.04             ‐             0.27 
   5        1026506         3.51          5.36         5.16            53.68        21.92          3.51             ‐             0.29 
   6        3992887 
                            2.30          4.48         2.00               5.46       1.10          0.95             ‐             0.25 
Average                     3.25          6.16         3.79            18.90         7.82          3.02           0.60            0.27 

    GSA 1 Ranking            5             3             5                 1           3            3               5              2 
     

    Table 4‐44 was also amended from the Substance Abuse Treatment Services Capacity Report in 
    the  population  figures  used  to  derive  the  per  capita  values.  In  that  report,  2006  population 
    figures were used against 2008 data to derive the per capita data.  The population figures used 
    in Table 4‐44 (pulled from Table 1‐2) are for 2008 and have been used consistently throughout 
    this Needs Assessment.   

    For youth, the availability of residential substance abuse facilities is lower in GSA 1 than the rest 
    of the state.   Availability  of general outpatient and  intensive outpatient services for youth are 
    reported  as  low  to  average.    The  report  does  not  go  into  detail  for  youth  substance  abuse 
    treatment services. 

    A  review  of  the  AFF  Program  found  that  AFF  providers  are  either  over  or  at‐capacity  with  no 
    waiting  list.  However,  AFF  providers  report  that  due  to  “capacity  limitations  at  treatment 
    facilities”, some clients receive a less‐intensive level of service than is needed while waiting for 
                                                                  [88] 

     
the  availability  of  a  more  appropriate,  higher  level  of  care.    Clearly,  an  assessment  of  the 
treatment  services  which  lack  the  capacity  to  provide  timely  service  to  AFF  clients  is  needed.  
Unfortunately, this has not been done to date.     

The  Capacity  Report  concluded  that  for  AFF  clients  the  number  of  treatment  providers  per 
100,000 adults was highest in GSA 4 and GSA 1.  GSA 6 was assessed as having the greatest need 
in  the  state  for  additional  treatment  resources.    Unfortunately,  this  assessment  does  not 
differentiate  between  the  types  of  treatment  services  which  are  able  to  provide  timely 
treatment versus those that do not.  Nor does it accurately consider the true need for treatment 
since it uses the population of a region instead of the actual rates of enrollment for either the 
AFF  program  or  state  funded  treatment  programs.    If  these  considerations  were  taken  into 
account it would provide  a more accurate assessment of the treatment needs throughout the 
state.   

 

4.4      Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant (SAPT) 
The Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT) Block Grant represents a significant Federal 
contribution to the States’ substance abuse prevention and treatment service budgets.  On 30 
September 2010, the SAPT Block Grant Application for Arizona was filed. The application required 
submission of a 3‐year plan (FY2011 – FY2013) for intended use of the funds with information on needs 
assessment, resource availability and State’s priorities. 

Prevention 

The prevention component of the plan required the state to describe their existing mechanisms to 
support sub‐recipients and community coalitions in implementing data‐driven and evidence‐based 
preventative interventions.  The state relied heavily on data from the Arizona Youth Survey to describe 
the substance abuse concerns for youth as well as the Arizona Statewide Substance Abuse Epidemiology 
Profile.  It stated the overall direction of prevention services for Arizona is established by the Arizona 
Substance Abuse Partnership (ASAP).   

The application explained that capacity to plan and implement effective substance abuse prevention 
strategies were inconsistent across the state with rural areas lacking the capacity that urban areas 
enjoyed.  When state substance abuse prevention funds were eliminated in January 2010, ADHS and the 
RBHAs reviewed the needs and resources of each community to determine where reductions in funds 
would be least likely to negatively impact rates of substance abuse and substance abuse related 
consequences.  Programs identified in Mohave County eligible for funding included: 

        Mohave County Projects by Stop Teen Underage Drinking Coalition, Arizona Youth Partnership & 
         the Coalition for Successful Youth Development 
        KUSD Elementary Prevention Project for grades 3, 4 and 5 

                                                        [89] 

 
       MethSmart by the Boys and Girls Club – a youth statewide program 

SAPT prevention funds are allocated from ADHS to RBHAs.  Prevention providers who receive funds are 
required to plan, implement, and evaluate all prevention services in collaboration with a community 
substance abuse prevention coalition. 

Treatment 

The application states, 

        “ADHS/DBHS  endorses  a  comprehensive,  person/family  supportive,  and  recovery 
        oriented  system  of  care  for  people  in  need  of  publicly  funded  behavioral  health 
        treatment.    To  ensure  this  vision  of  recovery  is  achieved,  the  Department  of  Health 
        Services maintains a firm commitment to increasing access to care and reducing barriers 
        to treatment; collaboration with the greater community; cultural competency; effective 
        innovation and program evaluation, and; emphasizing consumer and family involvement 
        in an individual’s treatment program.” 

Furthermore, ADHS/DBHS makes clear that it encourages data‐driven decision making at all levels of the 
provider network to improve the quality and timeliness of service delivery.   

Data used to assist in understanding the statewide distribution of need, demand and capacity for 
substance abuse treatment found: 

    1. there is little geographic variation in the prevalence of need for substance abuse treatment 
       (Household Survey); 
    2. demand for treatment varies most by population size, with denser areas of the state 
       experiencing the highest demand for treatment (Household Survey, Jail Studies);   
    3. certain high‐risk groups do exist, including young adults, women in the northern Arizona region 
       (Household Survey) and Tribal nations (Tribal Study); 
    4. statewide, treatment capacity is insufficient to meet needs identified in the general population. 

In evaluating treatment needs throughout Arizona, the population of each region was multiplied by 9.2 
percent which is the approximate percentage of the population, nationally, in need of treatment for an 
illicit drug or alcohol use problem (2008 NSDUH).  Likewise, estimations for women in need of treatment 
were determined by multiplying each region by 6.4 percent, which according to the 2008 NSDUH, is the 
national average for women in need of treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol use problem.  Estimates 
for Arizona’s population that needs treatment but not receiving treatment are also estimated using 
national averages as reported by NSDUH.  This methodology for assessing treatment needs relies 
entirely on population and disregards local variables.  Considering that NSDUH provides state level and 
sub‐state level data on treatment needs (see above section on NSDUH), the use of a national average is 
not the most accurate method to evaluate Arizona’s need.  In general, Arizona’s treatment needs are 


                                                      [90] 

 
higher than the national average.  Consequently, the SAPT application appears to be underestimating 
the treatment needs of the state. 

The state lists twelve priorities as part of the SAPT application.  The number one priority is to “ensure 
that consumers with a substance use disorder/dependence are referred and placed into the most 
appropriate treatment modality based on their clinical need by contractually mandating and 
implementing the statewide use of the American Society of Addiction Medicine’s Patient Placement 
Criteria (ASAM‐PPC)”.  In total, six priorities (including the top two) are treatment related, four are 
prevention related, and two are administrative. 

