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					    Certificate II in
Transport & Distribution
  Maritime Operations




    Teacher’s Guide
Maritime Toolbox                                      Teacher’s Guide




                                   Table of Contents
GENERAL OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................................................3
    PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................................................3
    TARGET AUDIENCE ....................................................................................................................................................3
    UNITS OF COMPETENCY .............................................................................................................................................3
    UNDERPINNING IDEAS ...............................................................................................................................................4
KEY FEATURES ........................................................................................................................................................4
    LEARNING SETTING ...................................................................................................................................................4
    ONLINE COMMUNICATION .........................................................................................................................................6
    ACCESSIBILITY ..........................................................................................................................................................6
USING THE TOOLBOX ............................................................................................................................................8
    WORKPLACE ACTIVITIES ...........................................................................................................................................8
    ASSESSMENT .............................................................................................................................................................8
    RESOURCES ...............................................................................................................................................................8
    TEACHER’S ROLE .......................................................................................................................................................9
    CUSTOMISATION ........................................................................................................................................................9
DETAILED INFORMATION ON COMPETENCIES.......................................................................................... 10
    TDMME101A – UNDERSTAND ORDERS AND BE UNDERSTOOD IN RELATION TO SHIPBOARD DUTIES ...................... 10
    TDMME501A – TRANSMIT AND RECEIVE INFORMATION BY MARINE RADIO OR TELEPHONE .................................. 14
    TDMMF701A – OBSERVE SAFE WORKING PRACTICES............................................................................................ 18
    TDMMF801A – COMPLY WITH EMERGENCY PROCEDURES .................................................................................... 22
    TDMMF901A – FIGHT AND EXTINGUISH FIRES ...................................................................................................... 26
    TDMMF1001A – PROVIDE FIRST AID .................................................................................................................... 32
    TDMMF1101A – SURVIVE AT SEA IN THE EVENT OF VESSEL ABANDONMENT ........................................................ 39
    TDMMF201A – RESPOND TO NAVIGATIONAL EMERGENCIES ................................................................................. 44
    TDMMF3201A – APPLY REGULATIONS WHEN OPERATING A SMALL VESSEL ......................................................... 50
    TDMMF1201A – MINIMISE THE RISK AND MAINTAIN A STATE OF READINESS TO RESPOND TO EMERGENCY
    SITUATIONS INVOLVING FIRE ................................................................................................................................... 54
    TDMML201A – CONTRIBUTE TO EFFECTIVE HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS ON BOARD A VESSEL ................................... 57
    TDMMR4301A – ASSIST IN MOORING AND ANCHOR HANDLING ACTIVITIES .......................................................... 61
    TDMMR3001A – OPERATE AND CARRY OUT BASIC MAINTENANCE ON MARINE PROPULSION SYSTEMS ................. 64
    TDMMR3101A – OPERATE AND CARRY OUT BASIC SERVICING ON AUXILIARY SYSTEMS ...................................... 68
    TDMMR3201A – OPERATE AND CARRY OUT BASIC ROUTINE SERVICING OF MARINE EXTRA LOW AND LOW
    VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS .............................................................................................................................. 72
    TDMMB601A – MONITOR CONDITION AND SEAWORTHINESS OF A SMALL VESSEL ................................................ 75
    TDMMC701A APPLY SEAMANSHIP SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES WHEN OPERATING A SMALL VESSEL ........................ 79
    TDMMC901A – MANOEUVRE A VESSEL OF LESS THAN 12 METRES IN LENGTH WITHIN INSHORE LIMITS................ 84
    TDMMH701A – APPLY WEATHER INFORMATION WHEN NAVIGATING A SMALL VESSEL ........................................ 89
    TDMMH801A – PLAN AND NAVIGATE AN INSHORE PASSAGE ................................................................................ 93




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Maritime Toolbox                  Teacher’s Guide




General Overview
Purpose
The demand for training in Maritime operations throughout Australia extends beyond the city and town
limits where most Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) are based and deliver their training.

All states have a significant Maritime industry in metropolitan and regional areas and find that the costs
and block release models associated with traditional training methods are often prohibitive for both
employer and learner.

It is evident from the experiences and feedback from employers and learners that the need to provide a
more flexible approach to training is a necessity to meet the demands of this industry. The increased use
of electronic technologies in the Maritime industry has created an environment that will enthusiastically
adopt computer based training.

This toolbox approaches learning in an innovative and challenging way and will enable providers to
customise learning resources so they are relevant to their immediate audience.

Target audience
The target audience for computer-based delivery of the selected Units of Competency from this Maritime
Toolbox consists of learners primarily studying at the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) levels 1
and 2. The toolbox covers 20 units of competency. This includes the 8 pre-sea entry-level units of
competency, which are also common compulsory units for each of the 6 certificate qualifications from
certificate 1 to the advanced diploma and 11 units of competency selected from the Maritime Deck
Operations and cover the full range of work activities for the Certificate II in Transport & Distribution
(Maritime Operations) within the Maritime training package.

The ability to access computer based training will be particularly valuable to learners, such as trainees in
regional areas, who currently are required to travel to the cities to undertake “block release” training. It will
also be of benefit to trainees whose employers would prefer to have them trained on the job. In these
instances, one of the benefits to the employer will be that the learner/trainee will be guided in their
learning through the provision of tasks that fit into the usual routines of the enterprise.

The ability to provide customised training, to be undertaken “on the job”, will open up opportunities for
training of staff for many Maritime enterprises that have previously found training to be too far away, too
expensive, and/or too generic for their needs.

Training at AQF levels 1 and 2 provides the foundation skills for the Maritime Industry, and learners at this
level are required to gain practical experience under supervision. In line with the requirements of the
Training Package assessment for each unit of competency must be undertaken within relevant marine
authority approved and audited arrangements by a registered training organisation. The tasks for each
unit may be used for assessment of knowledge however appropriate practical assessment must also
occur at the registered training organisation or on an appropriate working or training vessel.

