1999-2001 - Washington State Department of Ecology Home Page by zhangyun

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									                                 All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Fiscal   Funding
Year      Status    Funding Program          Recipient Name            Project Title
2001      Closed   Section 319            ADOPT-A-STREAM      FISH PASSAGE WATER POLLUTION
                                          FOUNDATION          ASSESSMENT




2001      Closed   Section 319            ADOPT-A-STREAM      NORTH CREEK STREAMKEEPERS
                                          FOUNDATION




2001      Closed   Section 319 - DIF      AGRICULTURE         OUR WATER, OUR WORLD
                                          DEPARTMENT OF
2001      Closed   Section 319            BELLINGHAM CITY     STREAM MANAGEMENT AND
                                          OF                  EDUCATION




2001      Closed   CWSRF                  BREMERTON CITY      ANDERSON COVE CSO REDUCTION
                                          OF                  FACILITIES



2001      Closed   Aquatic Weeds          BREMERTON PARKS KITSAP LAKE WATER QUALITY
                   Management Program     AND RECREATION  IMPROVEMENT PROJECT




                                             Page 1
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial            BREMERTON PORT     SURFACE WATER MANAGEMENT
                                      OF                 PLAN




2001   Closed   Centennial            BREMERTON-KITSAP UPPER UNION RIVER
                                      CO HEALTH        RESTORATION PROJECT
                                      DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Centennial            CENTRAL KLICKITAT LITTLE KLICKITAT TMDL
                                      CONSERVATION DIST COORDINATION PROJECT




2001   Closed   FUND 001              CENTRAL KLICKITAT LITTLE KLICKITAT TEMPERATURE
                                      CONSERVATION DIST TMDL PROJECT COORDINATION


2001   Closed   CWSRF                 CENTRALIA CITY OF CENTRALIA WASTEWATER
                                                        TREATMENT PLANT




                                         Page 2
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial            CHELAN CO PUBLIC   MANSON STORMWATER
                                      WORKS              MANAGEMENT PLAN




2001   Closed   CWSRF                 CHENEY CITY OF     CHENEY WASTEWATER
                                                         TREATMENT/RECLAMATION
                                                         PROJECT



2001   Closed   Centennial            CLALLAM            DUNGENESS IRRIGATION WATER
                                      CONSERVATION       QUALITY IMPROVEMENT
                                      DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         CLALLAM COUNTY     LAKE SUTHERLAND MILFOIL
                Management Program                       ERADICATION




                                         Page 3
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial            CLALLAM COUNTY      WRIA 18 WATER QUALITY AND
                                                          PLANNING




2001   Closed   Centennial            CLARK COUNTY        DE-WATERING FACILITY FOR
                                      DEPT OF PUBLIC      VACTOR WASTE - PHASE 2
                                      WORKS


2001   Closed   Centennial            CLE ELUM CITY OF    INTERIM WASTEWATER
                                                          TREATMENT FACILITIES




2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         CLEAR LAKE WATER Clear Lake Milfoil Management
                Management Program    DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Centennial            CLINTON WATER       CLINTON COMPREHENSIVE SEWER
                                      DISTRICT            PLAN




2001   Closed   Section 319 - DIF     COMMUNITY           CRITICAL AREAS ORDINANCE
                                      DEVELOPMENT         MODELS
                                      OFFICE OF
2001   Closed   CWSRF                 COUPEVILLE TOWN     WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                      OF                  PLANT EXPANSION




                                         Page 4
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial             COWICHE SEWER      WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                       DISTRICT           FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS

2001   Closed   FUND 001               EISENHOWER HIGH    MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL
2001   Closed   Centennial             ELMA CITY OF       WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                          PLANT CONSTRUCTION


2001   Closed   CWSRF                  ELMA CITY OF       WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                          PLANT CONSTRUCTION
2001   Closed   FUND 001               ELMA SCHOOL        MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       DISTRICT
2001   Closed   Centennial             ENUMCLAW CITY OF WHITE RIVER WATER QUALITY
                                                        STUDY




2001   Closed   Centennial             FARMINGTON TOWN FARMINGTON SEWER SYSTEM
                                       OF              REHABILITATION

2001   Closed   Section 319            FERRY              FCD RIPARIAN DEMONSTRATION
                                       CONSERVATION       EDUCATION PROJECT
                                       DISTRICT




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                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         FISH AND WILDLIFE   CHEHALIS RIVER PURPLE
                Management Program    DEPARTMENT OF       LOOSESTRIFE CONTROL




2001   Closed   Centennial            FOSTER CREEK        PROTECTING WATER FOR PEOLE
                                      CONSERVATION        AND FISH
                                      DISTRICT




2001   Closed   PWTA FUND 058         GOLDENDALE CITY     WASTEWATER FACILITY
                                      OF                  IMPROVEMENTS




2001   Closed   CWSRF                 GOLDENDALE CITY     WASTEWATER FACILITY
                                      OF                  IMPROVEMENTS




2001   Closed   Section 319 - DIF     HEALTH              OPTICAL STORAGE FOR ON-SITE
                                      DEPARTMENT OF       SEWAGE RECORDS




                                         Page 6
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial             ISSAQUAH CITY OF    TIBBETTS CREEK
                                                           RESTORATION/SEDIMENT
                                                           CONTROL




2001   Closed   Section 319            JEFFERSON CO        ON-SITE SEWAGE
                                       HEALTH & HUMAN      OPERATION/MAINTENANCE
                                       SERVICE             PROGRAM




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  JEFFERSON CO        SEPTIC REPAIR REVOLVING LOAN
                                       HEALTH & HUMAN      FUND
                                       SERVICE




2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          KING CO SOLID       KING COUNTY HYDRILLA
                Management Program     WASTE               ERADICATION PILOT PROJECT
                                       MANAGEMENT DIV




2001   Closed   Section 319 - DIF      KIRKLAND CITY OF    PROGRAMMING WEBSITE FOR
                                                           CHINOOK BOOK FOR GREATER
                                                           KING COUNTY
2001   Closed   Section 319            KITSAP CO DEPT OF   BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE
                                       COMMUNITY           BIOLOGICAL MONITORING
                                       DEVELOP             PROGRAM




                                          Page 7
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Section 319            KITTITAS COUNTY   WATERWAY MONITORING &
                                       CONSERVATION DIST LANDOWNER ASSISTANCE




2001   Closed   FUND 001               KOMACHIN MIDDLE MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL
2001   Closed   Section 319            LEMOLO CITIZENS NEARSHORE HABITAT
                                       CLUB            EVALUATION & ENHANCEMENT




2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          LEWIS COUNTY       Brazilian Elodea Eradication - Chehalis
                Management Program                        River




2001   Closed   FUND 001               LEWISVILLE MIDDLE MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL




                                          Page 8
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial             LIND TOWN OF       WASTEWATER DISINFECTION AND
                                                          COLLECTION SYSTEM
                                                          IMPROVEMENTS




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  LONG BEACH CITY    WWTP UPGRADE DESIGN PHASES 2
                                       OF                 AND 3




2001   Closed   Section 319            LOWER COLUMBIA     LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER
                                       ESTUARY            HABITAT PROTECTION
                                       PARTNERSHIP




2001   Closed   Section 319            LUMMI INDIAN       HISTORIC SCALE LOGJAMS PHASE
                                       BUSINESS COUNCIL   2




                                          Page 9
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Section 319            LUMMI INDIAN       NORTH FORK NOOKSACK
                                       BUSINESS COUNCIL   SEDIMENT REDUCTION




2001   Closed   Centennial             LUMMI INDIAN       NORTH FORK NOOKSACK
                                       BUSINESS COUNCIL   SEDIMENT REDUCTION (PHASE 2)




2001   Closed   Centennial             LUMMI INDIAN       ROAD SEDIMENT REDUCTION
                                       BUSINESS COUNCIL   EFFECTIVENESS MONITORING




2001   Closed   Centennial             LYNDEN CITY OF     WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                          PLANT UPGRADE/EXPANSION

2001   Closed   CWSRF                  LYNDEN CITY OF     WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                          PLANT UPGRADE/EXPANSION

2001   Closed   FUND 001               METHOW VALLEY      MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL DISTRICT
2001   Closed   FUND 001               MONUMENT           MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       ELEMENTARY
2001   Closed   FUND 001               MOUNTAIN           MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       MEADOW
                                       ELEMENTARY
2001   Closed   Section 319            NORTH YAKIMA       NYCD 2000 - 2001 WATER QUALITY
                                       CONSERVATION       PROJECTS
                                       DISTRICT




                                          Page 10
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   CWSRF                  OROVILLE CITY OF   OROVILLE WASTEWATER
                                                          TREATMENT FACILITY
                                                          IMPROVEMENT




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  OSTERGAARD JONI    PREPARE SRF LOAN AGREEMENT
                                                          BOILERPLATE FOR REFINANCING
2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          PACIFIC            Loomis Lake Eurasian Watermilfoil
                Management Program     CONSERVATION       Control
                                       DISTRICT




2001   Closed                          PACIFIC COUNTY     Salmon Habitat Recovery in Willapa
                                                          Bay.
2001   Closed   Section 319            PACIFIC            LELAND WATERSHED WATER
                                       ECOLOGICAL         QUALITY MONITORING
                                       INSTITUTE




2001   Closed   FUND 001               PATHFINDER         MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL
2001   Closed   Centennial             PE ELL TOWN OF     WASTEWATER COLLECTION AND
                                                          TREATMENT IMPROVEMENTS




                                          Page 11
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   CWSRF                 PE ELL TOWN OF     WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                         FACILITY DESIGN




2001   Closed   Section 319 - DIF     PEND OREILLE       PEND OREILLE CHILDREN''''S
                                      CONSERVATION       WATER FESTIVAL 2002
                                      DISTRICT
2001   Closed   Centennial            PIERCE CO          PIERCE CD TECHNICAL
                                      CONSERVATION       ASSISTANCE
                                      DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Centennial            POMEROY CITY OF    WASTEWATER FACILITIES
                                                         IMPROVEMENTS CONSTRUCTION -
                                                         STEP 3



2001   Closed   CWSRF                 POMEROY CITY OF    WASTEWATER FACILITIES
                                                         IMPROVEMENTS CONSTRUCTION -
                                                         STEP 3



2001   Closed   Centennial            PROSSER CITY OF    WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                         FACILITIES PHASE 1 UPGRADES


2001   Closed   CWSRF                 PROSSER CITY OF    WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                         FACILITIES PHASE 1 UPGRADES


2001   Closed   Centennial            PUYALLUP CITY OF   CLARKS CREEK WATERSHED
                                                         POLLUTANT REDUCTION




                                         Page 12
                            All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Section 319 - DIF    QUINCY SCHOOL      PROVIDE WATER FESTIVAL FOR
                                     DISTRICT           ELEMENTARY STUDENTS @
                                                        MONUMENT ELEMENTARY
                                                        SCHOOL
2001   Closed   CWSRF                REDMOND CITY OF    IDYLWOOD PARK STREAM
                                                        RESTORATION PROJECT




2001   Closed   FUND 001             RICHLAND SCHOOL    MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                     DISTRICT
2001   Closed   CWSRF                ROZA-SUNNYSIDE     ON-FARM IRRIGATION
                                     BOARD OF JOINT     CONVERSIONS PROJECT
                                     CONTR




2001   Closed   CWSRF                SAN JUAN CO        SAN JUAN ON SITE FAILURE
                                     HEALTH &           REPAIR
                                     COMMUNITY SRVS




2001   Closed   FUND 001             SKAGIT             SKAGIT FINNEY ROAD
                                     CONSERVATION       IMPLEMENTATION
                                     DISTRICT




                                        Page 13
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         SKAGIT COUNTY      CAMPBELL/ERIE LAKE PLAN
                Management Program                       IMPLEMENTATION




2001   Closed   Centennial            SKAGIT COUNTY      SUBSURFACE EFFLUENT DISPOSAL
                                                         FIELD

2001   Closed   CWSRF                 SKAGIT COUNTY      SUBSURFACE EFFLUENT DISPOSAL
                                                         FIELD

2001   Closed   Centennial            SKAMANIA COUNTY CARSON STORMWATER
                                                      FACILITIES PLANNING




2001   Closed   Centennial            SKAMANIA COUNTY STABLER WATER
                                      OF              QUALITY/QUANTITY STUDY




2001   Closed   Centennial            SKAMOKAWA       DISPOSAL FACILITY PURCHASE
                                      WATER AND SEWER PROJECT
                                      DISTRICT



2001   Closed   CWSRF                 SKAMOKAWA       SKAMOKAWA COMMUNITY
                                      WATER AND SEWER SEWER PROJECT
                                      DISTRICT




                                         Page 14
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial            SNOHOMISH          FISH FRIENDLY FARM BMP
                                      CONSERVATION       IMPLEMENTATION
                                      DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Centennial            SNOHOMISH          RILEY SLOUGH HABITAT
                                      CONSERVATION       ENHANCEMENT
                                      DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Centennial            SNOHOMISH          STILLAGUAMISH-SNOHOMISH
                                      CONSERVATION       AQUATIC HABITAT
                                      DISTRICT           ENHANCEMENT




2001   Closed   Section 319 - DIF     SNOHOMISH          FINEY BLOCK/STILLAGUAMISH
                                      CONSERVATION       WATER QUALITY
                                      DISTRICT           INFRASTRUCTURE
2001   Closed   CWSRF                 SNOHOMISH          GROUND WATER MANAGEMENT
                                      COUNTY PUBLIC      PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
                                      WORKS




                                         Page 15
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial             SNOHOMISH          CITIZEN-BASED PUBLIC
                                       COUNTY SURFACE     INVOLVEMENT COMPAIGN
                                       WATER MGMT




2001   Closed   Section 319            SOUTH YAKIMA       SULPHUR CREEK AGRICULTURAL
                                       CONSERVATION       BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
                                       DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Section 319            SPOKANE AQUIFER    SPOKANE WELLHEAD
                                       JOINT BOARD        PROTECTION PROGRAM
                                                          IMPLEMENTATION




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  SPOKANE COUNTY    HANGMAN CREEK CLEAN WATER
                                       CONSERVATION DIST PROGRAM




2001   Closed   Centennial             STEVENS CO         PINGSTON CREEK WATERSHED
                                       CONSERVATION       PLANNING PROJECT
                                       DISTRICT




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  STEVENS COUNTY     WAITTS LAKE SEWER SYSTEM
                                       PUD #1             LOAN FINANCING




                                          Page 16
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   CWSRF                  STEVENS COUNTY     VALLEY SEWER SYSTEM LOAN
                                       PUD #1             FINANCING




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  SULTAN CITY OF     SURFACE WATER QUALITY
                                                          MANAGEMENT PLAN




2001   Closed   Section 319            TACOMA-PIERCE CO SEPTIC SYSTEM EDUCATION AND
                                       HEALTH           MAINTENANCE
                                       DEPARTMENT




2001   Closed   Section 319            TACOMA-PIERCE CO SHELLFISH WATERSHEDS
                                       HEALTH           PROTECTION
                                       DEPARTMENT




2001   Closed   Centennial             TONASKET CITY OF   WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                          FACILITIES UPGRADE




2001   Closed   CWSRF                  TONASKET CITY OF   WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                          FACILITY UPGRADE PROJECT




                                          Page 17
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial             UPPER GRANT        BI-LINGUAL MOBILE IRRIGATION
                                       CONSERVATION       LABORATORIES
                                       DISTRICT




2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          UW WA COOP FISH & WEEVIL PERFORMANCE
                Management Program     WILDLIFE RESEARCH




2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          WAHKIAKUM          WAHKIAKUM AQUATIC WEED
                Management Program     COUNTY             CONTROL PROGRAM




2001   Closed   Section 319            WHATCOM COUNTY SOUTH FORK 2000
                                       CONSERVATION DIST




                                          Page 18
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Centennial            WHATCOM COUNTY RECOVER BERTRAND CREEK,
                                      CONSERVATION DIST WRIA 1




2001   Closed   Centennial            WOODLAND CITY OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                       PLANT IMPROVEMENTS



2001   Closed   CWSRF                 WOODLAND CITY OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                       PLANT IMPROVEMENTS



2001   Closed   Centennial            WSU                WHITMAN COUNTY RESTORATION
                                                         AND EDUCATION PROJECT




2001   Closed   Centennial            YAKAMA NATION      FLOODPLAIN SURFACE MINING
                                                         IMPACT STUDY




                                         Page 19
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2001   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          YAKIMA CO          PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE EDUCATION
                Management Program     NOXIOUS WEED       AND AWARENESS
                                       CTRL BD




2001   Closed   Centennial             YAKIMA COUNTY      FLOODPLAIN SURFACE MINING
                                                          IMPACT STUDY




2001   Closed   Centennial             YELM CITY OF       YELM GROUND WATER QUALITY
                                                          MONITORING




2000   Closed   FUND 001               ABERDEEN HIGH      MAGIC APPLE TECHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL
2000   Closed   Section 319            ADOPT-A-STREAM     CULVERT IDENTIFICATION AND
                                       FOUNDATION         ASSESSMENT PROJECT




2000   Closed   Centennial             ARLINGTON CITY OF STORMWATER FUNDING
                                                         IMPLEMENTATION




                                          Page 20
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   FUND 001              BELLINGHAM CITY    REDUCING POLLUTANT LOADING
                                      OF                 INTO LAKE WHATCOM



2000   Closed   Centennial            BENTON             ENDANGERED SPECIES HABITAT
                                      CONSERVATION       IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
                                      DISTRICT



2000   Closed   Centennial            BENTON             YAKIMA RIVER WATER QUALITY
                                      CONSERVATION       IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
                                      DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial            BREMERTON CITY     BREMERTON CSO REDUCTION
                                      OF                 PLAN UPGRADE




2000   Closed   CWSRF                 BREMERTON CITY     BREMERTON CSO REDUCTION
                                      OF                 PLAN UPDATE




2000   Closed   CWSRF                 BREMERTON CITY     CALLOW CSO DESIGN - FINAL
                                      OF                 PRIORITIES



2000   Closed   Centennial            BREMERTON PARKS COOPERATIVE APPROACH TO CSO
                                      AND RECREATION  REDUCTION




                                         Page 21
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   CWSRF                  BREMERTON-KITSAP LOCAL LOAN PROGRAM (ON-SITE
                                       CO HEALTH        REPAIRS)
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial             BUCKLEY CITY OF    WASTEWATER IMPROVEMENT
                                                          PROJECT (PHASE 5)




2000   Closed   Section 319            CAMAS HIGH        MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL
2000   Closed   Centennial             CENTRALIA CITY OF BELT FILTER PRESS




2000   Closed   Centennial             CHEHALIS BASIN    CHEHALIS BASIN ALLIANCE DAIRY
                                       DISTRICT ALLIANCE IMPLEMENTATION




2000   Closed   Centennial             CHEHALIS CITY OF   CHEHALIS WATER EFFECTS RATIO
                                                          STUDY




                                          Page 22
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Centennial            CHELAN COUNTY      LAKE CHELAN BASIN
                                      DEPT OF PUBLIC     STORMWATER PLAN
                                      WORKS




2000   Closed   Centennial            CLALLAM            JIMMY-COME-LATELY CREEK &
                                      CONSERVATION       ESTUARY RESTORATION
                                      DISTRICT


2000   Closed   Centennial            CLALLAM COUNTY     STATE OF THE WATERS: CLALLAM
                                                         COUNTY




2000   Closed   Centennial            CONFEDERATED       OWHI WATERSHED RESTORATION
                                      TRIBES OF COLVILLE




2000   Closed   Centennial            CONNELL CITY OF    WASTEWATER SYSTEM
                                                         IMPROVEMENTS



2000   Closed   CWSRF                 COWICHE SEWER      WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                      DISTRICT           FACILITY-DESIGN &
                                                         CONSTRUCTION




                                         Page 23
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Centennial             COWLITZ            LOCAL INVOLVEMENT IN
                                       CONSERVATION       RESOURCE ISSUES
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial             EASTERN KLICKITAT HEALTHIER WATER THROUGH
                                       CONSERVATION DIST CONSERVATION FARMING




2000   Closed   Section 319            EDISON             MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       ELEMENTARY
                                       SCHOOL
2000   Closed   Centennial             FERRY              KETTLE TRI-WATERSHED PROJECT
                                       CONSERVATION
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          FISH & WILDLIFE    FEDERAL AQUATIC NUISANCE
                Management Program     DEPARTMENT OF      SPECIES TASK FORCE MEETING
2000   Closed   Centennial             FRANKLIN           COLUMBIA BASIN CROP AND
                                       CONSERVATION       WATER QUALITY MONITORING
                                       DISTRICT




                                          Page 24
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Section 319            FRIENDS OF         BLACKMAN LAKE EDUCATION
                                       BLACKMAN LAKE




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  GOLDENDALE CITY    GOLDENDALE WASTEWATER
                                       OF                 FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS




2000   Closed   Section 319            HITCHCOCK MARK     CRUISE AND ROAD SURVEY
                                                          CONTRACT
2000   Closed   CWSRF                  ISLAND COUNTY      ON-SITE REPAIR FINANCIAL
                                       HEALTH             ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
                                       DEPARTMENT



2000   Closed   Centennial             ISLAND COUNTY      ISLAND COUNTY WATERSHED
                                       PUBLIC WORKS       IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS
                                                          PROJECT




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  ISLAND COUNTY      GLENDALE CREEK RESTORATION
                                       PUBLIC WORKS




                                          Page 25
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   CWSRF                 ISLAND COUNTY      IVERSON FARM ACQUISITION
                                      PUBLIC WORKS




2000   Closed   Centennial            ISSAQUAH CITY OF   ISSAQUAH BASIN WATERSHED
                                                         COMMUNITY LINK




2000   Closed   Centennial            ISSAQUAH CITY OF   ISSAQUAH CREEK BANK/HABITAT




2000   Closed   Centennial            JAMESTOWN          DUNGENESS SEDIMENT
                                      S'KLALLAM TRIBE    REDUCTION FOR FISH/SHELLFISH




                                         Page 26
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         KENT CITY OF       LAKE FENWICK WEED CONTROL
                Management Program                       PLAN




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         KENT CITY OF       LAKE MERIDIAN WEED CONTROL
                Management Program                       PLAN




2000   Closed   CWSRF                 KING CO DEPT OF    WEST POINT SECONDARY
                                      NATURAL            TREATMENT UPGRADE
                                      RESOURCES          REFINANCING




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         KING COUNTY        MILFOIL ERADICATION PILOT
                Management Program                       PROJECT (REGIONAL IAPMP)




2000   Closed   Centennial            KITSAP CO PUBLIC   KITSAP STORMWATER
                                      WORKS              CONSORTIUM EDUCATION
                                      DEPARTMENT         PROJECT




                                         Page 27
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Section 319            KITSAP COUNTY      BURLEY AGRICULTURAL
                                       CONSERVATION       POLLUTION CORRECTION PROJECT
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   PWTA FUND 058          KITTITAS CITY OF   WASTEWATER FACILITIES
                                                          CONSTRUCTION



2000   Closed   Centennial             KITTITAS           COOPERATIVE WATER QUALITY
                                       RECLAMATION        MONITORING PROJECT
                                       DISTRICT


2000   Closed   Section 319            LAKE WASHINGTON MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL DISTRICT
2000   Closed   Centennial             LAKEWOOD CITY OF STEILACOOM LAKE RESTORATION
                                                        EXPANDED STUDY




2000   Closed   Centennial             LEAVENWORTH CITY WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                       OF               FACILITY UPGRADE


2000   Closed   CWSRF                  LEAVENWORTH CITY LEAVENWORTH WASTEWATER
                                       OF               TREATMENT FACILITY UPGRADE


2000   Closed   Centennial             LEWIS CO WATER     WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                       DISTRICT NO 2      FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  LEWIS CO WATER     WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                       DISTRICT NO 2      FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS




                                          Page 28
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Centennial            LEWIS COUNTY       LEWIS COUNTY POULTRY
                                      CONSERVATION       NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT
                                      DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial            LINCOLN COUNTY    UPPER CRAB CREEK WATERSHED -
                                      CONSERVATION DIST PART 2




2000   Closed   Centennial            LONG BEACH CITY    WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                      OF                 PLANT UPGRADE PHASE 1




2000   Closed   CWSRF                 LONG BEACH CITY    WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                      OF                 PLANT UPGRADE PHASE 1




2000   Closed   Centennial            MASON              CHEHALIS WATERSHED
                                      CONSERVATION       RESTORATION PROJECT
                                      DISTRICT




                                         Page 29
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   CWSRF                  MASON COUNTY       NORTH BAY/CASE INLET
                                                          WASTEWATER FACILITIES
                                                          CONSTRUCTION PROJECT




2000   Closed   Centennial             MASON COUNTY       LOWER HOOD CANAL POLLUTION
                                       HEALTH SERVICES    SOURCE




2000   Closed   Section 319            MT PLEASANT        MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL DISTRICT
2000   Closed   Centennial             MUKILTEO WATER     OPEN CHANNEL UV DISINFECTION
                                       DISTRICT           SYSTEM




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  MUKILTEO WATER     OPEN CHANNEL UV DISINFECTION
                                       DISTRICT           SYSTEM




2000   Closed   Centennial             NORTH BEND CITY    WWTF IMPROVEMENTS PHASE 2A
                                       OF



2000   Closed   CWSRF                  NORTH BEND CITY    WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                       OF                 FACILITY IMPROVEMENT PHASE
                                                          2A & 2B



2000   Closed   Section 319            NORTH MASON HIGH MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL




                                          Page 30
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Section 319            NORTH MASON        LOWER HOOD CANAL
                                       SCHOOL DISTRICT    COMMUNITY WATERSHED
                                                          STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM




2000   Closed   FUND 001 - EPA         O'CONNOR         SEDIMENT BUDGET AND
                TMDL FUNDS             ENVIRONMENTAL    DELIVERY TO CHANNEL
                                       INC
2000   Closed   Centennial             OKANOGAN CITY OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                        IMPROVEMENTS DESIGN AND
                                                        CONSTRUCTION



2000   Closed   CWSRF                  OKANOGAN CITY OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                        IMPROVEMENTS DESIGN &
                                                        CONSTRUCTION



2000   Closed   Centennial             OKANOGAN           OKANOGAN IRRIGATION WATER
                                       CONSERVATION       MANAGEMENT
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial             OKANOGAN           OKANOGAN WATERSHED WATER
                                       CONSERVATION       QUALITY
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial             OKANOGAN COUNTY METHOW WATERSHED
                                                       HYDROLOGIC MODEL




                                          Page 31
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Section 319            PALOUSE             PALOUSE RIVER BASIN WATER
                                       CONSERVATION        CEANUP PLANNING
                                       DISTRICT


2000   Closed   PWTA FUND 058          PATEROS CITY OF     WASTWATER TREATMENT
                                                           FACILITY CONSTRUCTION

2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          PEND OREILLE        DAVIS LAKE MILFOIL
                Management Program     COUNTY              ERADICATION PROJECT




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          PEND OREILLE        FAN LAKE MILFOIL ERADICATION
                Management Program     COUNTY              PROJECT




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  PIERCE COUNTY       KEY PENINSULA WATER FESTIVAL
                                       PUBLIC WORKS
2000   Closed   Centennial             RITZVILLE CITY OF   WASTEWATER TREATMENT
                                                           FACILITY




2000   Closed   Centennial             ROZA-SUNNYSIDE      DRAIN INVENTORY FOR BUFFER
                                       BOARD OF JOINT      ZONES
                                       CNTRL


2000   Closed   Centennial             ROZA-SUNNYSIDE      INVENTORY ON-FARM IRRIGATION
                                       BOARD OF JOINT      PRACTICES
                                       CNTRL




                                          Page 32
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   GENERAL FUND -         ROZA-SUNNYSIDE     ROZA-SUNNYSIDE BOARD OF
                TMDL                   JOINT CONTROL      JOINT CONTROL TMDL PROJECT
                                       BOARD