NARBHA’s existing substance abuse treatment resources were reviewed as part of its Assessment of 
Need, which is a requirement of the SAPT application.  With respect to detoxification/stabilization and 
residential treatment facilities, the following services were listed as available through NARBHA: 

    o   Winslow  ‐ Sixteen bed Rural Substance Abuse Transitional Agency (Navaho County). 
    o   Holbrook – Sixteen bed Rural Substance Abuse Transitional Agency (Navaho County). 
    o   Winslow ‐ Ten bed transitional sober living beds (Navaho County). 
    o   Flagstaff – Twelve bed Intake Triage Unit (ITU), licensed as a Rural Substance Abuse Transitional 
        Agency (Coconino County). 
    o   Flagstaff – Sixteen bed Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Center (Coconino County). 
    o   Prescott – Twenty four bed Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Center (Yavapai County). 
    o   Cottonwood – Twelve bed facility for women with co‐occurring diagnosis (Yavapai County). 
    o   Cottonwood – Approximately twelve bed Residential Treatment – separate cost (not block 
        purchased) (Yavapai County). 

In Mohave County, no inpatient or detoxification services were listed but it was noted that outpatient 
treatment is available in Kingman, Bullhead City and Lake Havasu City by Southwest Behavioral Health 
Service (SBHS) and Mohave Mental Health Clinics (MMHC).  Other services available at these locations 
include counseling, peer support, and methadone service.  It was noted that outreach efforts had been 
made to the Hualapai and Fort Mojave Tribes. 

The needs NARBHA identified include: 

    o   Add SBHS as an additional Responsible Agency in Mohave County to assist in the expansion of 
        substance abuse and other services in Mohave County. 
    o   Increase and expand treatment services, specifically counseling services, throughout the 
        network. 
    o   Expand housing, peer support services, and employment services. 
    o   Increase the number and availability of specialty service providers. 

The application notes that only 2.5% of consumers live outside of a 25 mile radius to a comprehensive 
service provider.  Hualapai Behavioral Health Services is being recruited into the provider network in 
response to this 2.5% and to provide more convenient access to culturally relevant services for members 

                                                    [91] 

 
of the Hualapai Tribe. NARBHA indicates the data does not show a need for additional network 
expansion based upon geographic accessibility.  Interestingly, the need for additional CD residential 
treatment services was not mentioned.  

4.5     Arizona Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile 
The Arizona Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile was first prepared in 2005 to provide data required 
for the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF SIG) from the federal Center for 
Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) in SAMHSA.  The SPF SIG provided $11.75 million over five years to 
reduce substance use in Arizona.  These funds were intended to prevent the onset and reduce the 
progression of substance abuse, with a special focus on the reduction of underage drinking; to reduce 
substance abuse and its associated consequences in communities throughout the state; and to build, 
grow and sustain the state’s prevention capacity and infrastructure.  The focus of the Epidemiology 
Profile is to show the impact of substance abuse on our state and its populace.  In addition, it identifies 
data gaps that exist in our state and discusses the progress made in this area over the past two years. 

The data used in the Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile does not include any primary research.  It is 
derived from reports and surveys already discussed elsewhere in this Needs Assessment.  Therefore, 
only a summary of the findings from the Epidemiology Profile as it relates to defining the substance 
abuse problem in Arizona and specific issues identified within Mohave County will be discussed here.  

The Profile begins with several facts on the impact of substance abuse in Arizona.  Seven of the ten 
leading causes of death in Arizona are at least partially linked to the abuse of alcohol, tobacco, or other 
drugs.  Between 2000 and 2007 the rate of drug‐induced deaths more than doubled from 6.5 deaths per 
100,000 to 18.3 deaths per 100,000.  Similarly, the number of alcohol‐induced deaths per 100,000 
population almost doubled from 2000 to 2007.  A comparison of drug and alcohol‐related deaths by 
county shows that Mohave County, along with Yavapai County, ranks second in the state in the rate of 
drug and alcohol‐related deaths per 100,000 population (Gila County ranks first).    

4.5.1  Tobacco 

Mohave County has the highest rate of malignant neoplasm of trachea, bronchus and lung deaths in the 
state.  The number of these tobacco‐related deaths per 100,000 people is 88.1.  This is more than twice 
the overall state rate.  Gila and Yavapai Counties have the second and third highest rates at 65.2 and 
64.5 per 100,000 people. 

The rate of cardiovascular disease deaths is also very high in Mohave County at 354.1 deaths per 
100,000 people.  The highest rates in the state are Gila County at 425.6 and La Paz County at 373.4.  The 
state average rate is 203.0. 

 

 

                                                    [92] 

 
4.5.2  Alcohol 

The percent of adults who currently drink alcohol in the Arizona is similar to the U.S. for all age groups 
except our state’s oldest residents.  In 2009, 49% of Arizonans age 65 and older drank alcohol compared 
to 41% of this age group nationally.  This age group also surpassed national rates in both heavy alcohol 
use and binge drinking. 

A breakdown of youth alcohol consumption by state shows that Mohave County youth rank second, at 
68.7%, in reporting using alcohol at least once during their lifetime.  Mohave County ranks third in 
Arizona for the rate of youth which report drinking in the past 30 days at 36.4%.  Youth reporting binge 
drinking (5+ drinks on one occasion) in the past two weeks was 22.7% in Mohave County, slightly less 
than Gila County at 24.7% and Greenlee County at 24.5%. 

4.5.3  Illicit Drugs 

The Epidemiology Profile used the NSDUH as its main source of information about adult consumption of 
illicit drugs. It does not go into substate‐level detail and only reviews data through 2007.  MSTEPP 
therefore recommends that readers refer to Section 4.1.1 for substate specific data on illicit drugs. 

Arizona borders Mexico and is a known gateway for trans‐national drug trafficking.  Therefore, drug 
seizures provide useful information on the types of drugs in demand in the U.S. and Arizona.  Between 
2006 and 2009, there was a significant decrease in the amount of cocaine and methamphetamine 
seized.  Unfortunately, there was almost a 90% increase in the amount of heroin seized. 

Tucson and Phoenix are primary drug transit areas through which many tons of cocaine, marijuana, 
methamphetamine and heroin are smuggled into for distribution throughout the country.  
Consequently, easy access to illicit drugs has generated local community drug abuse problems 
throughout the state.  Marijuana is the most commonly trafficked drug. 

Illicit drug consumption by youth is assessed based on data from two sources:  the Arizona Youth Survey 
(AYS) and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS).  Analysis of the age when students begin 
experimenting with illicit drugs indicates youth in Arizona experiment with drugs earlier than students 
nationally (34.7% of Arizona students versus 19.6% of students in U.S. in 2008).  Likewise, the 
percentage of Arizona students which report using illicit drugs in the past 30 days was higher than the 
U.S. for 2004, 2006, and 2008.  Historically, the rate of use for marijuana is higher among students than 
any other illicit drug.  Though marijuana remains the drug of choice for youth today, the rate of use 
decreased slightly in Arizona between 2004 and 2008. 

A comparison of youth illicit drug use by county was presented.  Mohave County leads the state in the 
percentage of youth indicating they have tried heroin (2.4%) and non‐prescribed prescription drugs 
(27.7%) in their lifetime.  Mohave County also ranks very high in the state (among the top four counties) 
for youth indicating past 30‐day use of ecstasy, heroin, steroids and hallucinogens.  Overall, Mohave 


                                                   [93] 

 
County ranks above the state average for percentage of youth indicating they have used an illicit drug in 
their lifetime for all drugs except cocaine. 