Units of competency
 Training Package           Maritime
 Qualification              TDM 201 01 Certificate II in Transport & Distribution (Maritime
                            Operations)
 Competencies
 National Code                                       UNITS OF COMPETENCY
 TDMME101A                  Understand orders and be understood in relation to shipboard duties
 TDMME501A                  Transmit and receive information by marine radio or telephone


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 TDMMF701A                  Observe safe working practices
 TDMMF801A                  Comply with emergency procedures
 TDMMF901A                  Fight & extinguish fires
 TDMMF1001A                 Provide first aid
 TDMMF1101A                 Survival at sea in the event of vessel abandonment
 TDMMF201A                  Respond to navigational emergencies
 TDMMF3201A                 Apply regulations when operating a small vessel
 TDMMF1201A                 Minimise the risk of fire and maintain a state of readiness to respond to
                            emergency situations involving fire
 TDMML201A                  Contribute to effective human relationships on board a vessel
 TDMMR4301A                 Assist in mooring and anchor handling activities
 TDMMR3001A                 Operate and carry out basic maintenance on marine propulsion systems
 TDMMR3101A                 Operate and carry out basic maintenance on auxiliary systems
 TDMMR3201A                 Operate and carry out basic routine maintenance on extra low voltage
                            electrical systems, starter motors and alternators
 TDMMB601A                  Monitor condition and seaworthiness of a small vessel
 TDMMC701A                  Apply seamanship skills and techniques when operating a small vessel
 TDMMC901A                  Manoeuvre a vessel less than 12 meters in length within shore limits
 TDMMH701A                  Apply weather information when navigating an inshore passage
 TDMMH801A                  Plan and navigate an inshore passage

Underpinning ideas
The Maritime Toolbox takes an activity and problem-based approach to learning. Each unit of
competency in the Toolbox presents learners with a task to complete for that unit of competency.

Learning tools and activities are provided for the learners to develop their skills and underpinning
knowledge in performing specific tasks. The activities also provide an opportunity for the learner to
assess and check their knowledge and understanding, conduct research and interact with other learners
and their facilitator/teacher.

Each unit has a number of tasks for the learners to complete designed to form a meaningful learning
experience. All activities, tools and tasks can be customised – they can be adapted by the teacher to
include content and/or different delivery contexts – and are supported by a range of learning support
resources. More information on activities and resources can be found in the Learning setting section
below.

Many of the activities have a workplace component where learners are asked to complete a task or
demonstrate a skill to their supervisor.

In line with the requirements of the Training Package, assessment for each unit of competency must be
undertaken within relevant marine authority approved and audited arrangements by a registered training
organisation. The tasks for each unit may be used for assessment of knowledge however appropriate
practical assessment must also occur at the registered training organisation or on an appropriate working
or training vessel. The organisation of workplace assessment is the responsibility of the Registered
Training Organisation.

Key features
Learning setting

The interface
To provide a relevant and authentic learning context, the activities and resources in this Toolbox are
located within a fictitious Marina that includes a jobs noticeboard, a tasks area, a tools area, an activity


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Maritime Toolbox                 Teacher’s Guide


area, a support area and Captain Pete, who will provide information throughout the toolbox. This provides
learners with a meaningful and familiar environment in which tasks and activities occur.

Pete’s Marina
The toolbox is set in Pete‟s Marina. Pete‟s Marina is located on the Muddy River. There are a number of
smaller rivers running into the Muddy River, which opens into a smooth water area, protected by a range
of small islands. Although called the Muddy River it is actually a beautiful location that attracts numerous
visitors and tourists. The fishing is also plentiful for both tourists and commercial fisherman alike.

Pete‟s Marina is home to a range of operations. There you will find fishing vessels, tourist charter boats,
self-sail yachts, houseboats and dinghy hire. Vessels are moored on the jetty as well as on pole
moorings. Maintenance on all the vessels and motors occurs behind Pete‟s Marina in the workshop.

On entering the toolbox the learner takes on the role of trainee at Pete‟s Marina. Due to the diversity of
operations at Pete‟s Marina the learner will get to work in a range of areas and on different vessels. The
jobs that Captain Pete will assign the learner as trainee will help them gain the skills and knowledge to
meet the units of competency provided in the toolbox.

Captain Pete will explain what they need to do to complete the jobs and tasks given. As he has been in
the Marine industry for a long, long time he will also be able to offer advice from time to time.

The Top Navigation
The top navigation is provided within each of the different areas within the Toolbox and uses icons to link
to the job, tasks, tools, activities, glossary and support, so that learners or teachers may easily access
any area no matter where they are within the Toolbox.

There is also a Breadcrumb trail provided within the top navigation bar. This can help the learner or
teacher identify where they are and how they got there by tracking the links which they have taken.
Clicking on the home icon at the beginning of the breadcrumb trail will return you to the home page.




      Job
For each unit of competency the learners need to complete a job and one or more tasks within that job.
Each job and task will assist the learner to develop the skills and knowledge for that unit.

The job page presents the learner with a scenario to complete.




      Tasks
Each job requires the learner to complete one or more tasks. Each task includes:
    Details of the task
    What needs to be done to complete the task
    Tools and activities to help complete the task




         Tools
Tools provide extra information to complete a task. Access to the tools is either where they are mentioned
in the task or using the tools icon to select the information as needed. The tools are there to provide
additional information to the learner to understand and complete various aspects of your tasks.




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       Activities
Activities are provided at relevant points throughout the task for the learner to assess their own
underpinning skills and knowledge and/or to check understanding. There are activities where the
computer will tell the learner if their response is correct e.g. multiple choice, drag and drop, match-ups,
short answer. Other activities require the learner to post and respond to comments on the discussion
board or interact with other learners.




       Glossary
Meanings of words that appear in bold type can be found in the glossary. Clicking on these words will
reveal the meaning in a new window. The glossary can also be accessed through the glossary icon that
appears on the navigation bar.

Web links
At various places in the toolbox links are provided to specific websites where the learner can obtain
further information. If the links are provided for the learner the words will be underlined. To access, roll
the mouse over the words, a hand will appear clicking the mouse will take the learner to the website.




        Support
This is the area where the learner can communicate with the online facilitator and other learners. The
facilitator will be required to explain more fully how to use these functions.
The support area is designed for the Registered Training Organisation to include features specific to their
organisation. This could include but is not limited to:
      Link to the discussion board
      Facilitators email addresses, phone contacts etc
      Access to additional resources
      Links or information about additional learning support
      Information about job outcomes
      Licensing requirements within your state and job outcomes.

Online communication
Communication is an integral part of the learning experience promoted by the Maritime Toolbox.

Communication tools
Where appropriate in activities, learners are encouraged to post responses to activities or questions to
the discussion board, or to submit their work to the teacher for evaluation and feedback. Some activities
take a discursive slant, asking learners to contribute to a discussion topic, and to discuss the topic with
their peers and teacher.

Accessibility
The Toolbox has been designed with accessibility in mind, and has been designed to comply with the
W3C priority 1 level guidelines.

