Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation by liuhongmei

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									     Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation
                Final Report

                  Senior Design May06-09

                       Client: Lockheed Martin

                   Faculty Advisors: Arun Somani
                                     Zhao Zhang


                   Team Members: Isi Oamen
                                 David Roberts
                                 Shawn Yockey

DISCLAIMER: This document was developed as a part of the requirements of an
electrical and computer engineering course at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. This
document does not constitute a professional engineering design or a professional land
surveying document. Although the information is intended to be accurate, the
associated students, faculty, and Iowa State University make no claims, promises, or
guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, quality, or adequacy of the information.
The user of this document shall ensure that any such use does not violate any laws with
regard to professional licensing and certification requirements. This use includes any
work resulting from this student-prepared document that is required to be under the
responsible charge of a licensed engineer or surveyor. This document is copyrighted by
the students who produced this document and the associated faculty advisors. No part
may be reproduced without the written permission of the senior design course
coordinator.



                                 May 3, 2006
Project Design – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


Table of Contents
1.  Introductory Materials............................................................................................... 1
  1.1. Executive Summary .......................................................................................... 1
    1.1.1. Project Need .............................................................................................. 1
    1.1.2. Project Activities ........................................................................................ 1
    1.1.3. Final Results .............................................................................................. 1
    1.1.4. Follow-on Work Recommendations ........................................................... 2
  1.2. Acknowledgements ........................................................................................... 2
  1.3. Problem Statement ........................................................................................... 2
    1.3.1. Problem ..................................................................................................... 2
    1.3.2. Approach ................................................................................................... 3
  1.4. Operating Environment ..................................................................................... 5
  1.5. Intended Users and Intended Uses................................................................... 5
    1.5.1. Intended User(s) ........................................................................................ 5
    1.5.2. Intended Use(s) ......................................................................................... 5
  1.6. Assumptions and Limitations ............................................................................ 6
    1.6.1. Assumptions .............................................................................................. 6
    1.6.2. Limitations.................................................................................................. 6
  1.7. Expected end product and other deliverables ................................................... 7
2. Project Approach and Results .................................................................................. 8
  2.1. Functional Requirements .................................................................................. 8
    2.1    Design Constraints ........................................................................................ 8
    2.1.1. Technical Approach Considerations and Results ...................................... 9
  2.2. Detailed Design and Implementation .............................................................. 10
    2.2.1. System Display ........................................................................................ 10
    2.2.2. Data Input ................................................................................................ 10
    2.2.3. Software................................................................................................... 11
    2.2.4. Parts List .................................................................................................. 11
  2.3. End-Product Testing ....................................................................................... 12
    2.3.1. Voice Input/Microphone Testing .............................................................. 12
    2.3.2. Glove/Gyro Testing .................................................................................. 13
  2.4. Project End Results ........................................................................................ 14
3. Resources and Schedules ..................................................................................... 15
  3.1. Resource Requirements ................................................................................. 15
    3.1.1. Personnel Effort Requirement .................................................................. 15
    3.1.2. Other Resource Requirements ................................................................ 16
    3.1.3. Financial Resource Requirements ........................................................... 17
  3.2. Schedules ....................................................................................................... 20
4. Closure Materials ................................................................................................... 24
  4.1. Project Evaluation ........................................................................................... 24
  4.2. Commercialization .......................................................................................... 24
  4.3. Recommendations for Future Work ................................................................ 24
    4.3.1. Improve I2C MicroGyro Device Driver ..................................................... 24
    4.3.2. Integrate I2C Master Controller/Keypad/ Mouse Clicks ........................... 24
    4.3.3. Bluetooth Wireless Peripherals ................................................................ 25



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    4.3.4. Develop Additional Software Applications................................................ 25
    4.3.5. Design a Display Module ......................................................................... 25
  4.4. Lessons Learned ............................................................................................ 25
    4.4.1. Positive Aspects of the Project ................................................................ 25
    4.4.2. Negative Aspects of the Project ............................................................... 25
    4.4.3. Technical knowledge gained.................................................................... 26
    4.4.4. Non-Technical knowledge gained ............................................................ 26
    4.4.5. What would the project team do if asked to re-do the project .................. 27
  4.5. Risk and Risk Management ............................................................................ 27
    4.5.1. Future Risks............................................................................................. 27
    4.5.2. Anticipated Encountered Risks ................................................................ 27
    4.5.3. Unanticipated Encountered Risks ............................................................ 27
    4.5.4. Changes to Risk Management over the Course of the Project ................ 28
  4.6. Project Team Information ................................................................................ 28
    4.6.1. Client Information ..................................................................................... 28
    4.6.2. Faculty Advisor Information ..................................................................... 28
    4.6.3. Student Team Information ....................................................................... 29
  4.7. Closing Summary............................................................................................ 29




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List of Figures
Figure 1-1: FireFox Throat Microphone for Voice Activation ............................................... 3
Figure 1-2: Head-mounted Display ........................................................................................... 4
Figure 1-3: Gaming Glove........................................................................................................... 4
Figure 3-1: Gantt chart showing Fall 2005 schedule ............................................................ 21
Figure 3-2: Gantt chart showing Spring 2006 schedule ....................................................... 22
Figure 3-3: Gantt chart - Fall 2005 Deliverables ................................................................... 23
Figure 3-4: Gantt chart - Spring 2006 Deliverables .............................................................. 23




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List of Tables
Table 0-1: Definitions ...................................................................................................... V
Table 2-1: Parts List ...................................................................................................... 11
Table 3-1: Original Personnel Effort Requirements ....................................................... 16
Table 3-2: Revised Personnel Effort Requirements ...................................................... 16
Table 3-3: Final Personnel Effort Requirements ........................................................... 16
Table 3-4: Original Other Resource Requirements ....................................................... 17
Table 3-5: Revised Other Resource Requirements ....................................................... 17
Table 3-6: Final Other Resource Requirements ............................................................ 17
Table 3-7: Original Financial Resource Requirements .................................................. 18
Table 3-8: Revised Financial Resource Requirements ................................................. 19
Table 3-9: Final Financial Resource Requirements ...................................................... 20
Table 4-1: Client Information ......................................................................................... 28
Table 4-2: Faculty Advisor Information .......................................................................... 28
Table 4-3: Team Member Information ........................................................................... 29




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Table 0-1: Definitions
Term                     Description
Artifact                 Any object made, modified or used by a project team.
                         A device that stores energy and makes it available in an
Battery
                         electrical form.
                         A device whose internal make-up, design, or operation is
Black box                discrete. Its function is known, but usually not its internal
                         components.
                         A radio technology built around a new chip that makes it
Bluetooth                possible to transmit signals over short distances between
                         computers and hand-held devices without the use of wires.
                         A small, pen-like device that can be used to control Bluetooth
Bluewand
                         enabled devices by hand-movements.
                         Compact Disc Read-Only Memory. An optical disc holding
CD-ROM
                         computer data.
Chair                    A seat typically having four legs and a back for one person.
                         A programmable electronic device that can store, retrieve, and
Computer
                         process data.
                         A software program that allows the user to type at 160 words
Dragon Naturally
                         per minute by speaking to the computer in perfectly natural
Speaking
                         continuous speech.
                         Stores and retrieves information on floppy disks. The floppy disk
                         consists of a plastic casing enclosed in a thin piece of plastic.
Floppy drive
                         The plastic has a coding of magnetic particles on it, onto which
                         the information is written in magnetic code.
                         An optical instrument consisting of a pair of lenses and often
Glasses
                         worn on the face.
                         A covering for the hand having separate sections for each of the
Glove
                         fingers and the thumb and often extending part way up the arm.
                         Hard disk drive. It is generally used as a storage device in a
HDD
                         personal computer.
                         A device which allows for hands-free operation via an ear and
Headset
                         mouthpiece.
                         The means by which two systems or devices are connected and
Interface
                         interact with each other.
                         An assemblage of systematically arranged keys by which a
Keyboard
                         machine or device is operated.
                         A monitor that utilizes a liquid crystal display instead of cathode
LCD Screen
                         ray tubes.
Memory stick             A type of transportable data storage device.