A review of treatment admissions reported by ADHS DBHS indicates that in 2008 alcohol accounted for 
the most treatment admissions of any substance type, followed by methamphetamine, marijuana, 
heroin and cocaine. A review of rates of drug and alcohol treatment admissions by county shows that 
Mohave County ranks third in the state for admissions for a problem with heroin, sixth for 
methamphetamine and eighth for all drugs.  It should be noted, however, that Mohave County does not 
have a full range of treatment services within the county so people who need services not available 
locally (such as residential treatment) must go outside the county for treatment. 

Property crime is considered an indicator of drug use since approximately 30% of property crimes are 
attributable to illegal drug use.  The rate of reported property crime in Arizona is reported as 
consistently higher than the national rate since 1994.  An analysis of property crime by county shows 
that Mohave County has the highest rate of property crime in Arizona for youth; it ranks third in the 
state for adults. 

 4.5.4  Substance Abuse in Critical Populations 

Data on substance abuse in the populations which are part of Arizona’s correctional and/or child welfare 
systems are discussed in the Profile although county specific data is minimal.  Detailed data on critical 
populations in Mohave County is provided in the Courts, Child Welfare, and Probation chapter of this 
report.  

 

4.6     Mohave County Treatment Services 
4.6.1  Mohave Mental Health Clinic (MMHC) 

MMHC is a private, non‐profit community mental health center servicing Mohave County from three 
office locations in Kingman, Bullhead City and Lake Havasu City.  They contract with NARBHA to provide 
publicly funded behavioral health services to eligible residents of Mohave County. MMHC’s services 
include: 1) screening and assessment, 2) substance abuse, intake and assessment and treatment, 3) 
adult seriously mentally ill (SMI) case management and treatment, and 4) child and adolescent services.  
Substance abuse treatment services available through MMHC include outpatient individual and group 
therapy, as well as intensive outpatient treatment (Matrix Model).  Buprenorphine services are also 
available.  Methadone services are available through a NARBHA contract with Community Medical 
Services (CMS) in Bullhead City, Arizona.  Medical detoxification services are available through a Level I 
Subacute Facility on a case by case basis.  All residential treatment is provided outside of Mohave 
County, primarily at West Yavapai Guidance Clinic (Hillside), where MMHC has “block purchased” five CD 
residential beds. 

                                                   [94] 

 
MMHC initiates treatment with a professional clinical assessment including utilizing ASAM 
Placement Criteria.  Recommendations are made based on assessed needs.  A medically 
necessary behavioral health service plan is negotiated in collaboration with the client and 
his/her natural support system(s).  

MMHC has sufficient resources and availability for outpatient services.  Medical detoxification 
and CD residential treatment in Mohave County is the most obvious unmet need.  The current 
strategy of providing CD residential treatment for Mohave County residents in Yavapai County 
does not sufficiently provide this level of care in a timely manner that would optimize recovery.   
Nevertheless, records indicate that MMHC keeps their allocated CD residential treatment beds 
fully utilized throughout the year and often has more people in CD residential than they have 
designated spaces.  For instance, in September 2010, Hillside had seven people from Mohave 
County.  Clients may sometimes wait up to two weeks for a CD Residential bed.  This is an 
unacceptable delay in treatment for a client who is assessed to need CD residential treatment.  
It is generally understood that a client who has a residential treatment facility available locally is 
more likely to get a residential bed immediately than a client who lives 2 ½ hours from the 
facility.  Furthermore, there are a number of clients that need CD residential treatment but 
refuse that level of care because it is too far away.  Consequently, these clients enter into a 
locally available outpatient treatment programs rather than the level of care that their 
assessment recommends. 

MMHC also recognizes the value of family involvement in the treatment process.  When clients enter 
into residential treatment which is 150 to 200 miles away from their community, the family component 
of treatment is difficult to facilitate at best and often not possible.  This occurs because these families 
frequently lack the resources to travel this distance to visit their family member in treatment.   

 

4.6.2  Treatment Assessment Screening Center (TASC) 

TASC provides substance abuse and mental health assessment and treatment services in Mohave 
County.  They have offices in Bullhead City, Kingman and Lake Havasu City.  The TASC laboratory is 
exclusively dedicated to substance abuse oriented testing and they have provided testing services to 
Mohave County’s criminal justice and court systems, including the child welfare system, for several 
years. The results of drug testing from TASC provide a fair indication of the preferred substance of use 
for these critical populations.  Table 4‐45 provides the types of substances that tested positive between 
1 July 2007 and 30 June 2010.  Appendix I includes additional data on the TASC test results from each of 
its Mohave County locations. 

 

 


                                                     [95] 

 
Table 4‐45:  TASC Client Drug Test Results 

                                  TASC Client Drug Test Results 
                   Drug Type         Bullhead City        Kingman     Lake Havasu City 
                    Alcohol              0.40%             2.70%           5.30% 
                 Amphetamine            10.80%             23.90%          23.40% 
                  Barbiturates           0.10%             0.10%           0.10% 
                     Benzo               0.30%             0.90%           0.90% 
                  Carisoprodol           0.00%             0.00%           0.10% 
                    Cocaine              0.60%             0.30%           0.40% 
                    Ecstasy              0.00%             0.00%           0.60% 
                       ETG              28.10%             15.90%          10.70% 
                    Opiates              9.00%             19.80%          8.00% 
                 Propoxyphene            0.00%             0.10%           0.20% 
                      THC               50.70%             36.40%          50.30% 
                     TOTAL             100.00%              100%          100.00% 
 

The majority of positive drug test results showed THC (marijuana) as the primary substance of use.  The 
second most popular drug was amphetamine in Kingman and Lake Havasu City; ETG (alcohol) in 
Bullhead City.  These three drugs, along with opiates, were the most frequently used drugs among the 
critical populations tested by TASC.  

4.6.3  Hospital Discharge Data 

An assessment was conducted on Mohave County hospitals to determine volume of admissions due to 
alcohol or drug related disorders. The data is in Table 4‐46. These numbers are believed to be 
conservative for a couple of reasons. First, they exclude emergency room department discharge volume.  
Second, data from Kingman Regional Medical Center and Havasu Regional Medical Center are reporting 
discharge only as primary diagnosis excluding a secondary diagnosis that may be uncovered during 
treatment and considered an alcohol or other drug disorder (AOD). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                  [96] 

 
 Table 4‐46:  Admissions Due To Alcohol or Drug Related Disorders 

     Reporting Medical              Total Number of                     Reporting Period 
        Institutions                  Admissions 
    Kingman Regional Medical                 42                          July 2008‐June 2009 
            Center 

    Havasu Regional  Medical                 87                         January 2008‐July 2009 
            Center 

      Valley View Medical                    895                       January –December 2008 
             Center 

             Total                          1,024 

 

4.6.4  Fort Mojave Tribe Behavioral Health 

Treatment statistics was provided by Fort Mojave Indian Tribe Behavioral Health for years 2006 through 
2009. 