2000   Closed   Centennial             SAN JUAN CO        WETLAND RIPARIAN PROTECTION
                                       CONSERVATION       PROJECT
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Section 319            SEQUIM MIDDLE      MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       SCHOOL
2000   Closed   CWSRF                  SHELTON CITY OF    BASIN 2 SEWER REHABILITATION
                                                          DESIGN




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  SKAGIT CO         SKAGIT COUNTY LOCAL LOAN
                                       PLANNING & PERMIT FUND
                                       CENTER




                                          Page 33
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         SKAGIT COUNTY      LAKE MCMURRAY EXOTIC WEED
                Management Program                       ERADICATION




2000   Closed   Centennial            SKAGIT COUNTY      SAMISH BAY WATERSHED WATER
                                      PUBLIC WORKS       QUALITY MONITORING PROJECT




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds         SNOHOMISH CO       SEVEN LAKES MILFOIL
                Management Program    SURFACE WATER      ERADICATION IMPLEMENTATION
                                      MGMT




2000   Closed   Centennial            SNOHOMISH          SMALL FARMS WATER QUALITY
                                      CONSERVATION       IMPROVEMENTS
                                      DISTRICT




                                         Page 34
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Section 319            SNOHOMISH           QUILCEDA/ALLEN WATERSHED
                                       COUNTY SURFACE      CITIZEN ACTION PROGRAM
                                       WATER MGMT




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  SOAP LAKE CITY OF   SEWER TREATMENT SYSTEM
                                                           IMPROVEMENTS (DESIGN)




2000   Closed   Section 319            SOUTH YAKIMA        IRRIGATION DRAIN WATER
                                       CONSERVATION        QUALITY IMPROVEMENT
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Section 319            SOUTH YAKIMA        SULPHUR CREEK BMP
                                       CONSERVATION        EVALUATION
                                       DISTRICT

2000   Closed   CWSRF                  SPOKANE CITY OF     CSO REDUCTION BASIN PLANNING
                                                           (BASINS 6, 12, 15, 33 A-D, 34)




2000   Closed   Centennial             SPOKANE COUNTY    LITTLE SPOKANE WATERSHED
                                       CONSERVATION DIST DEVELOPMENT PLAN




                                          Page 35
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   CWSRF                  SPOKANE COUNTY    ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL
                                       CONSERVATION DIST SYSTEMS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  SPOKANE COUNTY    SPOKANE COUNTY MINIMUM
                                       CONSERVATION DIST TILLAGE ASSISTANCE




2000   Closed   Section 319            STEVENS CO         RESTORING COLVILLE RIVER
                                       CONSERVATION       WATERSHED HEALTH
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          STEVENS CO         MANAGING WATERMILFOIL IN
                Management Program     CONSERVATION       LONG LAKE
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          STEVENS CO         LOON LAKE
                Management Program     NOXIOUS WEED       ERADICATION/DEMONSTRATION
                                       CTRL BOARD         PROJECT




                                          Page 36
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Centennial            STEVENS COUNTY     ECHO ESTATES COMMUNITY
                                      PUD #1             SEWER SYSTEM REHABILITATION
                                                         PROJECT


2000   Closed   PWTA FUND 058         STEVENS COUNTY     ADDY PUBLIC SEWER SYSTEM
                                      PUD #1             (SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING)




2000   Closed   Centennial            STEVENS COUNTY     ADDY PUBLIC SEWER SYSTEM
                                      PUD #1             (SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING)




2000   Closed   FUND 001              STILLAGUAMISH      ELJ ENHANCEMENT AND
                                      TRIBE OF INDIANS   MAINTENANCE
2000   Closed   Centennial            THURSTON           HENDERSON INLET WATERSHED
                                      CONSERVATION       IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM
                                      DISTRICT




2000   Closed   CWSRF                 THURSTON COUNTY THURSTON COUNTY ON-SITE
                                      PUBLIC HEALTH   HARDSHIP LOANS


2000   Closed   PWTA FUND 058 AND TIETON TOWN OF         TIETON WASTEWATER FACILITIES
                CCWF FUND 139                            UPGRADE


2000   Closed   PWTA FUND 058         TWISP TOWN OF      CONSTRUCTION OF WASTEWATER
                                                         TREATMENT IMPROVEMENTS




                                         Page 37
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   CWSRF                  TWISP TOWN OF      CONSTRUCTION OF WASTEWATER
                                                          TREATMENT IMPROVEMENTS




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  TWISP TOWN OF      CONSTRUCTION OF WASTEWATER
                                                          TREATMENT IMPROVEMENTS




2000   Closed   Aquatic Weeds          UW                 WATERMILFOIL WEEVIL
                Management Program                        EVALUATION




2000   Closed   FUND 001               VANCOUVER          MAGIC APPLE GRANT
                                       SCHOOL DISTRICT
2000   Closed   Section 319            WAHKIAKUM          DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION
                                       CONSERVATION       ASSISTANCE PROJECT
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Section 319            WASHINGTON         SNOQUALMIE SEDIMENT AND
                                       TROUT              SCOUR ANALYSIS PROJECT




                                          Page 38
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


2000   Closed   Section 319            WHATCOM COUNTY RIPARIAN RESTORATION AND
                                                      WATER QUALITY




2000   Closed   Section 319            WHITSON            MAGIC APPLE TEACHER GRANT
                                       ELEMENTARY
                                       SCHOOL
2000   Closed   PWTA FUND 058          WOLLOCHET          SANITARY SEWER SYSTEM
                                       HARBOR SEWER       IMPROVEMENT
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   CWSRF                  WOLLOCHET          SANITARY SEWER SYSTEM
                                       HARBOR SEWER       IMPROVEMENTS
                                       DISTRICT




2000   Closed   Centennial             WSU COOP           SUSTAINABLE SMALL FARMS
                                       EXTENSION -        INCUBATOR DEMONSTRATION
                                       JEFFERSON CO




                                          Page 39
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Tracking   Funding
Number     Amount        Start Date   End Date
G0200026   $129,578.00   7/19/2001    8/31/2004




G0100158   $152,884.99   4/11/2001    7/31/2004




C0200103      $604.00     7/1/2001    6/30/2003

G0100107   $147,505.85    1/8/2001    8/31/2003




L0100024   $959,573.00   4/11/2001    9/13/2001




G0100128     $6,169.84   3/28/2001    12/31/2005




                                           Page 40
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100208     $167,525.14    8/21/2001   9/30/2005




G0100200     $112,497.75    7/16/2001   12/31/2004




G0100201     $163,500.00    7/24/2001   10/31/2005




C0100245      $24,000.00    10/1/2000   9/30/2001



L010031A   $33,009,835.92   7/26/2001   10/31/2005




                                             Page 41
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100119     $57,907.29    3/9/2001    9/28/2002




L0100035   $2,480,430.40   8/28/2001   2/14/2002




G0100135    $250,000.00    3/23/2001   12/31/2004




G0100085     $43,750.00    9/11/2000   10/31/2006




                                            Page 42
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100186    $147,573.83    6/29/2001   6/30/2004




G0100066    $206,000.00    9/30/2000   7/31/2002




G0100089    $524,927.93    8/31/2000    5/1/2002




G0100041     $33,750.00    9/6/2000    12/31/2009




G0100137     $45,000.00    7/5/2001    6/30/2003




C0200101     $60,000.00    7/1/2001    10/31/2003


L0100027   $1,810,050.33   8/21/2001   10/31/2005




                                            Page 43
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100117    $350,000.00    2/21/2001    3/31/2003


G0100164        $750.00    4/20/2001    6/20/2002

G0100109   $1,624,087.45    5/2/2001    6/30/2004



L0100018   $2,771,094.97   5/23/2001    6/30/2004

G0100167        $750.00    4/18/2001    6/20/2002

G0100202     $18,750.00    8/15/2001    6/30/2006




G0100102     $37,490.73    12/28/2000   12/31/2002


G0100111    $250,000.00     1/8/2001    12/31/2003




                                             Page 44
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100123     $27,260.00    2/9/2001    12/31/2004




G0200071     $81,250.00    8/28/2001   6/30/2005




G0100113   $1,937,456.02   3/9/2001    12/31/2003




L0100021   $1,495,456.47   3/9/2001    12/31/2003




C0200099     $49,941.48    7/1/2001    12/31/2002




                                            Page 45
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100154   $146,000.00   5/24/2001   12/31/2003




G0100173    $80,600.00   5/23/2001   12/31/2003




L0100030    $22,148.22   8/3/2001    12/31/2004




G9600163   $453,504.95   7/1/1995    9/30/2003




C0100244     $5,000.00   6/15/2001   6/30/2001


G0100191    $26,360.00   7/5/2001    1/31/2005




                                          Page 46
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100152   $128,829.04   4/3/2001    3/31/2004




G0100161      $750.00    4/19/2001   6/10/2002

G0100125   $214,093.58   2/23/2001   6/30/2005




G0100126    $48,852.80   3/25/2001   1/15/2008




G0100162      $750.00    4/25/2001   6/10/2002




                                         Page 47
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100153   $421,579.55   4/24/2001   2/28/2003




L0100026   $284,000.00   6/4/2001    4/30/2003




G0100110    $43,800.00   1/31/2001   12/31/2002




G0100010   $249,812.00   7/31/2000   12/31/2003




                                          Page 48
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100009    $249,626.50    7/31/2000   12/31/2003




G0100148    $215,572.00    3/28/2001   12/31/2004




G0100008    $160,600.00    7/31/2000   12/31/2003




G0100134    $762,068.00    4/3/2001    9/30/2003


L0100023   $6,521,932.00   4/3/2001    9/30/2003


G0100163        $750.00    4/20/2001   6/10/2002

G0100168        $750.00    4/20/2001   6/10/2002

G0100169        $750.00    4/23/2001   6/10/2002


G0100171     $75,643.00    5/7/2001    10/31/2003




                                            Page 49
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0100015   $250,000.00   3/27/2000   1/10/2001




C0100155     $7,700.00   3/16/2001   6/30/2001

G0100159    $56,652.83   5/2/2001    12/31/2007




G0100175    $15,000.00   5/21/2001   12/1/2004

G0200038    $66,733.00   8/15/2001   12/31/2003




G0100165      $750.00    4/19/2001   6/10/2002

G9900067   $442,585.00   8/19/1998   6/30/2002




                                          Page 50
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0100008    $264,485.38    12/14/2000   12/31/2001




C0100242      $5,000.00     1/1/2002    6/30/2002


G0100124    $149,839.53    3/14/2001    9/30/2003




G0100130   $1,188,246.53   3/12/2001    12/31/2003




L0100022   $1,188,246.54   3/12/2001    12/31/2003




G0100157    $498,561.00    4/11/2001     1/1/2003



L0100025    $930,284.55    4/11/2001     1/1/2003



G0100116    $225,000.00    2/21/2001    12/31/2004




                                             Page 51
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


C0100100      $4,875.71     1/1/2001    6/30/2001



L0100037    $330,000.00    8/30/2001    12/31/2006




G0100166        $750.00    4/20/2001    6/20/2002

L0100011   $8,092,085.92   11/13/2000   11/9/2004




L0100014    $244,024.31     4/1/2000    6/30/2003




C0100122     $49,423.68     9/1/2000    9/30/2002




                                             Page 52
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0200067    $40,000.00   9/11/2001    12/31/2002




G0100087   $360,000.00   12/22/2000   10/31/2003


L0100017    $57,479.00   12/22/2000   9/30/2003


G0100122   $237,620.71   2/15/2001    8/31/2003




G0100205    $60,000.00   8/21/2001    6/30/2004




G0100059   $180,600.00    1/2/2001    6/30/2001




L0100020   $696,129.65   3/22/2001    11/30/2003




                                           Page 53
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100092   $200,217.38   11/15/2000   3/31/2004




G0100105   $123,750.00   12/20/2000   12/31/2003




G0100099   $186,000.00   12/4/2000    12/31/2002




C0100193    $16,990.44    4/1/2001    6/30/2001


G0200031   $246,666.39   8/15/2001    6/30/2005




                                           Page 54
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100151    $108,334.88    8/15/2001   12/31/2003




G0100060    $127,287.00    9/25/2000   3/31/2004




G0100144    $249,999.75    3/28/2001   6/30/2005




L0100033    $215,644.75    8/30/2001   8/31/2003




G0100141    $165,408.38    4/3/2001    12/31/2004




L0100028   $1,709,418.00   5/29/2001   11/17/2001




                                            Page 55
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0100029   $267,103.00   5/29/2001    11/17/2001




L0100034   $139,845.10   8/15/2001    2/15/2005




G0100120   $116,783.00   2/14/2001    12/31/2003




G0100121   $166,933.71   2/14/2001    12/31/2003




G0100067   $916,224.43   8/28/2000    12/31/2003




L0100012   $522,500.00   11/29/2000   6/30/2001




                                           Page 56
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100127   $234,610.36   3/2/2001    10/31/2003




G0100140    $20,000.00   12/1/2000   4/15/2003




G0100147    $29,076.19   4/23/2001   12/31/2003




G0100027   $250,000.00   5/1/2000    12/31/2003




                                          Page 57
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100188    $128,923.00    6/5/2001    12/31/2004




G0100061   $2,330,265.82   3/13/2001   1/31/2004




L0100009   $1,487,900.00   3/13/2001   1/31/2004




G0000373    $104,013.75    8/14/2000    8/1/2002




G0100187     $23,335.49    8/30/2001   12/31/2003




                                            Page 58
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100136     $5,112.62   3/2/2001     1/1/2002




G0100193   $212,389.00   8/28/2001   3/31/2004




G0100206   $113,861.74   8/28/2001   12/31/2004




G0000340      $750.00    9/5/2000    6/10/2001

G0000274   $131,943.00   3/24/2000   1/31/2002




G0000277    $37,500.00   3/24/2000   6/30/2002




                                          Page 59
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000374   $100,000.00   6/27/2000   12/31/2003




G0000279   $208,921.39   4/9/2000    12/31/2003




G0000280   $181,577.28   3/17/2000   12/31/2004




G0100028   $191,250.00   8/18/1999   12/31/2002




L0100005   $245,000.00   8/18/1999   12/31/2002




L0100004   $575,000.00   8/18/1999   12/31/2002




G0000172   $150,000.00   1/29/2000    2/2/2003




                                          Page 60
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0100003   $133,456.06   8/15/2000    1/31/2003




G0000178   $356,140.00   1/26/2000    12/31/2000




G0000344      $750.00    5/12/2000    6/10/2001

G0000057   $500,000.00   8/18/1999    7/31/2000




G0100033    $93,025.41   8/14/2000    8/15/2002




G0000247   $250,000.00   12/21/1999   12/31/2002




                                           Page 61
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000321     $51,450.00    6/27/2000   9/30/2001




G0000278    $249,997.78    3/29/2000   12/31/2003




G0000179    $106,594.50    2/8/2000    6/30/2004




G0000347     $54,271.00    7/26/2000   11/30/2003




G0000200   $3,600,000.00   2/7/2000    12/31/2003




L000018A    $290,158.37    10/1/1999   9/30/2003




                                            Page 62
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100038   $231,064.19   8/15/2000   12/31/2006




G0000328    $10,170.00   5/17/2000   11/30/2001




G0000341      $750.00    9/5/2000    6/10/2001


G0000145   $236,868.75   12/7/1999   12/31/2002




C0000046      $500.00    8/17/1999   8/25/1999

G0000084   $197,069.87   11/5/1999   12/31/2003




                                          Page 63
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000327     $4,500.00   5/18/2000   12/31/2001




L0000008   $458,183.00   12/6/1999   5/29/2001




C0000091     $1,200.00   12/1/1999   6/30/2000

L0100007   $114,471.91   8/14/2000   8/17/2002




G0000207   $230,707.70   3/6/2000    3/31/2006




L0000023   $380,000.00   7/25/2000    9/1/2002




                                          Page 64
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0000013   $667,992.43   7/25/2000   11/30/2001




G0000276    $33,000.98   3/31/2000   12/31/2002




G0000314    $60,450.00   4/25/2000   2/28/2002




G0000250   $187,128.97   10/1/1999   9/30/2002




                                          Page 65
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000348      $12,000.00    5/22/2000   3/30/2002




G0000349      $15,000.00    5/22/2000   3/30/2002




L0000020   $13,838,279.00   7/1/1989    12/31/1997




G0100112      $35,000.00    1/30/2001   12/31/2002




G0000125      $25,838.95    1/14/2000   3/31/2002




                                             Page 66
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000230    $249,704.25     2/3/2000    12/31/2004




G0000360    $230,000.00    7/26/2000    3/31/2002




G0000116    $139,170.00    11/23/1999   4/30/2002




G0000338        $750.00    5/12/2000    6/10/2001

G0000346    $175,000.00    6/29/2000    12/31/2003




G0000124    $840,000.00     7/1/1999    9/30/2000



L0000006   $2,301,000.00    8/8/1998    9/30/2000



G0000067    $449,850.00    10/21/1999   2/28/2004




L0000004    $550,150.00    6/18/1999    9/30/2002




                                             Page 67
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000371   $120,097.16   7/12/2000   9/30/2004




G0000233   $115,219.85   2/24/2000   10/31/2002




G0000246   $500,000.00   4/25/2000   4/30/2003




L0000019   $500,000.00   4/25/2000   4/30/2003




G0000368   $244,945.69   6/28/2000   6/30/2004




                                          Page 68
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0000021   $9,526,730.00   5/5/2000    12/31/2002




G0000357     $54,854.53    6/21/2000   6/30/2003




G0000339        $750.00    9/5/2000    6/10/2001

G0000167    $500,000.00    1/4/2000    12/20/2002




L0000009    $500,000.00    1/20/2000   12/20/2002




G0000173    $493,478.00    1/12/2000   5/31/2005




L0000010   $2,486,884.00   1/26/2000   8/18/2005




G0000343        $750.00    1/1/2000    6/10/2001




                                            Page 69
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0100011    $18,465.00   7/25/2000   12/31/2002




C0000022    $17,000.00   3/30/1999   12/30/1999


G0000234   $419,000.00   2/18/2000   12/31/2002




L0000015   $581,000.00   4/11/2000   2/28/2003




G0000249   $248,332.82   3/1/2000    3/31/2004




G0000225   $244,985.08   2/17/2000   6/30/2003




G0000353    $55,500.00   2/14/2000   9/30/2001




                                          Page 70
                                All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000369    $100,000.00    6/20/2000    12/31/2003




G0000372    $886,337.53     5/2/2000    6/30/2003


G0000355      $3,828.13     6/2/2000     1/1/2004




G0000359      $2,584.75    7/12/2000     1/1/2004




C0000234      $3,460.00    5/22/2000    6/30/2000

G0000111   $1,388,226.03   12/28/1999   12/15/2002




G0000305    $120,750.00    6/14/2000    6/28/2002




G0000320     $11,138.00    6/14/2000    6/30/2001




                                             Page 71
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000370    $250,000.00    6/21/2000   12/31/2003




G0000350     $37,500.00    5/26/2000   12/31/2001




G0000342        $750.00    9/5/2000    6/10/2001

L0100006    $155,000.00    8/16/2000   3/31/2005




L0000016   $1,534,779.76   5/22/2000   8/31/2003




                                            Page 72
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000256    $75,000.00    4/4/2000    1/31/2002




G0000258   $152,910.18   11/22/1999   10/1/2003




G0000248    $70,875.00    4/9/2000    12/31/2001




G0000304   $141,911.55   4/12/2000    12/31/2002




                                           Page 73
                             All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000291    $63,575.00   6/22/2000   12/31/2002




L0100001   $271,400.00   8/10/2000    8/1/2001




G0000354    $59,251.46   6/12/2000   3/31/2002




G0000245    $48,858.44   2/25/2000   7/31/2001



L0000022   $876,940.32   8/18/1999   9/30/2005




G0000198   $145,743.00   1/24/2000   4/30/2003




                                          Page 74
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L0000003   $1,500,000.00   6/15/1999   6/15/2001




L0000017    $991,816.39    3/31/2000   6/30/2002




G0000292    $244,213.00    10/1/1999   9/30/2004




G0000224     $30,000.00    2/3/2000    8/1/2001




G0000043     $36,954.62    5/15/1999   1/31/2003




                                           Page 75
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000257    $153,752.00    4/9/2000    9/30/2002




G0000329    $116,193.00    5/23/2000   7/21/2002




G0000330    $100,000.00    5/23/2000   7/31/2002




C0100029     $50,000.00    8/1/2000    6/30/2001

G0000146    $221,125.00    12/7/1999   12/31/2002




L0000024     $22,689.76    6/28/2000   6/15/2002



G0100025   $1,298,870.24   8/10/2000    9/1/2003



G0000201   $2,091,585.54   2/11/2000    3/1/2002




                                            Page 76
                              All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


L000012A   $335,799.67   2/11/2000     3/1/2002




L000012B    $33,303.66    6/1/2002    7/15/2002




G0000275    $35,000.00   12/15/1999   6/30/2001




G0000356      $750.00     9/5/2000    6/10/2001

G0100037    $94,257.72   8/15/2000    12/31/2004




G0000199    $36,337.49   1/26/2000    10/15/2001




                                           Page 77
                               All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


G0000303    $250,000.00    2/15/2000   5/31/2002




G0000345        $750.00    9/5/2000    6/10/2001


G0000091   $1,411,885.63   5/9/2000    12/31/2002




L0000005    $134,640.00    9/24/1999   3/31/2002




G0000290    $128,368.00    4/20/2000   6/30/2003




                                            Page 78
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0




                    Project Description
The Adopt-a-Stream Foundation (AASF) Fish and Wildlife
Habitat Restoration Crew will use the money to inventory
three watersheds in urbanizing Northern King county and
Southern Snohomish County to locate water pollution sources,
determine water types, and identify barriers to salmon
migration.




The Adopt-a Stream Foundation will use the money to create a
partnership between the cities of Everett, Mill Creek, and
Bothell; Snohomish County and King County;, the
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe; and known public and private
groups with interest in North Creek, to analyze existing
watershed plans and issues affecting the stream's salmon
resources. In addition, the Foundation will conduct
Streamkeeper Field Training Classes for up to 80 volunteers
who will be trained to monitor the results of North Creek
restoration projects and conservation easements. They will
also be trained to provide water quality monitoring assistance
to King and Snohomish County Surface Water Management
Divisions.


The city of Bellingham will use the money to develop a
Master Plan for the Squalicum Creek Watershed. The plan
will include a vegetation inventory, which will be used to
prioritize stream restoration project proposals and further
research activities. A three part video series will also be
developed with the target areas being the Squalicum and
Padden Creek Watersheds. They will also implement the
Pledge Program, a community education program focusing on
the degradation of water quality as a result of stormwater
runoff from homes, yards, businesses, parking lots and
roadways.
The city of Bremerton will use the money to refinance costs
associated with the facility planning, design, and construction
of the Anderson Cove CSO separation facilities.


Control "weed creep" in the southern portion of Kitsap Lake
through application of Rodeo® (an aquatic herbicide) to
fragrant water lilies; Install bottom barrier fabric in the
swimming area in front of the city of Bremerton Park property
to regain use of this part of the lake; and Implement an
aggressive educational program to users and residents of
Kitsap Lake aimed at preventative measures that focus on
ways to ensure the health of Kitsap Lake



                                                          Page 79
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Port of Bremerton will use the money to develop a
surface water management plan which is a stormwater
planning project to support the area's Sub-area Plan by
identifying specifically how stormwater infrastructure
improvements will be developed while adequately protecting
water quality, critical habitat, and other environmental
resources. The plan will provide definitive analysis
addressing existing and future land conditions, facilities,
permits, hydrologic analysis, performance standards, sensitive
area protection and stormwater facility design, operation,
maintenance and financing requirements. Using this
approach, the plan may be considered a model for developing
low-impact surface water management strategies to protect
water quality and declining species.

Bremerton-Kitsap County Health District will use the money
to conduct parcel by parcel investigations, provide technical
assistance for agriculture activities, and to develop a water
quality monitoring plan to identify and track water quality
improvements.




The District will use the money to assist Ecology with the
preparation of a TMDL submittal for approval by the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency. Ecologywill develop the
technical report and provide overall guidance for the Little
Klickitat Temperature TMDL. The District will develop a
plan to implement the public outreach and involvement for the
TMDL. It will assist Ecology and local stakeholders in
conjunction with the ongoing implementation strategies and
monitoring goals to support and meet established temperature
TMDL targets. The TMDL Submittal Report will include
Ecology's technical report, the District's outreach and public
participation activities and summary implementation strategy
for approval by EPA. Once approved the District will assist
Ecology with the development of the detailed implementation
plan.




THE CITY OF CENTRALIA WILL USE THE MONEY TO
CONSTRUCT A NEW TRANSMISSION LINE FROM THE
EXISTING WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY TO
A NEW WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY. THE
NEW FACILITY WILLL BE LOCATED DOWNSTREAM
FROM THE EXISTING FACILITY.




                                                          Page 80
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Chelan County Public Works will use the money to prepare
the Manson Stormwater Management Plan. The plan will
identify solutions that when implemented will help reduce
future impacts to Lake Chelan water quality from urban and
rural sources of stormwater.




The city of Cheney will use the money to restructure its local
debt for the project, so it will be able to make approximately
the same repayment amounts over a 20-year period instead of
the 40-year period allowed by Rural Development and save
approximately $2 million in interest payments.

The District will use the money to achieve the implementation
of practices that combine source control and water
conservation. Open canals and ditches that contribute to fecal
coliform loading problems and are rated as high priorities for
piping to conserve water will be replaced with piplines. These
activities will be implemented based on the results of water
quality monitoring and a ditch ranking process. Three
irrigation laterals have been identified for this project. The
highest priority lateral is part of the Dungeness Irrigation
Company system, the second is part of the Clallam Irrigation
Company system and the third is part of the Agnew Irrigation
District system. Landowners and/or irrigation districts and
companies will contribute in-kind labor, equipment and/or
materials necessary for the implementation of these activities.


The purpose of the Lake Sutherland Milfoil Eradication
Project is to eradicate Eurasian watermilfoil from Lake
Sutherland. The County staff chose a combination of: diver
handpulling, diver installation of bottom barriers, and
skimming milfoil fragments from the water. to manage the
milfoil infestation in Lake Sutherland. Lake Sutherland has
exceptional water quality and clarity. Lake residents use the
water for drinking and did not feel comfortable allowing the
use of aquatic herbicides.




                                                          Page 81
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The County will use the money to mitigate and/or eliminate
septic system operation and maintenance factors that
contribute to the degradation of ground and surface waters and
shellfish harvesting areas within Water Resource Inventory
Area 18. Through the use of a monitoring process the county
will attempt to identify, mitigate and/or eliminate the factors
that contribute to the degradation of groundwater quality used
as drinking water for the Agnew and Carlsborg areas. In
addition they will support the Elwa-Morse Watershed
Management Team watershed planning activities through the
use of Streamkeepers and other volunteers to collect field data
needed for watershed assessment and will give citizens the
tools and information needed to decrease their impact on
water quality and play an active role in watershed stewardship.


The Clark County Department of Public Works will use the
money to add an additional 30' by 40' dewatering pad and
three additional settling vaults to the existing facility. All
dewatering pads and setting vaults will be covered to allow
them to process wastes much more quickly.
The city of Cle Elum will use the money to construct
ultraviolet disinfection facilities, provide for aerators in
lagoons 1 and 2, modifications to the headworks and the
addition of influent and effluent samplers. The City is also
pursuing additional regionalization of its municipal sewage
treatment facilities.
The Clear Lake Water District will use the money to survey
and monitor the lake for milfoil plants remaining after the
1999 Sonar treatment. Any milfoil plants will be removed via
hand pulling, installation of bottom barriers, and/or spot
treatment with aquatic herbicides.