Access and equity
In an attempt to address access and equity guidelines, the Maritime Toolbox incorporates the following
features:




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      Easy clickable icons
       The use of complicated navigation systems has been kept to a minimum throughout the Toolbox.
       The navigation features large icons with a correspondingly large „click zone‟.
      Text alternatives
       Where audio or other media has been used in the toolbox, a text alternative has also been
       provided.
      Screen reader friendly
       The toolbox navigation system has been designed to be screen reader friendly. Where required
       the toolbox makes use of „hidden links‟, invisible to the user, but detectable by screen readers. All
       browser pages have been developed to the XHTML standard as approved by W3C World Wide
       Web Consortium.
      Easy to navigate interface
       The Maritime toolbox has been designed with an interface that is both inviting and easy to
       navigate. The toolbox navigation is directed from the Marina screen interface. From here learners
       can follow links to the resource areas of the toolbox. Navigation to anywhere in the toolbox can
       be performed on any page, allowing learners to easily move between all areas.




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Using the toolbox
The Maritime Toolbox has been designed so that the teacher or training organisation can customise it for
different contexts of delivery. These contexts may be influenced by factors such as industry sector (e.g.
commercial fishing versus tourism), training setting (e.g. power driven versus sail boat) and individual
learning styles (recognition of current competencies and different learning contexts).

Customisation can occur on the following levels:
    Job/Task: The teacher can change or adapt the focus and parameters of a job or task.
       Worksheets have been saved as rich text format (RTF) and can easily be edited using a word
       processing package.
    Tools/Activities: Activities and learning tools can also be customised. With the use of industry
       standard applications they can be readily replaced added to or modified to suit.
    Images: Photos and diagrams can be replaced with images more suitable to the industry sector,
       region or local environment.

To customise resources, you will need to edit the HTML files using a HTML editor such as Dreamweaver,
Front Page, Homesite, or even a text-based editor such as Notepad. Some interactions are designed
using JavaScript, a language used to create interactive web pages. Anyone with a working knowledge of
JavaScript can edit these interactions.

Some activities have been built in Shockwave and Flash. These files have been included in a folder
called “source_files”, so that the interactions can be customised by anyone with a working knowledge of
flash or shockwave, or they can be deleted or completely replaced if they do not suit the target audience.

Workplace activities
A major strength of this Toolbox is that it integrates learning with workplace activities. These activities can
be completed by the learner in the workplace or simulated environment under the guidance of their
Facilitator/Master. In most cases a record of these activities will be kept on a downloadable work sheet.
This work sheet will then be:
     Signed off by the workplace supervisor
     Sent to the online facilitator
     And the original kept in the student‟s logbook file

Assessment
In line with the requirements of the Training Package assessment for each unit of competency must be
undertaken within relevant marine authority approved and audited arrangements by a registered training
organisation. The tasks for each unit may be used for assessment of knowledge however appropriate
practical assessment must also occur at the registered training organisation or on an appropriate working
or training vessel. Workplace-based assessment is outside the scope of resources offered in this
Toolbox. The organisation of workplace assessment is the responsibility of the Registered Training
Organisation.

Some tasks require the learner to complete a work sheet and have it signed off by their workplace
supervisor. The RTO may decide whether or not to accept this logbook as evidence of the learner‟s
competency.

Resources
Learners will need access to a computer with an Internet browser and preferably with Internet access, be
capable of supporting Shockwave/Flash and the free plug-ins installed. Learners will also need access to
a printer to print Workplace activity worksheets.




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Teacher’s role
The teacher‟s role is one of facilitator, support and guide. By familiarising yourself with the activities and
resources in the toolbox you can guide the learners toward particular areas or suggest a pattern of study
for those learners who need more direction than others.

Customisation
All of the activities can be modified to reflect specific industry or organisational standards. The scenarios
and images can be customised to reflect events or situations relevant to the workplace.

To customise resources, you will need to edit the HTML files using an HTML editor such as Macromedia
Dreamweaver, Microsoft® Front Page, or even a text-based editor such as Microsoft® WordPad. Some
interactions are designed using JavaScript, a language used to create interactive web pages. Anyone
with a working knowledge of JavaScript can edit these interactions.

Some interactions have been built using Macromedia Shockwave and Flash. These files are available for
customisation in the “source_files” folder in the root directory of the CD-ROM.




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Detailed information on competencies

TDMME101A – Understand orders and be understood in relation to
shipboard duties
This unit involves the skills and knowledge to communicate effectively with others in the course of
shipboard duties on board a commercial vessel, including understanding and interpreting orders.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section AII/1 of the STCW 95 Code and
AMSA Marine Orders Part 3, Issue 5, Appendix 4. It forms part of mandatory minimum requirements for
familiarisation and basic safety competence required for all seafarers under the STCW Code.

 Element                         Performance Criteria

 1. Communicate with                    Orders are attended to, interpreted and implemented in
    officers, crew and                   accordance with established nautical practice
    others in performing                Effective listening skills are demonstrated
    duties
                                        Questions are used to gain additional information
                                        Verbal and written communication with others in the
                                         performance of duties is clear and precise and uses the
                                         standard nautical vocabulary and follows established
                                         communications practice
                                        Misunderstandings in communications are avoided using
                                         appropriate confirmation techniques and established
                                         communication practice
                                        Appropriate techniques are used when communicating with
                                         others in multilingual crew to ensure that communications are
                                         effective and messages are clearly understood
                                        Various forms of non-verbal communication are appropriately
                                         used when working and communicating with others in the
                                         course of shipboard duties
                                        Responses are sought and provided to others in the group
                                        Constructive contributions are made in terms of the process
                                         involved
                                        Goals or outcomes are communicated and/or recorded


Job: Understand orders and be understood in relation to shipboard duties

Scenario:
Understanding and being understood doesn‟t just apply around Pete‟s Marina. The skills you learn and
practice will help you in all your interactions with other people.

Your new job entails working aboard a new luxury dive boat that takes passengers in comfort to the Outer
Reef for a day trip that includes snorkeling or two dives and a nice lunch. Dolphins, and in season, whales
are often seen during the trip.

You will need to make notes of orders given and any jobs on the trip and record your experiences.

Task List
    1. Understanding orders



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    2. Communicating with multilingual crew
    3. Non-verbal communications
    4. Communicating and participating

Task 1 – Understanding orders
Your new position at Pete‟s Marina is very exciting. The crew you will be working with consists of a
Master, Engineer, two deckhands, dive staff and cruise attendants from a variety of language
backgrounds.
So, what is established nautical practice?
English is the accepted and legal language of the sea.

Ask your master/skipper to assist you in compiling a list of orders given on a day trip to the reef.
Post to the discussion board and compare 3 others.

The standard nautical vocabulary is contained in the Standard Marine Communications IMO.

What are the dangers onboard a vessel from not using effective listening skills or misunderstanding
orders?
List 4 examples of each and post them to the discussion board. Compare two other postings.

Tools
    Standard marine communication phrases

Activities
     Active listening skills
     Standard nautical vocabulary

Task 2 - Communicating with multilingual crew
Although your crew all speak English, they are from a wide and varied background, including Scotland,
England, France, Canada, Germany, Israel, Japan and Australia. Lots of strong accents there!