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Term                Description
                    A fully integrated, dual-axis miniature gyroscope that is fully
MicroGyro           self-contained for easy integration into human input devices
                    such as computer mice, remote controls and game controllers.
                    A device for converting acoustic sound waves into an electrical
Microphone
                    representation of the sound wave.
                    Structural elements that are interchangeable. Maximum
Modular
                    flexibility in arrangement and size.
                    A cathode-ray tube used for display (as of television pictures or
Monitor
                    computer information).
                    The principal circuit board of the computer that contains the
Motherboard
                    processor.
Pentium             A high-speed microprocessor chip made by Intel.
Pointer device      A device for moving the cursor, e.g. a mouse.
                    The original form which serves as a model on which successors
Prototype
                    are based.
                    Fastened in such a manner as to ensure nothing will shake
Secured for Sea
                    loose in a turbulent environment.
                    An input device commonly used in laptop computers. It is used
Touch pad           to move the cursor, using motions of the user's finger. It is a
                    substitute for a computer mouse.
                    A ball that is mounted usually in a computer console so as to be
Trackball           only partially exposed and is rotated to control the movement of
                    a cursor on a display.
                    An operating system that supports multitasking and is ideally
UNIX
                    suited to multi-user applications (such as networks).
                    Universal Serial Bus. A protocol for transferring data to and
USB
                    from digital devices.
                    Voltage Alternating Current. The voltage measurement in an AC
VAC
                    system.
                    Voltage Direct Current. The voltage measurement in a DC
VDC
                    system.
                    An electronic software/hardware system that can be trained to
Voice recognition   recognize an individual’s voice patterns to allow for an
                    alternative means of computer input replacing the keyboard.
                    A real time camera whose images can be accessed using the
Web cam             World Wide Web, instant messaging, or a personal computer
                    video calling application.
                    A powerful computer often used for scientific applications. Also
Workstation
                    a desk, chair and other equipment at which someone works.




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1. Introductory Materials
1.1. Executive Summary
The executive summary is an overview of the results of this project. It includes a
description of the project needs and activities, the final project results and the
possibilities for follow-on work.

1.1.1. Project Need
The project need specified by the client was for the military and its mobile computing
requirements. Sailors, airmen and other personnel needed to be able to access
powerful computing tools while at the same time retaining their personal mobility.
These computing tools are designed to report on the condition of equipment in the field
as well as other important battlefield intelligence.

1.1.2. Project Activities
The need for mobility and powerful computing power were two tasks that needed to be
balanced in the final design for this project. To this end, non-traditional computer input
and output devices were researched to enable the user to utilize a computer in a space
that would constrain the use of a traditional desktop or laptop computer system.
Computer input was split into three subsystems: voice input for data entry, a glove
pointer to allow for mouse movement, and a keypad to allow for redundant data entry
and quick action functions. The goal was to allow an operator to utilize a computer
secured either under the user’s chair or for demonstration purposes. To demonstrate
this, it was necessary to use a backpack where the user could not interface with the
computer with traditional methods. A weekly status report was prepared to notify all
stakeholders in the project of project goals, deadlines, and status of the various parts of
the project.

1.1.3. Final Results
The results of this project include a prototype of each subsystem. The monitor system
was completed with a pair of EyeTop display glasses. The glasses utilize a monocular
display in the right eye to display visual data. The voice input system was completed
utilizing a throat microphone from Fire-Fox Technologies and Dragon Naturally
Speaking 8.0. The throat microphone allows the user to utilize the voice input system in
any ambient noise condition. The final subsystem, the pointer glove, was completed
utilizing a dual-axis MicroGyro which uses I2C technology. The gyro is affixed to the
back of the hand to allow the user to move the mouse with hand movements. A keypad
on the back of the wrist completes the glove, allowing for data entry or programmed
macros. All of the project development thus far is described in the project documents
such as the final presentation and this final project document.




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1.1.4. Follow-on Work Recommendations
As an introduction to the possibility of mobile computing, there are many areas of
improvement available for future work on this project. The first suggestion is to
integrate the glove hardware so that it utilizes one USB cord instead of three. Once the
hardware is integrated, a cleanup of the pointer glove device drivers would be advisable
to allow for quicker response time. If monetary constraints for a future project team do
not exist, it is highly recommended to procure a display device with better resolution that
can be utilized for more than fifteen minutes an hour.

1.2. Acknowledgements
Dr. Arun Somani and Dr. Zhao Zhang of Iowa State University have provided technical
and practical advice throughout the creation process. Furthermore, R. J. Monson of
Lockheed Martin has provided design specifications and requirements as appropriate.

1.3. Problem Statement
The problem statement consists of two areas: the problem and the solution. These
statements shall provide the reader with a general overview of the problem and the
approach that has been used to solve the problem. This is included so that the reader
will have the correct concept of the problem and the solution approach.

1.3.1. Problem
The intended placement of the design, as specified by the project client, is in a tactical
military environment aboard either a watercraft or aircraft. The intended operator for the
design is specified as a sailor or airman in the United States military, but the design may
be extended to any similar military or civilian environment. As such, the design assumes
full use of all limbs and fingers and the ability to understand words and symbols
common to the English language. Furthermore, because a high school education or
equivalent is required for participation in the United States military, such a level of
education is also assumed.

The user interface must allow similar functionality to that of a standard personal
computer system, while simultaneously allowing the greatest freedom of movement
possible. Furthermore, a display must allow the operator an unobstructed view of the
output while also allowing a view of his or her peripheral environment. Suitable
replacement for standard input/output devices will be incorporated in a novel
configuration to allow the user full functionality while simultaneously protecting the
hardware and software devices from environmental factors such as impact or excessive
movement. Such alternative devices may include a voice activated system and a
function-specific programmable keyboard. The intended power supply for the main unit
is 120 volts alternating current, which will allow for a more universal power adaptation.
Further power considerations will include the use of a rechargeable battery system for
the satellite display, voice activation system, and pointer system. The specific power
supplies will be altered as needed.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


To ensure the proper functionality of the workstation, the core system components must
be secured to the chair while the audio, video, and pointer components must be
attached to the body of the operator. For demonstration purposes, the project team has
utilized a backpack to house the host computer to prove that the end-user can utilize the
peripherals designed and still operate the computer. In addition to environmental
factors such as heat, cold, dirt and dust, the design must compensate for possible
environmental instability such as rocking, swaying, tilting and shock.