The District will use the money to prepare a Comprehensive
Sewer Plan, which will delineate the necessary components
for the construction of wastewater collection, treatment, and
disposal in the Clinton area.




The Town will use the money for design of the entire project
while construction of the upgrade will proceed in two phases
as follows: Phase 1: Upgrade of the effluent pumping
capacity, Installation of a standby generator for emergency
power. Phase 2: Construction of a second clarifier,
conversion of the disinfection system to ultraviolet
technology, Construction of a second oxidation ditch.




                                                          Page 82
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Cowiche Sewer District will use the money to upgrade
their existing wastewater treatment facility and provide
capacity for the town of Tieton.


The city of Elma will use the money to construct a Biolac
based wastewater treatment facility. This upgrade will result
in improvement of water quality in the Chehalis River.

The city of Elma will use the money to construct a Biolac
based wastewater treatment facility.


The city of Enumclaw will use the money to provide much
needed background data on the White River to determine if
the wastewater treatment plant effluent has a potential to cause
a violation of the water quality standards. These data will also
support Ecology's development and monitoring requirements
of the White River nutrient Total Maximum Daily Load
(TMDL) and the Puyallup River dissolved oxygen TMDL.




The town of Farmington will use the money to perform a
collection treatment system field investigation and to develop
a general sewer plan.
The Ferry Conservation District will use the mone to develop
a field and classroom education program, implement riparian
improvement demonstration sites, conduct landowner riparian
education workshops, and develop a natural education area
and native hardwood and shrub nursery on property owned by
the Ferry Conservation District to supply and enhance
countywide riparian areas.




                                                            Page 83
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Fish and Wildlife will use the money to inventory and
prioritize purple loosestrife infestations on the lower Chehalis
River. They will implement low cost, long-term control by
raising and releasing large numbers of a a biological control
agent the weevil Galerucella spp. in high density loosestrife
stands on public and private property. They will survey and
map over twenty miles of the lower Chehalis, associated
wetlands, and major tributaries for the noxious invasive
aquatic weeds. They will use integrated pest management
practices to control all newly found and existing purple
loosestrife infestations within the project site. Purple
loosestrife and other invasive, non-native aquatic plants pose
an insidious threat to the environmental integrity of the lower
Chehalis River through adverse habitat modification and water
chemistry changes. The lower Chehalis provides critical
habitat needs for fish and wildlife species, in addition to
providing fish- and wildlife-dependent recreational uses such
as hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and
environmental education and interpretation.
The Conservation District will use the money to support
proactive educational efforts and projects that help eliminate
severe erosion problems and reduce riparian livestock
impacts.




The City will use the money to upgrade the existing
wastewater treatment facility in accordance with Ecology's
compliance order and National Pollutant Discharge
Elimination System Permit No. WA-002112-1. The
modifications will include construction of a Biolac Treatment
Facility, provision for mechanical screening of the influent,
ultraviolet disinfection of the effluent, and upgrading the main
pump station.
The City will use the money to upgrade the existing
wastewater treatment facility in accordance with Ecology's
compliance order and National Pollutant Discharge
Elimination System Permit No. WA-002112-1. The
modifications will include construction of a Biolac Treatment
Facility, provision for mechanical screening of the influent,
ultraviolet disinfection of the effluent, and upgrading the main
pump station.




                                                           Page 84
                                           All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The city of Issaquah willuse the money to develop plans and
specifications, construct a sediment control facility, and plant
necessary vegetation along Tibbetts Creek. The project will
intercept sediment from upstream sources that currently
impacts downstream reaches and Lake Sammamish, and will
create a floodplain corridor to contain floodwaters that
currently overflow into city streets and commercial areas.


The County will use the money to implement a revised local
code governing on-site sewage systems (adopted September
21, 2000) with emphasis on expansion of the operations and
maintenance program. The project will include staff training,
data system development, and workshops for the public and
interested professionals to improve understanding and
compliance with the new on-site sewage sytem requirements.


Jefferson County will use the money to continue to support a
local loan fund to provide financial assistance to citizens to
repair or replace failing on-site sewage systems. The purpose
of this project is to provide low interest loan financing to lots
that have the potential to directly impact water quality. This
program will give an incentive to homeowners to repair and
upgrade their failing septic systems.

The purpose of this project (and ongoing efforts) is to
eradicate hydrilla from Pipe and Lucerne Lakes (and the
Pacific Northwest) using a combination of herbicide
treatments and diver survey and hand pulling.




Kitsap county will use the money to assess the biological
intefrity of 15 to 20 salmonid producing streams in Kitsap
County to help determine where protection and
rehabilitation/restoration should occur.




                                                             Page 85
                                           All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


In addition to providing a comprehensive study of the water
quality in Kittitas County, the project will specifically address
fecal coliform levels that exceed standards in many of the
local creeks. The District will use the money for
administration, scientifically sound water quality monitoring,
fecal coliform investigation, on-farm evaluations and
assistance, and landowner education.



Liberty Bay is an important national estuary used by
threatened salmon, highly regarded species, unique plant
communities and estuarine habitats. The Lemolo Citizens
Club will use the money to control nonpoint pollution in
Liberty Bay. Nonpoint pollution in the bay is, at least in part,
the result of inadequate buffers, uncontrolled stormwater
runoff, and decreasing vegetation with disruption of the
natural landscape. This control program will mitigate these
adverse effects and protect salmon habitat with abundant
vegetation using native plants while monitoring water quality
and gauging results of strategic ongoing remediation activities.
The objective of this project is to affect nonpoint source
pollution problems through evaluation of existing conditions,
implementing strategic fundamental improvements; while
promoting citizen stewardship and community-wide public
education. To achieve these goals, the Lemolo Citizens Club
will provide volunteer training, shoreline monitoring,
nearshore habitat enhancement, and project-based learning
opportunities through a highly visible program with strong
community support. A web page will be used to disseminate
Lewis County's goal is to eradicate Brazilian elodea from the
Chehalis River and Plummer Lake. A combination of diver
dredging, diver handpulling, and the installation of bottom
barriers will be used control Brazilian elodea in the Chehalis
River. County staff estimate that only one acre of Brazilian
elodea is located in the River. County staff will consult with
scientific experts to use the latest technologies to develop an
effective treatment scenario for Brazilian elodea in Plummer
Lake. County staff will collaborate with the Grays Harbor and
Thurston Noxious Weed Control Boards to develop and print
a brochure that describes invasive aquatic noxious weeds and
alerts boater that they may be transporting them.




                                                            Page 86
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The town of Lind will use the money to design and construct
the first phase of the Wastewater Facilities Plan
recommendations for upgrading the town of Lind's wastewater
facilities. Specifically, the Town will complete contract
documents and construction of approximately 8,200 lineal feet
of the Town's wastewater collection system previously
impaired by excessive infiltration and inflow, replacement and
upgrading of the wastewater treatment facility's disinfection
system.
The project consists of the preparation of plans and
specifications for the second and third phase upgrade
construction projects. Phase II will convert the existing
aerobic digester to a secondary clarifier, construct a new
aerobic digester, and add a plant drain pump station and non-
potable water system. Phase III will replace the force main
from the main lift station to the headwork's, add grit removal,
improve the treatment capacity of the existing aeration basins,
construct a new laboratory/motor control center and add space
to the existing operations building to house the aeration basin
blowers.
The Columbia River Foundation will use the money to assess
all available habitat inventory data on the lower 46 miles of
the Columbia River and identify critical wetland habitat and
habitat functions in need of protection, enhancement, and/or
restoration. The Foundation will establish a technical
assistance team to assess critical habitat conditions, identify
the technical steps necessary to effectively protect, enhance
and restore critical habitats, and develop a process to maintain
and monitor them into the future. A work force of volunteer
organizations and individuals will be established to complet
habitat restoration work.

The purpose of the project was to construct a series of six
large log jams that would attempt to replicate some of the
historical functioning that log jams once provided in the South
Fork Nooksack River. These log jams were designed to
reduce sediment inputs from a large landslide, promote
sediment redistribution and recruitment of spawning gravels,
promote formation and maintenance for deep pools, and
otherwise increase channel complexity with associated habitat
benefits. The specific area targeted was downstream of the
Larson's Bridge crossing, river mile 19.7 to 21.0. These six
log jams were jointly funded under two Ecology grants (also
G9900127), and comprise the first phase of a series of as
many as 29 planned log jams that may ultimately be built.
The project also included habitat monitoring to determine
whether the log jams were achieving their goals.




                                                           Page 87
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Lummi Indian Business Council will use the money to
reduce sedimentation from roadways which have been
identified to be at high risk for mass wasting or surface
erosion. Selected high priority roadways have already been
identified in the North Fork Nooksack Sediment Reduction
Plan. An estimated 17 miles of roads in the Racehorse and
Slide Mountain drainages, have been targeted for formal
abandonment and an additional 9.5 miles have been identified
for long-term storm-proofing treatment.

The Lummi Indian Business Council will use the money to
abandon or storm proof 22 miles of active and inactive roads
in the drainage. The effectiveness of this approach will be
evaluated using methodologies already established.




The Lummi Indian Business Council will use the money to
evaluate roadway sediment reduction efforts. Previously
completed road sediment reduction projects, on federal, state,
and private lands in the Nooksack River watershed, will be
evaluated and the effectiveness of the respective treatment will
be determined. Efforts will focus on determining whether the
applied treatments met state standards and regulations and
recommendations for future sediment reduction projects and
methodologies will be made. A computer database will be
developed utilizing data collected from monitored locations.

The city of Lynden will use the money to complete the
upgrade and expansion of its wastewater treatment plant.

The city of Lynden will use the money to complete the
upgrade and expansion of its wastewater treatment plant.




The North Yakima Conservation District will use the money
to provide technical assistance to oversee the conversion from
furrow irrigated lands to drip irrigation systems of
approximately 1400 acres. In addition, the District will
provide information and education, and implement the North
Yakima Conservation District Monitoring Plan.




                                                           Page 88
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The city of Oroville will use the money to refinance a recent
upgrade to the City's Wastewater Treatment Facility. The City
switched from chlorine disinfection to ultraviolet disinfection
to help meet water quality permit requirements. Also, a
rotating screen was installed at the headworks to capture large
debris so the facility operates better.



The goal of the project is to eradicate Eurasian watermilfoil
from Loomis Lake by treating the entire lake with multiple
whole-lake applications of an aquatic herbicide called
Sonar®. Follow up diver surveys will be scheduled for the
following three years to ensure that remaining plants are
quickly removed through diver hand removal, installation of
bottom barriers, or treatment with 2,4-D. The latest
technologies will also be used to remove another state-listed
noxious weed - Brazilian elodea - which was recently
introduced to Loomis Lake. A secondary project goal is to
assess the recovery of native aquatic plants following the
Sonar® treatment. Ecology and Pacific Conservation District
staff will monitor biomass and species diversity in the lake;
both pre- and post-herbicide treatment. The U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers provided matching funds for this project under a
Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration grant to Ecology.




The Pacific Ecological Institute willl help local groups work
to expand present environmental education programs in
Quilcene School to include hands-on learning through actual
water quality monitoring. Adult volunteers from the
community will be trained to conduct ongoing water quality
monitoring. A baseline of useable data will be established
with the assistance of the Jefferson County Department of
Environmental Health. The data will be available in making
policy decisions on management and protection of water
quality.


The town of Pe Ell will use the money to replace existing
sewer collection lines and manholes and make improvements
to the wastewater treatment facility. These improvements will
alleviate the public health posed by wastewater overflows and
reduce pollutant loads in the Chehalis River.




                                                          Page 89
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The town of PeEll will use the money to design a new
wastewater treatment facility. As part of the overall
wastewater treatment improvements, funds will be used from
this grant and loan to improve its existing sewer system that is
impacted by excess inflow and infiltration. This causes higher
flows of water to the existing wastewater treatment facility
that impairs its ability to meet water quality standards.




The Pierce Conservation District will use the money to work
with landowners in portions of the Nisqually, Puyallup and
Key Peninsula watersheds in Pierce County. With help from
the Washington State Conservation Corps the District will also
help implement riparian fencing and planting practices.
Volunteers will be used to help plant riparian areas and
perform water quality monitoring.

The City will use the money to construct major improvements
to their sanitary sewer collection system and wastewater
treatment facilities which will enhance water quality of Pataha
Creek by improving the quality of effluent discharging from
the City's wastewater treatment plant.

The City will use the money to construct major improvements
to their sanitary sewer collection system and wastewater
treatment facilities which will enhance water quality of Pataha
Creek by improving the quality of effluent discharging from
the City's wastewater treatment plant.

The city of Prosser will use the money to construct a new
influent flow meter, headworks modifications, effluent
pumping system modifications, two buildings, and other
necessary modification work.
The city of Prosser will use the money to construct a new
influent flow meter, headworks modifications, effluent
pumping system modifications, two buildings, and other
necessary modification work.
The city of Puyallup will use the money to establish total
maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for pollutants degrading
beneficial uses of waters in the Clarks Creek watershed.
Water quality parameters of particular concern include pH,
temperature, fecal coliform bacteria, and dissolved oxygen.
Systematic inventories of point and nonpoint sources of
pollution will identify and quantify contaminant loads to the
creek. A watershed action plan will be developed to guide the
implementation of pollution reduction strategies and source
control options.




                                                           Page 90
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0




The city will use the money to construct a bypass pipeline for
excessive storm flows, construct fish passage under West Lake
Sammamish Boulevard, and rehabilitate 800 feet of stream
channel for habitat. This reach will be improved in two
phases. Loan funds will be used to stabilize the banks and
streambed along approximately 800 lineal feet of the upper
reach of Idylwood Creek. The target reach of Idylwood Creek
flows through a steep, wooded ravine bordered by single-
family homes. Bioengineering techniques, including
installation of logs, root wads, boulders, and new riparian
plantings, will be the primary methods used to stabilize the
banks.


The Roza-Sunnyside Board of Joint Control willuse the
money to establish a local loan fund and offer low interest
loans to landowners as an incentive to implement best
management practices that reduce or eliminate runoff,
suspended sediment, and other pollutions. BMPs such as drip
irrigation and microspray sprinklers may improve the on-farm
irrigation efficiency by as much as 40 percent. In most cases,
on farm irrigation runoff will be eliminated thereby keeping
the soil and water on the land and out of the Yakima River.

San Juan County will use the money to continue a local loan
fund to assist residential homeowners with repair of failing
residential on-site sewage disposal systems.




                                                         Page 91
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The management goals of this project include:

"Eradicating or reducing Eurasian watermilfoil in Lake
Campbell using a combination of aquatic herbicides and diver
hand pulling;
 Preventing the spread of Eurasian watermilfoil to Erie Lake
and other nearby lakes; Managing for lake conditions that
sustain a diverse and healthy balance of native plant
communities to support the needs of lakeside residents and
beneficial uses of the lake; Developing an educational
program that promotes lake and watershed stewardship and
greater awareness of the threat of noxious weeds; and
Developing a funding mechanism to continue long-term
control of noxious weeds.
This project will improve the current drainfield system and
eliminate the surfacing of treated effluent.

This project will improve the current drainfield system and
eliminate the surfacing of treated effluent.

Skamania County will use the money to develop a
comprehensive Stormwater Facilities Plan that: protects the
health, safety and welfare of the 2,331 residents of Carson by
improving and controlling stormwater drainage in residential
areas; limit property damage by reducing flooding and
controlling landslides throughout the 2,700 acres of
development; improve the water quality and fish habitat of the
listed salmon and steelhead species in the lower five miles of
the Wind River by improving Carson's drainage hydrograph
and controlling the water quality of stormwater runoff.

Skamania County will use the money to gather technical
information on water quality and quantity within the Stabler
area which is located in parts of Townships 3 and 4 North and
Ranges 7, 7.5, and 8 East. the objectives are to increase data
the county currently has on water quality and quantity, reduce
gaps or inconsistencies in water quality information, monitor
fluctuations in water quality readings over time, and compare
current information with past information to identify possible
trends. This information will be useful in making management
decisions related to future growth in the Stabler area.

Skamakawa Water and Sewer District will use the money to
purchase an existing wastewater disposal facility that was built
by a developer. This facility, along with the construction of
new wastewater collection lines, will result in correction of the
community's failing individual on-site systems.

Skamokawa Water and Sewer District will use the money to
construct a wastewater collection system and mainline to
connect into a recently purchased wastewater disposal area
that a private developer has sold to the District.


                                                            Page 92
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Snohomish Conservation district will use the money to
develop farm plans, cost share for livestock exclusion fencing,
and the planting of riparian vegetation within stream corridors.
These activities will be focused on farms most effected by the
Endangered Species Act listing of salmonids.




The Snohomish Conservation District will use the money to
improve the water quality in the Snohomish River Watershed
by focusing habitat enhancement efforts towards the Riley
Slough. The Riley Slough is a six-mile stretch of water that is
located int he Tualco Valley south of Monroe and is an
important historical and potential salmon-rearing channel.




The Snohomish Conservation District will utilize the grant
funds to work with landowners on a voluntary basis to
implement habitat improvements on portions of the
Stillaguamish and Snohomish Rivers. These activities will
improve the water quality of these rivers and benefit fish and
wildlife habitat.




Snohomish county will use the money to collect and anlyze
data about ground water quality, quantity, land uses, ground
water withdrawals, and stream flow within a selected subarea.
The County will prepare a subarea ground water management
study and submit it to Ecology for final approval. The county
will also develop a water quality database and publish it on its
Internet site.




                                                           Page 93
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Snohomish County will use the money for extensive surveys to
determine attitudes about water quality and salmon recovery.
Based on these surveys, a public information and education
program will be developed.




The South Yakima Conservation District will use the money
to provide technical assistance to farmers implementing Best
Management Practices (BMPS). The BMPS will be site
specific and designed to reduce wate quality degradation
caused by sediment and nutrient loss from the land.



The Spokane Aquifer Joint Board will use the money to
educate business owners and the public about the aquifer and
how to protect it, provide assistance to potentially contaminant-
contributing small businesses, and inventory potential
contaminant sources.




The Spokane County Conservation District will use the money
to provide low-interest loans to assist area farmers and
landowners in conservation planning, Best Management
Practice (BMP) installation, and awareness programs for
water pollution. The implementation of the BMP systems will
reduce pollutants from entering Rattler's Run Stream.

The Stevens County Conservation District will use the money
to establish monitoring sites throughout the Pingston Creek
Watershed, and organize a watershed management committee
who will draft recommendations to maintain, improve and/or
protect water quality within the watershed.




The PUD No. 1 of Stevens County will use the money to
refinance, at a lower interest rate, an existing loan that was
used to construct a new sewer system for the unincorporated
community of Waitts Lake.




                                                           Page 94
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The PUD No. 1 of Stevens County will use the money to
refinance, at a lower interest rate, an existing loan that was
used to construct a new sewer system for the unincorporated
community of Valley.


The City will use the money to develop a surface water quality
management plan, which will be the basis for the formation of
a city surface water utility. The plan also represents the City
of Sultan's committment to managing stormwater and overall
water quality improvement. Due in part to this planning effort
the City of Sultan has approved the formation of a Surface
Water Utility.
The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department will use the
money to identify on-site sewage (septic) systems that
represent a substantial risk of ground and surface water
contamination, with principal focus on commercial and
community systems. Staff from the Health Department will
provide training to system owners and operators concerning
proper system use, performance monitoring, and maintenance
practices. The Health Department will also revise the current
Operation and Maintenance (O&M) regulations to expand the
O&M program by applying O&M requirements to more
systems and strengthening the program's enforcement tools.

The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department will use the
money to improve water quality in two threatened commercial
shellfish growing areas and one closed area in Pierce County.
This will be accomplished through sanitary surveys that
identify and correct sources of fecal coliform pollution.
Dutchers Cove and Filucy Bay are the threatened commercial
shellfish growing areas and Vaughn Bay is the closed
commercial shellfish growing area. The project is a
continuation of an effort to develop a permanent program.

THE CITY OF TONASKET WILL UTILIZE THE GRANT
FUNDS TO REPLACE THE CITY'S 23 YEAR OLD
WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY THAT DOES
NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT WATER QUALITY
STANDARDS. THE NEW FACILITY WILL BE ABLE TO
MEET PERMIT REQUIREMENTS AND PROVIDE FOR
FUTURE EXPANSION IF NECESSARY.
The city of Tonasket will utilize the grant funds to replace the
city's 23 year old wastewater treatment facility that does not
comply with current water quality standards. The new facility
will be able to meet permit requirements and provide for
future expansion if necessary.




                                                           Page 95
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Upper Grant Conservation District will use the money to
fund two mobile labs to teach both Hispanic and English
speaking operators of irrigation systems methods to reduce
sediment and pesticide run-off. The project will involve the
Moses Lake, Othello, and Warden Conservation Districts with
Upper Grant as the lead.



The University of Washington will use the money to evaluate
the feasibility of using the milfoil weevil as a biological
control for Eurasian watermilfoil in Washington lakes and
rivers. The weevil could provide managers with an innovative
method of dealing with Eurasian watermilfoil in lakes and
rivers where endangered salmon and/or trout are present or
where homeowners are not open to more traditional milfoil
control methods such as mechanical harvesting and herbicides.
The goal of this grant is to develop criteria for selecting lakes
that are suitable for weevil treatments.

Wahkiakum County will use this money to develop an
integrated aquatic vegetation management plan for the
management of these noxious aquatic weeds in the Columbia
River and Welcome Slough, Brooks Slough, Elochoman
River, Grays River, Grays Bay, Deep River, Coffeepot Island,
and Puget Island. County staff feel that it is important to
develop an integrated plan for suppression and future control
of these noxious weed populations within the County. Plan
development will include: an updated survey of plant
populations in the area, a map of these plant populations, and
management recommendations that are compatible with
endangered species and permitting requirements.

The Whatcom Conservation District will use the money to
address water quality in the South Fork Nooksack River
Watershed. This will be accomplished through: road storm
proofing, riparian plantings, salmon recovery projects, water
quality monitoring, and riparian maintenance and management
activities.




                                                           Page 96
                                           All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


To implement a program to improve water quality and habitat
by improving land use practices that were adversely affecting
water quality and leading to a decline in shellfish downstream
and in salmonids withing the Bertrand and Fishtrap Creek
systems. The grant allowd the District to support partnerships
to strengthen community knowledge of and involvement in the
important Bertrand Creek and Fishtrap Creek watershed
issued of water quality and quantity. Positive and lasting
outcomes that have resulted at least in part to this grant
funding, include relationships among the District and
watershed landowners and Canadian partners, increased
knowledge of Bertrand Crk. habitat, and the formation of the
Bertrand Watershed Improvement District. Components of
the project include stream surveying habitat assessment, and
analysis as the framework for selecting rehabilitation projects
and focusing a public outreach program. A Stream Team
volunteer program was developed to increase awareness of
watershed issues and to continue water quality monitoring.
Small farm education and planning were accomplished throu
awareness of watershed issued and to continue water quality
monitoring. Small farm education and planning were
The city of Woodland will use the money to meet the City's
wastewater discharge permit requirements by upgrading its
wastewater treatment plant, which includes changing from
chlorine disinfection to an ultraviolet light disinfection system.

The city of Woodland will use the money to meet the City's
wastewater discharge permit requirements by upgrading its
wastewater treatment plant, which includes changing from
chlorine disinfection to an ultraviolet light disinfection system.

The University will use the money to implement a program of
stream restoration projects which will include riparian
revegetation, bioengineering and monitoring activities, and
will provide an environmental education element to support
the implementation effort. The project area will include
Whitman County, and the Upper Columbia Resource
Conservation and Development Area. Participants will be
made up of local partners, Washington State University's
Center for Environmental Education and the County's schools
working together to establish projects that meet local water
quality needs.
The agreement provides funding to the Tribe to support
fisheries data collection efforts associated with Yakima
County's effort to determine floodplain surface mining
impacts.




                                                            Page 97
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Yakima County Noxious Weed Control Board will use
the money to design and install purple loosestrife
informational signs at six access points along the Yakima
River. They will also publish a newspaper insert this summer
about purple loosestrife and its management. Purple
loosestrife is a state listed noxious weed that is impacting
wetlands and river habitat in Washington by outcompeting
native vegetation. Purple loosestrife provides poor food and
cover for our native waterfowl and wildlife and is considered a
significant threat to Washington's wetlands.

Yakima County will use the money to investigate fish
assemblages, benthic macroinvertebrates, and water
temperatures both inside the gravel pits and in the river
adjacent to the pits. In addition, the geomorphology and
bathymetry of the pits will be assessed and historic locations
and uses associated with gravel pits will be determined.

The city of Yelm will use the money to determine whether
there is any potential for groundwater contamination from its
water reclamation facility by monitoring surface water and
groundwater at all stages of the constructed wetland - fish
pond - groundwater recharge facility, monitoring wells, and
water supply wells. Data taken during the next two years will
be compared to the baseline monitoring results completed in
1998. These monitoring efforts will test for pollutants as well
as indicator parameters.


The adopt-a-stream foundation will use the money to
inventory five watersheds in urbanizing Snohomish County
and northern King County to locate culverts placed in stream
channels. Improperly installed culverts present a physical
barrier to fish passage and cause high volumes of sediment
that can suffocate salmonid eggs and fry. After analyzing
data, the foundation will prepare a list of culverts that are
barriers to salmonid migration and recommend priorities for
removing identified barriers. Data collected will also be
useful for determining adverse water quality impacts caused
by these culverts. This project will take place on Little Bear,
North, Swamp, Quilceda, and Allen creeks which drain
approximately 150 square miles. There are estimated to be
more than 1,000 culverts in these watersheds.

The City will use the money to prepare an update of its
stormwater management plan to incorporate recently annexed
areas, define revenue requirements for a stormwater program,
and recommend an appropriate funding program.




                                                           Page 98
                                        All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Establish gaging station on tributaries to Lake Whatcom in
support of Ecology TMDL efforts. Determine feasibility of
using street cleaning equipment as a cost effective BMP to
reduce pollutant loading to Lake Whatcom.

The Benton Conservation District will use the money to
reduce water quality degradation due to soil, nutrients, and
associated chemicals coming from farm runoff. The district
will organize and establish a cost-share program for
conversion of highly erodable irrigation systems to
nonerodable irrigation systems.
The Benton Conservation District will use the money to
provide technical assistance to growers, carry out water
quality and agriculture monitoring programs, and provide
educational opportunieis for schools, civic, and grower groups
on the impact of water quality in threateded and endangered
species.




The city of Bremerton will use the money to update its
Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction Plan, targeting those
basins that require CSO reduction improvements as required
for compliance with state regulations, Department of Ecology
consent orders, and court orders.

The city of Bremerton will use the money to update its
Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction Plan, targeting those
basins that require CSO reduction improvements as required
for compliance with state regulations, Department of Ecology
consent orders, and court orders.

The city of Bremerton will use the money to design
improvements to reduce CSOs events from the Callow Avenue
Basin to one per year per outfall as required for compliance
with state regulations, Department of Ecology consent orders,
and court orders.
The city of Bremerton will use the money to educate
businesses and citizens of Bremerton about stormwater
reduction measures and point and nonpoint source pollution
prevention practices they can use.




                                                         Page 99
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Establish a local loan fund for providing financial assistance
to homeowners to repair or replace failing on-site sewage
disposal systems in Kitsap County. Priority will be given to
protection of drinking water sources and marine shoreline
areas. The program is targeted at low and moderate income
homeowners.

The city of Buckley will use the money to continue its efforts
to correct infiltration and inflow problems with the City's
sewer system. The sewer system is very old, allowing massive
amounts of infiltration and inflow into the system during
rainfall events. This causes surcharging of the system and
discharge of raw wastewater into public areas. High flows
also overwhelm the treatment facility, causing a discharge of
sewage to the White River.




The Chehalis Basin District Alliance willuse the money to
review and update existing farm plans and assist operators in
implementing BMPs and obtaining certification of their dairy
plan(s). The recipient will provide financial assistance for
installation of eligible BMPs that have been identified in farm
plans, and help cooperators find other sources of fudning for
installation of ineligible (to this funding source) BMPs.