Using the communication tool provided:
     Consider why appropriate techniques are needed to communicate with a multilingual crew. Give 3
        examples of techniques you could use with your crew.
     Give three examples of incidents where better communications would have resulted in better
        outcomes.
     Review the examples of incidents given in the tool. Give an example where poor communication
        could cause problems onboard your vessel.
Forward to your facilitator for comment.

Tools
    The importance of effective communication

Task 3 – Non-verbal communication
Various forms of non-verbal communication are used when working and communicating with others in
relation to shipboard duties.

Make a list of all the non-verbal communication used onboard your vessel, including:
    hand signals
    distress signals
    pictograms etc
Post to the discussion board and compare 3 others.

Tools
    Other signals used on the water



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Activities
     Non-verbal communication

Task 4 – Communicating and participating
Ahoy, how is the communication going? The ship‟s master will want to ensure that the crew know the plan
for the day and what their tasks are, so now it is time to put all you have learnt into practice.

Crew information:
The crew consists of a Master, Engineer, two deckhands, dive staff and cruise attendants. As the ship
caters for tourists, the crew must be aware of language and cultural differences.

The Master is a local with twenty years experience. In charge of an expensive asset and responsible for
many people‟s lives, the Master knows that the crew must be active and aware of many issues including
safety and passenger comfort.

The Engineer is from Glasgow, Scotland, which presents its own language challenges. One deckhand is
a local with a coxswains licence while the other is from Canada and is getting sea time for coxswains.

The cruise attendants are from England and France and are both sure of the superior status of their
respective languages. They have hospitality and marine safety qualifications.

The dive staff consists of two dive instructors, a dive master and a DIT or Divemaster in Training. The
dive instructors are from Germany and Israel while the dive master is from Woy Woy, NSW and the DIT is
from Japan.

The company that operates the ship is safety conscious and customer orientated. The management know
that their crew is an important asset of the business.

Training is fundamental to the success of the operation. Language education is integrated within the
context of the overall learning rather than being regarded as a separate area.

This task requires group participation. If you are not part of a crew ask you facilitator how to complete the
task.

You and your crew are required to participate in the planning for the day‟s activity. Compile a report
addressing all the issues below and comment on the outcomes of your group‟s discussions and
communication between crewmembers.

For a successful crew meeting you will need to discuss and report on the following:
     Any special requirements should be noted – refer to the crew information to address all the needs
     What training/language education is required or has been completed prior to the voyage?
     What responses are sought and provided to others in the crew in relation to times, tides,
        destination, activities, etc. List all areas needing to be addressed.
     List what constructive contributions are made in terms of the process involved. Get it right the first
        time, the ship‟s master would rather have you ask a question then get it wrong later. What
        questions were asked or should be asked by the crew?
     What are the goals and outcomes? How are they communicated and/or recorded.
Once you have completed your report forward to your facilitator for comment.

Activities
     Communication record sheet




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Teachers role
       Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with
        the activities.
       Moderate the postings to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students
        to comment of each others postings.
       Provide feedback on communication activity and crew meeting reports.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Set up a role play with students taking on the role of different crew members and conduct a crew meeting.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Posted orders list to the discussion board
     Posted examples of dangers on board a vessel from not using effective listening skills or
         misunderstanding orders
     Active listening skills and Standard nautical vocabulary activities
     Forwarded importance of effective communication answers to your facilitator
     Non-verbal communication activity
     Crew meeting report
     Practical activity – Communication Record Sheet




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TDMME501A – Transmit and receive information by marine radio or
telephone
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to transmit and receive information by marine radio or
telephone on board a commercial vessel, including using marine VHF and HF radiotelephone in
accordance with regulations, carrying out user-maintenance and fault-finding procedures on radio
equipment and power supplies, and operating an emergency position indicating beacon (EPIRB) and a
search and rescue transponder (SART).

The unit is consistent with the Radio Regulations adopted by the World Administrative Radio Conference
for the Mobile Service, 1987, the AMSA Marine Orders Part 6, and the Australian USL Code, Section 2,
Schedule 5.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Operate VHF and HF                  Types of radio equipment are selected and operated within
    Radio equipment to                   limits of specifications
    transmit and receive                Radio equipment is operated to transmit and receive various
    messages                             types of signal in accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions,
                                         established radio operation procedures and regulatory
                                         requirements
                                        Regulations and procedures applicable to vessel stations
                                         equipped with radiotelephony and digital selective calling
                                         (DSC) facilities are applied during radio communications
                                        OHS procedures and hazard control strategies are applied
                                         when operating radio equipment in accordance with vessel‟s
                                         ISM Code safety management system

 2. Maintain and fault-find             Routine maintenance checks are carried out on radiotelephony
    radio equipment                      equipment in accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions and
                                         specifications and company procedures
                                        Out-of-specification performances and faults in radio
                                         equipment are correctly identified and investigated using
                                         prescribed fault-finding techniques in accordance with
                                         established user maintenance procedures and manufacturer‟s
                                         instructions
                                        Identified faults and defective radio equipment and component
                                         parts are rectified or replaced in accordance with
                                         manufacturer‟s instructions and established maintenance
                                         procedures

 3. Access search and                   Application is made to the appropriate organisation for the
    rescue radio facilities              provision of the required search and rescue services
                                        Information required by AUSREP (Australian Ship Reporting)
                                         system is supplied in the required format

 4. Deploy and operate an               Routine checks are carried out on Emergency Position
    EPIRB and a SART                     Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) and Search and Rescue
                                         Transmitters (SARTs) to confirm their operational capability in
                                         accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions and specifications
                                        Appropriate action is taken to rectify or replace EPIRBs or



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                                           SARTs that are found to be malfunctioning or are inoperable in
                                           accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions and company
                                           procedures
                                          Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) and
                                           Search and Rescue Transmitters (SARTs) are deployed as
                                           required in accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions and
                                           established search and rescue procedures


Job: Transmit and receive information by marine radio or telephone

Scenario:
Working around Pete‟s Marina is great. There is always something going on, so you get many different
jobs.

Operating a marine radio is one skill you can really learn on the job. You will use the radio for all kinds of
things like calling the fuel dock to see if the boat can be refuelled and at what time.

Of course, you always need to get a weather report before heading out to sea. When you are at sea, you
listen for weather updates and navigational information. Capt Pete might want to call to see how you are
going, you might hear another boat say where the fish are biting or someone might need help.