1.3.2. Approach
In general, research into commercial applications and implementations of similar
products will determine what solutions have and have not worked in the past. A review
of current voice activation technologies will provide information on the durability,
functionality and availability of numerous configurations. Furthermore, speech-oriented
input configurations have been reviewed for applicability within a moderate to high
ambient noise environment. After attempting to utilize two separate Bluetooth headsets,
the project team decided to utilize a throat microphone. The Fire-Fox throat microphone
allows the user to communicate effectively with the computer in an environment with
loud ambient noise. In addition, a normal set of earphones utilized by the military can
be worn over the ear bud of the Fire-Fox.




                 Figure 1-1: FireFox Throat Microphone for Voice Activation


Display implementation will include a wearable display mounted inside a pair of glasses.
The voice activation and display will all be implemented so that the user does not have
constrained mobility. Streaming wireless and battery-operated technologies will be
incorporated to transmit signals from these devices to the main processing unit. The
display unit will be very similar to the monocular head-mounted display shown below.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation




                             Figure 1-2: Head-mounted Display


The user will employ a glove to act as a pointer similar to a mouse or trackball. The
hardware for the glove shall be placed on the back of the hand similar to the gaming
glove pictured below. The hardware for the glove shall be worn on the user’s belt with
cables routed through a vest to the belt. When the user moves his or her hand up and
down or left to right, the pointer shall move accordingly. The reason for this is a
MicroGyro embedded in the glove to monitor movement. The clicking shall be
accomplished with spines similar to the gaming glove. When the finger moves 90
degrees towards the palm, it is interpreted by the glove to be a mouse-click. The design
of the glove shall enable members of the military to be able to perform their duties and
operate a computer at the same time.




                                 Figure 1-3: Gaming Glove


The main computer will be a laptop that is secured in a docking station under the chair.
This shall expedite maintenance and allow for use of the laptop’s disk drives if need be.


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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


In addition, this shall make the process of securing the computer simpler when not in
use. If the laptop contains classified data it can be placed into the drawer of a safe
when not in use.


1.4. Operating Environment
The Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation is intended to be a self-contained, modular
system requiring an external 120 volt alternating current and a rechargeable battery
system to operate. The specific values of the power supply will be altered as needed
during product implementation. All hardware will be secured to the chair or operator
and the entire system will be mobile. Potential environmental hazards include
excessive heat, cold, condensation, dust, dirt and environmental movement such as
rocking or tilting. Additionally, operation in a small physical space and the movement of
personnel around the workstation must be considered.


1.5. Intended Users and Intended Uses
This subsection shall include two separately identified components: the intended user
and the intended use. To properly design an end product that will provide the maximum
satisfaction and perform in the most efficient manner, it is essential to understand the
end user and the associated end uses.


1.5.1. Intended User(s)
The intended operator for the design is a member of the United States Military.
However, the design may be utilized by other individuals as well. Thus, the intended
user group is a constraint of the client specifications, rather than inherent in the design
itself. The design assumes full use of all limbs and fingers and the ability to understand
words and symbols common to the English language and utilized on standard American
computer keyboards. Education level is assumed to be of a high school equivalent or
higher with adequate training on system use prior to operation. The design is intended
for use by both males and females and is not age specific. The workstation shall be
implemented so that any operator may use it regardless of height.

1.5.2. Intended Use(s)
The workstation is intended to be installed on a watercraft or aircraft for military
purposes. As such, the design will facilitate use and proper operation within limited
physical space. The projected prototype shall not be platform specific, but will require
the use of specialized hardware device drivers. The design will allow proper operation
of any application requiring standard personal computer capabilities. Input/Output
capacities allow further hardware or software expansion as needed.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


1.6. Assumptions and Limitations
This subsection describes design assumptions and limitations taken prior to
development. Although these are flexible and may change, the majority shall remain
integral components to the design process. The assumptions are made in regard to
specific uses and functionality, while the limitations are taken in regard to operating
environment and power availability.


1.6.1. Assumptions

1. The initial number of users shall be one, but the system shall be network capable to
   enable communication between systems.
2. The system will be used in a tactical military environment and thus subject to
   tolerable environmental factors such as dust, dirt, temperature variations, gravitation,
   and vibrations.
3. The system will be installed in a secure area; therefore hardware personnel
   identification devices (i.e. identification readers) are not necessary.
4. Physical area unit utilizes will be limited to smallest design possible while
   maintaining functionality.
5. The workstation shall be sheltered such that direct sunlight, rain, snow, etc. are not
   factors.
6. Only reading capabilities are needed; therefore a standard CD-ROM drive is
   sufficient.
7. Networking implementation will be wireless.
8. The prototype will utilize the Microsoft Windows XP operating system. This allows
   for ease of use and budget considerations and is in no way a limitation of the design
   itself.

1.6.2.    Limitations

1. The system will run from both a 120 VAC source and a rechargeable battery system.
2. The system should occupy the smallest amount of space possible.
3. The placement of components cannot interfere with the mobility of the operator.
4. All hardware must be securable to either the chair or the operator.
5. The functionality must match or exceed that of a common personal computer.
6. All components must be modular, allowing for easy replacement and adjustment in a
   tactical environment.
7. All components must be robust and able to endure greater than normal physical
   wear.
8. Although military specifications upon components is desired, budgetary constraints
   impose a limitation to standard components. This is a budgetary imposition and in
   no way reflects a limit of the design itself.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


1.7. Expected end product and other deliverables
A standalone, completely operational prototype for the Chair-Mounted Computer
Workstation will be delivered to Lockheed-Martin. The Workstation will provide or
exceed the same functionality as a personal computer, but in a modular and compact
design. Complete functionality will be provided through voice-activated functions in a
novel setup, head-mounted display, and standard input. The system shall demonstrate
non-conventional methods of data entry into a computer, allowing for less space to be
used by the traditional computer input devices.

Additional deliverables include:
   Weekly progress report to client
   Oral presentation of design results to client
   Bound revised project plan on October 11, 2005
   Peer review panel on December 6, 2005
   Bound revised design report on December 14, 2005
   Oral final report presentations to IRP on April 25, 2006
   Bound revised final report on May 3, 2006




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


2. Project Approach and Results
The following section will describe the different approaches which were considered and
chosen as well as the results of the project as a whole. In addition, the functional
requirements, design constraints, and detailed design are listed and discussed.

2.1. Functional Requirements
The following functional requirements address what the final product will and will not do.

    Data input
   The user will have the capability to enter and manipulate data into the system using
   voice recognition, a glove and keyboard.

    Quick function options
   A series of actions will be available on the keypad, voice recognition and glove that
   will execute a command or application. This will provide the user with a quick way to
   execute an operation without having to perform a sequence of steps.

    System navigation
   The user will have the capability to navigate through the system using conventional
   devices such as a trackball and keyboard; however there will be an emphasis on the
   unconventional use of data entry.

    Power
   The power supplied to the chair will be 120 volts alternating current, while the battery
   supplying power to the headset will be rechargeable. The specific voltages are
   subject to change based on the needs of the project.

2.1   Design Constraints
In the development of the project there are several constraints that need to be
considered. Each constraint causes a limitation on the design and functionality of the
project.