The city of Chehalis will utilize the grant funds for a Water
Effects Ratio Study. The City's wastewater effluent contains
concentrations of copper, silver, and zinc that are in violation
of its discharge permit. This study will determine if the metals
can be controlled at the source and/or treated to a level that
will meet the permit limits.




                                                          Page 100
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Chelan County Department of Public Works will use the
money to develop a comprehensive stormwater plan for the
Lake Chehaln Basin. The plan will address inadequate
drainage retention, folloding of property, erosion control, and
conveyance of pollutants into lake Chelan.



To rehabilitate Jimmy-Come-Lately Creek and Tidal Estuary
that will restore habitat functions for threatened and critical
species, as well as allow for increasing populations of fish and
wildlife currently using the region.

The County will use the money to coordinate countywide
monitoring efforts, and fill in significant gaps in watershed
data collection. They will establish County database
management standards including the use of GIS applications
and methods for reporting data on Internet web sites, and will
provide links to other agencies. Information obtained from
this project will be reported in the first annual 'State of the
Waters' summary for use by policy makers and the public. As
a result of this project, the public will have access to
previously inaccessible data and information on each stream,
and with the enhancement of information sharing to facilitate
watershed and salmon recovery planning currently underway,
may inspire additional individuals and groups to work for
water quality improvement.

The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation
will use the money for livestock management and to restore
the proper functioning condition of the riparian areas in the
watershed. This will be accomplished by installing range
improvements, including spring developments and fencing,
stabilizing and revegetation of eroding streambanks, and by
implementing an integrated livestock management plan.

The city of Connell will use the money to build a new
wastewater treatment facility and upgrades to its sewer
conveyance system. The existing facility does not meet permit
requirements and is deemed inadequate by the Department.

The Cowiche Sewer District will use the loan money for an
extensive upgrade to its wastewater treatment facility in order
to meet its state discharge permit.




                                                          Page 101
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The district, working at the local community watershed level,
will develop nonpoint source Total Maximum Daily loads
levels and will expand monitoring of local water quality with
emphasis on water temperature, frequency, duration,
magnitude, and extent of adverse conditions on impaired
water bodies.




The District will use the money to eliminate summer fallow in
several test plots that will result in the reduction of sediment
deposits into area streams and in the amount of nitrate
nitrogen entering ground water in the Bickleton area of eastern
Klickitat County. Nitrate reduction will be achieved by
reducing the amount of fertilizer required and by changing the
manner in which the fertilizer breaks down in the soils. The
plots will be in two different locations and will offer different
growing conditions for the tests.




The Ferry Conservation District will use the money for
monitoring water quality, surveying existing environmental
conditions and practices, and for preparing and implementing
a best management practices plant to protect and/ or improve
Lone Ranch, St. Peter, and Lambert Creek watersheds. The
intent of this project is to remove these watersheds from the
state's 303d list.




The District will use the money to continue its current surface
and ground water monitoring efforts in the Columbia Basin.
In addition, the District will develop a process to determine
existing crop patterns in Southeastern Washington using
Remote Sensing (RS) technology and will employ this process
to define the cropping patterns within Franklin County.




                                                           Page 102
                                           All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Blackman Lake group will use funds provided for
production and airing of six different educational video
segments on local cable Channel 28. These segments will
dramatize specific destructive land-use practices and
beneficial alternatives to provide city residents with practical
ways to reduce water pollution. The "video newsletter"
segments are consistent with local lake restoration and
comprehensive planning efforts. Video segments will be aired
every three hours for at least two weeks.

The City will use the money to complete plans and
specifications for improvements to their wastewater treatment
facilities and a new terminal lift station. When constructed,
the improvements to the City's wastewater treatment facilities
will bring the city of Goldendale into compliance with all
Department of Ecology Orders and the current NPDES permit
for the year round discharge of wastewater into the Little
Klickitat River.


Create a local loan fund to provide financial assistance to
private citizens to repair or replace failing on-site sewage
systems.



Island County Public Works will use the money to implement
recommendations from the North Whidbey Action Plan,
Island County Health Department's Ground Water Program,
and Island County Public Works Salmon Recovery Program.
Types of activities will include water quality monitoring,
wellhead protection efforts, on-site sewage system technical
assistance and education, outreach education to realtors and
community members, and pet waste management education.




Island County Public Works will use the money for the
replacement of an old culvert system on Glendale Creek that
was damaged during a winter in 1996-97. The project will
improve stream conditions for anadromous fish witha new
stream channel, streambank restoration to prevent erosion, and
vegetation of the stream corridor to reduce thermal effects and
promote wildlife.




                                                           Page 103
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Island County will use the money for the acquisition of a 300-
acre farm on Northeast Camano Island. This land acquisition
is for the preservation of wetlands and possible restoration of
an estuary.




The city of Issaquah will use the money to educate and
involve community members in wetland assessment,
restoration, and water quality improvements efforts. Efforts
will also focus on decreasing septic system failures and to
promote beneficial water quality management activities.




The purpose of the project was to use bioengineering
techniques to stabilize the stream bank, enhance fish and
wildlife habitat, and improve water quality. The project
included additional in-stream fish habitat structures (large
woody debris) and riparian vegetation to maximize restoration
benefits. Water quality benefits of the project include reduced
phosphorus load to Lake Sammamish, reduced sedimentation
affecting spawning gravel, and an enhanced riparian buffer to
increase shade and lower stream temperatures. The project
included final design and permitting, construction and
inspection, riparian planting, and vegetation and wildlife
monitoring. The engineering was not paid for with grant
funds.
The Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe will use the money to perform
a sespended sediment study, bacterial analysis, and reiver
temperature and marine sampling program. Water quality
monitoring and flow data will be collected and analyzed to
determine the relationships between physical and chemical
constituents along with salmon limiting factors.




                                                          Page 104
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The City of Kent will use the money to develop an integrated
aquatic plant management plan for Lake Fenwick. As part of
the planning process, the City will perform a limited aquatic
plant survey to provide qualitative and quantitative
information of the actual extent of Brazilian eloda stands.
Lakeshore residents and lake users will be educated about the
ecology and functions of aquatic plants and the alternative
methods of managing their growth using an integrated
approach to aquatic plant management.

The City of Kent will use the money to develop an integrated
aquatic plant management plan for Lake Meridian. The plan
will recommend strategies to reduce the spread of aquatic
plants, eradicate start-up populations of purpose loosestrife,
and restore and maintain the beneficial uses of Lake Meridian.




The regional IAPMP will provide a set of control measures
that are applicable to various weed infestation levels found in
the county's lakes. By having an accepted regional plan for
Eurasian watermilfoil control, residents living on waterbodies
infested with the weed can shorten the planning phase
significantly and move more directly to the control and
eradication phases. This shift allows for more prudent
expenditure of limited weed control funds by both local and
state governments.
Kitsap County will use the money to assess the current level of
citizen awareness about stormwater and nonpoint pollution;
educate the citizens about their impact on water quality, and
promote behavior changes. This is a multi-jurisdictional
approach to be undertaken by various local, state, and federal
agencies located within Kitsap County.




                                                         Page 105
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Kitsap Conservation District will use the money to fund
technical assistance to landowners for farm planning, design,
and implementation of best management practices (BMPs),
BMP monitoring, and water quality education of Burley
residents.




This city of Kittitas will use the money to construct a portion
of a new wastewater facility that will meet water quality
standards. The current wastewater facility is prone to flooding
and has experienced overflows of partially treated wastewater
to Cooke Creek.
The Kittitas Reclamation District will use the money to form a
cooperative water purveyor board, perform water quality
monitoring, and provide outreach/education to improve the
water quality from agricultural drainage in Kittitas County.



To expand the Phase I Study in an attempt to identify and
control the phosphorus at the source rather than the Lake.




The city of Leavenworth will use the money to upgrade its
wastewater treatment facility to better meet its water quality
permit and improve its discharge to the Wenatchee River.

The city of Leavenworth will use the money for a needed
upgrade to the City's wastewater treatment facility to meet its
water quality permit and improve its discharge to the
Wenatchee River.
The District will use the money to construct an upgrade to its
existing wastewater treatment facility that has reached its
design life and unable to meet its water quality permit
requirements. The upgrade, when complete, will improve the
water quality of the South Fork of the Newaukum River.


The District will use the money to design and construct
improvements to its existing wastewater treatment facility.
The upgrade, when complete, will enable the facility to meet
its permit requirements and improve the water quality of the
South Fork of the Newaukum River.




                                                           Page 106
                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The Lewis County Conservation District will provide
technical assistance to poultry producers to develop nutrient
management plans, conduct fall soil testing, design and
inspect BMPs, and assist in locating financial assistance for
implementing BMPs on private property.



Lincoln County Conservation District will use the money for
an assessment of the lower 40 miles of the Crab Creek
drainage. Project components include surface water studies
along with well monitoring, and an information and education
campaign to involve the public.


The city of Long Beach will use the money to bring the
headwork's at its waste-water treatment facility into
compliance with the Ecology criteria for sewage works design.
This project includes the design and construction of phase 1
improvements to their headwork's system.

The city of Long Beach will use the money to bring the
headwork's at its waste-water treatment facility into
compliance with the Ecology criteria for sewage works design.
This project includes the design and construction of phase 1
improvements to their headwork's system.



The Conservation District will use the money to work with
livestock owners and landowners to conduct a formal
inventory of farms and stream restorations projects in the
Satsop River and Newman subbasins of the Chehalis
Watershed. Individual farms and stream restoration projects
in each basin will be prioritized according to their degree of
water quality impairment. This information will be stored,
utilized and updated on an existing computer database and
included in the newly established Mason County agricultural
GIS system. Starting with the highest priority sites, livestock
owners will be encouraged to start Best Management Practices
(BMP), planning and implementation by completing a
resource management plan. Landowners with stream
restoration projects will be encouraged to begin planning with
the district. The Conservation District will also conduct
outreach and public awareness activities to promote watershed
stewardship.




                                                          Page 107
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


With this loan for $6,559,688 Ecology has committed loans
and grants for the construction phase of the north bay/case
inlet project totaling $14,179,688 or 80 percent of the total
eligible project cost of $17,816,200.



The Health Services will use the money to focus on the
shellfish growing areas in Lower Hood Canal with the primary
intent to identify the nonpoint pollution sources of fecal
contamination bacteria along the waterfront area from
Gladwin Road to Cherokee Beach on the North Shore of the
Canal.




Olympus Terrace Sewer District will use the money to replace
its existing chlorination disinfection system with a new
ultraviolet disinfection system. This new disinfection system
will allow the District to meet its discharge permit limits and
keep harmful chlorine residuals from its wastewater effluent
from entering Possession Sound.

Olympus Terrace Sewer District will use the money to replace
its existing chlorination disinfection system with a new
ultraviolet disinfection system. This new disinfection system
will allow the District to meet its discharge permit limits and
keep harmful chlorine residuals from its wastewater effluent
from entering Possession Sound.

The city of North Bend will use the money to construct an
Ultraviolet Disinfection System. This will eliminate the use of
chlorine for disinfection and improve the quality of North
Bend's wastewater effluent discharge into the South Fork of
the Snoqualmie River.
The city of North Bend will use the money to upgrade its
wastewater treatment facility to eliminate the use of chlorine
as a disinfectant and for needed improvements at the facility to
help meet its wastewater discharge permit. The upgrades will
improve North Bend's wastewater discharge to the South Fork
of the Snoqualmie River.




                                                          Page 108
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The purpose of this project is to assess all available habitat
inventory data (historic and new) on the lower 46 miles of the
Columbia River and identify critical wetland habitat functions
in need of protection, enhancement, and/or restoration.




The city of Okanogan will use the money to design and
construct improvements including a new influent lift station,
additional treatment capacity, and ultraviolet light disinfection
replacing chlorine. The project will improve the facility
reliability and improve its wastewater discharge into the
Okanogan River.
The city of Okanogan will use the money to upgrade its
wastewater treatment facility to eliminate the use of chlorine
as a disinfectant, and for needed improvements at the facility
to help meet its wastewater discharge permit. The upgrades
will improve Okanogan's wastewater discharge to the
Okanogan River.
The Okanogan Conservation District will utilize the funds to
focus upon management and consumption of farm irrigation
water in the Okanogan River Watershed. The project hopes to
improve on-farm irrigation practices that will lead to reduced
withdrawals from streams that support steelhead, salmon, and
cutthroat trout.




The Okanogan Conservation District will use the money to
characterize existing water conditions within the Okanogan
River Watershed. These characterizations will be used to
verify critical subwatersheds, prioritize future water quality
improvement efforts, determine whether water bodies are
meeting state water quality guidelines, and show the success
of the Okanogan Watershed Management Plan.



The Okaongan County Water Resources Department will use
the money to develop a framework for a multi-node
hydrologic routing model for the Methow River Basin. The
model will be utilized to evaluate and help manage competing
surface water resources within the basin that include
salmonids, habitat, and irrigation.



                                                           Page 109
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Establish a local process for developing water clean-up plans
(TMDLs) in the Palouse River Basin by first convening a
Palouse River Watershed Management Committee, and
second, by focusing on fecal coliform as the initial TMDL
parameter.
The city of Pateros will construct a new facility. The new
facility, when complete, will vastly improve the quality of its
discharge to the Columbia River.
Pend Oreille County will use the money to take immediate
actions to control Eurasian watermilfoil in Davis Lake. Each
year we allocate about $100,000 from our biennial
appropriation for high-priority early infestation projects that
deal with the control of noxious aquatic weeds like Eurasian
watermilfoil. By taking early and immediate action, it is
sometimes possible to eradicate or contain the spread of a
noxious plant that has just started to colonize a waterbody.

Pend Oreille will use the money to take immediate actions to
control Eurasian watermilfoil in Fan Lake. Each year we
allocate about $100,000 from our biennial appropriation for
high-priority early infestation projects that deal with the
control of noxious aquatic weeds like Eurasian watermilfoil.
By taking early and immediate action, it is sometimes possible
to eradicate or contain the spread of a noxious plant that has
just started to colonize a waterbody.



The city of Ritzville will use the money to construct a
wastewater treatment facility consisting of 47 acres of lagoons
and 68 acres of irrigated alfalfa crop. This new facility will
replace the City's old primary mechanical treatment plant and
eliminate ground water contamination.

The Roza-Sunnyside Board of Joint Control will use the
money to take an inventory of all drainage facilities and
develop a priority list, incorporate buffer zones along the
drainage waterways, and fence and restore a one to two mile
stretch of the drain.
The Roza-Sunnyside board of Joint Control will use the
money to inventory the present irrigation practices throughout
their service area.




                                                          Page 110
                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The purpose of this project is to learn more about utilizing
settling basins and wetlands to improve water quality for the
following parameters: total suspended solids, turbidity, and
fecal coliform. The recipient will will analyze the use of low-
head pumping systems, settling basins, and wetlands to
measure the effectiveness of final treatment of irrigation return
flows. The recipient will monitor the water quality affects of
these facilities on irrigation runoff before it enters the Yakima
River.
The San Juan County Conservation District will use the
money for identification and potential conservation of critical
wetlands, riparian zones, instream habitat and subtidal areas,
and developing the support of property owners for
conservation in target watersheds in San Juan County.




The City will use the funds for the preparation of plans,
specifications and bid documents for the replacement of
approximately 9,200 feet of 6 foot through 18 inch mainline
sewer pipe in Sewage Drainage Basin 2. When constructed,
the expected result will be a substantial reduction of
Infiltration and inflow in the sewer system in Sewage
Drainage Basin 2, that will reduce the pollution threat to
groundwater, freshwater creeks, and the Puget Sound.

The County will use the funds received from Ecology under
the loan agreement to improve and protect the water quality of
Skagit County through rehabilitation or replacement of failing
or failed on-site sewage systems, the installation and upgrade
of animal waste management systems, and implementation of
water quality related agricultural best management practices.




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The goal of this project is to eradicate Eurasian watermilfoil
from Lake McMurray by implementing the integrated aquatic
plant management plan (IAPMP) prepared for this lake under
another Aquatic Weeds Management Fund grant. The IAPMP
combines three components: chemical treatment, monitoring
and spot treatment, and public education. The project will last
for ten years, one of which was addressed through this grant.
The Lake McMurray residents have formed a Lake
Management District to help pay for the project. The
chemical treatment component of the project was completed in
2000. The public education component will be implemented
in 2000 and continue for ten years (duration of the project).
The monitoring and spot treatment component will commence
in 2001 and continue for the duration of the project. This
grant only funded the chemical treatment component of the
project.
The project was initiated to try to determine sources of
shellfish contamination in Samish Bay. By collecting fecal
coliform samples in tributaries and sloughs as well as the
mainstem Samish River, the intent was to bracket problem
areas and potential sources within the watershed. Secondary
objectives included gathering data on other related water
quality parameters, including dissolved oxygen, pH,
temperature, turbidity, nutrients and discharge. These data
would, in part, be used to assess the suitability of the Samish
Basin for spawning and rearing of salmonids with respect to
water quality.
Snohomish County will use the money to: 1) Eradicate
Eruasian Watermilfoil from lakes Goodwin and Shoecraft
within 3 to 5 years. 2) prevent Eurasian Watermilfoil from
spreading to new areas in these lakes or from spreading to
nearby lakes; 5) other nearby lakes); 3) inform and involve all
residents and lake users in order to sustain the Eurasian
Watermilfoil control for the long term including developing
long-term funding sources for integrated management.

THE SNOHOMISH CONSERVATION DISTRICT WILL
USE THE MONEY TO EDUCATE SMALL FARM
LANDOWNERS AND ASSIST IN DEVELOPING FARM
PLANS FOR ON-SITE IMPROVEMENTS TO PROTECT
WATER QUALITY. THE DISTRICT WILL MONITOR
IMPROVEMENTS WITH WATER QUALITY SAMPLING,
WHICH WILL INVOLVE SCHOOL CHILDREN FOR
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PURPOSES.




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The main purpose of the project was to establish a citizen's
based volunteer workforce to participate in habitat restoration
and monitoring efforts in the watershed. Volunteers were
trained in the skills necessary to perform habitat restoration
and water quality monitoring.




The city of Soap Lake will use the money to hire a
professional engineer to design improvements to the city's
wastewater treatment facility. The improvements will include
nitrogen removal, relocate and expand the land application
site, and upgrade the biosolids handling facilities. These
improvements will help the city to meet state water quality
standards and it's discharge permit requirements.

South Yakima Conservation District will use the money to
evaluate the effectiveness of the Instredm technology from
Battelle Memorial Institute in treating contaminated surface
water in a Yakima River irrigation return drain.



The South Yakima Conservation District will use the money
to provide technical assistance to targeted farms for
implementing on-farm best management practices.

THE CITY OF SPOKANE WILL USE THE MONEY TO
DETERMINE AND SCHEDULE THE PHYSICAL
IMPROVEMENTS NEEDED IN ORDER TO MEET THE
FEDERAL AND STATE REGULATIONS AND/OR
GUIDELINES FOR CSO REDUCTION AND THE
REQUIREMENTS OF THE CITY'S NATIONAL
POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM
PERMIT.
The Spokane County Conservation District will use the money
to conduct water quality monitoring and to do preliminary
work necessary to develop the watershed management plan.




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The Spokane County Conservation District will use the money
to establish a loan program that will provide low-interest loans
to grass seed producers or individuals for the purchase of
equipment to: 1) rake, bail, and remove grass straw, or 2)
remove and store bluegrass straw until it is transported for
processing or shipped to local or distant markets. The project
will prevent numerous acres of bluegrass from being taken out
of production and rotated into an annual grain crop that would
increase soil erosion, sedimentation, and degradation of water
quality in the project area streams and tributaries. The
National Resource Conservation Service has estimated that
four-tons per acre of soil would be lost for each area of
bluegrass eliminated from crop rotation.

The funds will be used to support Spokane County agricultural
operations in the transition from conventional tillage
equipment to a direct seeding concept. The direct-seed
concept encourages a one-pass system of placing seed
conventional tillage equipment to a direct seeding concept.
The direct-seed concept encourages a one-pass system of
placing seed and fertilizer, thus reducing tillage or disturbance
to the soil. Low interest loans will be offered to Spokane Co
producers to purchase minimum tillage equipment. Approx
30,000 - 50,000 acres of cropland will be impacted by this
project.
This grant provides $250,000 for the restoring Colville river
watershed health project. The total eligible project cost is
$333,333 and Ecology's share is 75 percent.




The Stevens County Conservation District will use the money
to develop an integrated aquatic plant management plan for
Long Lake. The plan will recommend strategies to reduce the
spread of Eurasian watermilfoil and to maintain the beneficial
uses of Long Lake.


The Stevens County Noxious Weed Control Board will use
the $40,000 grant to continue a milfoil
eradication/demonstration project in Loon Lake using the
aquatic herbicide 2,4-D. The initial results from the 1998
treatment with 2,4-D were positive with about 98 percent of
Eurasian watermilfoil being removed from the treatment plots
and no significant damage to native aquatic plants. This grant
will continue the project started last year on Loon Lake.




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The Public Utility District No. 1 of Stevens County will use
the money to eliminate existing septic tanks, replace a gravity
interceptor pipe main, install a new treatment/dosing tank at
the treatment site and construct a new control building.

The Public Utility District will use the money to supplement a
previous grant to design and construct a new public sewer
sytem for the unincorporated community of Addy.



The Public Utility District will use the money to supplement a
previous grant to design and construct a new public sewer
system for the unincorporated community of Addy.




The Thurston Conservation District will use the money to
determine the major sources of fecal coliform contamination
in Henderson Inlet. They will also identify salmon habitat
problems in the watershed and take actions to protect and
restore habitat. Both goals will be accomplished through
research, prioritization of potential sources, technical
assistance, education, and compliance action referrals when
necessary.


To provide loans to owners of failing septic systems with
annual family incomes of less than $50,000.


The grant funds will be used to upgrade the town's wastewater
facilities to meet their waste discharge permit and water
quality standards. Their wastewater facilities are located near
the North Fork of Cowiche Creek.
The town of Twisp will use the money for the construction of
improvements to its wastewater treatment facilities including a
new headworks, an additional oxidation ditch rotor, a new
clarifier, enhanced solids handling capability, and UV
disinfection. These improvements will bring the facilities up
to current equipment redundancy requirements for WAC 173-
308 biosolids regulations and the new chlorine residual
effluent limits.




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The town of Twisp will use the money for the construction of
improvements to its wastewater treatment facilities including a
new headworks, an additional oxidation ditch rotor, a new
clarifier, enhanced solids handling capability, and UV
disinfection. These improvements will bring the facilities up
to current equipment redundancy requirements for WAC 173-
308 biosolids regulations and the new chlorine residual
effluent limits.

To improve the wastewater facility as outlined in their
Wastewater Facilities Plan and 1998 Pre-Design Report for
Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements. This included
improvements to the headworks, oxidation ditch, aerator,
clarifier, and disinfection system. It also included
improvements to the solids handling treatment process.
The University of Washington will use the money to evaluate
the feasibility of using the milfoil weevil as a biological
control for milfoil in Washington lakes. This weevil has been
associated with declines of eurasian watermilfoil in the united
states. Surveys conducted in Washington showed that this
weevil was present in Washington, although it is more
commonly found in eastern Washington. Some unexplained
declines of eurasian watermilfoil have occurred in
Washington. It is suspected that the milfoil weevil may have
played a role in these declines.



The district will use the money to work directly with
landowners to develop conservation plans, provide design
assistance, and identify sources of nonpoint pollution.
Landowners will receive the tools necessary to prevent future
problems, and correct current problems.




Washington Trout will use the money to collect data on the
fine sediment intrusion into, and scouring of, Chinook and
Coho Salmon redds. These data will be used to infer survival
to emergence in streams in the Snoqualmie basin. The results
from this study will be used to guide salmon management and
restoration activities in the Snoqualmie basin, and ultimately
will provide an assessment of sediment and scour impacts on
both Chinook and Coho spawning reaches in the major
northern Puget Sound watersheds.




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The goal of the project was to systematically re-vegetate
riparian areas of water courses in lowland Whatcom County
with native trees and shrubs to lower water temperatures, filter
nutrients and shade out reed canary grass. This not only
provides a water quality benefit, but also benefits the farmers
by reducing the need for dredging at a time when dredging
permits are increasingly difficult to obtain. Whatcom County
worked with local drainage improvement districts and
Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association to plan and
coordinate the restoration effort, with labor provided by a low-
cost community service worker program through the Whatcom
County jail. These workers "work off" their judicial penalties
by implementing stream restoration projects. The idea was to
develop a low-cost program that could be replicated
throughout the state.




The immediate purpose of the project was to eliminate the
inadequate Wollochet Harbor treatment plant by intercepting
it to an existing larger municipal sewerage system at Gig
Harbor. The water quality goal was to remove the largest
source of contamination from the inner waters of Wollochet
Harbor, thus removing a significant obstacle to the possible
recertification of shellfish harvest areas there.



The immediate purpose of the project was to eliminate the
inadequate Wollochet Harbor treatment plant by intercepting
it to an existing larger municipal sewerage system at Gig
Harbor. The water quality goal was to remove the largest
source of contamination from the inner waters of Wollochet
Harbor, thus removing a significant obstacle to the possible
recertification of shellfish harvest areas there



The cooperative extension will use the money to recruit and
train individuals in the implementation of best management
practices on their farms. This training will consist of
classroom instruction, field trips, workshops, etc. Training
will cover a wide variety of topics ranging from efficient
irrigation techniques to high value developing a demonstration
farm at robin hill farm (a new Clallam County park).




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                                                       Project Results
The Adopt-A-Stream Foundation (AASF) Fish and Wildlife Restoration field crew completed the culvert and pollution
assessment survey described above in the MacAleer and Lyon Creek and Bear Creek stream systems. A total of 110 culvert
crossings were evaluated in the Lyon and McAleer watersheds, of which 37 culverts were determined to be barriers because
they did not meet WDFW fish passage criteria. 42 culverts were determined to be non-barriers and 30 culverts had an
undetermined status due to access difficulties. The majority of the barrier culverts were private or city-owned. Full physical
habitat assessments were conducted on stream segments covering 14 linear miles in Lyon and McAleer watersheds.
Approximately 2.8 acres of potential rearing habitat and 2.5 acres of potential spawning habitat were blocked by 25 culverts.
Priorities for culvert removal were developed based on these assessments. A total of 177 culvert crossings were evaluated
throughout the Bear Creek watershed, of which 103 were determined to be barriers. 46 culverts were determined to be non-
barriers and 28 culverts had unknown status. The majority of blocking culverts were private or King County owned. Full
Adopt-A-Stream put considerable effort into organizing the North Creek Watershed Coalition. Two watershed forums and
eight North Creek Watershed Coalition meetings were held. Thanks to distributing of flyers to watershed residents as well as
press releases, about 50 people attended the first watershed forum. While representatives of public agencies were present at
the initial few forums/meetings, their participation waned and the coalition became primarily a group of watershed residents.
Some of the meetings featured presentation from local governments. The membership roster includes about 50 people, but
most of the meetings had five to 10 participants. One volunteer produced a poster to publicize the coalition; another
produced an educational brochure. Some of the participants represented larger groups, such as fishing and neighborhood
groups, and some neighborhood school groups became involved in planning projects in the North Creek watershed. The
coalition had a difficult time defining a direction, but the organization is continuing. AASF held two Streamkeeper Field
Training classes with a total of about 30 participants. Several students from Mariner High School along with several North
Creek watershed residents completed Streamkeeper Field Training. There was room in the classes for more participants, but
despite publicity efforts, there appeared to be limited interest in the watershed for this type of training. During the course of
the grant, the Sammamish River Forum dissolved and the WRIA 8 Technical Committee assumed many of their functions.