Figure 4‐2:  Adults Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment 




                                                                                               

Figure 4‐1 illustrates the trend of adults receiving substance abuse treatment over the past four years.  
There was a 40% increase in the number of men receiving treatment and a 51% increase in the number 
of women receiving treatment during this time. 
                                                     [97] 

 
Figure 4‐3:  Juveniles Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment 




                                                                                              

 

The number of juveniles receiving substance abuse treatment is shown in Figure 4‐2.  For most years 
there were more juvenile males than females in treatment.  The number of juvenile males in treatment 
increased between 2007 and 2009.  No obvious trends are present for juvenile females. 

Table 4‐47:  Substance Used by Adults 

                                   Substance Used by Adults 
                                2006               2007               2008                2009 
                           Male  Female       Male  Female       Male    Female      Male    Female 
            Alcohol         23        7        29        9        25        24        34        21 
         Amphetamine         7        9        8         7        5         13        14         8 
           Cannabis          8        0        5         1        6          4         9         0 
            Opioid           1        2        4         3        1          3         0         3 
         Poly‐substance     0        1          8        5         7         7         11        9 
 

Table 4‐47 shows the substances used by adults in the Fort Mojave tribe.  Alcohol was the most 
commonly used substance for all years, for both men and women, followed by amphetamine.  Cannabis 
is also a commonly used substance, particularly for males.  Opioids are used to a lesser extent but 
appear to be more popular among women than men. 

 


                                                 [98] 

 
Table 4‐48:  Substance Used by Juveniles 

                                       Substance Used by Juveniles 
                                     2006                 2007                  2008                  2009 
                             Male       Female    Male       Female     Male       Female     Male       Female 
             Alcohol          1            2       1            1        3            2        4            1 
         Amphetamine          1            0       1            0        0            0        0            0 
            Cannabis          6            1       3            0        4            3        5            2 
            Cocaine           0            0       0            0        0            0        0            1 
             Opioid           0            0       2            0        0            0        0            0 
         Poly‐substance       1            0       0            0        0            1        0            0 
 

Juvenile substance preferences were slightly different from the adults.  Male juveniles slightly preferred 
cannabis over alcohol. Female juveniles appear to use both alcohol and cannabis in equal measure.  
Amphetamines, cocaine and opioids were used to a lesser extent (Table 4‐48).  

Table 4‐49:  Type of Treatment for Adults 

                                     Type of Treatment for Adults 
                                  2006                 2007                 2008                  2009 
                             Male  Female         Male  Female         Male  Female          Male  Female 
            Individual        13        7          23        19         18        23          27        23 
              Family          0         0          3         0          1          2          0          0 
              Group           0         0          4         0          0          0          0          0 
         Intensive Out‐pt     11        8          3         1          10        10          13        12 
           Methadone          1         2          2         2          1          2          0          0 
            In‐Patient        2         1          3         1          7          3          6          3 
 

The majority of treatment used for adults for both men and women was individual outpatient 
counseling followed by intensive outpatient treatment (Table 4‐49).  The number of clients requiring in‐
patient treatment increased between 2007 and 2008, and maintained at a higher level in 2009. 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                     [99] 

 
Table 4‐50:  Type of Treatment for Juveniles 

                                Type of Treatment for Juveniles 
                                 2006               2007                 2008                2009 
                             Male  Female       Male  Female         Male  Female        Male  Female
            Individual        3        0         3        0           2        4          6        2 
              Family          0        1         0        1           1        0          0        0 
              Group           4        2         0        0           0        0          0        0 
         Intensive Out‐pt     0        0         0        0           0        0          0        0 
           Methadone          0        0         0        0           0        0          0        0 
            In‐Patient        0        0         0        0           1        0          1        0 
 

Individual, family and group counseling have all been utilized for juvenile treatment (Table 4‐50).  As 
with adults, individual counseling is used most often.  Methadone and intensive outpatient treatment 
have not been used at all for juveniles in the past four years.  In‐patient treatment for juveniles has been 
used twice since 2006. 

4.6.5  Mohave County Tobacco Use Prevention Program 

Arizona is known to many as the Wild West, a place where citizens make their own lifestyle choices.  Do 
they choose healthy behaviors?  Surveying and monitoring surveillance systems allow us to follow 
trends and determine if people are actually engaging in healthy lifestyles.  

Arizonans, especially in Mohave County, tend to fall short of making the healthier behavior choices as 
seen in the national, state and local adult and youth risk behavior surveying.  The 2008 Arizona Vital 
Statistics reports that Mohave County adversely leads the state with high rates of chronic disease: 
Cancer, Pulmonary Obstruction, and Heart. 

Further alarming reports show our pre adults and high school youth are at risk too.  On average they are 
more likely than US youth to have ever tried using tobacco, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and 
drink alcohol before the age of 13.  The seriousness of youth participating in these at risk behaviors in 
their early years often leads to addictive lifestyles, chronic health diseases and compromised quality of 
life.  For the families, friends and community, these citizens become a societal and financial burden. 

Tobacco 

According to research, tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death in the United States. 
Each year in the United States, cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke causes 443,000, 
or 1 in 5 deaths.   

Mohave County has the highest smoking rate in the state, 33% (Figure 4‐4) of our adult population 
smoke in comparison to the 16% state average and 21% US smoking rate.  For almost the past ten years, 

                                                   [100] 

 
Mohave smoking rates have remained higher than state and national trends.  In several of the following 
graph summaries, Maricopa County serves as a reference point by which other Arizona counties are 
measure since it drives the state averages (Center for Disease Control, 2008).    

Figure 4‐4:  Adult Smoking Prevalence (with 95% CI) – Mohave & Maricopa County, 2000 ‐ 2008 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research shows that women who smoke during pregnancy have higher rates of pregnancy complication, 
premature delivery, low birth weight babies and increased risk of sudden infant death.  Additional 
burdens for infants born to mothers who smoke are higher rates of respiratory and ear infections, 
asthma, and colic.  Mohave County has much higher rates of women smoking during pregnancy than 
state and national trends.  On the positive side, the rates have been decreasing over the last several 
years (Figure 4‐5). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                 [101] 

 
Figure 4‐5:  Adult Smoking Rates – Mohave & Maricopa County, 1997 ‐ 2008 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children are also negatively affected by the hazards of tobacco through numerous exposures: second 
and third hand smoke, increased and expensive tobacco companies marketing campaigns targeted 
towards them, pressure to use tobacco from peers and family.  These experiences often promote early 
tobacco use leading to the increased risk of addiction and premature health problems.   

Each day in the United States, approximately 3,900 young people between 12 and 17 years of age smoke 
their first cigarette and an estimated 1,000 youth become daily cigarette smokers.  Youth that live with a 
smoker are 50% more likely to be exposed to second hand smoke. This is a critical adverse factor during 
the youth’s ongoing physiological development and they are twice as likely to become smokers 
themselves.  Approximately, 57% of Mohave County students 4‐8th grades who received tobacco 
education report that they live with someone that smokes (Arizona Statewide Substance Abuse 
Epidemiology Profile, 2007).  