    Size
   The size of the components must fit into the smallest possible area. For this project,
   all non-mobile components shall fit into a cart that is located next to the computer.
   The components shall occupy a space of no more that two cubic feet.

    Mobility
   The user must have the opportunity to be mobile while maintaining the same
   functionality as current computer systems.




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    Power
   The power subsystem must be able to support mobile user operations for two hours.
   While the user is in the chair, the mobile system should be able to be recharged with
   minimum hassle for the operator.

    Weight
   The mobile subsystem must be light enough to wear for extended periods of time.
   Therefore, the total weight will be a consideration in all components designed and
   used by the project team. The maximum weight should not exceed four pounds total
   or one-half pound on extremities.


2.1.1. Technical Approach Considerations and Results
There are several aspects to the system that required further research. All components
of the system will optimize cost, mobility and performance. Some considerations are
the following:

    Display
   The means of technology used in displaying the information can be a standard LCD
   screen attached to the armrest or via a projected screen onto a headset worn by the
   user. The use of a headset display device maximizes mobility. Due to the costs of an
   LCD screen and the inheritance of a pair of display goggles from a previous project,
   the project team selected a headset worn by the user. It will operate under various
   lighting conditions in a satisfactory manner.

    Audio input
   All audio input will use a microphone technology. Bluetooth headsets were initially
   researched because of their transmission range and compatibility with any computer
   that has a USB port and utilizes Windows XP as its operating system. During unit
   testing, it was found that voice recognition software would not function due to
   distortion of the voice from the Bluetooth transmitter. The project team then
   researched traditional microphones utilizing a 3.5mm plug for voice input. The
   results were satisfactory, but interfered with the use of earphones and could not be
   used in locations with ambient noise. With elimination of ambient noise from data
   input in mind, the project team selected a throat microphone for the data entry
   system. The Fire-Fox throat microphone allows the user to perform all of the voice
   actions required for data input. In addition, the ear bud of the throat microphone
   allows the user to utilize a standard military headset, which keeps with the design
   goal of not hindering the user's duties.

    Data input
   The methods used for inputting data include a keypad, glove and voice recognition.
   If one input device should fail, an effort will be made to make an alternative device
   available. Since voice activation provides the user the most freedom and
   convenience, it was chosen as the primary source. The vast majority of computer



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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


   applications today require a mouse to function properly. The secondary input will be
   the glove subsystem, which will allow the user the ability to compute while away
   from the chair but still within the range of the wireless devices. A keyboard and
   trackball will be implemented as tertiary input methods for redundancy.

    System navigation
   The options for system navigation are the traditional trackball and keyboard or voice
   recognition and glove. Both methods will provide the user with special commands to
   execute certain applications. However, since the voice recognition and glove
   system provides the user the best mobility, it will be implemented as the primary
   option.


2.2. Detailed Design and Implementation
This section provides a detailed description of the chair mounted computer workstation.
In particular, this section defines the subsystems which enhance the overall functionality
of the system, and describes how theses subsystems interact with each other.

2.2.1. System Display
The overall functionality of this subsystem is to provide the user with the ability to view
the output of the system without being restrained to a monitor. To accomplish this task,
a wearable goggle mounted display was used.

The input port of the goggle subsystem is a standard RCA type connection. However
the only display output port of the system is a standard S-Video. An S-Video to RCA
adapter was used to connect the visual subsystem to the main system.

2.2.2. Data Input
This section provides a detailed description of the devices in the system that will be
used for data entry methods. It also includes an explanation of their construction and
how they will be implemented into the entire system.

    Microphone
   A throat mounted microphone was used to eliminate the background noise of the
   operating environment. This microphone has a standard microphone jack and can
   be plugged directly into the systems microphone input port. The microphone will be
   used in conjunction with voice recognition software. This software will allow a user to
   input text or commands.

    Glove
   As an alternative to a traditional mouse, a motion sensitive glove was created to
   generate mouse movements. This glove allows the user to be completely free from
   surfaces and have the ability to control the system mouse. The glove contains a
   gyroscope to sense the change in movement of the bearer’s hand. A supplementary
   program is used to convert these subtle changes into mouse movements.



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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation



    The gyroscope can be accessed through the I2C protocol. However a standard
    system does not convert to this protocol directly. A USB to I2C supplementary
    device was used to interpret for the system.

     Keypad
    Finally a standard numerical keypad was used for supplementary input. The keypad
    will be mounted in a convenient location and will be used in conjunction with key
    remapping software. This software will allow a user to press a key and execute a
    function, enter text, or enter a key combination.

2.2.3. Software
This section provides a detailed description of the aspects of the project relating to its
software and applications. It also describes the type of work done to each of the
applications to make it possible for use in the project.

     Voice Recognition
    The program Dragon Naturally Speaking was utilized to implement the voice
    recognition abilities for the system. This program was chosen because of its ability
    to execute macro functions.

    These functions can be programmed to execute any standard feature of the system.
    Through them the voice recognition software can execute key commands, macros or
    open programs.

     Key Remapping
    The program AutoHotKey was used to remap the functions of any given key. When
    a key from the keypad was depressed a number of different functions can happen.
    These range from a key combination, macro functions, or even written text. An .ini
    file had to be written containing the scripts to execute when a corresponding key
    was pressed. The AutoHotKey program has to be running to allow the remapping of
    keys.

2.2.4. Parts List
This section provides a compiled list of all the devices or software of the Chair-Mounted
Computer Workstation.
Table 2-1: Parts List
Item                                                                  Price of Component
Hardware:
EyeTop Display Glasses                                                $0.00
MicroGyro 2-axis Gyro                                                 $150.00
Fire-Fox Throat Microphone                                            $38.00
Dimax I2C Master Controller                                           $80.00
USB Keypad                                                            $34.00
Subtotal                                                              $302.00



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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation

Item                                                                  Price of Component
Software:
Windows XP Professional                                               $0.00
NASA World Wind                                                       $0.00
Dragon Naturally Speaking 8.0                                         $0.00
Subtotal                                                              $0.00


Complete Cost of Hardware/Software:
Subtotal                                                              $302.00


2.3. End-Product Testing
This section describes the procedures used for testing the hardware components of the
system. The methods, locations and results of the tests are also included in this
section.

2.3.1. Voice Input/Microphone Testing
As mentioned earlier in the report, several microphones were tested for suitability with
the project. All microphones were tested utilizing Dragon Naturally Speaking 8.0 and an
internet telephony program called Ventrilo. The testing and acceptance protocols were
developed after the Bluetooth microphone was found to be unacceptable.

The first test for microphone suitability was the voice quality test on Ventrilo. Ventrilo
was run off a team member's personal computer. The team member then utilized the
microphone to chat with different ambient conditions. To simulate a possible ambient
noise environment found in military situations, fan was blown near to the user. At the
same time a television in the background was used to create more ambient noise. If the
individuals on the other end of the connection could hear the team member clearly
despite the interference, the test was considered a success.

Under the same conditions for the informal voice quality check with Ventrilo, the project
team used Dragon Naturally Speaking 8.0. If the computer could understand the project
team member, the test was a success. The Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation is
intended to be utilized on platforms such as the P-3 Orion, which has 4 turbo props. If
the microphone did not survive our stress testing, it would not function well there.