The recipient completed vegetation inventories along a 400' wide riparian zone along Squalicum, Padden and Chuckanut
Creeks and their tributaries within the city limits and Urban Growth Boundary. The inventory was compiled using CITY
green software, which is an extension of ArcView Geographic Information System. The inventory incorporates data for tree
canopy cover, imperious surfaces, and weed infestations, with detailed information about tree sizes, forest structure and plant
species. It gives some economic values of existing riparian vegetation, highlights opportunities for restoration of forest
vegetation and offers values for enhanced environmental services for several restoration scenarios. The recipient developed
an educational video to provide CITY green software training, and the main architect of the inventory has been available to
tutor staff on the operation of the program. The recipient developed, printed and mailed 20,000 copies of a Pledge Book
within the target watersheds, aimed at encouraging individuals to 'take the pledge' to improve environmental practices. The
recipient produced three 30-minute videos and several pubic service announcements to present watershed protection
messages to the public. Two of the videos "Saving Squalicum" and "Protecting Padden" provided an historical perspective
Reduction of CSOs into Port Washington Narrows. This was accomplished by increasing wastewater conveyance capacity,
rerouting wastewater flows, and separation of sanitary storm sewers. The project involved facilities planning, design, and
construction. The construction of facilities involved: (I) construction of new storm sewers, and improvements and extensions
of existing storm sewers, (ii) construction new sanitary sewer lines, (iii) modifications at pump station CW-2, and (iv)
modifications of overflow structures 9, 10, and 11 (OF-9, OF-10 and OF-11).
In the spring/summer of 2005, the City of Bremerton contracted with a licensed applicator to apply the aquatic herbicide
glyphosate to fragrant water lilies growing 100 feet on either side of the marker buoys at the sound end of Kitsap Lake. The
City held an informational meeting before and after the water lily treatment. The contractor also surveyed the entire lake and
lake shoreline to document the presence of other invasive species. Due to difficulties with non-responsive applicators, no
further treatment occurred in 2006 or 2007. In addition, there were a number of key staff changes in the City during the
project that resulted in no action until 2005.




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A Stormwater Steering Committee was formed and helped to shape the final SWMP. The Port of Bremerton, in coordination
with Otak, Inc., created the SWMP for the South Kitsap Industrial Area: A Developer's Guide to Water Quality
Management. This extensive guide includes: Drainage base map of the South Kitsap Industrial Area (SKIA) and stormwater
management area. A combined watershed map of the three focus watersheds. A map of existing and future land uses. A
regulatory map. Stormwater planning criteria. Characterization of the habitats, aquifer, wetlands, steep slopes and other
critical areas of SKIA. A financial plan for the SWMP. An implementation plan for the SWMP, which includes a costs
analysis and a prioritization of activities.




KCHD applied its successful Pollution Identification and Correction (PIC) program protocol to the Upper Union River
watershed and surveyed approximately 179 properties for domestic and animal waste practices. KCHD also conducted
intensive ‘impact’ monitoring on the Upper Union River and its tributaries and conducted four educational public meetings in
the watershed. The project also included an agricultural inventory and some implemented BMPs by Kitsap Conservation
District. The Upper Union River Restoration Project accomplished the following specific actions; 79 on-site sewage systems
in Upper Union River Basin were rated as having no apparent problems: 8 on-site sewage system failures were found and
corrected, 2 farms confirmed to have inadequate livestock waste management had corrective actions taken, 1 farm
implemented BMPs to protect water quality. the Upper Union River Restoration Project also provided valuable water
quality data and bacteria source correction actions in relation to the Union River Fecal Coliform TMDL.
Task 1: Administration and Management: - Successful administration and management of the project Task 2: Public
Involvement and Implementation Strategy Development Successful completion of this task with public meetings and
landowner participation in riparian restoration projects. Assisted the DEPARTMENT with the development of an outreach
and public involvement communication strategy. Worked with local individuals and agencies to develop an effective and
acceptable implementation strategy. Initiated projects that will reduce temperature in the Little Klickitat River. Held public
meetings to educate community members about the Little Klickitat River TMDL. Received easements from landowners who
participated in the cost-share-funding program. Updated mailing list. Acquired educational materials. Printed sufficient
quantities for distribution to public. Task 3: Monitoring - Successfully completed the monitoring portion and submitted data
to the DEPARTMENT.




THE NEW TREATMENT PLANT WAS CONSTRUCTED AND IS BEING USED TO MEEET WATER QUALITY
REQUIREMENTS. THE REMAINING ITEMS FOR THE SECOND PHASE INCLUDE: ENGINEERING SERVICES,
AN EQUIPMENT BUILDING, AIR SYSTEM UPGRADES, VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES, AUTOMATIC UV
GATE ACTUATORS, SOLIDS PRESS SECURITY CAMERA, AND SECONDARY CLARIFIER ALGAE CONTROL.




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Project Administration/ Management. The engineering firm of Hammond, Collier, Wade, Livingstone LLC was retained to
prepare a conceptual plan for stormwater control from urban and semi-rural areas in the vicinity of Manson. This plan
includes the following items: Inventory of Existing Facilities. Identified location, ownership and maintenance
responsibilities of the existing storm drainage system. A copy of this data is included in the Final Report. Hydrologic
Modeling. The 24 hr. storm events of 2, 25, and 100-year recurrence intervals was modeled. The conceptual plan sized the
secondary and primary components of the storm system. Conceptual Stormwater System Plan. A conceptual stormwater
collection and treatment system meeting the needs of the Manson area has been completed and is consistent with local
standards and requirements. An improvement schedule, budget estimate and financing plan are included in the Manson Plan.
Information and Education. Two public information and educational concepts were pursued through this project. 1.The
development of a Lake Chelan poster showing the lake and its surrounding area, inhabitants (flora and fauna) of this area,
The loan was utilized to retire the remaining prior debt incurred with the United States Department of Agriculture Rural
Development. The City's original bond was retired on February 7, 2002. The Cheney Wastewater Treatment and
Reclamation Project improved water quality in Minnie Creek.



Approximately 16,000 feet of buried irrigation pipeline was installed to completely eliminate two contaminated tailwater
return flows to Matriotti Creek and two in-stream irrigation pumping stations. An additional 4,500 feet of pipeline on this
lateral was installed under funding from the Washington Conservation Commission Dairy Cost Share Program. An estimated
17,000 feet of open irrigation ditch was eliminated. The total cost of the non-dairy portion of this project (not including
some minor system adjustment and electrical work) was $219,819, including inkind contributions from Clallam County Road
Department for County road crossing expenses, and inkind contributions from the Clallam County Public Utility District for
electrical work associated with pumping station relocations. Inkind contributions from the Clallam Ditch Company have not
been totaled. Electrical upgrades were made to one pumping station as part of the Clallam Ditch Company Carlsborg Road
Lateral Project. Two Cline Irrigation District laterals (CL-3 and CL-13) were replaced with closed-end pipelines in
November and December 2004. The piping of these open ditches will eliminate contaminants from entering the systems and
eliminate all tailwater. All water entering the pipelines will be utilized for irrigation only. Three septic effluent pipelines as
well as numerous roof runoff outlets and basement sump pumps draining to the CL-13 lateral were encountered during
construction. Costs associated with the piping of these two laterals exceeded estimates (due to greater backfill volumes than
estimated to fill open ditches). Due to these unexpected costs, construction on the CL-3 lateral was temporarily stopped and
additional funding was pursued. Additional funding has been secured and completion of the project will occur in January
2005. A tour of the Cline Irrigation District projects was conducted as part of the Governor's visit in the summer of 2004. In
After initially using contract divers, County staff decided that it would make more economic sense to become certified for
diving and lead volunteer divers to locate and remove milfoil. This volunteer effort has been ongoing for a number of years.
The volunteers conduct and complete comprehensive underwater surveys of the lake's littoral zone to identify and remove all
infestation sites, either by hand pulling or by installing bottom barriers over larger patches of milfoil. To date, the Lake
Sutherland community has been able to effectively control the watermilfoil through these efforts. The exceptional water
clarity of this lake helps in this effort making it easier for divers to see and remove milfoil plants. Because grant funding is
limited, the County formed a Lake Management District that provides enough revenue to continue funding this milfoil
detection and removal effort (purchasing air for divers, bottom barrier, etc.) for many more years. The County estimates that
there is now less than the equivalent of a city lot's worth of Eurasian milfoil left scattered throughout the entire lake. Ecology
staff surveyed Lake Sutherland in 2006 and found only a few milfoil plants. Although milfoil continues to be found in the




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"Training to onsite staff for operation and maintenance of related topics.
"Creation and implementation of three septic clinics for owners and operators of advanced treatment systems and three
septic clinics for business owners.
"Current local onsite policies were updated. Currently the second draft of the regulations are in staff and county review.
The draft is on hold until the final revision of WAC 246-272 is adopted by the State Board of Health.
"A sanitary survey form to be used for designer septics of concern was developed.
"A report for Groundwater Monitoring for Nitrates in the Agnew-Carlsborg Area was developed. While the majority of
samples in While the majority of samples indicate "good" ground water quality, three of the 125 wells tested have nitrate
levels which exceed the drinking water standard of 10 mg/L. These areas highlight the importance of protecting the wider
regions relatively uncontaminated groundwater quality.
"Streamkeepers established a flow monitoring team to monitor stream flow in several areas of WRIA 18.
the wider regions relatively uncontaminated "Streamkeepers established a flow monitoring team to monitor stream flow in
several areas of WRIA 18.
"Six newsletters titled the Clean Water Herald were mailed to all residents of the Sequim Dungeness Clean Water District
"Several residents and businesses were given Watershed Stewardship Awards. These awards were given for septic systems
investigations and repairs and for land improvements.
The processing area was increased via a mirror image doubling of the facility. The entire facility was covered with a metal
roof. A self-powered trommel screen was purchased to recover valuable materials from the dewatered waste. The screening
also greatly reduces the amount of material requiring expensive landfilling.


Modifications to the WWTP to convert disinfection from chlorine to ultraviolet irradiation. Converted natural stabilization
lagoons to aerated treatment lagoons. Modifications to the headworks, addition of aerators to the first two lagoons,
conversions of the third stage lagoon to wetlands, addition of a re-aeration chamber following the wetlands. Addition of
influent and effluent composite samplers. The CRO will work with the City and monitor the NPDES permit requirements in
lieu of monitoring in a one year certification. The City is currently developing a plan to regionalize with other entities and
Trendwest.
The Clear Lake Water District successfully eradicated Eurasian watermilfoil from Clear Lake using hand removal. The final
report for the project (completed by consultant, Herrera Environmenal Consultants) concludes that the Sonar treatment,
followed by intensive annual diver surveys and hand pulling, was an effective technique for control of Eurasian watermilfoil.
Early effectiveness of this project was hindered by a lapse in plant surveying and hand pulling during 2003 and 2004. The
recipient is well aware of the likelihood of reintroduction of milfoil into the lake by boats and fishing gear and plans
continued lake surveys and hand pulling efforts. The lake also has been found to harbor variable leaf milfoil, a relatively
new invasive species (and a Class A noxious weed). In FY 2010, Ecology awarded a grant to the recipient for eradication of
The consultatnt, CHS Engineers Inc., prepared a comprehensive sewer plan (CSP) for the community of Clinton. The CSP
provides the Clinton Water District with versatile, concept-level options for planning wastewater management in the
community. The CSP outlines several modern wastewater treatment options that would be suitable for the particular
characteristics of the Clinton community. The advantages, disadvantages and cost estimate are provided for each of the five
options considered. The CSP provides an adequate level of detail to provide the basis for a facility plan after one of the five
options is selected.



All of the project objectives were achieved.




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Constructed a regional wastewater treatment facility in Cowiche to handle the wastewaters of both Tieton and Cowiche.




The new upgraded wastewater treatment was constructed and brought on-line. Final construction completion was 11/25/02.



The new upgraded wastewater treatment was constructed and brought on-line. Final construction completion was 11/25/02.



The project conducted monthly sampling of ambient data in the White River for metals to determine if the effluent of the
Buckley and Enumclaw wastewater treatment plants has a reasonable potential to cause a violation of the water quality
standards. In addition to the sampling for metals, the monthly grab samples were analyzed for ambient nutrient
concentrations to assist in the development of the Lower White River nutrient TMDL related to pH violations.
A QAPP was completed in December 2003 and monthly sampling was conducted from February 2004 through January 2005.
Field methods were completed as described in the QAPP. Laboratory methods were performed as outlined in the QAPP as
well and in accordance with the laboratory's quality assurance program. The laboratory quality control results are included
with the ambient metals monitoring results.
The results of the monitoring are consistent with a glacially-fed river upstream of concentrated urban influences. Dissolved
oxygen was consistently high, near saturation in all events. pH was relatively stable and BOD concentrations were very low.
In general, the data is fairly consistent and in the range that would be expected for a river upstream of urban or agricultural
influences. The range of the sampling results were quite consistent throughout the sampling The range of the sampling
results were quite consistent throughout the sampling program with the exception of August and September, when the total
metals concentrations for the majority of the constituents were significantly higher than the other sampling events. The
exceptions were mercury and cadmium. Results for phosphorous, hardness and total suspended solids were also elevated in
The general sewer plan and NEPA documents have been prepared, submitted and approved.


The CD participated in educational events focused on teaching both children and adults about the nature and benefits of
healthy riparian areas. Major gatherings included the Lake Roosevelt Water Festival (for 4th graders), the Ferry County
Spring Conservation Fair, and the Ferry County Fair. The CD also provided information on request to local residents, and
worked with county teachers on individual class projects related to water quality and riparian ecology. Working
cooperatively with other agencies and groups, the CD installed three high profile riparian and/or channel repair projects to
demonstrate softer (not based on rock and concrete) approaches to bank stabilization than many local residents are
accustomed to. One was at Brixner Park near Curlew, another at the Ferry Conservation District property south of Curlew
Lake, and the third at Bridge Creek, a tributary to the Sanpoil River. Smaller scale cost-share projects designed to improve
riparian health were built at five different sites. The property owners all agreed to allow FCD to bring people out and "show




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Water quality and invertebrate monitoring was conducted through out the Foster /Douglas Creek Conservation District.
Initially there was a narrow focus on Foster Creek drainage. This was expanded to include various other drainages and lakes
in the district. Appendix 3 of the Final Report details the results and conclusions of the monitoring. The data was submitted
to Ecology's EIM database. Difficulties with permitting issues and a foreshortening of the grant reduced the number of
headcut repairs down to one major project being completed. The project included the installation of drop structures and
restoration plantings to protect the embankments. The results are documented in the Final Report. The Information and
Education program resulted in: Preparation of PowerPoint presentations and other materials such as posters. Publication of
progress reports and results on the districts website. A booth at the North Cental Washington Fair for 3 years, 7 articles
published in the Conservation Voice Newsletter Numerous tours to the headcut. Sponsorship of an "Envirothon" for local
schools. The did result in several local ranchers asking for technical assistance with various livestock projects.
Upgrade the facility to include the following: Construction of a Biolac Facility; Mechanical screening of the influent; UV
disinfection of the effluent; Upgrading the main pump station.




The upgrade to the facility included: Construction of a Biolac Facility, Mechanical screening of the influent, UV disinfection
of the effluent, Upgrading the main pump stations.




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The activities carried out under the grant have successfully met the major project objectives described above. The project
included construction of 1000 feet of improved channel, riparian and floodplain restoration within Tibbetts Valley Park,
approximately 500 feet of additional riparian restoration on the neighboring Kelly Ranch property, and construction of a
sediment control facility on park property. The City of Issaquah contracted with Mountain to Sound Greenway to provide
procurement and delivery of 14,348 plants, coordination of delivery of City-purchased construction materials (i.e., logs,
mulch, and soil amendments), coordination of Earth Corps crews for plantings, and a public information campaign to recruit
volunteers for planting events. Approximately 435 volunteers contributed 1600 hours of volunteer time to plant trees and
shrubs. Based on final costs for all City- contracted work, including consultants and construction contractors, plus the cost of
City staff, the total project cost was $756,758, of which Ecology provided $146,000.
The project had the following results: Public workshops were conducted throughout Jefferson County for homeowners
groups, professional organizations and special groups. There were 30 workshops with 549 people attending; There were
three documents developed as a part of this effort to enhance the monitoring program. 1) Inspecting Your Septic Tank -
Risers, Baffles, Scum and Sludge, 2). How to Read Your PUD Monitoring Report, and 3) Hiring a Septic System Designer
and the Permit Process; A monitoring element was added to the county permit data base. Then the PUD was connected to the
county network. Training was provided to the O & M specialists, installers, septic tank pumpers and designers on important
elements in operating and maintaining onsite sewage systems. A survey tool was used for some of the homeowner
workshops. The survey was sent out in May 2003 for those participants that went to workshops in Sept and Oct 2002. This
was done to see what was remembered. See report for more details.
The loan program was not as successful as the County had hoped. Due to the very low interest loans available through local
banks, many failures were repaired with either escrow accounts or refinancing of standard mortgages. Many homeowners
found it more advantageous to refinance the repairs with their existing mortgages. This provided them a tax write-off.
However, two successful loans were written and executed with the loan program.




The initial whole lake Sonar treatment in 1995 reduced the hydrilla biomass by 99.99 percent. However each hydrilla plant
makes thousands of tiny tubers that do not all sprout at once. Continued efforts have been to treat and remove plants
sprouting from these tubers which can be long-lived. The great news has been that hydrilla has not been reported anywhere
else in the Pacific Northwest since the 1995 discovery in these lakes. Herbicide treatments were halted in 2001 because of
the Talent Irrigation District decision. All concerted hand pulling efforts were made, the divers could not locate every plant
and additional tubers were set. This has set back this project by about 5 years. However only about 50 hydrilla plants were
seen in the lakes in 2004. In 2004, the project is still continuing under a new grant agreement. A new agreement was
negotiated at the request of Ecology's fiscal program.



The recipient sampled and collected data from 19 streams at 21 different sites during the length of the project. The recipient
translated the data to show the level of biotic integrity for each stream per year of the project as well as the percentage of
forest cover. Sites that illustrated a higher level of biotic integrity were in streams where the level of development was
minimal and where an intact riparian corridor existed. Sites with a low lower level of biotic integrity were in more developed
areas with the least amount of forest cover. The recipient submitted the final report to Kitsap County Surface and Storm
Water Management Department, Kitsap County Department of Community Development, Kitsap County Health District, the
City of Bremerton, the Suquamish and S'Kallam Port Gamble Tribal Fisheries Departments, and Salmon Web. These entities
may use the report to base their future development, protection, and restoration plans on.




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Prepared QAPP and monitored for temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, TSS, total phosphorus, nitrate, fecal
coliform bacteria for two years at 8 - 11 sites. Analyzed combined KCCD and Kittitas Reclamation District (KRD) data to
determine compliance with water quality standards. Identified locations of maximum concern for future implementation of
BMPs to improve water quality. Assisted landowners in Kittitas County in soil moisture monitoring in association with
application of PAM to reduce soil erosion loss. Worked with landowners to identify other sources of funding for
conservation actions. Prepared 14 handouts showing case studies of issues identified on farms, proposed solutions, actions
taken, and funding sources. Published 11 newsletters and hosted at least 8 grower meetings. Printed or reprinted 5,000
copies of the "Kittitas County Rural Living Handbook" and 3,000 additional copies of the "Small Ranch Manual" for use by


The recipient evaluated physical habitat characteristics, monitored physio-chemical water quality, completed inventory of
priority species, developed a program for regular monitoring, and conducted biological sampling. This information will
provide a baseline for assessment of ecological conditions in Liberty Bay to support adaptive management, future
conservation, enhancement, and restoration efforts. The recipient provided education for homeowners about erosion and the
negative impacts of bulkheads, stormwater, and improper septic system operation and maintenance. Children and adults had
opportunities and places to develop a sense of caring and ownership for marine resources, and to learn how impacts to the
nearshore, intertidal, and estuarine habitats are compensated by effective improvements. By working cooperatively with
stakeholders, the recipient mitigated a adverse effects of shoreline development on habitat by planting abundant native
vegetation in the nearshore zone. Volunteer opportunities were easy and fun, and for more complex projects, well supported
by advisors. A technical advisory team helped manage activities, shared understanding of the issues, engaged new players,
and helped build opportunities for volunteers to participate in monitoring and restoring marine habitats. Other elements,
such as characterizing diversity and abundance of fish species, salt marsh vegetation, benthic and shellfish surveys, provide a
gauge of ecosystem functions with which to predict environmental outcomes of future "salmon focused" restoration projects.




Short-term management and control of Egeria densa was achieved; however, the plant population recovered to its previous
growth conditions after the initial treatments. Control work done to date has not brought about the long -term control
desired. This is due to the very aggressive and hard to control nature of Brazilian elodea with limited treatment options.
Unfortunately, the grant expired with funds unexpended just as new management information was developed. By following
the new management strategies, it may now be possible to eradicate Brazilian elodea. The Recipient intends to continue
management using aquatic herbicides purchased before the grant expired. The Chehalis River with its salmon runs is too
important an ecosystem to give up noxious weed management. The education brochure was not produced because of
anticipated need for funds for direct control strategies. However, Thurston County produced a Brazilian elodea brochure for
the Chehalis River and this brochure fills the niche.




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Construction approximately 8,200 lineal feet of wastewater collection system previously shown to be
impaired by excessive infiltration and inflow. Replaced and upgraded the wastewater treatment facility's disinfection system.
An Operation and Maintenance Manual was prepared and approved.




Plans and specifications for the Phase II&III upgrade were approved on March 4, 2003. A summary of compliance with
various technical requirements in the agreement is included in the file.




Wetland Habitat Assessment - evaluation were completed of existing information about wetland habitat in the Columbia
River Estuary to identify critical wetlands. Technical Assistance Team Development - this team hosted habitat workshops to
establish a framework and general criteria for assessing habitat condition. Critical Wetland Habitat Protection and
Maintenance - Eight workgroups were charged with responding to a criteria paper developed by estuarine scientists from
National Marine Fisheries Service.




Six engineered log jam structures were completed during the summer of 2001. A very large log jam (Logjam #5) is
constructed near the toe of a massive bank failure, and is configured as a revetment to provide a catch basin for eroding
material. The five other log jams are smaller and are designed to adjust channel morphology, increase flood plain
connectivity and form complex habitat features. The log jam sites, staging and access areas were The Lummi Nation
performed monitoring before, during and after log jam construction. Data collected included topographic surveys, pebble
counts, large woody debris measurements, stream discharge and temperature, habitat utilization, and photo documentation.
The following reports were produced and are included in the project file: South Fork Nooksack River Historic-Scale Log
Jam: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan, prepared by Lummi Natural Resources Department, December 2001. Photo
Monitoring of the Larson's Reach Engineered Log Jam on the South Fork Nooksack River, prepared by M.E. Holter, Lummi
Natural Resources Department, 2001. Construction of Historic-Scale Log Jams in: Larson's Bridge Reach of the South Fork
Nooksack River in Skagit County, Washington, prepared by Gregg S. Dunphy, Lummi Natural Resources Department, 2002.
South Fork Nooksack River Historic-Scale Logjams: 2002 Project Status Report, prepared by Lummi Natural Resources
Department, December 2002. The single most profound and immediate project benefit to salmonids and water quality
occurred as a consequence of construction of Logjam #5. Following construction, fine sediment delivery to the south fork
from the failure immediately upland of the logjam was halted. Although the land continued to slide, the sediment was
contained behind the logjam and the river thalweg was successfully moved away from the toe of the slope. In addition, the




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Lummi Natural Resources completed storm proofing work on 17.03 miles of forest road (9.5 mile target).
Washington Department of Natural Resources completed road abandonment treatments on 13 miles of road. (This work was
used as project match.) Lummi Natural Resources contracted with Bitteroot Restoration, Inc. to complete the effectiveness
monitoring on both phases (storm proofing and abandonment) of the project. The monitoring report, An Evaluation of
Sediment Reduction Work (Pre- and Post-Treatment) on Racehorse Creek Watershed, is included in the project file. This
report indicated some variability in the effectiveness of sediment reduction treatments, particularly road abandonment
measures. Further review indicated that the work met or exceeded Washington State Forest Practice Act requirements, which
differ somewhat from US Forest Service standards with which the consultant was most familiar. Using the remaining funding
from this grant, combined with the remaining funding from G0100148 (which funded sediment reduction on other road
segments in the Racehorse Creek watershed), Lummi Natural Resources was able to complete four additional high priority
Lummi Natural Resources completed storm proofing work on 17 miles of forest road (9 mile target).
Washington Department of Natural Resources completed road abandonment treatments on 17 miles of road. (13 mile target.
This work was used as project match.) Lummi Natural Resources contracted with Bitteroot Restoration, Inc. to complete the
effectiveness monitoring on both phases (storm proofing and abandonment) of the project. The monitoring report, An
Evaluation of Sediment Reduction Work (Pre- and Post-Treatment) on Racehorse Creek Watershed, is included in the
project file. This report indicated some variability in the effectiveness of sediment reduction treatments, particularly road
abandonment measures. Further review indicated that the work met or exceeded Washington State Forest Practice Act
requirements. Using the remaining funding from this grant, combined with the remaining funding from G0100009 (which
funded sediment reduction on other road segments in the Racehorse Creek watershed), Lummi Natural Resources was able to
complete four additional high priority fish passage improvements and three additional sediment reduction treatments.
Lummi Natural Resources contracted with Bitteroot Restoration, Inc. to complete a field study of publicly funded sediment
reduction projects. The first part of the project was to develop a methodology for monitoring the effectiveness of road
abandonment and storm-proofing treatments in actually reducing excess sediment delivery from forest roads into aquatic
systems. (See Appendix A, Modified Veldhuisen et.al. Methods in the project file.) Second, it used those methodologies to
assess the effectiveness of over 200 miles of previously completed road sediment projects within the Nooksack basin. (See
An Evaluation of Sediment Reduction Treatments on Forest Roads in the Nooksack River Watershed, December, 2000, in
project file.) Bitteroot reviewed a total of 87 Nooksack Recovery Team projects with 50 segments receiving intensive
evaluation and 44 roads receiving cursory assessment. 44 percent of the roads reviewed had no problems, 22 percent had
drainage problems, 17 percent had erosion problems, and 17 percent had both drainage and erosion problems. The report
concluded that sediment reduction projects in the Nooksack River watershed have reduced the quantity of sediment delivered
to aquatic systems. However, there are a number of roads treated for sediment reduction that continue to contribute sediment
The waste water treatment system is improved and upgraded, and the facility expanded with more capacity. The plant now
has an anoxic reactor to efficiently perform nitrogen removal. UV is now the primary disinfectant so chlorine is used only in
unusual situations. The facility no longer needs to de-chlorinate.
The wastewater treatment system is improved and upgraded, and the facility expanded with more capacity. The plant now
has an anoxic reactor to efficiently perform nitrogen removal. UV is now the primary disinfectant so chlorine is used only in
unusual situations. The facility no longer needs to de-chlorinate.




Converted 91% of 6,386 acres from furrow irrigated land to drip irrigated land. Reduced sediment from historical (1974-
1981) levels of 43 tons per day to 4 tons per day (in 2001).




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Upgraded headworks by installing an automated headworks screen. Improved water quality by installing ultraviolet
treatment as a replacement for chlorine disinfection.




As a general observation, in 2002 (prior to treatment) the lake had very dense Eurasian milfoil and Brazilian elodea growth
nearly throughout. By the end of 2002 and into spring and summer of 2003, the lake sediment was largely left bare of plant
growth due to the herbicide treatment. By June 2004, rooted plants and macroalgae were beginning to colonize the lake
sediment. Although Eurasian milfoil was not collected during sampling events in 2003 and 2004, divers doing hand pulling
of the Brazilian elodea did find some growth of Eurasian milfoil in 2004. By 2005, both Eurasian milfoil and Brazilian
elodea were collected in frequency and biomass samples. The project met the data collection objectives. Ongoing efforts
will be required to control these invasive aquatic weeds.