You will need to do the following:
    Transmit and receive information by marine radio or telephone on board a commercial vessel,
         including using VHF & HF radiotelephone
    Carry out user maintenance and faultfinding procedures on radio equipment and power supplies
    Access search and rescue and rescue radio facilities
    Deploy and operate an EPIRB and a SART
    Maintain records of radio communications

Task List
    1.   Types of equipment and how to use them
    2.   Search and rescue
    3.   Deploy and operate an EPIRB and SART
    4.   Maintain records of radio communications

Task 1 - Types of equipment and how to use them
Ahoy there, ready for a new task? Capt Pete has a rule that the only people worth employing are those
who see something that needs doing and they then do it, so it is easy to get experience around the
marina.

Radio operation is a good example as communication is so important to the smooth operation of Pete‟s
Marina and its fleet of boats.

Locate the communication equipment onboard your vessel and post to the discussion board. Compare 2
others.

Using the Marine Radio handbook, complete the following:
     Prepare samples of radio calls
     Practice using the radio calls
     Make notes of your practical use of various radio and communications equipment including the
        telephone
     Use a small tape recorder to hear what you sound like „on air‟
Then complete the “Marine Radio Record Sheet”.




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To complete this task you will need to complete the following:
     Demonstrate and practise safe handling of lead acid batteries
     Make a list of battery safety procedures
     Demonstrate and practise basic faultfinding
     List what pre sea checks are required
     When do you call an electrician?
Forward to your facilitator for comment.

Tools
       Types of radio equipment
       Radiotelephone transceiver controls
       Sounding good on the radio
       Using a marine radio
       OH&S procedures and hazard control strategies

Activities
     Marine radio transmissions

Task 2 - Search and rescue
Ahoy. Before you go out to sea, you will need to get a weather report. Make sure you are confident using
basic marine operation and know how to access search and rescue radio facilities.

Let‟s get a forecast for the weather before we set sail. Go to the BOM (Bureau of Meteorology) website at
http://www.bom.gov.au/info/marine/marpamp.shtml to check out the weather in you local area.

Before you go to sea, you need to get a weather report. Click on the link to go to the Bureau of
Meteorology and locate the weather report for your area:
http://www.bom.gov.au/marine/seaphone_ug.pdf

Let‟s look at basic radio operation in a bareboat fleet. Go to:
http://www.holidaysallover.com.au/rio/rio/vhf/vhf.html to research using your VHF marine Radio and Using
your VHF marine Radio2.

To complete this task you need to give details of the following:
     What are the SAR frequencies for VHF and MF/HF including DSC
     What are the content requirements of distress messages
     What are the legal requirements
     Demonstrate written log book requirements
Forward to your facilitator for comment

Tools
    Weather

Task 3 – Deploy and operate an EPIRB and SART
Report on the following then forward to your facilitator:
    Describe how an EPIRB works
    How do you deploy and operate an EPIRB
    Describe how a SART works
    How do you deploy and operate a SART
    How do you safely transport and stow this equipment
    Describe radio distress signals

Task 4 - Maintain records of radio communications
Ahoy. Records of all radio communication are vital. The radio log needs to be updated, stored, filed and
positioned in an accessible location on the vessel.


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Prepare:
    A list of required documents for the vessel
    A logbook sheet
Refer to the Marine Radio Handbook for clues. Once completed forward to you facilitator for comment.

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Ensure learners have access to the Marine Radio Operators Handbook.

Moderate discussion board postings and encourage learners to comment on the postings from other
learners.

Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Provide opportunity for learners to practice operating a marine radio. This could be in a real situation or
simulated via role-play or in an online chat session with or without audio.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Located the communication equipment and posted to the discussion board
     The radio calls task and Marine Radio record sheet
     Researched the regulations and procedures
     Battery and fault finding task
     Marine radio transmissions activity
     Researched the various websites for information on weather and basic Radio Operation
     Answered the Search and rescue questions
     Listed the emergency distress equipment onboard your vessel
     Reported on EPIRB and SART equipment and procedures
     Prepared a list of required documents and logbook sheet
     Reported on EPIRB and SART equipment and procedures




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TDMMF701A – Observe safe working practices
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to implement regulatory requirements for
occupational health and safety on board a commercial vessel, including following and applying
established maritime safe working practices and procedures and hazard control strategies.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section A VI/1-4 of the STCW95 Code and
AMSA Marine Orders Part 3, Issue 5, Appendix 4. It forms part of mandatory minimum requirements for
familiarisation and basic safety competence required for all seafarers. It covers the National
Occupational Health and Safety Commission Generic Competency A and is equivalent to the Seafood
Industry competency standard SFICORE104A Meet Workplace Health and Safety Requirements.

 Element                        Performance Criteria


 1. Identify and follow                Safety regulations and established vessel‟s safety and hazard
    workplace procedures                control practices and procedures are obtained, interpreted and
    for hazard identification           applied to day-to-day work activities
    and risk control                   Workplace procedures for Occupational Health and Safety and
                                        related work instructions for controlling risks onboard a vessel
                                        are accurately followed
                                       Workplace procedures for dealing with shipboard accidents,
                                        fire and emergencies are known and followed
                                       Hazards in the workplace are identified and appropriate action
                                        is taken to report them and to minimise or eliminate risk to
                                        personnel, vessel and the environment
                                       Where relevant, procedures and precautions necessary for
                                        entry into a pump room, fuel tanks or other confined spaces on
                                        a vessel are correctly followed
                                       Personal protection clothing and equipment is correctly used in
                                        accordance with established shipboard safety practices and
                                        procedures
                                       Appropriate assistance is provided in the event of a shipboard
                                        emergency to secure the vessel and its machinery and
                                        equipment and to maintain the safety of the vessel and
                                        persons involved
                                       Established emergency and contingency plans are followed in
                                        the event of a shipboard emergency

 2. Contribute to                      Occupational health and safety issues and identified safety
    arrangements for the                hazards are raised with designated personnel in accordance
    management of                       with workplace procedures and relevant occupational health
    occupational health and             and safety legislation
    safety                             Contributions to occupational health and safety management
                                        in the workplace are made within workplace procedures and
                                        provisions of relevant legislation
                                       Occupational health and safety issues are raised with
                                        designated personnel in accordance with workplace
                                        procedures and relevant occupational health and safety
                                        legislation
                                       Contribute to participative arrangements for occupational


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                                           health and safety management in the workplace within vessel‟s
                                           procedures and scope of responsibilities and competencies

 3. Complete Occupational                 Occupational health and safety records for self are completed
    Health and Safety                      in accordance with workplace requirements
    records                               Legal requirements for the maintenance of records of
                                           occupational injury and diseases are followed


Job: Observe Safe Working Practices

Scenario:
In this job you will be working with Tom, who is the Workplace Health & Safety Officer at Pete‟s Marina, to
ensure that the new vessel in the fleet is safe for crew and passengers.