The Bluetooth microphone was simple to set up, but failed both of the tests created by
the project team. On Ventrilo, the team member sounded like "a NASCAR Driver"
according to other users on the server. It is little wonder that Dragon Naturally
Speaking was unable to register the team member's voice inputs as it could not properly
understand the user.

The next microphone tested was a standard 3.5mm plug-in desk microphone. The desk
microphone passed the first test with no ambient noise present. However, with the fan
and television, the other Ventrilo users could not understand the team member. The
desk microphone was found to be unsuitable for further consideration and was
scrapped after the first test.


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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation



After the failure of the desk microphone, the project team borrowed a throat
microphone. The throat microphone passed the first test with flying colors. There were
a few complaints that the team member "did not sound right." However, the team
member was heard loud and clear, even with ambient noise in the background. The
team member then proceeded onto the second test to ensure the throat microphone
would be suitable as the team's final selection. The user profile earlier associated with
the team member would not function with the throat microphone. After rebuilding a new
profile for the team member, Dragon Naturally Speaking worked as intended. Based on
the testing results, the throat microphone was the clear-cut winner.

2.3.2. Glove/Gyro Testing
The pointer glove system was developed utilizing an iterative design process. When a
new component was added to the system, regression testing was conducted to ensure
that no new faults were added to the system. The glove went through five iterations of
design building before the subsystem was considered to be working as intended.

The first three iterations of design and testing centered on the MicroGyro system. The
first round of testing involved the project team’s ability to reliably poll data from the gyro.
The MicroGyro has the ability to provide temperature, voltage, and axis information.
The first round of testing was concentrated on ensuring that the team had a confirmed
change in state when the conditions around the gyro changed. The method to test the
onboard temperature sensors consisted of taking the gyro and computer out of the lab
in Coover Hall into the outdoors. The gyro repeatedly reported the correct temperature
both inside and outside of the lab. The final prototype does not utilize this feature, but it
was important to confirm that communication between the computer and gyro was
working as intended.

The second iteration of device drivers and the ensuing testing focused on the ability of
the design team to poll the gyro and to not consume the entire system’s resources. A
console display showed the changing bits when the gyro was moving around. At the
same time, the project team utilized an open source mouse driver to drive the mouse
pointer around the monitor. The mouse was unusable in this state, but the goal of this
design phase was to prove that the project team could utilize the gyro as intended.

The third testing phase involved user testing of the gyro on its test card. The mouse
movement was fine tuned in this design stage with testing priorities revolving around
ease of use. To ensure that the gyro driver was not consuming too much of the
system's resources, multiple applications were run at the same time to stress test the
CPU. The final test was to attempt normal computer operation with Dragon Naturally
Speaking running, a second display to simulate the display glasses in use, and the gyro
software all operating at the same time. The system was a little sluggish, but this was
partly attributed to asking too much of an older computer.

On the fourth iteration, the keypad was added to the system. The keypad was an off-
the-shelf USB number pad to simulate the wrist keypad which was not allowed in the


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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


budget. Because the keypad was off-the-shelf, no testing was required by the project
team other than a cursory function check. After remapping the keys on the keypad, the
project team took turns surfing the internet utilizing the gyro and keypad to ensure ease
of use. The project team had differing opinions on which keys should be mapped
where; however, all agreed that the glove and keypad worked together well.

The final phase involved working within a Microsoft Word document utilizing only the
glove and voice system. A secondary display was enabled again to simulate the stress
on system resources caused by the display goggles. The display glasses were not
worn for this test as it is difficult to run Microsoft Word with a 320 x 240 pixel resolution.
It took the team member conducting the test approximately two man-hours to set up the
peripherals to efficiently work with Microsoft Word. After the system adjustments were
finished, the test was completed satisfactorily.

2.4. Project End Results
The end result of the project is a working, fully functional mobile workstation, complete
with head-mounted display, pointer glove, and voice control. The project team has
proven that its methods for utilizing a computer without the traditional console
accessories are possible. There is much that can be worked on with the prototype, but
with the loss of a team member and financial constraints, the project team did
everything in its power to produce the best working product possible.
Recommendations for future work are contained in the closure materials section of this
report.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation



3. Resources and Schedules
The completion of this project was highly dependent on the ability to utilize resources
and to remain on schedule. Detailed below are the resources that were allocated during
the completion of the project, along with the project schedule. All of the resources
allocated were accurately documented. The project schedule was subject to change
based on the needs of the project and the availability of resources.

3.1. Resource Requirements
The resources that were required to complete this project consisted of three separate
components. These include: (1) personnel effort requirements, (2) other resource
requirements, and (3) financial requirements. Each of these components contains three
sections: the original estimate, the revised estimate, and the final results.

3.1.1. Personnel Effort Requirement
The personnel effort requirement of the group was the most likely to change during the
course of the project. Due to the chance of sudden changes, this requirement was the
most difficult to predict. As unexpected problems arose, the distribution of the
personnel effort was restructured.

The initial distribution of the personnel effort was split up into hardware and software.
Two members were assigned to the hardware group while the remaining members were
assigned to software. A majority of the hours placed into the project were estimated to
come from the designing of the system. On the hardware side, the development of the
schematic and footprints of each component were estimated to be the most time
consuming. As for the software, developing the voice recognition interface was
estimated to require the most effort. Once the hardware and software components
were both completed, a large amount of effort was estimated for testing.

Other areas where personnel effort was to be allocated were the creation of project
reports and the weekly advisor meetings. During the course of the project there were a
total of three written reports and three oral reports. These reports detailed our progress
and aspirations for the final result of the project. Along with the reports, weekly one-hour
long progress meetings with our advisors were held. Table 3-1 shows the original
estimate of the personnel effort distribution of the group members during the completion
of the project.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation



Table 3-1: Original Personnel Effort Requirements (Project Plan Estimate)
                                     Project        Project       Project
  Member Name        Meetings                                                     Totals
                                     Reports       Research     Construction
 Christian Baldus        60            40             45            65              210
    Isi Oamen            45            35             40            90              210
  David Roberts          60            80             55            30              225
  Shawn Yockey           45            30             65            75              215

      Totals            210            185           205                260         860

Towards the end of the first semester of work on this project, the personnel hours
contributed by each member were updated. The extra hours resulted from additional
research on system components and familiarization with software that would be needed
the following semester. In particular, more research was required for I2C. Table 3-2
below shows the revised personnel effort requirements.

Table 3-2: Revised Personnel Effort Requirements (End Product Design Estimate)
                                     Project        Project        Project
   Member Name        Meetings                                                     Totals
                                     Reports       Research      Construction
 Christian Baldus        65            40               55               65         225
    Isi Oamen            50            35               50              110         245
  David Roberts          65            80               55               30         230
  Shawn Yockey           50            30               70               75         225

      Totals            230            185           230                280         925

At the start of the second semester, the project team lost a member. The total hours
for reporting, research, and construction were close to the estimates. If one subtracts
the difference in expected hours from the lost team member, then the adjusted estimate
of 758 hours is close to the actual manpower usage of 810 hours. The project team
forecasts a minimal amount of future man-hours for the remainder of the project, and
these will be spent on preparing for the Industrial Review Panel.