Through public meetings, educational and field activities citizens in the Leland watershed community have become
personally involved in water quality monitoring. Current environmental education programs at the Quilcene School have
been expanded to include in-class curriculum about local watershed health along with hands-on learning through field and
laboratory water quality monitoring activities. This project provides important data on water quality parameters in Leland
Creek indicating direct threats to salmon populations.




The plans and specifications for the 1999 Sewer System Improvements were approved on June 15, 1999. The plans and
specifications for the Second Street Sewer Repair Project were approved on January 18, 2001. As-built drawings have been
received. The plans and specifications for the Phase II Sewer Repair Project were approved on June 11, 2001. As-built
drawings have been received. As of April 11, 2002, construction of all three collection projects (including correction of
deficiencies) and improvements at the wastewater treatment facility have been completed. A copy of the Declaration of
Construction for the collection system work is in the file. Planned TV inspection of the sewer system has been completed.
Initial construction to utilize the balance of the construction funding in the grant has been completed.




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The plans and specifications for the Wastewater Treatment Plant project were approved on March 26, 2002. The plans and
specifications for the Sewer Repair projects Phase II were approved on June 11, 2001.




One on one technical assistance for farm management and water quality BMP's to 299 landowners (240 required by the
grant). Wrote 32 conservation plans (24 required by the grant). Implemented 85 farm and water quality best management
practices guided by the Natural Resources Conservation Service standards and specifications (24 were required by the grant).
All farms assisted were given a priority status based upon the initial grant negotiation with priority assistance given to farms
that had the highest priority ranking. (See report for ranking criteria). Eight newsletters were prepared and distributed to a
mailing list of 1,800. These newsletters highlighted cooperators, new practices, native plant uses, and water quality
protection. Conducted 22 workshops that covered farm and water quality BMP's. 516 landowners attended these
workshops. Purchased and distributed 151 Stream Sign replacements as inventoried.
Enhancement of the overall water quality in Pathaha Creek through improved quality of treated wastewater effluent
discharging from the upgraded WWTP. Partial reduction of existing infiltration/inflow in the sanitary sewer collection
system by means of sewer rehabilitation and replacement where warranted.



Enhancement of the overall water quality in Pathaha Creek through improved quality of treated wastewater effluent
discharging from the upgraded WWTP. Partial reduction of existing infiltration/inflow in the sanitary sewer collection
system by means of sewer rehabilitation and replacement where warranted.



New influent flow meter; Headworks modifications; Polymer feed systems; Intermediate clarifier modifications; Effluent
pumping system modifications; Replacement of primary digester floating cover; Building with digester mixing system
pumps; Operations building; Data acquisition collection system.

New influent flow meter; Headworks modifications; Polymer feed systems; Intermediate clarifier modifications; Effluent
pumping system modifications; Replacement of primary digester floating cover; Building with digester mixing system
pumps; Operations building; Data acquisition collection system,

A watershed action plan was submitted to Ecology on February 15, 2005. The plan identified contaminant source locations
and concentrations, estimated pollutant loads for Clarks Creek, and developed a pollutant reduction plan to control
pollutants. This report was submitted on time; however, the DEPARTMENT is still working on some of the aspects of the
Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). Therefore, this document is preliminary and may still undergo corrections after the
grant period is over.




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In order to construct the project, which is located on private property, the City of Redmond worked with 23 property owners
to obtain 26 permanent easements and to gain temporary construction access across eight properties. In preparation for the
second phase, the city's consultant assembled a team of professionals whose work included landscape design, surveying,
mapping, biological assessment, design and construction document preparation, geotechnical reconnaissance, attendance at
public open house, and construction oversight. Their understanding of natural stream processes combined with traditional
water resources engineering resulted in a stream reach that that resembles pre-development condition. The stream was routed
to the bypass pipeline during construction. The city's requirements and contractor's innovative approach minimized
disturbance to stream ecology from construction equipment and material delivery. All on-site material, including brush,
downed wood logs, hazard trees, and soil was reused. No material was hauled away except for trash. Existing footing,
downspout, and storm drains that were discharging onto the face of the slopes were extended to the channel bottom to
minimize saturation and erosion of slope soils. A combination of bioengineering techniques were used to stabilize the banks
and stream bed, including installation of boulders, large woody debris, log and rock wiers, grade control logs, boulder


In November 2000 $10,000,000 was provided to the Roza - Sunnyside Board of Joint Control to loan out to local producers
to convert irrigation practices over to more efficient methods. By November of 2004 $7,940,186.08 was loaned out on 260
projects. This converted 12,593 ac. from rill to some type of sprinkler or drip system. Progress was evaluated by water
quality monitoring. The water quality monitoring was funded with another grant, G0100060, given to the South Yakima
Conservation District. The data was analyzed and synthesized into a single report entitled Conservation Practices and Water
Quality Trends in Sulphur Creek Wasteway and Granger Drain Watersheds, 1997 to 2002.




The activities under the loan have successfully met or exceeded the major project objectives enumerated above. San Juan
Health and Community Services loaned out a total of $244,024 for repair of 21 failing septic systems, seven each on San
Juan, Orcas and Lopez Islands. Repair costs ran from $5583 for a pressure distribution repair of a failed gravity distribution
system to $41,598 for the replacement of a failing pressure distribution system serving a restaurant. This repair included a
recirculating gravel filter and Nibbler treatment units. The average system repair cost was $11,620.21. Fourteen of the
systems were sand filters replacing either standard gravity, mound or pressure distribution systems or outfalls. Four of the
systems were pressure distribution systems replacing standard gravity systems. Two of the systems were recirculating gravel
filters plus Nibbler replacing pressure distributions systems.




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In 2002 Lake Campbell was treated with the granular formulation of 2, 4-D at a rate of 100 pounds per acre. Sixty acres of
the lake were treated. Most of the chemical was applied over milfoil beds in the western portion of the lake. Infested areas of
the shoreline were also targeted. A post-treatment survey in September 2002 showed that this herbicide treatment achieved
excellent control of milfoil in the treatment areas. The County provided four education/training events to the community
varying from septic maintenance to the importance of native plants. County staff developed a color brochure describing lake
ecology/invasive plants. These brochures were distributed to the lake residents. A second brochure describing proper boat
cleaning procedures was also prepared and was distributed on opening day of boating season.




Successful disposal of treated and disinfected wastewater has been achieved. A system to warn of impending surfacing of
treated wastewater problems has been installed. Rules and Regulations ordinance has been enacted. Operation and
Maintenance Manual Completed. Eight acres of additional disposal area was purchased.
Successful disposal of treated and disinfected wastewater has been achieved. A system to warn of impending surfacing of
treated wastewater problems has been installed. Rules and Regulations ordinance has been enacted. Operation and
Maintenance Manual Completed. Eight acres of additional disposal area was purchased.
The Final Stormwater Plan was developed and is a quality stormwater facilities plan for the Carson area. The document
gives a sound foundation for addressing stormwater concerns in the Carson area.




The Stabler Water Quantity and Quality Study Report was finalized on February 13, 2004. It will provide useful information
for future planning. Five recommendations were made in this report: Perform additional geologic sampling and analysis to
enhance the definition of area hydrostratigraphy (define area ground water systems) and identify the extent of relatively
"open" ground water zones as well as more limited ground water bearing "pockets" that supply water to wells. Determine
locations of wells within and immediately surrounding the study area to refine the proposed list of wells to be monitored.
Finalize locations of stream water sampling and flow gauging stations. Finalize the long term water resources monitoring
plan including updating the QAPP based on the guidelines in section 9 of the report. Consider protecting the potential zones
that may act as important recharge pathways for the study area ground water against water quality impacts.



The following project components were either purchased or designed/constructed: A total of 1.30 acres was purchased and
four cells (one in reserve) were constructed for a community drainfield. Approximately 1,287 feet of 1.5 inch PVC for was
installed for lateral distribution in each cell. A three-chamber septic tank with a total volume of 19,850 gallons was installed.
A sewage pump station and wetwell was constructed. 750 feet of 4-inch Ductile iron pipe was installed to convey sewage
from the wetwell to septic tank.

The plans and specifications were approved by Ecology and the Department of Health on August 15, 2002. The community
STEP system is complete and operating satisfactorily. The local health department has indicated it will lift the declaration of
severe public health hazard.




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Conducted 154 technical assistance site visits to discuss farm planning and Agricultural BMPs; Completed 26 farm plans;
Developed a Priority ranking matrix to identify farms most impacted by ESA rules. Installed 8,700 linear feet of livestock
exclusion fencing on four farms. Planted 6,350 linear feet of riparian area with native vegetation on eight properties.
Developed 10 landowner agreements with participating landowners. Completed a water quality monitoring plan. Conducted
one year of baseline monitoring of three sites where fencing installation and or riparian restoration occurred previously.
Each site had an upstream and downstream monitoring site to assess water quality improvements. Produced a final water
quality monitoring report entitled: Water Quality Monitoring Report: Fish Friendly Farm Implementation Water Quality
Monitoring Project, December 2003. Prepared a Public Information and Education Plan (PIEP). Implemented all the actions
in the PIEP including: Developing fact sheets, conducting farm tours, staffing conservation district booths at local fairs, and
conducting four presentations and writing four news articles.
Developed a Quality Assurance Project Plan for conducting monitoring in Riley Slough. Conducted baseline water quality
monitoring and produced a monitoring report which included data analysis, results and conclusions. Completed and
implemented a Public Information Education Plan. Implementation included: project newsletters, two community meetings,
habitat fact sheets, web page, participation in community fairs and outreach events, and publicizing the project in local
newspapers and the Conservation District Newsletter. Developed and implemented eight restoration plans for Riley Slough
over the life of the project. Completed ninety-one (91) landowner site visits. Restored 8,200 linear feet of riparian habitat
along Riley Slough. This included removal of invasive blackberries, planting of native tree and shrub species, and follow-up
maintenance and monitoring. Replacement of three undersized/partially blocked culverts with bridges. Installed 8,600 liner
feet of fencing along Riley Slough. Developed landowner agreements with the eight participating landowners. Made use of
Washington Conservation work crews and Snohomish County Correction volunteer crews to assist with restoration activities
Conducted 279 site visits to basin landowners to provided stream and wetland restoration assistance and to investigate
potential restoration projects. Completed 29 restoration project designs and budgets over the project life. A number of these
projects were implemented with centennial grants funds, some with other funding sources, while others are awaiting funding
approval from non-Ecology funding sources. Developed 18 landowner agreements for habitat restoration projects.
Recipient staff attended eight different local and regional habitat restoration trainings to assist with project implementation.
Completed 18 stream habitat restoration projects in the project area. $69,551 grant funds were spent on implementation
projects. Coordinated over 1000 hours of volunteer labor to assist with project implementation. Coordinated the use of
Washington Conservation Corps crews for a total of 36 weeks to assist with project installation and follow-up maintenance.
Investigated and coordinated cost share funding from other sources to assist with project implementation. Conducted
restoration site evaluations to track the survivability and growth of plants, and the integrity of restoration work. This included



The recipient performed and extensive ground water study in their pilot subarea, which was the Getchell Plateau. The study
included a general overview of the Getchell Plateau environment, plus an overview of basic ground water investigations and
sampling; an explanation of the hydrogeology of the Getchell Plateau; a detailed look at the groundwater system; an
explanation of the ground water utilization; land use impacts on the ground water; and conclusions and recommendations.
"The recipient assessed potential and future concerns for ground water quality and quantity in terms of population increase,
septic systems, wastewater, stormwater, landfills, hazardous waste, underground storage tanks, petroleum spills, sand and
gravel quarries and mines, agriculture, herbicide, fertilizer, animal waste, and well construction and decommissioning.
"The recipient's project team developed a comprehensive ground water database, which allowed them to assess the water-
table, piezometric-surface elevation, and ground water quality. It also allowed them to bring a large amount of previously
and recently collected data into a central location. Future ground water investigations may now be initiated without the need




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Conducted an initial assessment of citizen attitudes concerns and motivations. This assessment included: A benchmark
telephone survey of 400 residents and the use of three different focus groups (two countywide workshops and one streamside
landowner workshop). Produced a report entitled: Motivating Public Involvement in Salmon Conservation and Water
Quality, March 2002. This report summarized the initial assessment work. Developed a public involvement and education
plan (PIE) based in part on outcomes of the initial assessment. The PIE plan defined two phases of work, target audience
cultivation, and evaluation. Implemented the PIE plan. This included developing key messages, conducting eight streamside
landowner workshops (123 participants) and developing water quality / stream habitat education material. Conducted a
follow-up assessment of 73 members of the target audience and 249 streamside property owners to measure program success.
Produced a report entitled: Report of findings from an Elite Survey of 22 Snohomish County property owners who received
surface water management mailings and a survey of 300 streamside property owners, December 2003. This report
The project had the following results: Reviewed 56 irrigation designs and developed 32 farm plans; Leased data loggers and
associated soil moisture sensors to 20 growers. Developed GIS layer of crop and irrigation type for non-tribal irrigated land
within the district. Technical assistance, planning and administrative support on BMP's over 3,039 ac. Water quality in
Sulphur Creek has improved. This is one of several water quality improvements projects going on in the sub-basin at the
same time. It is difficult to attribute how much this project contributed. But, without it many landowners would not have had
technical assistance available in irrigation management. This grant augmented the water quality monitoring program that
began with the Roza Sunnyside Joint Board of Control. A separate technical report was produced for that effort. Outreach
for this grant included starting a district newsletter for publishing results and promoting the project.
Reached an estimated 20,000 area residents through television, radio and newspaper advertising, public information booths,
and public speaking events; 2.Distributed an abundance of materials designed to raise awareness about the aquifer and its
vulnerability to contamination; developed the www.spokaneaquifer.org website which receives an average of 1,760 hits per
month and includes two educational Virtual Field Trips of the aquifer; developed an aquifer-protecting superhero named
Aqua Duck who gave live performances at schools and public events; partnered with the Department of Transportation to
place "Aquifer Influence Signs" on major road ways that intersect with the aquifer; began restoring a historic well to be used
as an interpretive center to educate people and students about the aquifer; partnered with KSPS public television to develop
a ready-to-learn program to educate school-aged children about the aquifer; increased proper household hazardous waste
disposal by 7 to 10 percent through education and door -to -door pick up services; funded interns with the Department of
Ecology's Hazardous Waste and Toxics Reduction Program to provide technical assistance to businesses that could have a
Five (5) loans for a total amount of $215,644 were provided to producers for the purchase of minimum tillage systems.
Through the use of minimum tillage, 1,449 of additional acres in the Rattler's Run subwatershed of Hangman Creek will
produce less sediment to the watershed system. An estimated 13,000 tons of sediment from this acreage would be prevented
from entering the waterways. An effective and efficient local loan program was established. Additional acreage outside the
Rattler's Run subwatershed will also be subjected to minimum tillage with the equipment purchased by this loan project and
by previous loans projects. The Spokane County Conservation District will continue to promote direct seeding and minimum
tillage through education, promotion and through an in-house loan program.
The project had the following results: Monitoring stations were established at 9 sites spread throughout the watershed.
Sampling occurred approximately monthly between January 2002 and June 2003. Parameters included flow, specific
conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, fecal coliform bacteria, turbidity, total suspend solids, and nutrients.
Dissolved oxygen, pH, and fecal coliform were the parameters that didn't meet the state's standards most often. Pingston
Creek was also sampled for benthic macroinvertebrates at three locations, once in early summer of 2002 and again in 2003.
Based on the "bug work" alone, Pingston Creek was judged to be "slightly impaired." Water quality monitoring data were
submitted to the Department of Ecology's EIM database. Watershed Management Plan was written, focusing on voluntary
actions which could be taken to improve/protect water quality in the Pingston Creek watershed as a whole and in each of the
six sub-watersheds individually.
The scope of work for the Waitts Lake Sewer System consisted primarily of furnishing and installing, or otherwise
constructing, a septic tank/effluent pump [STEP] collection system and aerated facultative lagoon treatment with storage
lagoon, and land application via spray irrigation as final disposal of the treated effluent. The recently completed public
sewerage system collects the domestic sewage and pumps it to a treatment/disposal site site outside the Waitts Lake drainage
basin solving the sewage contamination problem at Waitts Lake. The treatment/disposal facilities also serve the
unincorporated community of Valley, Stevens County, Washington, which prior to this had no public sewerage treatment




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Since there was no existing public sewer system, the new collection system replaced existing on-site disposal facilities. This
work consisted primarily of furnishing and installing approximately: - 33 STEP/STEF tanks ranging in size from 1,000 -
1,500 gallons
- 23,300 LF of sanitary sewer gravity and pressure pipe
- 1,900 LF of sewer casing pipe - Miscellaneous valves, cleanouts, and other appurtenances

The project accomplished the following results: Development of a quality assurance project plan for water quality
monitioring. Conducted monitoring as part of a Sultan High School education program. Held two public workshops and a
public hearing during plan development and finalization. Presented planning information three times before the Sultan City
Council. Developed a draft and final surface water quality management plan. The plan consists of a hydrologic analysis,
existing conditions, water quality problem identification and corrective actions.


The project staff identified priority areas of sensitive water quality where on-site sewage septic systems were in use. Various
means were used to contact and educate owners about the special nature of the area that they live, and how understanding
their septic system could benefit, water quality, health and property values. Educational efforts included 450 30 second
commercials on cable television, direct mailing of over 5,000 brochures to residents of sub-watersheds identified as having
valuable fish and shellfish stocks, and 19 workshops conducted at various locations throughout Pierce County. The Land Use
Regulation of the Tacoma-Pierce County Board of Health was revised during the term of the project. The purpose of the
revision was to expand and refine the coverage of the sections of the regulation concerned with septic system operation and
maintenance.




153 on-site sewage systems were dye tested, and a number of other properties were eliminated from the original database
through visual checks of the drainfield, or were determined to be vacant. Six failures were detected and repaired. The goal
of this project was to improve and protect water quality in the following three threatened or closed shellfish watersheds in
Filucy Bay, Dutchers Cove, and Vaughn Bay. This goal was accomplished. The project also served as an intermediary step
to the formation of an ongoing Shellfish Watersheds Program that provides a proactive approach to protecting our shellfish
resources. Performance of Recipient: The recipient was prompt at turning in progress reports. The electronic data
submitted to EIM was much slower. It was received approximately 6 months late.



THE NEW SYSTEM WAS CONSTRUCTED AS PLANNED AND IS ANTICIPATED TO MEET WATER QUALITY
STANDARDS.




Constructed a new wastewater treatment facility.




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The Conservation Districts Partnership (CDP) publicized the technical assistance opportunity through the local media, public
service announcements and by word-of-mouth, resulting in successfully getting participation by the field operators. The
material was printed in both Spanish and English. The CDP developed and presented training seminars. The seminars were
held once a week for six weeks. There were over 100 participants; 85 certificates of completion were presented. In addition
to the operators, staff from other conservations districts and from Ecology participated in some of the training. Site specific
field data was provided to participants. The CDP staff worked with the selected operators to provide information and advice
on the irrigation system's efficiency of operation. Over 140 site specific reports were given to the operators. Approximately
18,000 acres were impacted by the training. Requests for the service are still submitted by local producers and operators.
However, the loss of the bi-lingual staff has severely limited the ability to provide the service.
This was the last of a series of grants to the UW for weevil research. The UW determined that the milfoil weevil is
widespread in Washington, but that it is much more common in eastern Washington. The milfoil weevil is found feeding on
both native and non-native milfoil in Washington Lakes. There is speculation that some milfoil declines in Washington lakes
could be due to the presence of these weevils. A number of scientific publications have resulted as a result of this and other
grant projects on the milfoil weevil. Rearing the weevil in the laboratory and releasing it in milfoil lakes is still considered
experimental in Washington, but Ecology is continuing research into this potential biological control method.




An integrated plan was developed an approved by Ecology. The plan calls for the use of the aquatic herbicides 2,4-D and
diquat to be used in Welcome Slough on Puget Island and in the Cathlamet Marina. The steering committee determined that
control of milfoil in the other areas was not necessary at this time. Biological control agents (insects) will be used to help
combat the purple loosestrife invading along the Columbia River.




Whatcom Conservation District contracted with Lummi Natural Resources and Crown Pacific to complete road storm
proofing on 3.05 miles of forest road (CP4000 road). Crown Pacific contributed $447,552 of its own funds to this project to
match the $135,000 of grant funds. Whatcom Conservation District contracted with Nooksack Salmon Enhancement
Association (NSEA) to complete the riparian restoration portion of the project. NSEA planted four project sites, two on
Black Slough and two on the South Fork Nooksack, totaling about 4000 lineal feet of riparian buffers, averaging 25 to 60
feet in width. Approximately 600 feet of 5-strand barbed wire fence was constructed for livestock exclusion. Exotic plant
species were removed from planting locations and controlled using Roundup during follow-up maintenance. Appropriate
vole and beaver protection were installed. Whatcom Conservation District contracted with NSEA to maintain seven existing
riparian restoration sites. Maintenance activities included: cutting six-foot diameter circles around each plant with weed-
whackers, and grubbing by hand if necessary to reduce competition; spraying with Roundup to control Himalayan




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Comprehensive Public Education and Outreach Program: The recipient offered two sesssions of stream team classes; a
Stream Team Handbook was developed and distributed to Stream Team members; three Bertrand and Fishtrap watershed
tours were co-hosted with Canadian vounteers; Stream Team volunteers worked in plant sale and discussed stream
restoration and native plants with customers, a Stream Team member gave a talk to the local Lions Club and included
watershed information in a 4-H and local Agriculture Preservation Committee newsletters; a Lynden Christian High School
teacher lead a public tour of the school's student-run salmon hatchery and followed up with a District-lead native plant tour,
and District staff coordinated with two second grade classes from Fisher Elementary in planting native vegetation for a
stream restoration at a private residence along Fishtrap Creek; and published eleven articles related to Stream Team, Betrand
Creek in the 'Whatcom Conservation News', or 'Bertrand Creek Stream News'; and a Power Point slide show was developed
for use in shcools, 4-H clubs, scout troops, etc. a Bertrand Creek/Fishtrap Creek watershed map was created, and a Power
Point presentation on the Stream Team program was developed. Small Farm Planning: two "Horses for Clean Water"
workshops and two workshops on Mud & Manure commercial Farm Resource Kit was distributed to landowner which gave
technical assistance about providing a healthy reparian zone, District staff provided technical assistance via telephone and
site visits, and the "Small Farm Composting Guide" specific to Whatcom Conty was developed and distributed to small farm
cooperators; "Watershed Steward" signage was placed on Betrand Creek watershed properties; eleven small farm plans or
community based restoration plans were developed either by Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association, Conservation
Reserve Enhancement Program, the Environmental Quality Incentive Program or through community volunteers for private
properties, parks, or commercial dairies; Completion/Continuation of Monitoring, Assessment, Analysis, and Reporting;
Bertrand Creek Water Quality QAPP and Report was submitted which found improvement in the area watershed and a
reopening of the Portage Bay shellfish beds; "Bertrand Creek Salmonid Habitat Assessment" was prepared by Lynden
Biological, it included a limiting factros analyses and project prioritization recommendations; the "Bertrand Creek Salmonid
The expansion of the facility up to 2.0 MGD is projected to be sufficient for 20 years of growth. The upgrade to the
treatment facility includes construction of a new headworks, three sequencing batch reactor basins, an ultraviolet disinfection
system, an aerobic solids digestion facility, an upgraded effluent pump station, a new laboratory facility, an emergency power
generation system and associated site work, electrical and other miscellaneous improvements.

The expansion of the facility up to 2.0 MGD is projected to be sufficient for 20 years of growth. The upgrade to the
treatment facility includes construction of a new headworks, three sequencing batch reactor basins, an ultraviolet disinfection
system, an aerobic solids digestion facility, an upgraded effluent pump station, a new laboratory facility, an emergency power
generation system and associated site work, electrical and other other miscellaneous improvements.

Native trees were planted along Paradise Creek. Protective tubes were used to reduce the impact from wildlife. Four
different local school districts were involved in the educational efforts. They planted trees and monitored water quality at
several locations in Whitman County (Little Hangman Creek, Paradise Creek, Pine Creek, Union Flat Creek, and the South
Fork of the Palouse River). In all, 36 different project sites were addressed and 2112 native trees and shrubs were planted.
Buffer maintenance activities were performed to replace dead trees and to remove weeds. Four raptor perches were built and
installed within the project areas to improve wildlife habitat. A QAPP was developed and submitted for approval. In turn,
macroinvertebrate studies were done on four project sites and water quality monitoring was completed for several parameters
at these sites. The parameters monitored included temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and nitrates. Multiple presentations to
local school teachers and administrators were made by the Center for Environmental Education staff and guests to promote
the educational opportunities available through this project. Stream activity guides were developed and distributed to
teachers who expressed interest. In addition, staff developed grade level-appropriate materials for use with this project.
Characterized the fish in ten gravel mining pits/ponds in the Yakima Basin.




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This goal was accomplished by designing and installing informational signs about purple loosestrife at six public access
points along the Yakima River. The sign locations were chosen so that the majority of people who use the river will see
them. In addition, a full page was purchased in the Yakima Herald Republic newspaper to provide information about purple
loosestrife and its control to the public. This newspaper has a circulation of 40,000.




Provided extensive data on the following characteristics at 10 pits in the Yakima floodplain: Pond bathymetry; Temperatures;
Fish Assemblage; Benthic macroinvertebrates.




A project report was completed. The report analyzed the impacts on water quality from the use of CTWs for secondary
polishing of the Class A reclaimed water. It also completed a qualitative analysis between this project and the baseline. The
conclusion was that the recharge with Class A reclaimed water has had no effect on nitrate levels within the aquifer, however,
secondary polishing of Class A reclaimed water with constructed treatment treatment wetlands in some cases improves water
quality, while in other cases, it contributes to the degradation of the water quality.




Adopt-A-Stream Foundation (AASF) issued press releases to the local media regarding the intent and purpose of the survey
project. Three articles were published in local newspapers. AASF completed a map and aerial photograph survey to identify
potential locations of culverts in the channels of the target stream systems. AASF contacted private landowners either in
person, with door-hangers, or by letter, to request their permission to survey culverts located on private property. About 60
percent of property owners gave AASF permission to conduct the on-site survey. AASF also provided educational materials
concerning stream protection to landowners. AASF located, surveyed, and documented 569 culvert crossings in the five sub-
basins. Of that a total of 249 culverts were determined to be barriers not meeting fish passage criteria, 172 were determined
not to be barriers, and 148 had an unknown barrier status. AASF completed WDFW Level B field surveys and performed
subsequent hydraulic analysis on 85 stream crossings. AASF mapped identified barrier culverts using a Geographic
Information System. AASF conducted habitat assessment surveys above 35 stream crossings where significant barriers to
salmon migration were documented. AASF completed prioritization index calculations for significant barriers and worked
with local jurisdictions to develop near-term action projects to remove high priority culverts. Preliminary field survey data-
sets of individual sub-basins were released to Snohomish and King counties to assist them in completing master drainage
inventory surveys in these local sub-basins. Preliminary survey information has also been disseminated to local jurisdictions
such as Mill Creek, Bothell, Everett, and Marysville. AASF compiled the project findings, maps and supporting data in a
Developed estimates of the city's impervious surface area and rate payer base. Developed stormwater program one-time only
costs, capital improvement costs and ongoing annual program cost elements. Developed a summary report outlining the
findings of the stormwater rate structure committee. A rate analysis is included in this report. Developed stormwater utility
ordinances creating Arlington's stormwater utility. Created a City ordinance establishing the stormwater utility rate structure.
Developed draft procedures for establishing accounts and setting up city stormwater utility rates. Presented stormwater
utility development information to the City Council and the public. City Council approval of implementation of the
stormwater utility and rate structure.