With the help of tobacco awareness and prevention programming during 2004 and 2008, the U.S. 
reported a decrease in the number of youth that smoke.  However, the decrease was not substantial.  
“The U.S and Arizona both witnessed decreases between 2004 and 2008 in the percentage of youth 
indicating smoking in the past 30 days, but the decrease was more significant in the U.S.  While the U.S. 
saw a 4.6 percentage point of decrease in past‐month 12th grade smokers, Arizona only saw a 0.5 
percentage point decrease from 2004 to 2008 among these youth.”(Figure 4‐6) (Mohave County 
Tobacco Youth Survey, 2006). 

 
                                                  [102] 

 
Figure 4‐6:  Percentage of Youth Indicating Smoking Past 30 Days 

 
              (2004)
                             Percentage of Youth Indicating Smoking in Past 30 Days by Grade,
                                                  AZ vs. U.S. (2004-2008)

 
                                 30




                                                                                                   U
 




                                                                                                    .S
                                                                                              AZ

                                                                                                      .


                                                                                                                 AZ
                                 25




                                                                                                      U
                                                                                                       .S
                                                                                                        AZ
 




                                                                                                                      U
                                                                                                         .


                                                                                                                       .S
                                                                                                                         .
                                 20




                                                                      AZ
               Percentage




                                                                       AZ
                                                                       U




                                                                        AZ
 




                                                                         .S

                                                                           U
                                                                           .
                                                                                               (2004) (2006) (2008)




                                                                             .S
                                 15




                                                                               .

                                                                                       U
 




                                                                                        .S
                                        AZ


                                        AZ
                                        U




                                                                                          .
                                         U




                                         AZ
                                         .S
                                          .S


                                           .
                                 10
                                             .




                                                         U
                                                                      (2004) (2006) (2008)
                                                          .S
                                   5    (2004) (2006) (2008).
 
                                   0
                                               Grade 8                    Grade 10                   Grade 12
                            AZ 2004             10.7                         17.7                         24.4
                                                 9.2                          16                          25
                            U.S. 2004
                            AZ 2006             10.5                         17.1                         21.2
 
                            U.S. 2006            9.7                         14.5                         21.6

                            AZ 2008              9.7                         16.6                         23.9
                            U.S. 2008            6.9                         12.3                         20.4
 

Whereas, Mohave County youth in grades 8th and 10th observed decreased percentages in 30 day 
tobacco use, 12th graders were fairly constant.  (Figure 4‐7) 

Figure 4‐7:  Use Tobacco in Last 30 Days ‐ 2008 Mohave County Arizona Youth Survey 

 

                                          30
                                          25
                                          20                                                               2004
                                          15                                                               2006
                                          10                                                               2008
                                                                                                           State
                                           5
                                           0
                                                   8th         10th       12th
 

 

                                                          [103] 

 
 

               8th graders                 10th graders                     12th graders

            2004 – 10.4           2004 – 18.1                        2004 – 29.7

            2006 – 13.1           2006 – 19.9                        2006 – 20.6

            2008 – 7.6            2008 – 17.9                        2008 – 20.8

            State – 8.7           State – 16.6                       State – 23.9

 

In comparison to Maricopa County, Mohave youth prevalence of cigarette smoking and smokeless 
tobacco use are similar with the smokeless rates fairly unchanged over time.  Cigarette smoking rate is 
stable overtime despite some erratic changes in grades 8th and 12th (Figure 4‐8). (University of Arizona, 
Feb 2010)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                   [104] 

 
Figure 4‐8:  Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking & Smokeless Tobacco Use 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                               [105] 

 
4.7     Closing Remarks on Treatment Services and Substance Abuse Surveys 
  
The statistics provided by SAMHSA’s annual NSDUH are frequently quoted as a comprehensive and 
unbiased source of data on the severity of substance abuse in the United States.  The Arizona 
Department of Health Services relies on this information to help assess the behavioral health needs of 
the state (Arizona Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile) and make its case for receiving grant funds 
(Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant).  The responses received to NSDUH questions 
on “Needing but Not Receiving Treatment for” a substance and “Dependence On or Abuse of” a 
substance are considered by many substance abuse specialists as the best available assessment of the 
treatment needs for a given community. 

For all age groups, approximately 94% of the NSDUH estimates collected in the NARBHA area for 2002‐
2008 are above the national average.  This fact persists despite the fact that the percentage of the 
population using, or depending on, illicit drugs and alcohol has decreased for many substances in recent 
years.  For many survey questions NARBHA region ranks first or second in Arizona, particularly in the age 
range 18‐25.  It may be that one of the factors which helps contribute to the high level of substance use 
and dependence in northern Arizona is the exceptionally poor perception of the understanding of 
perceived risk for substance use in this region.  The data show that northern Arizona has become 
progressively more naïve with respect to the risks associated with using cigarettes, marijuana and 
alcohol since 2002.  

SAMHSA’s N‐SSATS provide a picture of the availability and utilization of treatment services in Mohave 
County, NARBHA and for southern Arizona (all counties outside of the NARBHA counties).  For the past 
few years Mohave County has enjoyed an increase in regular outpatient treatment services, and based 
on the number of clients served per capita, Mohave County appears to use outpatient services more 
heavily than the rest of the state.  It may be Mohave County’s high usage of regular outpatient 
treatment is due to an abundance of availability of this type of treatment service whereas other forms 
of treatment services, such as residential services, are lacking locally.  In fact, MMHC reports that some 
clients which are assessed as needing residential treatment refuse to leave the county to receive this 
service.  Consequently, they frequently choose to follow a treatment course (i.e. outpatient) they can 
receive closer to their home.  In any case, the availability of outpatient treatment services appears to be 
sufficient in Mohave County. 

There are no residential CD treatment services available in Mohave County.  It is the only county in 
Arizona with a population greater than 100,000 people which does not have some type of CD residential 
facility (long term, short term, stabilization, or substance abuse detoxification).  It is the largest county 
(by land area) in the contiguous United States which does not have some type of a CD residential facility.  
Mohave County residents who require publicly funded residential treatment must travel approximately 
200 miles to receive CD residential treatment (in Prescott, Arizona).  These rural Arizonans must travel 
the longest distances in the state to receive publicly funded CD residential treatment.   


                                                   [106] 

 
West Yavapai Guidance Clinic in Prescott has five publicly funded beds allocated to Mohave County 
residents.  These beds are fully utilized at all times.  In fact, Mohave County regularly exceeds their 
allocated number of beds.  Clients must sometimes wait up to two weeks to be admitted into CD 
Residential Treatment.  NARBHA indicates this delay is likely due to a lack of bed availability.  Treatment 
professionals are in agreement this wait time is unacceptable.  NARBHA recognizes the need for 
additional beds for Mohave County.  They further acknowledge that a residential treatment facility 
located in Mohave County is needed. 