Tom will guide you through a number of tasks so that you become familiar with safe work practices
including:
      the deckhands responsibilities
      the type and location of all safety signage
      the safety clothing on board
      safety practices and procedures
      OH&S legislation
      how to report marine incidents

Task List
    1. The working environment
    2. Safe working practices
    3. OH&S, audits & report marine incidents

Task 1 – The working environment
Ahoy me Matey's, In this task you are going to look at some of the basic responsibilities relating to safety
on board a vessel.

Practical Activity - you are required to identify the type and location of all safety signage on board a
commercial vessel. Use the “Safety Sign Identification Record Sheet” to complete this activity.

Identify the dangers or hazards on board your vessel. What are the deckhand‟s responsibilities to control
risks for each of these? Post to the discussion board and compare 3 others findings.

Tools
    Responsibilities and dangers

Activities
     A Deckhands‟ responsibility
     Safety sign identification record sheet

Task 2 – Safe working practices
Ahoy, what procedures are required to make sure your vessel is a safe place to work? How can you
assist to maintain a safe environment? This task will help answer those questions.

Using the safety procedures you have learnt, identify how you would provide appropriate assistance in
the event of a shipboard emergency to:
     Secure the vessel
     Secure its machinery and equipment
     Maintain the safety of the vessel



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    Ensure safety of persons onboard
Complete the Emergency Record Sheet and forward to your facilitator for assessment.

Tools
    Operations and procedures

Activities
     Protective clothing and equipment
     Safety quiz
     Emergency record sheet

Task 3 - OH&S, audits & report marine incidents
Ahoy, Tom needs a hand to complete a safety audit of the vessel. Your task is also to assist in identifying
and reporting on areas of non-compliance.

It is now time to help Tom with the Heath and Safety Audit. Don‟t forget to identify at least one issue from
the audit and complete a hazard report. Click on Health and Safety Audit for more details.

Obtain the “Marine Incident Form” from your local marine authority, ships captain, course facilitator or
from the internet.
An example of the form used by Pete‟s marina is available here: Marine Incident Form F3071.

Fill in the form using the following scenario:
During a violent tropical storm one of the vessels Moored at Pete‟s Marina the ME II, broke free of its
mooring.
The ME II Registration No. “WWW1010” is an 18-meter, steel boat with a 150Hp diesel inboard engine
used for prawning in the local estuaries.

The ME II is owned by Captain Pete Morgan of Pete‟s Marina, Windy Point.
Ph. No. 555 555 757
D.O.B 15/01/1945
Master Class 5
License No.2222 5559999

Tools
       The Act‟s objective
       International Safety Management (ISM) Code 2002
       Marine incidents
       Hazard Report Form

Activities
     Health and safety audit

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Provide learners with examples of OH&S records. Provide examples of completed audits. Facilitate an
online discussion/chat on issues highlighted in the Health and Safety audits and discuss
recommendations to reduce/minimize risk factors.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Provide learners with the opportunity to conduct a health and safety audit on different vessels.



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To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     The safety sign identification record sheet and practical activities
     Posted dangers, hazards and responsibilities of deckhand to discussion board
     A Deckhands‟ responsibility and safety sign identification record sheet activities
     The safety quiz and protective clothing activity
     The emergency record sheet and sent details of safety procedures assistance to facilitator
     The health and safety hazard form
     Health & safety audit
     The marine incident report




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TDMMF801A – Comply with emergency procedures
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to take appropriate initial action on becoming aware
of an emergency on board a commercial vessel and to follow established emergency response
procedures.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section A VI/1-4 of the STCW95 Code and
AMSA Marine Orders Part 3, Issue 5, Appendix 4. It forms part of mandatory minimum requirements for
familiarisation and basic safety competence required for all seafarers.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Take action on                      Emergency situations are correctly recognised and identified
    becoming aware of an                Response to an emergency situation follows established
    emergency                            vessel‟s emergency response procedures
                                        Correct action is taken on discovery of an actual or potential
                                         emergency in accordance with established vessel procedures
                                        Information given on raising alarm is prompt, accurate,
                                         complete and clear

 2. Follow established                  Vessel‟s contingency plans for emergency response are known
    emergency procedures                 and are implemented in real and simulated emergency
                                         situations
                                        Escape routes and internal and external communications and
                                         alarm systems are correctly used in real and simulated
                                         emergency situations in accordance with regulatory
                                         requirements and established procedures
                                        Emergency communications and alarm signals and systems
                                         are understood and required action implemented in
                                         accordance with emergency procedures and regulatory
                                         requirements
                                        Planned damage control procedures for dealing with damage
                                         to the vessel and its hull are implemented in accordance with
                                         company procedures and regulatory requirements

 3. Follow procedures for               Participation in life saving drills confirms readiness to correctly
    the use of various life-             carry out life-saving procedures and use life-saving appliances
    saving appliances                   Procedures for the use of various shipboard life-saving
                                         appliances are followed in accordance with regulatory
                                         requirements, manufacturer‟s instructions and company
                                         procedures
Job: Comply with emergency procedures.

Scenario:
You are employed as a deckhand at Pete‟s Marina. Before working on any of the vessels in the fleet all
crew at the marina are required to complete a safety induction. Everyone also participates in emergency
drills on a regular basis. In emergency situations, you and the other members of the crew need to make
some quick decisions and take appropriate actions, while complying with emergency procedures.

While working at the marina this week you are involved in 3 emergency situations.



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These are:
    Beaching and refloating the vessel
    A fire
    An emergency at sea

Task List
    1. Beaching and refloating the vessel
    2. Fire on board the vessel
    3. Emergencies at sea

Task 1 – Beaching and refloating the vessel
Ahoy. You are returning from a whale-watching trip and one of the passengers needs urgent medical
treatment. You will need to beach the vessel in order to get the ill passenger safely to an ambulance.
Afterwards you will need to refloat the vessel and return it to the mooring at the marina.

Good luck and safe travelling!

Determine how you will:
    Beach the vessel to get your ill passenger safely to an ambulance
    How you will refloat the vessel
    What you will do if the vessel begins to founder
Document this in a report and forward to your facilitator for feedback.

Tools
    Beaching
    Stranding and grounding
    Foundering

Activities
     Beaching, Grounding and Stranding

Task 2 – Fire on board a vessel
Ahoy. While preparing for a whale watching tour aboard the charter vessel “CU II”, a fire has started in the
engine room. You and the other members of your crew will need to make some quick decisions and take
appropriate actions to deal with this fire-fighting emergency on board the vessel.

Determine your initial response to the fire in the engine room. Using the following headings dot point your
response to the fire on board the vessel “CU II”:
     Safety precautions you need to take
     How and if you will attack the fire
     What you should do after the fire is out
Post your response to the discussion board and compare your answers with the other learners.