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Gaging station are operational. Provisional data is submitted approximately monthly by USGS for use by modelers working
on Lake Whatcom. Three of the stations are also programmed to assist in collecting composit samples for use in storm
sampling. Street cleaning is not currently recommended because effective cleaning requires 1) operation only in dry weather.
2) slow speeds and multiple passes are required that would cause unacceptable interruptions of traffic flow on the heavily
used roads most in need of cleaning.
Many growers were assisted individually and through group presentations and annual Ag. Tours; Sampling was conducted
and analyzed for erosion into Spring and Snipes Creeks. Data was provided to Ecology for entry into EIM; In the first year
of the project, 5 schools and 130 students were involved in the Salmon In The Classroom program. In the final year of the
project, over 600 students and 45 volunteers in 15 schools were involved. 22,050 acres of crops in the lower Yakima River
basin were GIS mapped for irrigation methods, crop type, cover crop, and field slope.

Task 1 Administration and Management: Successful administration and management of the project. Task 2 District
Interaction: The District interacted with Kittitas, Klickitat, North Yakima, and South Yakima Conservation Districts on
numerous projects and activities to enhance services provided and efficiently utilize grant funds. Task 3 Technical
Assistance: The District assisted in writing and implementing 249 NRCS approved farm plans. The plans included Best
Management Practices (BMPs) for irrigation improvements emphasizing soil and water conservation. In 2002 the grant was
amended to include implementation of a streambank stabilization project on the banks of the Yakima River, which was
successfully completed. Task 4 Information and Education: The District provided information and education on soil erosion
reduction, irrigation water management, and water quality through a variety of vehicles. There were many one-on-one
opportunities in the field with individual growers. The District produced twelve newsletters and distributed 1800 copies per
mailing. Information was provided to the public at three annual Benton-Franklin County Fair exhibits. Three annual
A facility plan was prepared in accordance with the facility planning requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations 40
CFR part 35, and State Regulations WAC 173-240, Submission of Plans and Reports for Construction of Wastewater
Facilities and WAC 173-245, Submission of Plans and Reports for Construction and Operation of Combined Sewer
Overflow Reduction Facilities. The facility plan evaluated the recent rainfall and CSO data collected by the City, and
recommended cost-effective improvements to the City's wastewater collection system to reduce CSO discharges to an
average of one event per year per CSO site as required by state regulations.
A facility plan was prepared in accordance with the facility planning requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations 40
CFR part 35, and State Regulations WAC 173-240, Submission of Plans and Reports for Construction of Wastewater
Facilities and WAC 173-245, Submission of Plans and Reports for Construction and Operation of Combined Sewer
Overflow Reduction Facilities. The facility plan evaluated the recent rainfall and CSO data collected by the City, and
recommended cost-effective improvements to the City's wastewater collection system to reduce CSO discharges to an
average of one event per year per CSO site as required by state regulations.
The purpose of the project is to design the separation facilities for Priorities 3 and 5 of the Callow Avenue Basin, which
continues the ongoing project to reduce CSO events to one per year per outfall as required for compliance with State
regulations, WDOE consent orders, court orders, and the improvement of the Puget Sound water quality. Construction of the
project will complete CSO reduction improvements for the Callow Avenue Basin.

Completed 10 multimedia workshops to educate citizens on CSO reduction. Developed an internet website for distributing
program information. Developed 2 separate education videos. One described the goals of the program and sewer system
operations; the other demonstrates how to separate rain leaders from the sewer system. Developed and distributed over
22,000 self help brochures describing the CSO reduction program and downspout separation. Produced a public access
television segment on the CSO reduction program. Developed standard engineering configurations of rain leaders going to
storm sewers. Distributed these documents during property site assessments. Advertised program through mailings,
billboards and newspapers. Simplified right of way permit process to complete CSO improvement work. Completed 2,848
CSO separation property site assessments. Completed 44 CSO separations in the right of way and a total of 358 separations
during the life of the project. As a result of the project an estimated 260,000 gallons of stormwater runoff per inch of rain
has been removed from the Bremerton sanitary sewer system.




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Developed a local loan application process including review and approval. Developed and implemented a loan marketing
strategy. Processed and approved a total of 15 loans for on-site septic system repair/replacement. 15 failing on-site septic
systems were replaced through this loan program. The District has recognized the problems in their loan processing and
approval system that Note: The Kitsap County Health District had numerous loan defaults under this loan program and
previous local loan programs. The District has made significant progress in addressing these defaults. Currently 12 loans are
in default for a total of $55,911. Only two loans from this project are in default, totaling $1269contributed to these defaults.
Any future local loan programs would require more thorough screening of applicants.
Replacement of approximately 7150 linear feet of sanitary sewer, associated side sewer, storm sewer and surface restoration
to reduce stormwater infiltration and inflow (I/I) to the sanitary sewer lines and treatment facility . From preliminary data, I/I
reduction achieved from the project appears to be 20 to 30 percent.




Purpose: The purchase is helping the recipient meets its NPDES permit goals and enhance the water quality of the Chehalis
River. Results: 1) The city has installed a trailer mounted 1.5 meter belt filter press with integrated polymer and addition and
lime stablization systems. The press allows for removal of biosolids from the WWTF on a continuous basis and allws the
use of the drying beds to be discontinued. The biosolids are land applied in eastern Washington. 2) In case of flooding, the
equipment can be disconnected quickly and moved to higher ground. 3) The city will shortly begin design and construction
of a new waste- water treatment facility. Upon completion, this equipment will be moved to the new facility. Final
Inspection: 1) Because of the simplicity of this project, this document also serves as the final inspection report. The
inspection took place on July 5, 2000. 2) The equipment is functioning as per design specification. Operation presently
averages 3 days per week. Because of inadequacies in the present solids handling system, equipment operation is far from
optimal. 3) Greg Nanney, the operator explaining the system during the inspection, indicated that staff have been adequately
One dairy heifer rearing operation plan has implemented components in Lewis County. One nutrient management plan for a
heifer rearing operation in Grays Harbor County is completed and approved. One new dairy nutrient management plan has
been completed and approved by the Thurston County Conservation District. About 9 various nutrient management plans
have been serviced throughout the project period.
Thurston and Lewis County dairy operators with possible fencing/riparian components in plans have been contacted and
advised of possible cost-share opportunities for eligible BMP's. There has been no interest from those contacted to
implement riparian fencing/planting in plans. Therefore, no BMP's were implemented under task 3. A GIS-compatible
database has been completed by the Thurston Conservation District.


The project found that the partitioning should be above the default. The project determined a WER for silver and copper
should be above the default for both the low and high flow situations. NOTE: My conclusion is that the value of this project
in establishing some important precedents within Ecology as to what we should require as a standard for performance of such
a study and standards for documenting such findings in the reports has been achieved. The potential value in the particular
case of Chehalis was lessened greatly because while this study was in progress, the City decided not to discharge to the river
in the low flow season. While the study addressed both wet and dry seasons, since the dry (low flow) season was the critical
time for permit limits, this received the emphasis in both the partitioning and WER studies. The city will likely not have
permit limits that it requires an adjustment to the water quality criteria to meet. According to our policies, this is a
prerequisite to adjusting the default partitioning and WER ratios, so therefore the practical value of this project was less than




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                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


A Lake Chelan Wapato Basin Stormwater Plan was successfully developed and was received by Ecology on August 17,
2001. The plan is a comprehensive stormwater, erosion, and grading plan, which includes best management practices
(BMPs) for industrial and construction activities, and recommendations for addressing stormwater through a collaborative
approach. The following results are listed in the Stormwater Plan: Field survey results of existing stormwater systems, highly
erosive areas, wetlands, and maintenance areas are listed in the Stormwater Plan. Existing stormwater analysis and financing
estimates for improvements. Existing clearing, grading, erosion, and stormwater management plans and information was
compiled and identified. Education Program: "The permit and education information requested by Ecology upon review of
the document was received in September 2001 and inserted into the front of each Stormwater Plan document.
Completion of channel realignment and construction. A public workshop for area residents affected by the proposed project
was held on July 31. Approximately 20 people attended and everyone spoke in favor of the project. Photo points were
established prior to construction and photo documentation of project site and channel construction. A comprehensive
monitoring plan for the project was drafted by Schreffler Environmental (with funding provided by the Jamestown S'Klallam
Tribe). Pre-project.
This project addresses the issue of coordinated monitoring and information dissemination through the coordination of
monitoring efforts and filling in gaps in data. The project also proposes an establishment of a county database and reporting
of information in the first annual "State of the Water" report for use by policy makers and the public. This project has
supported the organization and monitoring of the "Streamkeepers" group. An Ecology approved QAPP was used for
monitoring by Streamkeepers. Streamkeepers monitored at least 11 streams located all over Clallam County including
macroinvertebrate sampling and special projects conducted at the request of various resource management organizations and
project advisors. A database was created to keep all local monitoring activities. Monitoring sites are now connected to GIS.
The State of the Waters Report was completed. This ground-breaking report shall serve as a preliminary evaluation to help
citizens in Clallam County to understand and evaluate the health of their individual watersheds. This report contains the
status of water quality and habitat conditions in a non-technical report that covers the entire county.




Water quality monitoring was conducted on 5 streams through out the length the project. Ten spring developments were
completed in late 2001 and 2002. A total of 4986 ft of fencing was installed. The majority was along the South Nanamkim
Spring and Kincaid Creek-the grant required only 3500 ft. Seventeen hardened rock crossing were installed on Fish
Hatchery, Owhi, Kincaid and South Nanamkim creeks. A series of 8 K-log weir installations fixed two head cuts on Owhi
Creek. Revegetation.



Both schedules A and B have been completed. An operation and maintenance manual has been prepared, submitted, and
approved.



Constructed a regional wastewater treatment facility in Cowiche to handle the wastewaters of both Tieton and Cowiche.




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                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Eleven initial watershed meetings were hosted to inform residents of water quality issues and to describe the TMDL process
for addressing these issues. A watershed meeting flier and PowerPoint slides were developed as part this project. A second
round of meetings was used to present the results of stream temperature monitoring. Meetings were also used to evaluate
community interest in pursuing opportunities to address resource concerns within the watershed. Based on this effort, the
Cowlitz and Wahkiakum Conservation Districts (Districts) provided additional assistance to the Skamokawa Creek
watershed community in WRA 25 and the Coweeman River watershed community in WRA 25 and the Coweeman River
watershed community in WRIA 26 under a separate Ecology grant.

The Districts managed the stream-monitoring network for five years. Fourteen thermographs were replaced due to loss,
damage, or operational failure. A MS Access protocol to compile the hourly data measurements into daily maximum, daily
minimum, and daily average stream temperature compatible with Ecology's EIM database was developed. All compiled data
has been shared with the EIM Coordinator (Clay Keown). Early stream temperature data helped determine the focus area for
The project met all tasks and completed the contract agreement.




The project had the following results: Water quality sampling was conducted twice per month between May 2000 and June
2001 at two sites on Lambert Creek, three on St. Peters Creek, and four on Lone Ranch Creek. Parameters measured
included fecal coliform bacteria, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, stream discharge/flow and
nutrients (monthly). Thermographs were placed in each thermal reach along the three creeks in order to take hourly readings
of both air and water temperatures. Canopy cover over the stream was also measured. Bacterial colonies from the water
samples were subjected to DNA analysis and matched against the E. coli source library created for the tri-watershed area as
part of the project. Possible sources of any contamination were then identified. Hydrology, vegetation, and
erosional/depositional characteristics were surveyed along all three stream corridors. The general state of repair of culverts
at road/stream crossings was also noted. Technical assistance, especially help with project design and implementation, was
provided to landowners interested in providing off stream watering stations for their livestock. One such project was built at


The combined tasks of water quality monitoring, crop classification and technical assistance/education worked together to
provide a "three-dimensional" picture of the Franklin County agricultural area. The water quality sampling provided
baseline and trend information for ground and surface water, while the crop classification provided a picture of the surface
activities. Using this information, they were able to provide technical support to growers about irrigation and nutrient
management and education to the general public about ground water quality and methods to protect and restore the resource.
With the continuation and refinement of long term monitoring, the District staff are beginning to see some trends in ground
water quality. Although the system is complex and difficult to make any profound conclusions, it does appear that the there
is a leveling off or decrease in the percentage of wells with NO3-N values greater than 15 ppm and 20 ppm. The crop
classification has been successful on at least three fronts: One is the development of a method, using GIS and remote sensing
technology, to locate, identify and map the crops in both the dry and irrigated sections of Franklin County. The two other




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Production of six water quality education videos which discussed land use and individual homeowner activities that
potentially degrade lake water quality and recommended practices to minimize nonpoint pollution. The videos also
discussed historic watershed conditions, potential stream restoration and gave an overview of the lake watershed. Aired each
of the six videos on the local public access station a minimum of every three hours for two- week periods. Mailed a one-
page questionnaire to area residents after the videos were aired to gauge effectiveness. Compiled the results of the
questionnaire.




A set of plans for a 2.4 mgd Biolac treatment plant has been prepared and awaits the money necessary to create Biolac
lagoons and with plastic lining. A set of specifications for a 2.4 mgd Biolac treatment plant has been prepared and awaits the
money necessary to create Biolac lagoons and with plastic lining.




Developed a local loan application packet. Developed a list of environmental and economic criteria for determining loan
eligibility. Coordinated with the Island County Treasurer and Whidbey Island Bank to set up a loan evaluation process, a
system for processing approved loans and repayment plans for individual loans. Marketed the loan program locally through
licensed septic pumpers, sewage system designers, financial institutions, and local community organizations. The Island
County Health Department also informed landowners of the program through education programs and site visits. Approved
and processed ten loans which resulted in the replacement or repair of ten failing on-site septic systems.
Island County Public Works (ICPW) submitted the North Whidbey Water Quality Assessment Report and database was
submitted, the Water Quality Assessment Report and database, and the Stream Gauge Monitoring Report to Ecology. ICPW
made a collection of wellhead protection area delineations for all Group A public water systems in Island County. This
collection led to the creation of mapping layers in the existing mapping system depicting the wellhead protection areas. The
wellhead protection mapping final report contained a large-scale map showing the map layers on a countywide basis. The
report also contained some smaller, project evaluation scale maps as examples of how this data will be utilized. The report
also contains a discussion of the methodology that will be utilized to incorporate this information into the land use regulatory
process. ICPW submitted the Well Withdraw Impact Summary-Report to Ecology. "Island County Health Department
provided on-site sewage treatment system technical assistance on an ongoing basis to citizens requesting information about
their on-site sewage treatment systems. Island County Health Department in partnership with the Waste Wise Program
performed On-Site Sewage Treatment System Public Workshops for homeowners about the operation and maintenance of
their on-site sewage treatment systesms. The Waste Wise Program and the Beach Watchers conducted Real Estate Water
Quality Workshops, with assistance from the Island County Health Department. These workshops were offered for credit
Developed set of plans and specifications for project construction. Developed set of as built drawings for project
construction. Developed a construction quality assurance plan. Certification statement signed by County Engineer
indicating that the project was completed in accordance with approved project plans and specifications. Construction
included: removal of damaged culvert system; construction of open stream channel, new seawall opening and outfall
structure; revegetation of creek banks. Developed a water quality monitoring plan for post construction monitoring.
Conducted water quality monitoring and developed a final report which outlines the monitoring results and provides
conclusions and recommendations. Conducted an on-site sewage system technical assessment of properties in the Glendale
Creek basin. Provided basin homeowners with information and technical assistance on maintenance and operation of their




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The Recipient purchased the property initially on August 10, 1999. The former landowner, Conservation Futures, was
reimbursed for the property per the terms of this loan agreement on October 3, 2000. The special warrant deed
documentation of the purchase of the property was developed and signed in August 1999. Conducted a contracting process
for hiring consultants to complete the project feasibility studies. Completion of a biological feasibility study entitled: Iverson
Farm Restoration Feasibility Study. Completion of geomorphic/flood study entitled: Flood Study to determine Alternatives
for Restoration and Enhancement of Marsh Habitat and shoreline processes for the Iverson Farm Property on Camano Island.
Developed a feasibility report summary, which discusses the alternatives developed by the two feasibility studies. Note: The
Island County Board of Commissioners (BOC) decided to take the "No Action" alternative for the site at this time and retain
the Iverson Farm in its current condition. Preservation of agricultural land is a priority for the BOC and expressed purpose
for purchasing the property. It is hoped that the County will give further consideration to the other restoration alternatives in
The activities carried out under the grant have successfully met the major project objectives described above. Five wetlands
were selected to be the focus of wetland education and volunteer efforts. Five teams were and a training program was
implemented with guest speakers teaching their area of expertise in classroom and field settings. The overall program
evaluations were good or better, but it proved difficult to maintain volunteer involvement over the longer term. Restoration
and education efforts were limited to three wetland groups and included mapping reed canary grass infestations, a small
planting project working with high school students to remove aging PVC irrigation lines, and creation of an informal flyer.
An educational workshop series was held covering a variety of water quality and related environmental topics. In return for
this training, participants agreed to donate 40 hours of environmental service to the Lake Sammamish Basin. Seventeen (17)
people originally signed up for the course and fourteen (14) participants graduated form the program. Of those, eleven (11)
have completed some portion or all of their environmental service. In the final evaluation of classes and field trips (the
The city of Issaquah negotiated a temporary construction easement with Issaquah Creek Condos for the in-stream portion of
the project adjacent to the condos. The remainder of the project was on City of school district property. The City developed
construction plans and specifications for the project, applied for and obtained required permits, including a hydraulic project
approval from WDFW, and developed bid documents. The City contracted for the clearing of blackberries at the site, which
included mowing and mulching of blackberries, removal of debris, and spraying of Garlon herbicide. Unfortunately,
following removal of the blackberries, the condo association decided not to reauthorize replanting the easement, so planting
the portion of the stream buffer was eliminated from the project. The project was constructed as planned, including a
bioengineered bank, using root wads on the outside bend of the river; three logjams; two deflector logs; and re-sloping and
eroding bank. City staff organized a volunteer planting event, publicizing it through direct mailings, the city's web site, King
County's web site, The Seattle Times, and The Issaquah Press. Plants were ordered and the planting event was held on
October 21, 2000. It was attended by over 100 people. The city irrigated the plants as necessary during the summer and fall,
2001. City staff developed a site-monitoring plan, which was approved by Ecology. The City carried out the monitoring
with the help of Stream Team volunteers. The monitoring included plant survival, wildlife and bird usage, photo
From November 1999 to September 2000, two continuous, automated sediment samplers (river mile (RM) 11.8 and RM 0.9)
recorded daily suspended sediment discharge during normal weather patterns and interval discharge measurement during
flood events. Additional manual measurements were taken at the RM 0.9 site. Temperature gauges were installed at both the
upper and lower stations, and data were collected continuously with electronic data loggers from Nov 1999 through
September 2001. Automated flow discharge measurements were collected at both the upper and lower stations from
November 1999 through September 2001. The Tribe provided field assistance to Ecology for the Dungeness River/Matriotti
Creek Fecal Coliform Bacteria TMDL Study. Ecology, the Tribe, and the county sampled thirty-five to forty stream sites
monthly from November 1999 through October 2000. The Tribe was also a leader in outreach to the community for the
TMDL study and water cleanup plan. During the summers of 2000, 2001, and 2002 the Tribe placed at least eight
temperature loggers in the lower Dungeness River, along with two ambient air temperature loggers. Temperature monitors




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An integrated aquatic vegetation management plan was developed for Lake Fenwick. The consultant hired by Kent combined
the Lake Meridian and Lake Fenwick plans into one document. The Lake Fenwick plans calls for the introduction of triploid
grass carp for the control of Brazilian elodea in the lake. As of 2003, the plan had not been implemented. The King County
Noxious Weed Control Board and Ecology both plan to put some gentle pressure on Kent to implement this plan soon. We
will encourage them to apply for Aquatic Weeds funds for the project.




An integrated plan was developed for Lake Meridian and for Lake Fenwick (the city’s consultant combined the two planning
projects together). The Lake Meridian plan focused on individual homeowner efforts to reduce Eurasian watermilfoil. The
main method of choice included extensive use of bottom barriers. Aquatic herbicides were not considered to be an option for
this lake because Kent has ordinances against the use of herbicides. As of April 2003, the plan has not been implemented. It
is understood that lake residents share the use of a cutting machine and they cut the plants around their lake front residences.

Purpose: Eliminate one of the few remaining mahor primary (raw sewage) discharges to the Puget Sound and meet the
requirements of the CWA and their NPDES permit. The upgrade to secondary treatment would greatly improve the elluent
quality, provide supperior removals for priority pollutant metals and organics. The upgrade would result in decreases of
43,000 tons/year of conventional pollutant, 45 tons/year of priority pollutant metals, and 41 tons/year of priority pollutant
organics discharged into Puget Sound. The reductions would reduce the number of fecal coliform violations near West Point
and at the adjacent beaches affected by West Point effluent. Results: The West Point WWTP was upgraded to secondary
(133 mgf) and eliminated one of the largest and few remaining primary raw sewage discharges to the Puget Sound. The
West Point WWTP was partially funded by the Centennial Extended Payment Grant TAX 90-051 ($175,144,044), SRF 91-
004 (($48,000,000). The final eligible project costs for loan participation was $75,158,627. This loan contracts for the
Access Roadway and Utility Improvements, Site prep, Structural Steel Mfg. and Delivery, Reinforced Concrete Mfg. and
A regional plan was developed for King County for Eurasian watermilfoil. As a result of the plan development a series of
articles about milfoil eradication strategies were written and are now posted on Ecology's website. A number of King County
lakes were surveyed.




Conducted a baseline survey of citizen's knowledge of stormwater and nonpoint pollution. 400 citizens were interviewed.
Produced a comprehensive report analyzing the results of the baseline survey. Using results of the survey, developed
education adds to present to citizen focus groups. Organized and conducted citizen focus groups which assisted with refining
education material and messages. Advertised refined education material in local newspapers, stores, businesses and the
County Fair. Conducted a follow-up survey of 400 citizens, 100 of who had participated in the baseline survey. The survey
assessed the effectiveness of the project's education program. Produced a report analyzing the findings of the follow-up
survey. Follow-up survey results indicated that: over 50% of respondents recalled seeing, hearing or reading water quality
education information generated through this project. About one-third of survey respondents claim to have modified their
behavior to help reduce nonpoint pollution. Note: This project was very successful and managed extremely well by Pat
Kirschbaum of Kitsap County Stormwater and Surface Water Management. All the required reports were well done and very




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The agricultural inventory found that the number of agricultural properties in the watershed had increased from 165 in 1998
to 247 in 2002; the number on agricultural landowners had increased from 94 to 170 during the same period. Priorities
relative to agricultural practices and water quality for many properties have changed, some improved and some degraded
relative to the baseline inventory. The inventory information was incorporated into a mailing list that was used in the
outreach effort. This grant enabled the District to develop 23 farm plans and complete 34 incentive program applications.
Of those applications, 33 incentive grants were awarded through EQUIP and CREP totaling $109,366 to complete projects
such as waste storage structures, heavy use area protection, fencing, fish stream improvements, and pasture planting. District
staff developed 54 site specific best management practices designs that conformed with NRCS standards and specifications.
These included (in order of frequency): fencing, heavy use area protection, pasture planting, waste storage structures, waste
storage structures, waste storage structure roof, pipeline, roof and runoff management, tree and shrub establishment,
An updated wastewater facility was constructed as outlined in the approved facility plan dated February 28, 2000 and in
accordance with Ecology-approved plans and specifications. However, the facility does not meet state water quality
standards for ammonia. Ecology believes that the City constructed the plant in good faith. Measures are being taken to
remedy the problem. A draft O&M manual has been submitted. A final O&M manual is expected to be submitted for
approval when the final improvements have been made.
Water quality sampling of irrigation return flows every two weeks during the irrigation seasons, years 2000 and 2001, at
approximately 27 sites in Kittitas County. Field measurement of flow, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH specific
conductivity, estimate of turbidity. Laboratory analysis of samples for turbidity, total suspended solids, fecal coliform
bacteria, total phosphorus, nitrate/nitrite. Education and outreach about results, primarily to the Kittitas County Water
Purveyors and irrigators. Final report, with data results and recommended implementation measures.


This project produced the report The Study of Phosphorus Sources in Groundwater Entering Lake Steilacoom. The study
suggests that loading of the groundwater by historic septic systems and/or soil minerals account for the predominate sources
of phosphorus in Lake Steilacoom. Please note that this recipient was inconsistent with progress reports. There was also an
extreme delay in receiving the final report. It was received 10 months past the due date. The data was not provided in
electronic format and therefore, not included in EIM. The EIM coordinator, Clay Keown, is currently working with the
consultant, recipient, and WSU to obtain the data. Clay has indicated that the raw data can be obtained to enable him to
enter the data into the EIM system.
A new headworks with comminutor, flow metering, grit removal and fine screening; a new oxidation ditch and modifications
to the existing ditch; a new clarifier was built to augment the existing clarifiers; the method of disinfection was changed to
ultraviolet disinfection; improvements were made to the sludge (biosolids) dewatering system to aid in disposal by
composting.
Results:A new headworks with comminutor, flow metering, grit removal & fine screening; A new oxidation ditch and
modifications to the existing ditch; A new clarifier was built to augment the existing clarifiers; The method of disinfection
was changed to ultraviolet disinfection; Improvements were made to the sludge (biosolids) dewatering system to aid in
disposal by composting
This project installed approximately 7000 lineal fee of new sewer line including associated service laterals and manholes, to
replace the most severely deteriorated portions of the collection system. The improved collection system eliminated the need
for the two aging pump stations. The treatment facility upgrade and collection system improvements improved the water
quality of the South Fork of the Newaukum River and enabled the WWTF to meet permit requirements. This project was
jointly funded with USDA - Rural Development. Rural Development participated in both the upgrades to the wastewater
treatment facility and infiltration and inflow correction work. Ecology funded the design and construction of the wastewater
facility upgrade and construction of the collection system improvements only.
Design of the facility was approved on March 17, 2000. An Ecology final inspection was performed on September 20, 2002.
The facility is functioning normally and easily meeting NPDES permit requirements.




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A mailing list was created for all poultry producers and stakeholders involved with the poultry industry. Also a technical
advisory committee was formed. Quarterly letters were mailed explaining new information on regulations, cost share, and
how to apply. Inventories were taken for all poultry facilities that had owners that cooperated with the District during the
grant contract. Conservation plants were developed for 21 of the 22 poultry operations in Lewis County. The Lewis County
Conservation District took 20 soil samples for poultry producers during the grant period. Samples were tested for nitrates in
the first and second foot of the soil column. BMP's were designed to protect the environment and/or prevent water quality
degradation. The District held meetings to display what cooperators were to doing to better manage their operations in
accordance with their approved conservation plans.
Water quality of Crab Creek appears to decrease in a downstream direction, with some segments being potential candidates
for the 2002 303(d) List for pH, dissolved oxygen, and fecal coliform. Excessive nutrient loading has occurred during
periods of high flow, which, as the data suggests, is more often than not related to high suspended sediment values. Scattered
ground water quality problems in the study area are site specific and are not significantly related to location or distance away
from Crab Creek. However, a moderate relationship was found between increasing well depth and increasing pH in the well
water samples. Wells with nitrate concentrations greater than 10 mg/L were generally between 100 and 500 feet deep and
located south of Crab Creek.
Ecology conducted a final inspection of the facility on June 12, 2003. The facility is functioning satisfactorily. A summary
of compliance with various technical requirements in the agreement is included in the file (Long Beach Contract
Requirements 1.XLS).



Ecology conducted a final inspection of the facility on June 12, 2003. The facility is functioning satisfactorily. A summary
of compliance with various technical requirements in the agreement is included in the file (Long Beach Contract
Requirements 1.XLS).