An estimate of the number of CD residential beds needed by Mohave County can be derived by using 
national or statewide average figures.  The 2009 N‐SSATS indicate 10% of all clients in treatment were 
either in residential or hospital in‐patient treatment programs.  The state of Arizona is able to provide a 
more accurate picture. According to the 2008 Annual Report of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs 
prepared by ADHS/DBHS, brief or long term residential treatment services were provided to 8.6% of 
enrollees receiving Arizona’s publicly funded substance abuse treatment services.  If we use the total 
number of people using outpatient services in Mohave County as the figure for “total enrollees” in 
Mohave County (1591 persons), and apply the 8.6% state average, we can estimate that approximately 
137  people in Mohave County would have used some type of residential treatment service in 2008.  The 
2009 Annual Report of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs indicates 9.5% of enrollees received 
substance abuse treatment services.  When this statewide average is applied to Mohave County (for 
1360 enrollees), it is calculated that in 2009 approximately 129 Mohave County residents would have 
used residential treatment services.   

Currently Mohave County fully utilizes their available CD residential beds, which means approximately 
60 people per year receive state funded residential treatment.  Therefore, Mohave County’s utilization 
rate is roughly 54% under the statewide average.  If the statewide average determined by ADHS/DBHS is 
used to determine the need in Mohave County, another six to seven CD residential beds should be 
allocated to Mohave County to serve its treatment needs. 

The state of Arizona claims there is little geographic variation in the prevalence of need for substance 
abuse treatment and the demand for treatment varies most by population size, with denser areas of the 
state experiencing highest demand (p.20, 2010 SAPT Block Grant Application).  However, when 
population is compared to the number of enrollees in Arizona’s publicly funded substance abuse 
treatment programs, we see in 2009 NARBHA had 15.9% of the enrollees although their five counties 
consist of 11.6% of the state’s population.  In contrast, Maricopa County has 60.3% of the states’ 
population, but only 39.5% of the enrollees.  Logically, if the prevalence of need was based upon the 
population, the percentage of the population within a region should equal the percentage of enrollees 
in publicly funded substance abuse treatment programs.  Furthermore, the whole point of the often 
touted SAMHSA surveys is to assess the severity/needs of the substance using population in regions 
throughout the country.  If the prevalence of need for substance abuse treatment and the demand for 
treatment was truly the same everywhere, why not just survey a small population in the country, 
determine the need at that location and use the estimates from there throughout the country?  
Certainly, local variables exist which influence a region’s treatment needs.  Yet in determining the 
                                                     [107] 

 
treatment needs of the NARBHA region, the SAPT Block Grant application simply multiplies the 
population of that region by a national average for the population in need of treatment for an illicit drug 
or alcohol use problem (derived from the 2008 NSDUH).  SAMHSA’s statewide and sub‐state values, 
which are universally higher than national values, were ignored. 

Arizona recognizes families involved in the child welfare system as the population within the state which 
is in greatest need of treatment services.  This population is served by Arizona Families F.I.R.S.T. (AFF).  
The Needs Capacity Report (April 2008), prepared by ADHS/DBHS, was specifically prepared to assess 
the need of this population for treatment throughout the state.  It did this by comparing the total 
number of treatment services in a county to the population of the county.  However, the fact that 
multiple services may be provided by a single provider was mentioned in the report but not considered 
in the calculations.  Also, the capacity of outpatient service providers was not discussed.  Nevertheless, 
the report concluded Mohave County had among the lowest need for additional treatment services 
whilst Maricopa County had the highest need.  Yet a review of referrals to the AFF Program shows that 
Mohave County has a significantly higher number of referrals per capita than the state average (which is 
driven by Maricopa County).  Furthermore, as was previously discussed, while Mohave County has an 
abundance of regular outpatient treatment providers, it has no residential treatment providers.  The 
report states the number of treatment services per 100,000 adults for AFF clients is reported as highest 
in NARBHA’s area, however it also points out that AFF indicates their clients receive a less intensive level 
of service than is needed while waiting for the availability of a more appropriate, higher level of care.  In 
consideration of this, there can be no doubt with all in‐patient services out of the county, Mohave 
County’s AFF clients who need CD residential care, are likely receiving a lesser level of care than they 
require.   

With respect to hospital admissions, it is MSTEPP’s view that some admissions to hospitals for medical 
complaints which do not have an AOD as a primary diagnosis could nevertheless have an AOD as an 
underlying problem which is not disclosed.  It is likely that a certain (unknown) percentage of people 
seeking medical care do not self report their drug history which may be an underlying cause to the 
medical complaint. Therefore, the actual number of people who enter the hospitals with an OAD is likely 
significantly greater than the reported numbers. 

Finally, it is interesting to examine the substance abuse treatment patterns for Fort Mojave Tribe 
because it is a sub‐population of Mohave County which has its own behavioral health agency.  The 
logical premise is that with a significantly smaller population to administer to, the tribe’s behavioral 
health agency is able to be more responsive to its members.  For the past four years, Fort Mohave Tribe 
Behavioral Health has observed increasing numbers of adults requiring substance abuse treatment.  The 
number of people requiring in‐patient treatment increased in 2008 and has maintained at a high level 
through 2009.  In 2008, 13% of clients received in‐patient treatment, and in 2009, approximately 11% of 
clients received in‐patient treatment.  It is noteworthy that the Fort Mohave Tribe’s need for in‐patient 
treatment is significantly higher than the statewide average of 8.6% or Mohave County’s 3.8%. 

                                                                                                                
                                                    [108] 

 
5.0  DISCUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 
5.1     Discussion 
Substance abuse destroys lives and negatively impacts the community at multiple levels.  The costs 
associated with substance abuse are far ranging and borne by all.  The impact of substance abuse on 
families, at the workplace, within the schools, upon the health care system, and in the courts and jails is 
undeniable.  Nevertheless, it should be kept in mind that not all substances are illegal and not all use is 
abuse.  Such may be the case for alcohol and prescription drugs.  Although the line between use and 
abuse may be disputed, the consequences of substance abuse are not.  For example, the correlation 
between substance abuse and child abuse is irrefutable.  In Mohave County, this relationship is 
exceptionally strong.  Furthermore, Mohave County has among the highest rates of child abuse reports 
and investigations in Arizona.   

Multiple other indicators also imply a high level of substance abuse in Mohave County.  For example: 

       The percentage of juvenile male drug arrests has doubled in the past five years. 
       It is accepted that approximately 30% of property crimes are attributable to illegal drug use and 
        Mohave County has among the highest rates of property crime in Arizona.   
       Arizona’s Crime in Arizona Report shows Mohave County had more synthetic narcotic (i.e. 
        methamphetamines) related arrests between 2006 and 2008 than any other Arizona county 
        reviewed.  Arrests for other dangerous drugs has also risen to very high levels.    
       From 2006 through 2008, Mohave County had the highest percentage of alcohol related crashes 
        in the state.   
       Records from the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission indicate Mohave County ranks among 
        the counties with the highest number of drug court cases, per capita, statewide.   
       The number of dependency case filings and the number of children in dependencies have 
        steadily increased in the past four years. 

When these data are considered alongside SAMHSA’s NSDUH results which report approximately 94% of 
substance abuse estimates in Northern Arizona are above the national average, it is sensible to infer 
Mohave County has a substantial substance abuse problem.  In fact, when we consider that in statewide 
comparisons, Mohave County’s substance abuse indicators are frequently among the highest in the 
state, it is reasonable to estimate that Mohave County’s rate of substance abuse may also be among the 
highest in the state.  