Tools
       Safety precautions when fighting a fire
       How and when to attack a fire
       When the fire is out
       Practice fire drills

Activities
     Fire fighting
     New crew orientation




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Task 3 – Emergencies at sea
Ahoy there, keep alert there is another emergency!! While on your whale watching tour, a passenger
gets a bit excited at seeing the whales close up and falls overboard. What do you do now?

Find out the following information for the Volunteer Marine Rescue Group, which is responsible for your
local area:
     Location (base)
     Call sign
     Repeater No.
     Phone No.
Post this information to the discussion board.

To complete this task, you need to make a detailed report on the man overboard-emergency situation on
board the vessel. Include the following:
     Identify the situation
     What are the vessels emergency response procedures?
     What actions would you take?
     How would you raise the alarm?
     Life-saving appliances – your participation and use.
Send your report to your facilitator for feedback.

Tools
       The essentials for survival at sea
       Emergency station list or muster list
       Emergency signals
       Safety and distress calls

Activities
     Skills and knowledge
     Emergency station
     Identify emergency signals
     Safety and distress call identification

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Provide feedback on reports sent by learners. Moderate the postings to the discussion board by
providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of each others postings.

Provide examples of situations involving beaching and refloating vessels and dealing with other
emergency situations.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Role play emergency drills and safety and distress call procedures. Provide opportunity to use various
life-saving devices.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Determined how to beach and refloat vessel – sent report to facilitator
     Beaching, Grounding and Stranding activity
     Posted response to the fire to the discussion board
     New Orientation Checklist and forwarded to your facilitator



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      Fire fighting and new crew orientation activities
      Practical activity for emergency stations
      Posted the VMR findings to the discussion board
      Forwarded your report to your facilitator
      Skills and knowledge, emergency station, identify emergency signals and safety and distress call
       identification activities




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TDMMF901A – Fight and extinguish fires
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to fight and extinguish fires onboard a commercial
vessel.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section A VI/1-2 of the STCW95 Code,
AMSA Marine Orders Part 3, Issue 5, Appendix 4, and the Australian USL Code. It forms part of
mandatory minimum requirements for familiarisation and basic safety competence required for all
seafarers.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Operate portable fire-              A, B, and C classes of fires are correctly identified in
    fighting equipment                   accordance with accepted fire-fighting practice
                                        Correct portable fire-fighting equipment is selected and used to
                                         fight specific classes of fires
                                        Class F fires are correctly extinguished with a fire blanket in
                                         accordance with accepted fire-fighting practice
                                        Correct techniques are applied for the use of hose lines to
                                         extinguish fires on board a vessel
                                        Where applicable, correct techniques are applied for the
                                         setting up of foam making equipment to extinguish B Class
                                         fires on board a vessel

 2. Recharge portable fire              Where applicable, correct techniques are used to recharge the
    extinguishers (where                 various types of portable fire extinguisher
    applicable)                         Portable fire-fighting equipment is confirmed as operational
                                         following recharging

 3. Carry out fire-fighting             Correct procedures and techniques are followed when fighting
    operations                           fires in simulated or real fire emergencies
                                        Safety clothing, appliances and equipment are appropriate to
                                         the nature of the fire-fighting operations
                                        Extinguishment of a fire is achieved using appropriate
                                         procedures, techniques, equipment and fire-fighting agents
                                        Correct portable fire-extinguisher(s) are selected and used for
                                         the class of fire involved in a fire emergency
                                        Appropriate safety precautions and procedures are applied
                                         when fighting fires in accordance with regulatory requirements,
                                         vessel‟s procedures and established fire-fighting practice
                                        The timing and sequence of individual actions when fighting
                                         fires onboard a vessel are appropriate to the prevailing
                                         circumstances and conditions
                                        Procedures for donning and starting up self-contained
                                         breathing apparatus (SCBA) are correctly applied
                                        Procedures for the logging of SCBA operators on a BA Control
                                         Board is correctly followed in accordance with vessel‟s
                                         procedures an accepted fire-fighting practice
                                        Search and rescue operations in a smoke filled environment



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                                           are correctly conducted as a member of a fire-fighting team in
                                           accordance with accepted fire-fighting practice
                                          Interior fires are extinguished using appropriate fire fighting
                                           equipment and procedures as a member of a fire-fighting team
                                           in accordance with accepted fire-fighting practice
                                          Lifeline signals are correctly used during interior fire-fighting
                                           operations
                                          A compartment filled with high expansion foam is correctly
                                           entered as per accepted fire-fighting practice


Job: Fight and Extinguish Fires

Scenario:
You are employed as a deckhand on the commercial fishing vessel “MEII”, at Captain Pete‟s Marina. A
fire has started in the engine room.

It is the crew‟s responsibility to try to save the vessel and crew. You will need to:
       Determine the cause and type of fire
       When and how to attack the fire
       Follow the fire plan for your vessel
       Successfully use the appropriate fire fighting equipment

After ensuring the fire is out and the vessel and crew are safe you will need to report this incident to the
local authorities.

All crew complete a thorough induction before starting on any of the vessels in the fleet and also practice
the Emergency Drills on a regular basis.

Task List
    1.   What is a fire
    2.   Signs, notices and colour codes
    3.   The fire plan
    4.   Fire fighting equipment on your vessel
    5.   When there is fire

Task 1 – What is a fire
You need to determine what elements need to be present for a fire to start and how they are able to
spread throughout a vessel or even to other vessels.

You have been notified that there is a fire in the engine room. Determine what elements need to be
present to start a fire. Then describe:
     What type of fire it is
     How the fire could have started
     How it could spread throughout the vessel
Post you findings to the discussion board and compare two others.

Post to your discussion group:
    Three (3) fire risk areas of a vessel
    Describe what you, as a crewmember can do to prevent an incident from happening in these
        areas
    What can be done to maintain a safe environment onboard a vessel




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You need to determine how, when and if to attack the fire. Use the information you have learnt in “rate of
burning” and “classes of fire” to give details on what you would do in the case of the engine room fire.
Forward to your facilitator for assessment and feedback.

Tools
       Elements of a fire
       How fires spread
       Common causes of fire
       Fires in ships
       The five classes of fire

Activities
     Fire
     Classes of fire

Task 2 – Signs, notices and colour codes
You need to be able to identify the various Safety Signs, Notices and Colour Codes aboard your vessel
so that you are able to ensure your own safety and that of your fellow crew.

You will need to have access to a vessel currently within survey. If you are not sure how you will achieve
this, speak with your course facilitator.
      Inspect each major compartment on board that has regular access for routine tasks and note
         each of the safety signs with a description of its purpose.
      Identify the type of all Fire Extinguishers on board and list by location.
Complete the new crew orientation checklist and forward to your facilitator.