A prioritization of farms and stream enhancement projects in each sub-basin was placed in prospective databases according
to the degree of water quality impairment. There were two databases created, one for farms and one for streams. Best
Management practices were implemented on 36 different parcels of land for a total of 58 implemented (see spreadsheet from
final report). Stream restoration and fish habitat enhancement projects were completed for 6 different areas. These ranged
from wetland/riparian enhancements to fish stream improvements (see attached report.) Ten landowners were assisted with
cost share funds and loan programs to implement the BMPs. Students from the Mary M. Knight School participated in the
Kids with Conservation Knowledge (KWICK) in 2000, but due to budget constraints, they were able to do so in 2001. Both
wetland and stream restoration projects which choice school students were completed in 2003.




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                                          All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


The wastewater collection system serves approximately 900 connections, approximately 450 of which include grinder pump
stations. The system includes approximately 250,000 lineal feet of low pressure and gravity sewer (main line and side sewer)
and seven pump stations. The water reclamation facility is designed to produce 0.304 million gallons per day of Class "A"
reclaimed water. The facility includes a headworks, two sequencing batch reactor basins, an equalization basin, polymer
feed system, two effluent filters, ultraviolet disinfection, an aerobic digester, a sprayfield pump station, a bypass and a Class
"A" storage pond, a sprayfield, piping, electrical and miscellaneous appurtenances. The system is on-line and meeting its
State Waste Discharge permit.
Identified the non-point sources of fecal contamination along the waterfront area from Gladwin Beach Road to Boad Havan
Road. Helped identify a number of possible solutions for the impacted community. Confirmed contamination originating
from Belfair State Park, leading to elimination of a major source. Proved that untreated effluent could move underground
and surface out in the marine water, resulting in: - the County Commissioners passing an ordinance placing a moratorium on
septic permits in the study area until the study was completed; - Mason County Water Quality Policies and Procedures being
amended to provide for better testing methods to identify non-point sources of pollution; - the Belfair Urban Growth area
sewerage plan being expanded to include the study area. Increased awareness and understand of the community. An
improved understanding of the impact shoreline development has on water quality that has been used to improve
development practices in other areas of Mason County.


Stopped the NPDES permit violations of the chlorine limits. Improved the reliability of the facility during power outages by
the replacement and upgrade of the standby emergency generator. The flows through the facility are more reliably monitored
with the installation of the effluent flow meter. The canopy structure over the disinfection facility was installed resulting in
an effluent without algae blooms.



Stopped the NPDES permit violations of the chlorine limits. Improved the reliability of the facility during power outages by
the replacement and upgrade of the standby emergency generator. The flows through the facility are more reliably monitored
with the installation of the effluent flow meter. The canopy structure over the disinfection facility was installed resulting in
an effluent without algae blooms.



Installed an ultraviolet disinfection system demolish toilet and sink and installed odor control in the head works area
(covered and aerated Excess Sludge Holding Tank), made connection to send Return Activated Sludge to the old clarifier,
and added a valve box to send Waste Activated Sludge to centrifuge.


The UV system was installed. The floor elevation in the old chlorine contact basin was adjusted. The effluent re-use (3W)
system improvements was designed and installed. The rotors from US Filter were installed in the oxidation ditch in April
2005. Electrical service was installed for the new equipment and building. construction of the building which houses the
sludge drying equipment was completed, and the dryer and sludge hopper were installed. The biofilter for the foul air system
was installed. The entire system was tested to assure proper operations and passed. Factory representative for the drying
equipment came on-site to provide start-up testing and training in accordance with specifications.




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Wetland Habitat Assessment - evaluation were completed of existing information about wetland habitat in the Columbia
River Estuary to identify critical wetlands. Technical Assistance Team Development - this team hosted habitat workshops to
establish a framework and general criteria for assessing habitat condition. Critical Wetland Habitat Protection and
Maintenance - Eight workgroups were charged with responding to a criteria paper developed by estuarine scientists from
National Marine Fisheries Service. An important step was made toward implementing a comprehensive, coordinated,
ecosystem-based program for wetland habitat restoration in the lower Columbia River and estuary. The combination of on
the ground investigations of restoration sites which provided a profile of the diversity and extent of restoration opportunities
and the enhanced coordination with existing restoration programs provides the programmatic basis for a consensus-based
ecosystem restoration strategy. The infrastructure built for this program is helping leverage additional funds from ongoing
authorities that will benefit future restoration planning and implementation or the region.



Design and construction of the following: New influent lift station; Additional rotating biological contactor units; UV light
disinfection system.




New influent lift station; Additional rotating biological contactor units; UV light disinfection system.




The project goal was to provide technical assistance to 30 growers in the Okanogan watershed. A total of 43 cooperators
participated in the IWM project. Growers were educated on bringing application rates in line with crop watering needs
based on soil types, crop uptake needs and evapotranspiration rates. Anecdotal information has been received from the
growers by the district on more efficient water use, decreased irrigation costs and improved fruit quality. Hard data on water
and energy savings are difficult to document because of the current water policy of "Use it or lose it." It is anticipated that
50% of the cooperators who started the program will continue to apply Irrigation Water Management processes. Another
25% of the cooperators that do not completely follow process and procedures will still make improvements in their irrigation
water management practices. While hard data on water quality improvements and greater efficiency was not gathered, the
intuitive current understanding of the connections between IWM and water quality/quantity indicates that proper water
management results in more efficient water usage and prevents contaminated return flows. The public education campaign
Project Administration/ Management This grant was administrated by the Okanogan Conservation District. During the life
of the grant there was a change in personnel doing the monitoring. Cross training with other staff allowed for a smoother
transition. Quality Assurance Plan A Quality Assurance Project Plan was produced and eventually signed that identified the
monitoring protocols and sampling methodology for the project. Water Quality Monitoring Monitoring started in May of
2000 at 6 primary sites and 16 secondary sites on various tributaries. After the first season of monitoring a request for 5
additional monitoring stations was approved. These station helped characterize fecal coliform issues on Bonaparte Creek.
Equipment and Supplies The District purchased and maintained various pieces of water quality monitoring equipment for the
project. Data and Reports Quarterly and annual reports were submitted as required. Facilitate Volunteer Monitoring
Program During the second year a volunteer sampling program was started. This effort is continuing. Water Quality
Monitoring Program Evaluation The results of the monitoring were shared with the Conservation District Board, the
The Okanogan County Water Resources Program was able to meaningfully participate in a larger study being conducted by
the USGS on hydrology of the system. Existing Information has been gathered and catalogued. A website at
http:/methow_planning_unit.golder.com has been created to make this information available to the public. The skeleton of a
Basin Water Balance Model was produced. The components for a stream monitoring network were identified. This includes
gauge locations, types and purposes for gauging. This was grant was part of a larger effort by the Methow Planning Unit to
produce a technical document that will be used as a springboard for for developing a water budget for the basin.



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Palouse Conservation District convened a local watershed management committee; A watershed characterization was begun;
An information and education campaign was developed and implemented.



Main lift station; Improved headworks; Aeration basin/clarifiers & digesters; UV disinfection system; Biosolids (sludge)
handling facility; Building and structures to house these facilities; TV inspection of the sewer system.

A diver survey was performed September 5, 2000. Thie milfoil growth at the north end was sparse and at the south end it
was dense. The lake was treated with 2,4-D in 2001 and 2002. Follow-up diver hand removal was performed. In
subsequent years the lake group could not raise enough funding to keep the milfoil under control and the milfoil expanded in
the lake. However, the lake residents funded a milfoil plan in 2005 and are determined to work diligently to remove milfoil
from Davis Lake in the future.




Milfoil was treated with aquatic herbicide 2,4-D in July, 2000. Approximately 2 acres out of the 79-acre lake were treated.
Follow-up diver survey in September saw a few remaining milfoil plants. Milfoil was hand removed in July 2001. Because
there are few lake residents to "drive" the project, no more follow-up took place. Without follow-up, milfoil returned to the
lake.




A new wastewater treatment facility has been constructed. The Paha Creek excavations have been rehabilitated. The treated
effluent is being beneficially used to irrigate alfalfa. The source of ground water contamination has been removed. Total
Coliform counts are now below the ground water standards. Monitoring wells are installed and functional.



Inventoried drainage system and collected data on topography, land use, ownership and soil characteristics. Evaluated and
prioritized drainages. Submitted a site evaluation assessment report for 5 sites. Determined buffer widths needed for each
site. Fenced and revegetated 4 sites with a total of 3.7 miles of fence and 3.5 miles of bank reshaping and revegetating.
Collected water quality samples at each site that preliminary analysis shows to have improved turbidity, suspended solids and
fecal coliform. On-going sampling will occur as part of another project.
The final report indicates the following accomplishments: A schedule for completion was included in the Final Report. A
visual survey of all crop types and irrigation methods were completed by district personnel. The data was input onto an
EXCEL spreadsheet. Statistics on percentages were compiled from the data provided. An article on the statistics was
published in the June 2001 RS BOJC Newsletter "The Waterfront". A brochure is being created which summarizes the
information. The data has been input into the NRCS GIS system.




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Wetlands provide a cost-effective, low maintenance and environmentally beneficial method for improving water quality.
They act as a filter, removing sediment, excess nutrients, and pollutants from the water. In addition, wetlands provide vital
wildlife habitat. The ability of a wetland to mitigate water pollution depends upon several factors, including types of plants,
soils, hydrologic factors, water chemistry, size of wetland and water retention time. The RSBOJC wetland utilizes over 15
acres to filter .8 cfs of water. It takes 7-10 days of water retention in order to filter that volume of water. The amount of
vegetative and biological material has substantially in the year since the wetland was built. This has resulted in greater
surface area available for filtering water. Analysis of 2002 data, although limited (and biased towards end-of-irrigation-
season data) due to technical difficulties, reveals a notable, overall positive change in water quality when tracked from
untreated water at the inflow (Drain 2, also called Site #2) to treated water at the outflows (effluent from north cell is termed
With the assistance from members of the San Juan County Watershed Committee, the San Juan County Conservation District
designated three target watershed for this grant: Swifts Bay (Lopez Island), West Sound (Orcas Island), and False Bay (San
Juan Island). The District inventoried land use activities in all three watershed using existing records and windshield surveys
over a two year period. Results were analyzed and compiled into a GIS database and incorporated into the 2000-2001
Agricultural Land Use Study (December 2001). The District sent mail-out surveys to all property owners in each watershed
to assess their interest in being involved in watershed restoration and conservation efforts. 152 responses were returned
(response rate of approximately 10%) and compiled in a table, and the District sent information on conservation topics to
those requesting it. The District used the survey responses in combination with the land use survey to identify those
properties for which farm/forest planning or other technical assistance from the District seemed indicated. The District
prepared watershed assessments and draft plans, which were presented at six public workshops and to the Board of County


Final Bid Documents (Plans and Specifications) for Basin 2 Inflow and Infiltration Reduction Project were completed and
submitted on April 6, 2005. The plans were approved on April 20, 2005.




Publicity and word-of-mouth notification of loan program resulted in immediate and continuous demand for loan funds to
repair failing septic systems. A total of 120 individual on-site septic systems were repaired or replaced. Of those 38 were
conventional systems and three were tank only replacements. The remaining on-site systems involved some type of
advanced treatment, such as sand filters, pressure systems, recirculating systems, or special filters or other processes. In
addition, one community septic system was replaced. The average cost of a septic system installation through the loan
program was $12,789. This included some large on-site commercial repairs and a high percent of installations in areas that
required non-conventional systems. One agricultural BMP project was funded through the program. This involved
installation of drip irrigation to reduce sediment production from a blueberry farm. Water quality benefits expected were
reduced sedimentation and turbidity. Skagit County's rivers, lakes and marine waters did benefit from the repair of failing on-
site septic systems and introduction of agricultural best management practices. Bacterial discharges were reduced for many




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Results: Prior to treatment the lake was surveyed by divers to assess the status of the milfoil population. Milfoil density had
significantly increased from a 1996 survey of the lake. A public meeting was held to educate the lake residents about milfoil
and the pending Sonar® treatment. On June 1, 2000, the first Sonar application was made to the lake with a target
concentration of 12 ppb. Water samples were collected at five stations to determine fluridone concentrations in the lake. Four
additional Sonar applications were made lake-wide form June 15 to July 13th. Prior to each treatment, water sampling was
conducted to determine the current fluidone conditions in the lake. The results were used to determine the treatment rate
needed to bump the fluridone levels back to the target concentration of 12 ppb. On August 23rd another diver survey was
conducted of the entire littoral zone. No healthy milfoil plants were detected throughout the littoral zone of the lake. Only ten
to twenty dead or dying stalks of milfoil remained. These plants were typically less than six inches tall and did not show any
signs of viable plant tissue. Some of the water lilies in the lake were also impacted by the Sonar® treatment. A graph of the
fluridone concentrations showed that concentrations ranged from about 8 to 10 ppb with one high value of 20 ppb.




Sampling began in April 2000 and continued into June 2003. A full range of water quality parameters (listed above) in
addition to fecal coliform were measured on a bi-weekly basis at 24 sample sites in the Samish Basin and nearby independent
drainages leading to Samish Bay. Operation of the project was aided by a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) composed
of water quality experts from around the region. The TAC met on seven occasions between October 1999 and July 2003.
The group helped plan the project prior to initiation of monitoring, reviewed data collected and provided input on
interpretation of results and methods to address problems encountered with the monitoring. Overall geometric means for the
study period ranged from 25 colony forming units per 100 ml (CFU) for the Samish River at Highway 9 (Site 23) to 366
CFU for the Samish River near Innis Road (Site 24). Interestingly, Site 23 is the next sampling site downstream from Site
24, exhibiting a rapid decline in fecal coliform between the two sites. The river flows through a large wetland in this area
which may serve as a sink for coliform bacteria. River sites showed a consistent pattern of high fecal coliform at the
upstream station (24), very low coliform at the next station, then gradually increasing downstream. The station with the
The treatment of Lake Shoecraft was very successful. A fabric barrier was installed around the milfoil areas and the area
inside the barrier was treated with the aquatic herbicide Sonar®. Sonar water samples were taken and the area inside the
barrier was treated with the aquatic herbicide Sonar®. Sonar water samples were taken both inside and outside of the barrier.
The barrier effectively contained the Sonar inside the barrier with little leakage to the water outside of the barrier. Any
milfoil plants outside of the barrier were removed by hand. Although this grant only funded the first phase of this project,
follow-up from the County indicates that milfoil was completely eradicated within the treatment area. Hand removal methods
have been successful in the untreated areas of Lake Shoecraft and have been successful in Lake Goodwin. The rest of the
elements of this project have been funded through a Lake Management District.




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Training of local citizens to assist with water quality monitoring and various restoration activities.      Over 100 people
attended these trainings. Recruitment of volunteers to assist with the implementation of project tasks. Conducted 13
volunteer training workshops on six different monitoring and restoration topics. Published two watershed newsletters for
updating citizens on project activities. Develop a quality assurance project plan for water quality monitoring. Conducted 22
months of monitoring for fecal coliform bacteria, stream flow and precipitation. Maintained a website for public access to
collected monitoring data. Developed and implemented restoration projects on nine sites in the watershed. Over three acres
of riparian habitat was restored. Conducted restoration site assessments and periodic site condition/plant survival monitoring
of the restoration sites. Produced a final project report which included an analysis of the monitoring data; restoration
activities and education efforts.
Improvements to the design of the oxidation ditch to reduce effluent nitrogen concentrations. Relocation and expansion of
the land application site. Elimination of the effluent spray application site, adjacent to the school Elimination of the effluent
drain field which was grossly overloaded. Improvements to the solid handling facilities. Project design consisted of the
preparation of construction bid documents including plans & specifications.




The SYCD contracted with Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory to design and test the device. A Quality Assurance Project
Plan was produced. Battelle NW produced about 800 g of potassium ferrate, a key ingredient for the project, in anticipation
of using the product for the project. Preliminary bench tests were conducted using both stock water solutions and samples
taken from the drain. Analysis of the bench tests results showed that far greater concentrations of potassium ferrate would be
needed to meet the goals. The addition of this amount of potassium could have created potential toxic conditions and the
need for various permits. As a result, it was determined that the project could not proceed and was therefore closed out in its
entirety.
Prioritization of two sub-basins for monitoring. Monitoring of water quality changes in these sub-basins. Results of data
were analyzed and included in the final report. A database was provided to Ray Latham, Project Manager, Central Regional
Office. Effective outreach campaign. Eight farm plans were written (One more than required in grant agreement.). 110
acres of rill irrigation were converted to drip.
CITY OF SPOKANE - COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW REDUCTION SYSTEM WIDE ALTERNATIVE REPORT.




A Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) was established that advised the recipient on projects needed to contribute to the
development of the plan. Representatives of various agencies and local stakeholders served on the Committee. The TAC
developed the list of data needs that the Recipient addressed. The Recipient prepared a report that compiled the project
results. Included are results for: A macro-invertebrate study; A Riparian area inventory and delineation; Water quality
monitoring; Water quantity measurements. The Recipient engaged in numerous public outreach/information activities,
including public meetings, posters displayed at various conferences and meetings, and articles printed in newsletters. The
final public meeting also served as the first meeting for public information about the development of the management plan.
The project resulted in recommendations for inclusion in the management plan. These include protecting and restoring
riparian areas, reducing sediment inputs from upland areas, and reduction of nutrients from septic tanks and agricultural land.
The project results will provide the building blocks for the management plan that is being developed in stage three. The




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                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


Twenty-two loans were made to producers and custom operators for the purchase of grass handling equipment. Projects
included loans for the purchase of one swather header, six mowers/shredders, and one bale compressor. The equipment
purchased by the landowners will treat over 17,000 acres annually in Spokane County. Accounting codes were established to
track the funds received and disbursed, and a database was constructed to monitor the performance of each individual loan.
The project was successful in maintaining a majority of the bluegrass acres in Spokane County, thus keeping the benefits of
filtering runoff and preventing wind and water erosion.




Forty loans were provided to area producers for minimum tillage equipment purchases. Through this program, 49,959 acres
in Spokane County will be treated with minimum tillage. The loan program was well designed and well managed. The goal
toward 100 percent implementation of conservation tillage is progressing.




This project focused on areas most in need of restoration to improve water quality by reducing fecal coliform loading
potential to the Colville River. The restoration projects were installed to stabilize the riverbanks, reduce sediment loading ,
and revegetate stream banks. By planting vegetation, the plants will eventually provide shade thereby reducing water
temperatures, and provide large woody debris for enhancement of fish habitat on the Colville River. Receiving pre-
authorization for the grant allowed the district to coordinate sampling activites with Ecology for the Colville River
Watershed Fecal Coliform TMDL. This grant also enabled the district to concentrate additional water monitoring between
sites with the highest fecal coliform levels. Sampling down and upstream of the Northwest Alloys facility was also
We were disappointed with the consultant's plan and asked the consultant to revise the plan to our satisfaction. The Long
Lake residents continued to be disappointed by the plan even though Ecology determined that it did just meet our minimum
standards for an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan. Ecology committed to work with the residents and amend
the plan until the plan met their criteria. Unfortunately the lake residents appeared to lose interest in the plan and the plan
was not amended or implemented. I consider this project to be unsuccessful. Most groups make good use of their grant funds,
but unfortunately this was a situation where the grant did not succeed in motivating the group to continue forward with
milfoil control plans.
This is a long-term project. The lake group has formed an LMD and is continuing treatment efforts.




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This project accomplished the following results: Elimination of surfacing sewage effluent through the repair and
rehabilitation of the existing sewer collection, treatment and disposal system for the unincorporated community of Echo
Estates. Elimination of existing septic tanks, replacement of a gravity interceptor sewer pipe, installation of a new
treatment/dosing at the treatment site, construction of a new control building and appurtenances, , site preparation, and site
fencing.
This project resulted in the installation of wastewater collection and treatment infrastructure for the alleviation of potential
pollution of surface water and groundwater as well as bringing Addy into compliance with current health standards. The
original project scope of work was expanded during construction to accommodate sewage flows from the unincorporated
community of Blue Creek which is in close proximity to Addy's wastewater treatment facility. The majority of costs
associated with the expanded scope of work for Blue Creek flows were funded by US Department of Agriculture-Rural
Development (USDA-RD) and the Department of Community, Trade, & Economic Development (CTED) block grant
This project resulted in the installation of wastewater collection and treatment infrastructure for the alleviation of potential
pollution of surface water and groundwater as well as bringing Addy into compliance with current health standards. The
original project scope of work was expanded during construction to accommodate sewage flows from the unincorporated
community of Blue Creek which is in close proximity to Addy's wastewater treatment facility. The majority of costs
associated with the expanded scope of work for Blue Creek flows were funded by US Department of Agriculture-Rural
Development (USDA-RD) and the Department of Community, Trade, & Economic Development (CTED) block grant


Bacterial loading was calculated by Thurston County for 6 streams in the watershed and mapped; data and maps were
provided to Ecology, and some of the contaminant sources were narrowed down. On-site septic systems: 233 residents from
in or near the watershed attended one of the seven on-site operation and maintenance workshops put on by Thurston County;
technical assistance was provided via a "Septic Help Line" and field visits. Sediment Resuspension Study: Thurston County
found high levels of fecal coliform bacteria in sediments and high loading during storms in this study. Farm inventory:
Thurston CD conducted a windshield survey of farms in the watershed and submitted a data base with location, ownership,
animal counts and notification records for 270 parcels. Nineteen (twenty) of the parcels were rated as "very high" priority
and were referred to Thurston County, who conducted site visits. One site was (and still is) undergoing enforcement.
Conservation plans: Thurston CD developed 23 Conservation Plans, four of which were for seven of the "very high" priority
parcels, including the one enforcement case. 70% of the BMPs for these plans have been implemented. Six other owners
Two loans were made under this program, both repaired on-site sewage systems were inspected and certified by either
Thurston County Environmental Health Division or by the sewage system designer. Many sewage systems workshops were
conducted. Information brochures about the On-Site Financial Assistance Program were sent to all septic system pumpers,
installers, and designers. Potential public health hazards were mitigated through this program.
Constructed a regional wastewater treatment facility in Cowiche to handle the wastewaters of both Tieton and Cowiche.



New headworks; Additional oxidation ditch rotor; New clarifier; Enhancement of solids handling (digester, polymers); UV
disinfection




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                                         All_WQ_Grants_and_Loans__FY00_0


New headworks; Additional oxidation ditch rotor; New clarifier; Enhancement of solids handling (digester, polymers); UV
disinfection.




New headworks; Additional oxidation ditch rotor; New clarifier; Enhancement of solids handling (digester, polymers); UV
disinfection




This grant only partially funded laboratory and field studies. This project is ongoing and a final project report will be
available in 2002. Types of information being collected include: Determining whether nutritional differences exist between
Eurasian and northern (native) milfoil; Determining whether nutritional differences in milfoil occur in lakes where the
weevils are present versus lakes without weevils; Quantifying the reproductive success of the milfoil weevil on northern and
Eurasian watermilfoil under laboratory conditions; Developing protocols for surveying weevil's overwintering habitat;
Assessing the availability of data on fish communities present in the study lakes; and Developing an index of weevil site
suitability.




The Wahkiakum Conservation District failed to fully implement the project scope and expend all of the grant funds as
planned. However, once the issues with the district were resolved, the grant was very effective in generating results such as:
946 road crossings were visited and level "A" barrier assessments were completed for the stream crossing structure. The
District developed a Microsoft Access database to manage watershed data that was collected by a series of interns through
the Americorps program. The principal watersheds in Cowlitz and Wahkiakum Counties were broken down into smaller
subwatersheds to create a portfolio of maps and overlays that can be used to characterize the basin. Cowlitz Conservation
District worked with the Whittle Creek watershed community to complete stream surveys on all of the fish bearing streams
within the watershed. The city and District are currently working together to prepare project proposals to implement the bulk
of restoration projects identified in the plan. Cowlitz County and the Cowlitz Conservation District worked together to
identify a local watershed for a pilot. The pilot worked on securing development rights on riparian areas through permanent
Prepared a quality assurance project plan to guide project monitoring. Conducted site selection based on appropriate
geomorphology for Chinook and Coho spawning sites. Installed scour chains and egg boxes at monitoring sites.




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Whatcom County Public Works contracted with the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association to coordinate the
restoration activities. The Whatcom County Sheriff's Department alternative correction crew provided the labor force. To
accomplish additional restoration work, Whatcom County also hired a Washington Conservation Corps crew. Twenty-five
projects totaling 56,000 lineal feet (10.6 miles) of riparian restoration along rivers, streams, and other watercourses have
been completed under this grant. Landowner agreements were negotiated with each owner and planting prescriptions,
including site preparation, planting and maintenance details, were developed for each site. Twenty-five thousand (25,000)
native plants were installed on these projects. Plant materials paid for by this grant were supplemented by additional plants
purchased with Whatcom County Special Projects funds donated plants, and plant materials harvested from donor sites.
Plantings complied with the conditions of Washington Department of Fish &Wildlife hydraulic permits for dredging the
watercourses, and were planted at high densities within the immediate riparian zone. The idea was to remove reed canary
grass and excess sediment with dredging and then discourage the reed canary grass from growing back by providing shade.
In most cases, plantings were interplanted a second year to achieve desired densities. Typically, projects were maintained
once every 26 days during the growing season. Projects were monitored during regular maintenance, alerting the project
managers of special needs such as rodent proofing or increased watering or soil amendments that need to be considered.
Vegetation surveys were conducted pre-restoration and post restoration, with set photo-points and monitoring of plant
survival.



The Wollochet Harbor treatment plant was eliminated. All sewage from the Wollochet Harbor Sewer District was
intercepted to Gig Harbor, where it now received the legally required degree of treatment. A significant source of
contamination was removed from inner Wollochet Harbor, enabling the State Health Department to consider recertifying
shellfish beds there. The last primary treatment plant in Ecology's Northwest Regional (and possibly in Washington State)
was eliminated. The District completed two components of this project using the Small Towns Environment Program
(STEP) method. The first part was the installation of a new collection system, including 24 septic tank effluent pumps. The
preliminary estimate for this project, assuming the use of an outside contractor was $95,000. The District used volunteer
labor, their consultant (Gray & Osborne) donated an inspector and the District purchased the materials. The approximate
final cost for this portion was $25,000, a savings of $70,000. The second part of the work accomplished through using STEP
was the landscaping. The District received a bid for the landscaping work of approximately $45,000. The District chose to
The Wollochet Harbor treatment plant was eliminated. All sewage from the Wollochet Harbor Sewer District was
intercepted to Gig Harbor, where it now received the legally required degree of treatment. A significant source of
contamination was removed from inner Wollochet Harbor, enabling the State Health Department to consider recertifying
shellfish beds there. The last primary treatment plant in Ecology's Northwest Regional (and possibly in Washington State)
was eliminated. The District completed two components of this project using the Small Towns Environment Program
(STEP) method. The first part was the installation of a new collection system, including 24 septic tank effluent pumps. The
preliminary estimate for this project, assuming the use of an outside contractor was $95,000. The District used volunteer
labor, their consultant (Gray & Osborne) donated an inspector and the District purchased the materials. The approximate
final cost for this portion was $25,000, a savings of $70,000. The second part of the work accomplished through using STEP
was the landscaping. The District received a bid for the landscaping work of approximately $45,000. The District chose to
Twelve of the original eighteen farms are being actively managed, and all those have implemented many innovative practices
to make their operations ecologically and financially sustainable. Curriculum and a training manual for the program was
completed. The curriculum website is http://clallam.wsu.edu/ccsfp/curriculum.htm The training manual is included with the
closeout. Three advanced training workshops were held in the final quarters of 2002 and spring 2003. Each training had 9
to 12 participants. Program staff finished researching and compiling reference material for the program library. The Small
Farms Library now contains over 1,200 educational resources such as books, journals, magazines, videos, fact sheets, and
more. The development of the Robin Hill Demonstration Farm is completed. The farm now contains four organic farming
plots, two of which have had a deer fence installed. Please note: quarterly reports were sometimes difficult to receive. The




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