By establishing that Mohave County has a significant substance abusing population, we may infer that it 
also has a large need for treatment services.  In accordance with this inference, SAMHSA reports that 
between 2006 and 2009 regular outpatient treatment services were utilized significantly more in 
Mohave County than the rest of Arizona.  In fact, the dramatically higher percentage of clients in 
Mohave County using regular outpatient services as compared to all of northern Arizona (the NARBHA 

                                                   [109] 

 
region) or southern Arizona (which includes Phoenix and Tucson) is so substantial, it is striking.  To 
accommodate the great need for outpatient services, NARBHA has recently added new outpatient 
facilities in Mohave County. 

Having established the need for regular outpatient services in Mohave County far exceeds the rest of 
state, does the same need hold true for in‐patient or residential treatment?  It’s certainly a possibility, 
but assessing this need requires that we consider residential utilization rates elsewhere in the state.  
When we apply the statewide average utilization rate (as determined by the Arizona Department of 
Health Services) for residential treatment by AHCCCS enrollees to Mohave County, we conclude that at 
least 129 to 137 people per year are in need of publicly funded residential treatment.  Considering the 
conservative limits placed on this calculation, including the use of the statewide average when Mohave 
County ranks well above the state average for outpatient services, these estimates are probably low.  
Mohave Mental Health Clinic reports they send approximately 60 people per year to West Yavapai 
Guidance Clinic (Hillside) for residential treatment and this fully utilizes the maximum number of 
allocated beds to Mohave County by NARBHA.   Therefore, according to own DHS’s estimate, Mohave 
County has a need for residential treatment beds that far exceeds the number of allocated beds actually 
granted to Mohave County. 

Although the need for additional residential treatment beds for Mohave County is clear based on the 
actual utilization rates in Arizona, additional factors must be considered when evaluating Mohave 
County’s need for residential treatment.  The lack of residential treatment beds allocated to Mohave 
County only touches upon the problem.  Even if the number of beds available at Hillside to Mohave 
County were to increase, the need for a residential facility within the county limits would remain.  The 
reasons for this are: 

        A. Successful residential treatment program includes family involvement.  Therefore, the 
           facility needs to be within a reasonable driving distance from home.  Hillside is too far away 
           from Mohave County to expect reasonable family involvement.   
        B. A local facility translates into shorter wait times.  Generally speaking, if a client needs a bed 
           and a bed is available locally, that client can occupy that bed the same day.  The treatment 
           needs of a client as they are assessed at a given time must be provided at that time…not 
           two weeks from now. 
        C. Clients are more likely to enter a residential facility if it is local.  Many clients have lived in 
           Mohave County for a long time and do not wish to travel outside the county for treatment 
           services.  They are more comfortable moving to a facility that is within familiar territory.  
           Additionally, parents are resistant to moving far away from their children. 
        D. Mohave County judges have indicated they are overburdened with substance abuse related 
           cases and the Sheriff has people undergoing detoxification and substance abuse recovery in 
           jail.  These officials hope that a local residential treatment facility may pave the way for 
           people to receive the treatment they need instead of using the jail for this purpose.       



                                                    [110] 

 
Furthermore, considering that Mohave County has the largest population in Northern Arizona on 
AHCCCS (as of 2009) and the Median Household Income is well below the state average, the need for 
publicly funded treatment services is likely the highest in northern Arizona. This would include both 
residential treatment and detoxification services.     

Detoxification is another important service which, for the most part, is absent from Mohave County.  
Arizona DES states that the average utilization of detoxification services in Arizona was 2.8% in 2008 and 
2.6% in 2009.  When these state‐wide averages are applied to the Mohave County, the estimated 
number of people needing detoxification services is between 36 and 45 people per year.  A person will 
not be admitted to a CD Residential Treatment program if they are in need of medical detoxification.  
Although many people may choose to detoxify themselves at home, others need help.  This help must 
be convenient and timely. 

At this time, the only publicly funded detoxification service provided in the county is done by the Level I 
Subacute facility at Mohave Mental Health Clinic.  Consideration for admission to the Level I Subacute 
Facility for medical detoxification is done on a case by case basis.   

Since the efficacy of medical detoxification as a stand‐alone treatment event is not encouraging, it is not 
uncommon for a referral to a CD Residential Treatment program to be considered following medical 
detoxification.  Not having a local treatment facility which can provide reliable, timely medical 
detoxification, as well as CD Residential Treatment creates the need for a client to wait for some portion 
of time to enter medically necessary treatment.  Asking these people to wait runs the risk of closing a 
window of opportunity for treatment.  Mohave County needs a better solution. 

Fortunately, the State of Arizona Department of Health Services maintains that it is firmly committed to 
“increasing access to care and reducing barriers to treatment” and “emphasizing consumer and family 
involvement in an individual’s treatment program”.  Further, it encourages data‐driven decision making 
and wishes to improve the quality and timeliness of service delivery.  Based on these assertions which 
were recently stated in their 30 September 2010 SAPT Block Grant application, the treatment gaps 
identified in this report should be remedied so as to provide the access to care and family involvement 
that the state claims to champion. 

Although the focus of this Needs Assessment was on Mohave County’s adult population, the treatment 
needs of youth were also made clear in this report.  In particular, the dramatic increase in drug related 
arrests of juvenile males over the past five years indicates a growing problem.  The striking increase in 
prescription drug abuse in the schools is also alarming.  These concerning statistics are supplemented by 
NSDUH’s estimates, which indicate that illicit drug use other than marijuana and nonmedical use of pain 
relievers are exceptionally high among northern Arizona youth.  Unfortunately, DES reports there are 
fewer residential treatment facilities for persons under 18 in NARBHA’s region than in the rest of 
Arizona.  NARBHA is also reported to have insufficient outpatient treatment services for juveniles.  

With respect to prevention, the NSDUH leaves no doubt that additional work needs to be done 
throughout northern Arizona on educating the public about the dangers of substance abuse.  Its 
                                                   [111] 

 
estimates for “Perceptions of Risk of Substance Use” showed that all ages in the rural north 
demonstrated a decreasing perception of risk for using cigarettes, marijuana and alcohol.  In fact, 
northern Arizona ranks the worst in the state for perception of risk for nearly every substance and for all 
groups.  Another area of concern was the lack of prevention programs in Mohave County that were 
eligible for funding by the SAPT Block Grant.  Other counties, including smaller less populated counties, 
appear to have a greater variety of preventative interventions eligible for funding.  Upon reviewing the 
prevention programs elsewhere and in light of NSDUH’s estimates, it appears that Mohave County 
should consider developing additional data‐driven, evidence‐based prevention programs for its 
population.    