Table 3-3: Final Personnel Effort Requirements (Actual Hours to Date)
                                   Project       Project        Project
  Member Name       Meetings                                                     Totals
                                   Reports      Research      Construction
                       26              9           23              0               58
   Isi Oamen           53             54           37             84              228
 David Roberts         56            120           65             47              288
 Shawn Yockey          56             33           58             89              236

     Totals           191            216           183            220             810


3.1.2. Other Resource Requirements
During the course of any project, there are unseen factors that may alter the result of
the project. One of these factors was the project team did not fully understand the



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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


reporting requirements for resource requirements. Table 3-4 displays the original
estimate for the other resources required for the project.
Table 3-4: Original Other Resource Requirements (Project Plan Estimate)
 Item                               Team Hours     Other Hours            Cost
 Project Poster                     10             0                      $65.00
 Miscellaneous Printing             20             0                      $100.00
 Mounting Equipment                 3              0                      $45.00
 Chair                              0              0                      $20.00
 Totals                             33             0                      $230.00

The original intention after the promised budget fell through was to place all of the
components for the system inside of a cart next to where the user was sitting. The cart
was never constructed as the team decided a 100% wearable prototype would be a
much better demonstration of the system.

Table 3-5: Revised Other Resource Requirements (End Product Design Estimate)
 Item                               Team Hours     Other Hours            Cost
 Project Poster                     10             0                      $0.00 (Donated)
 Miscellaneous Printing             20             0                      $50.00
 Cart                               3              0                      $45.00
 Totals                             33             0                      $95.00

The only resources not spent directly on the system were the resources utilized for
printing, and for preparing the poster. The poster mounting was $49.00 due to one
team member being in town to prepare it. The team member did not have the time to
prepare the poster themselves, so the entire process of laminating and mounting was
contracted out.
Table 3-6: Final Other Resource Requirements (Actual Cost to Date)
 Item                               Team Hours     Other Hours            Cost
 Project poster                     12             0                      $0.00
 Poster mounting materials          6              0                      $49.00
 Miscellaneous printing             3              0                      $12.00
 Totals                             21             0                      $61.00



3.1.3. Financial Resource Requirements
The financial resource requirements consisted of setting the budget for the project to
allow for completion given the donation provided by the sponsor. In order to stay within
the budget, the group developed an accurate listing of components for the project in the
early stages. As time progressed, the group attempted to find comparable products for
less to free up monetary resources for use in other areas of the project. Table 3-7
displays the original financial resource requirements.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation



Table 3-7: Original Financial Resource Requirements (Project Plan Estimate)
 Item                                          Price
 Hardware:
 LCD Screen                                    $200.00
 Head Set Display                              $600.00 (Artifact from last project team)
 Keyboard                                      $10.00
 Keypad                                        $20.00
 Processor                                     $150.00
 Motherboard                                   $120.00
 Memory                                        $50.00
 Mini HDD                                      $175.00
 Memory Stick Reader                           $40.00
 Trackball                                     $25.00
 Webcam                                        $20.00 (Donated from group member)
 Laptop Docking Bay                            $40.00
 MicroGyro Developing Kit                      $150.00
 Bluetooth Headset                             $40.00
 Bluetooth USB Transmitter                     $30.00
 Utility Belt                                  $10.00
 Battery Pack                                  $10.00
 Fingerless Gloves                             $25.00
 Miscellaneous Cables                          $80.00
 Subtotal                                      $1795.00

 Software:
 Operating system(Windows XP Pro)                $75.00 (Donated from department)
 Dragon Virtually Speaking                       $125.00 (Donated from group member)
 Subtotal                                        $200.00

 Miscellaneous:
 Printing                                        $210.00
 Chair                                           $65.00
 Fabrication Materials                           $85.00
 Subtotal                                        $315.00

 Parts, Software, Printing Total
 Total Project Cost without Labor                $2310
 Donated Total                                   -$820.00
 Printing Expenses Paid out of Pocket            -$165
 Net Cost:                                       $1280

 Labor:
 840hours @ $11.00/hr                            $9240
 Subtotal                                        $9240

 Total with Labor                                $11550
 Total with Labor and Donations                  $10730




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


Due to budgetary requirements, the scope of the design was changed to bring the
project into an affordable budget. The project was redirected into producing the core
peripherals for the chair system.

Table 3-8: Revised Financial Resource Requirements (End Product Design Estimate)
 Item                                       Price
 Hardware:
 Head Set Display                           $0.00 (Artifact from last project team)
 MicroGyro Developing Kit                   $150.00
 Bluetooth Headset                          $0.00 (Lent from group member)
 Bluetooth Receiver                         $0.00 (Lent from group member)
 Bluetooth Transceiver                      $50.00
 Utility Belt                               $10.00
 Battery Pack                               $10.00
 Fingerless Gloves                          $25.00
 Miscellaneous Cables                       $30.00
 Miscellaneous Parts                        $45.00
 Hardware Subtotal                          $320.00

 Software:
 Operating system(Windows XP Pro)           $0.00 (Donated from department)
 Dragon Virtually Speaking                  $0.00 (Donated from group member)
 Software Subtotal                          $0.00

 Miscellaneous:
 Project Poster                             $0.00 (Donated from department)
 Miscellaneous Printing                     $50.00
 Cart                                       $45.00
 Mounting Supplies                          $15.00
 Misc. Subtotal                             $110.00

 Labor:
 900hours @ $11.00/hr                       $10021.00
 Labor Subtotal                             $10021.00

 Total with out Labor                       $430.00
 Total                                      $10451.00

In the completion stages of the project, several changes were made to the components.
The largest change was with the need for an I2C master controller to control the gyro,
and all wireless components were removed from the project. The final project has a
working version of all three subsystems, but all are hard wired to the host system. In
addition to these changes, the project team demanded $12 an hour to overcome the
loss of a team member. Table 3-9 displays the final financial resource requirements for
the project.




Senior Design May06-09                                                                19
Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation




Table 3-9: Final Financial Resource Requirements (Actual Cost to Date)
Item                                           Without Labor             With Labor
Hardware:
EyeTop Display Glasses                          $0.00                    $0.00
MicroGyro 2-axis Gyro                           $150.00                  $150.00
Fire-Fox Throat Microphone                      $38.00                   $38.00
Dimax I2C Master Controller                     $80.00                   $80.00
USB Keypad                                      $34.00                   $34.00
Subtotal                                        $302.00                  $302.00


Software:
Windows XP Professional                         $0.00                    $0.00
NASA World Wind                                 $0.00                    $0.00
Dragon Naturally Speaking 8.0                   $0.00                    $0.00
Subtotal                                        $0.00                    $0.00

Miscellaneous:
Project poster                                  $0.00 (Donated)          $0.00
Miscellaneous printing                          $12.00                   $12.00
Poster mounting materials                       $49.00                   $49.00
Subtotal                                        $61.00                   $61.00


Labor at $12.00 per hour
Baldus, Christian                               @ 58 hours               $696.00
Oamen, Isi                                      @ 228 hours              $2,736.00
Roberts, David                                  @ 288 hours              $3,456.00
Yockey, Shawn                                   @ 236 hours              $2,832.00
Subtotal                                                                               $9,720.00

Total                                           $363.00                               $10,083.00




3.2. Schedules
Creating a well defined schedule is an essential part to the success of a project. During
any project there are obstacles that will delay progress. Many obstacles are caused by
not identifying all the necessary activities or by not properly estimating the amount of
effort required to complete the activity. A well defined schedule will provide gaps to
allow the reallocation of resources to compensate for the obstacles. During the initial
stages, the group developed a schedule detailing all the necessary activities in order to
successfully complete the project. Each of the desired deliverables were assigned a


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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


start and completion date. With many of the activities, the dates were flexible to allow
for restructuring in the case of unexpected problems. Figure 3-1 is a Gantt chart
showing the Fall 2005 schedule. There is a black line associated with each major task,
while the blue lines indicate each subtask necessary to complete that major task.




                     Figure 3-1: Gantt chart showing Fall 2005 schedule




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


Through the duration of the project, there were several tasks that were relegated to the
Spring 2006 semester because of time constraints in the Fall 2005 semester. These
were tasks such as design implementation and end product documentation. The group
strived to stay on schedule from where it ended during the fall semester. For each
major task, the chart contains a black line showing its duration. A set of blue lines
represent the subtasks that complete the major task. A Gantt chart displaying the
Spring 2006 schedule is displayed in Figure 3-2.




                   Figure 3-2: Gantt chart showing Spring 2006 schedule


For Figure 3-3, all project deliverables for the Fall 2005 semester are listed, with the
approximate start and completion dates. In the event a deliverable would need to be
delayed or given more time to complete, the group would extend the schedule to
accommodate the changes. All of the Fall 2005 deliverables were completed by the
due dates and maintained the original schedule. The black line shows the duration of
the fall semester, while the gray lines show the duration of time spent on each
deliverable.




Senior Design May06-09                                                        22
Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation




                      Figure 3-3: Gantt chart - Fall 2005 Deliverables


Spring 2006 introduced a new set of deliverables, such as the project poster and final
report. Because of the increased workload due to the loss of a team member, the
necessary time was allotted to complete each of these items without compromising the
scope of the project or impeding on the design implementation. A Gantt chart
displaying the schedule of deliverables for the Spring 2006 semesters is shown in
Figure 3-4. The black line shows the duration of the spring semester, while the teal
lines show the duration of time spent on each deliverable.




                     Figure 3-4: Gantt chart - Spring 2006 Deliverables




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


4. Closure Materials
The following section contains information for closure on the project plan including
client, faculty advisor and student team information. It also contains an overall
evaluation of the project, possible commercialization options, lessons learned over the
course of the project, risk management and recommendations for future work. Finally, a
closing summary is provided for the project as a whole.

4.1. Project Evaluation
The design goals of the Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation have been achieved.
There were many unforeseen events which occurred along the duration of the project,
but the team has been able to develop a functional set of peripherals that enable the
user to use a computer without a standard console.

4.2. Commercialization
Commercialization of the project in its current iteration is not advised. The purpose of
the project was to research non-traditional computing methods; to this end the project
team has developed a working prototype. The prototype demonstrates non-traditional
inputs adequately, but the interfaces require more work before a commercial release is
advisable. If the client wishes to continue work on the project, it is foreseeable that a
commercially ready prototype could be developed in the next iteration by a future
project team.

4.3. Recommendations for Future Work
The following section provides suggestions for future work possibilities on the general
project problem.

4.3.1. Improve I2C MicroGyro Device Driver
The project team had a difficult time writing the necessary code to utilize the MicroGyro.
The I2C embedded software protocol is not recognized by IEEE. As a result of I2C
being almost proprietary to Philips Electronics, there was no roadmap for the project
team to follow in developing the gyro control drivers. The device drivers developed
allow the gyro to work as intended; however, it consumes more system resources than
it should. If a project team follows up with this project, it is highly recommended that
they contact Philips for example code.

4.3.2. Integrate I2C Master Controller/Keypad/ Mouse Clicks
The current prototype is comprised of three different subsystems, each with their own
USB cable to provide functionality to the pointer glove. The glove in its present state is
proof of concept for a non-traditional pointing device as envisioned by the project team.
It is highly inefficient to utilize three USB cables for one device, and all of the
functionality could possibly be integrated onto a device that uses one USB cable. In
addition, this would hopefully produce a more rugged design that would better suit a
military environment.




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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


4.3.3. Bluetooth Wireless Peripherals
The prototype in its current condition has all peripherals attached to the main computer.
A future iteration of this project could free the user from the chair or backpack by
utilizing Bluetooth to communicate with the main computer. With a range of 10 meters,
Bluetooth would be an ideal technology to investigate for this purpose.

4.3.4. Develop Additional Software Applications
Due to the project being conceptual and research oriented, no specific applications
were given to the project team to implement. The project team focused on general
applications that could be solved with the use of voice activation. With more direction
from the client, future project teams could focus on specific applications to be
implemented to better suit the potential usage environment of the current project team’s
concept.

4.3.5. Design a Display Module
The project team used a third-party consumer market head-mounted display. Future
project teams could focus on developing a head-mounted display that would be more
suitable for the application of the software. The project team used a solution that was
less effective because of budget and time restrictions. With more or all of the focus on
developing a new module, a better solution may be developed.

4.4. Lessons Learned
This section contains a description of things that went well or not well during the effort to
complete the project. In addition, non-technical and technical knowledge gained by the
team will be addressed. This section will close with a brief summary of what the project
team would like to change if they had to do the project again.

4.4.1. Positive Aspects of the Project
The ability to produce a working prototype has been a learning experience for the
project team. Despite losing a team member and not having the promised funding to
produce the final project, the project was still completed on time. Along the course of
the project the project team polished research, troubleshooting, and planning skills. The
spirit of the project was maintained despite the many blind alleys that resulted from
products not being suitable for inclusion in the final prototype. The original project team
for the Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation had six members and did not produce a
working prototype. The current team has three members, and was able to complete the
assignment as intended.

4.4.2. Negative Aspects of the Project
Because the project was more conceptual than concrete, the team had to research
available technology, develop an idea, and vary the scope of their undertaking based on
time and budget restrictions. Since no solution was right or wrong, a large portion of
their effort was focused on creating a project that they would be capable of completing
in the allotted project time. A better set of requirements from the client would have
greatly eased the design and build process.


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Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation



As stated in the positive aspects, anything that could have gone wrong from a risk
management standpoint did go wrong. In the first semester, the project team was
warned about events that could occur such as: the loss of a team member, the lack of
funding, and loss of communication with the client. All of these events happened in this
project. The effects of these events on the team's morale are still being felt. The scope
of the project was changed to that of a realistic objective.

The largest factor holding the team back from fulfilling the full scope of the project was
budgetary considerations. The promised sum of $1000 never appeared, and the whole
design of the system had to be scrapped. The extra $100 to the project budget given by
Dr. Lamont was greatly appreciated by the project team. Despite this, the project team
spent over $300 of their personal money on parts for the project. The components that
are vital for the project will be donated in the hopes that a possible future team will not
have to waste time on rework.

4.4.3. Technical knowledge gained
Voice recognition technologies were researched to achieve an understanding of how a
voice engine “sees” a user's voice. Strategies to overcome some of the unaddressed
issues of voice recognition engines were implemented. The engine itself was also
integrated into a larger system to allow a user to have full functionality over the
application without traditional input devices.