5.2     Recommendations 
Based on the scope and severity of Mohave County’s substance abuse problem as well as an assessment 
of publicly funded treatment resources available to those in need, MSTEPP has identified the following 
treatment objectives: 

    1. Increase the number of residential treatment beds allocated to Mohave County to at least 
        twelve beds. 
    2. Establish a CD residential treatment facility within Mohave County to service the local adult 
        population; both men and women. 
    3. Establish a medical detoxification facility within Mohave County to service the local adult 
        population preparing to enter the CD residential treatment facility. 
    4. Provide transportation services throughout Mohave County for those who do not have the 
        means to travel to treatment providers. 
    5. Provide transportation services to families members who do not have the means to travel to the 
        CD residential treatment facility so they may be involved in the treatment program. 
    6. Develop incentives for those in recovery to encourage them to remain clean. 
    7. In consideration that Mohave County probably has the highest rates of methamphetamine use 
        in the state, conduct additional research to determine if a Methamphetamine Center of 
        Excellence would be viable within the county.   
    8. Conduct further assessment to establish the need for a CD residential facility for youth. 
    9. Conduct further assessment to establish the need for additional transitional housing programs 
        in Mohave County. 
    10. Maintain a community brochure of current substance abuse treatment referral options with 
        annual revisions and updates. 
    11. Encourage substance abuse prevention and awareness education throughout Mohave County. 
     

 

                                                                                                            


                                                   [112] 

 
                                                     

                                                     


                                  6.0  BIBLIOGRAPHY 
CHAPTER ONE 

Arizona Commerce Population Projections, 2006‐2009. From 
http://www.azcommerce.com/EconInfo/Demographics/Population+Projections.htm 

U.S. Census Bureau:  State and County QuickFacts.  Data Derived from Population Estimates, Census of 
Population and Housing, Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates.  Last Revised: 16‐Aug‐2010. From 
http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/04000.html 

County Statistics of the United States. From Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_statistics_of_the_United_States 

 

CHAPTER TWO 

Kingman Police Department.  Annual Report. From www.kingmanpolice.com. 

        (a) Year 2005 

        (b) Year 2006 

        (c) Year 2007 

        (d) Year 2008 

        (e) Year 2009 

Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, Enhanced Drug and Gang Enforcement (EDGE) Report.  From 
http://www.azcjc.gov/ACJC.Web/publications/publications.aspx?ServId=1003 

        (a) Fiscal Year 2005 

        (b) Fiscal Year 2006 

        (c) Fiscal Year 2007 

        (d) Fiscal Year 2008 

        (e) Fiscal Year 2009 


                                                  [113] 

 
 

 

Arizona Department of Public Safety.  Crime in Arizona Report. 
www.azdps.gov/About/Reports/Crime_In_Arizona/ 

        (a) Year 2006 

        (b) Year 2007 

        (c) Year 2008 

        (d) Year 2009 

Arizona Department of Transportation, Motor Vehicle Division, Motor Vehicle Crash Facts. From 
http://www.azdot.gov/mvd/statistics/crash/index.asp 

        (a) Year 2006 

        (b) Year 2007 

        (c) Year 2008 

 

CHAPTER THREE 

Arizona Department of Economic Security, Division of Children, Youth and Families, Administration for 
Children, Youth and Families. Child Welfare Reporting Requirements Semi‐Annual Report.   From 
https://www.azdes.gov/appreports.aspx?category=57 

        (a) For the period of 1 April 2009 – 30 September 2009 

        (b) For the period of 1 October 2008 – 31 March 2009 

        (c) For the period of 1 April 2008 – 30 September 2008 

        (d) For the period of 1 October 2007 – 31 March 2008 

        (e) For the period of 1 April 2007 – 30 September 2007 

        (f) For the period of 1 October 2006 – 31 March 2007 

        (g) For the period of 1 April 2006 – 30 September 2006 

State of Arizona.  Annual Report for State, Child Protective Services Expedited Substance Abuse 
Treatment Fund. 
                                                  [114] 

 
        (a) Fiscal Year 2007 

        (b) Fiscal Year 2008 

Hutchison, Linnae and Blakely, Craig. Substance Abuse – Trends in Rural Areas. 

Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, Enhanced Drug and Gang Enforcement (EDGE) Report.  From 
http://www.azcjc.gov/ACJC.Web/publications/publications.aspx?ServId=1003 

        (a) Fiscal Year 2005 

        (b) Fiscal Year 2006 

        (c) Fiscal Year 2007 

        (d) Fiscal Year 2008 

        (e) Fiscal Year 2009 

 

CHAPTER FOUR 

United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration.  National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH),2002‐2008 SubState Report of 
Substance Use & Serious Psychological Distress, from www.oas.samhsa.gov 

United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration.  National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH),2007‐2008 State Estimates of 
Substance Use & Mental Health, from www.oas.samhsa.gov 

United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration, Office of Applied Studies.  National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N‐
SSATS): 2009, Data on Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities. 

Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy, College of Human Services, Arizona State University Arizona 
Families F.I.R.S.T. Program Annual Evaluation Report, Prepared for Arizona Dept of Economic Security, 
Division of Children, Youth and Families, http://www.cabhp.asu.edu 

        (a)     1 July 2005 – 30 June 2006, released December 2006 

        (b)     1 July 2006 – 30 June 2007, released November 2007 

        ( c)    1 July 2007 – 30 June 2008, released January 2009 

        (d)     1 July 2008 – 30 June 2009, released January 2010 


                                                 [115] 

 
State of Arizona, Office of the Auditor General (July 2009).  Performance Audit, A Report to the Arizona 
Legislature, Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services – Substance Abuse 
Treatment Programs, Report No. 09‐07, from 
www.azauditor.govv/Reports/State_Agencdies/Agencies/Health_Services_Department_of/Health_Servi
ces_Department_of.htm 

State of Arizona, Office of the Auditor General (23 June 2010). Department of Health Services – 
Substance Abuse, Auditor General Report No. 09‐07, Initial Follow‐Up Report, from www.azauditor.gov 

Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services.  Annual Report on 
Substance Abuse Treatment Programs, Submitted Pursuant to ARS 36‐2023, from www.azdhs.gov/bhs/ 

        (a)     Fiscal Year 2008, 31 December 2008 

        (b)     Fiscal Year 2009, 31 December 2009 

State of Arizona, Governor’s Office for Children, Youth and Families, Division for Substance Abuse Policy/ 
Arizona Substance Abuse Epidemiology Work Group/ Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of 
Behavioral Health Services/ Arizona Department of Economic Security, Division of Children, Youth and 
Families (April 2008).  Substance Abuse Treatment Services Capacity Report, from www.azdhs.gov 

State of Arizona, Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (1 July 2010). 
Letter regarding budget crisis, from www.azdhs.gov 

Nelson, Laura Dr., Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health (28 July 2010). 
Letter regarding budget crisis, from www.azdhs.gov 

 Application for Federal Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT) Block Grant, OMB No. 0930‐
0080 

The Substance Abuse Epidemiology Work Group, State of Arizona Governor’s Office for Children, Youth 
and Families, Division for Substance Abuse Policy (2007), Arizona Statewide Substance Abuse 
Epidemiology Profile. 

 Arizona Department of Vital Statistics Records, 2008 

 Center for Disease Control, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Systems, 2008 

 Arizona Statewide Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile, 2007 

 Mohave County Tobacco Youth Survey, (MCTYS‐06)  

                                                                                                             

 


                                                  [116] 

 
 

 




    [117] 

 

				
DOCUMENT INFO