Research to develop a functional voice recognition system required finding the right
microphone for the job. Research and testing utilized many of the skills that were rarely
addressed in previous engineering classes. The experience in testing different products
in the same method will be a valuable lesson in future engineering projects.

The MicroGyro was supposed to be simple to integrate into a larger system. Research
for the project took on new dimensions when the team received the gyros and then
realized it had no clue on how to communicate with them. Hunting for an affordable I2C
master control device to control the gyro was difficult. After finding a clone of a more
expensive model from an Israeli manufacturer, the project team was faced with another
dilemma: there was no sample I2C code anywhere on the internet. The only example of
I2C code the team had access to was the application that came with the I2C master
device. Over 100 man-hours were spent on reverse engineering the code to find out
how it worked in order to develop new code to control the gyro. The glove as it exists is
now an integral portion of the project. In the future, the team members will know that
more research is required when considering the use of a component that they are not
familiar with.

4.4.4. Non-Technical knowledge gained
Some of the non-technical knowledge was acquired naturally due to human nature and
the team's working environment. These skills include: communication skills, budget
management skills, and the ability to cope with unforeseen events.



Senior Design May06-09                                                           26
Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


4.4.5. What would the project team do if asked to re-do the project
An important factor in the success or failure of the project was direction and detailed
criteria of what tasks were to be performed. This could be achieved with a better client
relationship to set more definitive boundaries for design and more generally what was
required as an end-product.

Also, a team should have more electrical engineering members to efficiently design the
peripherals of the Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation. The team members at the
beginning of the project did not have the required skill sets to efficiently work on the
project. Project manpower resources were wasted on developing the required skill sets
to complete the project, where the person with the right specialty could have alleviated
this problem.

4.5. Risk and Risk Management
The following section describes the future risks the team anticipates. In addition,
anticipated and unanticipated encountered risks are discussed along with how risk
management changed during the course of the project.

4.5.1. Future Risks
When the current project team took possession of artifacts left from the previous design
team, it took approximately 30 man-hours to research the artifacts and determine if they
are useful. To prevent the risk of this occurring again, turnover documents will be
prepared to brief any future teams on the final status of each artifact. The purpose of
this preparation is to hasten the development of future projects by another project team
who is utilizing the current team's artifacts.

4.5.2. Anticipated Encountered Risks
Voice recognition of accents and dialects was a concern of the team from day one.
With a diverse population enlisted in the military, it is important that the voice
recognition engine can interact with any user who can speak English. The team solved
the problem by requiring all users to be trained on the product before real-time usage.
This requires the computer to learn the voice type and inflection of the user, and for the
user to learn how to maneuver about the application and what functionality it contains.

Microphone implementation was also a concern, as the project team realized that a
microphone believed to work did not perform under the conditions required for the
project. To accommodate for this risk, the project team allocated extra time to ensure
the correct microphone was found.

4.5.3. Unanticipated Encountered Risks
As stated earlier in the report, this project has been a roller coaster ride from a risk
management perspective. The project team wrote in the Project Plan that the loss of a
team member and loss of funding were issues to worry about, but no contingency plans
were created as the possibility of these events occurring would be minimal. At the start
of the second semester, the project team faced the realization that there were three



Senior Design May06-09                                                          27
Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation


engineers instead of four, and the total project budget was $250 instead of the expected
$1000. The project's scope was redirected to be as cost effective as possible. Focus
was placed on the new peripherals that comprise the chair instead of designing a
custom-built computer designed into a chair. The spirit of the project has been
maintained through solving the core problem of this project: to use a computer without a
monitor, keyboard, and mouse, and to do so in an environment where space is crucial.

The loss of a team member forced the current members to spend more time on the
project to compensate for the lost productivity. 925 man-hours was the final estimate of
the team's time it would take to complete the project. As of the time of this writing, the
project team has a total of 810 hours invested in this project. The original team had six
personnel; the current team has three personnel and was still able to complete the
project at hand.

4.5.4. Changes to Risk Management over the Course of the Project
The only change in risk management has been the process of deciding on a specialist
in one area. Two people were conversant with every system. This exists in order to
prevent the loss of knowledge that occurred when the team lost a member in January.

4.6. Project Team Information
Project team member information is outlined below in tables. The information within
these tables includes addresses and numbers of people involved with the project.

4.6.1. Client Information
Figure 4-1 provides information pertaining to contacts provided by the client.
Table 4-1: Client Information

 Client         Contact         Office/Mailing           Office          E-Mail Address
 Name           Name            Address                  Number
 Lockheed       R.J. Monson     Eagan, MN                (651)456-2673   robert.j.monson@lmco.com
 Martin

4.6.2. Faculty Advisor Information
Figure 4-2 lists information pertaining to faculty member of Iowa State University that
will be assisting us in the design.
Table 4-2: Faculty Advisor Information

  Advisor            Office/Mailing Office               Fax Number E-Mail Address
  Name               Address        Number
  Dr. Arun Somani    2215 Coover         (515)294-0442   (515)294-3637    arun@iastate.edu
                     Ames, IA 50011
  Dr. Zhao Zhang     368 Durham          (515)294-7940   (515)294-1152    zzhang@iastate.edu
                     Ames, IA 50011




Senior Design May06-09                                                                 28
                                                                            Imped.   Audio            Throat
                                                             Filter         Match    Interface        Microphone
   Final Report – Chair-Mounted Computer Workstation
                                     Hybrid

                           Tx/Rx
   4.6.3. Balun
Filter
                  Team
          Student Switch Information
   Figure 4-3 lists information pertaining to the team members who designed and
                            Hybrid
   implemented the actual project.                                          Head-
                                                                            Imped.   Video
                                                             Filter                                    Mounted
   Table 4-3: Team Member Information                                       Match    Interface
                                                                                                       Display

     Member            Major(s)      Mailing Address        Phone Number        E-Mail Address
     Name
     Isi Oamen         Electrical    4335 Maricopa Dr #3    (712)540-4652       isi@iastate.edu
                       Engineering   Ames, IA 50014

     David             Computer      214 S. Hyland #3       (515)991-4150       robertdl@iastate.edu
     Roberts           Engineering   Ames, IA 50014                         Imped.   Audio
                                                             Filter         Match    Interface


     Shawn             Computer      110 McDonald Dr #13a   (712)574-0682       syockey@iastate.edu
                                     Hybrid
     Yockey            Engineering   Ames, IA 50014
                           Tx/Rx                                                                  CPU
Filter         Balun                                                                                 HDD    Keyboard
                           Switch

   4.7. Closing Summary
                                     Hybrid
   Current computer workstations involve significant computer hardware in an enclosure
                                                      some environmental Video
   usually placed in front of the operator, with Filter              Imped.   protection and
                                                                     Match   Interface
   maintenance required. A less intrusive and smaller workstation than this standard
   would enhance the ability of sailors or airmen to complete required tasks. By providing
   a chair-mounted computer workstation, the size and mobility will become assets rather
   than hindrances. The system will be designed specifically for tasks associated with
   sailors and airmen while maintaining functionality and durability the operator currently
   uses. This project will maintain the efficiency and functionality of current workstations
   while making significant advancements in reducing size and allowing the operator more
   flexibility.




   Senior Design May06-09                                                                        29
y06-09                                                                        29

								
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