Tools
    Safety signs and colour codes
    Portable fire extinguishers

Activities
     Identify gas cylinders
     New crew orientation checklist

Task 3 - The fire plan
Surviving a fire emergency should be much more than a matter luck. Although luck is always a factor, it
works much better when combined with skill, knowledge, and preparation. When a fire breaks out, every
second makes a difference. It takes a plan and a team.

After the Fire
Ask the ships master or crew from your vessel or others, if they can tell you about any fires they have had
or they know of, aboard a vessel. Post your findings to the discussion board and give details of:
      Did they have a fire plan
      How did the fire plan help in each example
Were there any mistakes

Post to the discussion board a description of the fire fighting drills performed on board your vessel and
their frequency. If you do not perform these drills on your vessel because it is not required to do so,
describe why it is not required and the method and frequency used to inform the crew of how to respond
to these emergencies.

Obtain a copy of the ships fire plan and review it. Post to your discussion board any comments you might
make in regards to:
    its currency
    layout



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       does it meet all legislative requirements
       is it complete
       how could it be improved upon

Tools
       Why have a fire plan
       The plan
       Common mistakes
       The importance of drills

Activities
     Reviewing the plan

Task 4 - Fire fighting equipment on your vessel
Your skipper should ensure that the vessel has the required fire fighting equipment on board, as outlined
in the USL code. However it is the duty of every crewmember to know how it is used and how to maintain
the equipment. The crew must also check that it has not been stolen or lost and that it is in good
condition.

Fire Fighting Arrangements
This exercise will help you to learn about the fire fighting arrangements aboard your vessel. To complete
this exercise you need to have access to a vessel in survey that has major compartments including
wheelhouse, engine room, accommodation spaces, galley and/or saloon.

Inspect each major compartment that has regular access for routine tasks and make notes:
     What portable fire fighting equipment is installed in each compartment
     Are there any fixed fire fighting installations or other means of preventing the spread of fire
     Draw a diagram of the layout of the vessel
     Show or list the fire appliances installed in each compartment
Forward your answers to your facilitator.

Tools
    Fire extinguishers
    Fire extinguisher selection
    Miscellaneous fire fighting equipment

Activities
     Fire extinguishers
     Selection
     Equipment choice
     Respiratory hazards
     Respiratory equipment and hazards

Task 5 - When there is fire
Big fires start as small fires. If fire breaks out on board there are a lot of things to do right away. You will
determine:
     your initial response
     evaluate the safety precautions you need to take
     decide on how and if you will attack the fire

Priority Actions
The following scenario will help you to think about how to react to a fire emergency.

While on watch with the skipper at 0430, the wheelhouse gauges indicate a problem is experienced with
overheating of the main engine. The skipper sends you below to wake the engineer and tell him the


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problem. On entering the accommodation space, you see smoke appearing from under the door of the
mate's cabin.

       What action would you take?
       Write down:
             o the order of priority of your actions
             o the reasons for the priority
             o any reports that you would make
             o the information you consider essential in those reports
Submit this information to your course facilitator.

Go to: Marine Incident Reports to complete this practical activity.

The following activities will need to be performed under strict supervision after adequate training has been
provided from a trained professional in fire fighting. Discuss this with your Course Facilitator/Master
before attempting either of these activities.

Once completed forward to your course facilitator for assessment.

Tools
       Safety precautions when fighting a fire
       When to attack a fire
       Removing the causes of fire
       When the fire is out
       Practice fire drills

Activities
     Fire fighting
     Marine incident reports
     Fire fighting record sheet
     Confined space record sheet

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Provide feedback on reports sent by learners. Moderate the postings to the discussion board by
providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of each others postings. Provide feedback on
tasks and activities.

Encourage learners to access their local fire service to gain additional knowledge.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Provide feedback on reports sent by learners. Moderate the postings to the discussion board by
providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of each others postings.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Determine what elements need to be present for a fire to start and posted to your discussion
         board
     Posted to the discussion board: Three (3) fire risks, preventative and maintenance requirements
         on board a vessel
     Forwarded details of how, when and if to attack a fire to your course facilitator
     Fire and classes of fire activities


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      Inspected each major compartment on board a vessel and completed the new crew orientation
       checklist and forwarded to course facilitator
      Identify gas cylinders and new crew orientation checklist activity
      Posted to the discussion group:
           o after the fire details
           o description of fire fighting drills
           o review of fire plan
      Reviewing the plan and activity
      Forwarded details of fire fighting arrangements to course facilitator
      Fire extinguishers, selection, equipment choice, respiratory hazards and respiratory equipment
       and hazards activities
      Forwarded details of priority actions to your facilitator
      The marine incident report
      Fire fighting, practical activities record sheet for fire fighting and confined spaces




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TDMMF1001A – Provide First Aid
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to provide basic first aid on board a vessel, including
the performance of immediate life saving first aid until qualified medical assistance is available; the
recognition of the symptoms and signs of acute illness and/or injury and the taking of appropriate action;
the correct management of wounds and bleeding, burns, and bone and muscle injuries; and the
adaptation of First Aid procedures for remote situations. (The unit is consistent with competency
requirements set for the „St John Ambulance National Senior Level First Aid Certificate‟ and „Level 2 First
Aid Certificate‟.)

(Note that this unit may be replaced with the generic First Aid Unit currently being developed by the
Health and Community Services Industry Training Advisory Board when endorsed)

The unit is consistent with basic first aid requirements specified in the AMSA Marine orders and the
Australian USL Code.

 Element                          Performance Criteria


 1. Perform immediate life               The priorities of First Aid Care are correctly applied in a real or
    saving first aid pending              simulated first aid situation
    the arrival of medical               The DRABC Action plan is correctly used to identify and
    assistance                            control danger, loss of consciousness, loss of airway,
                                          breathing and circulation
                                         An unconscious casualty is correctly placed in stable side
                                          position and the steps in clearing the airways to promote
                                          breathing in accordance with established first aid procedures
                                         The correct method of Expired Air Resuscitation (EAR),
                                          External Cardiac Compression (ECC) and Cardio Pulmonary
                                          Resuscitation (CPR) is applied in a real life resuscitation
                                          situation, or in a simulated exercise using a manikin

 2. Recognise the                        The symptoms and signs of the most common causes of
    symptoms and signs of                 unconsciousness are correctly identified
    acute illness and/or                 A real or simulated unconscious casualty is cared for in
    injury and take                       accordance with established first aid procedures
    appropriate action
                                         Causes of respiratory failure and breathing difficulty are
                                          correctly identified and appropriate care is provided for a real
                                          or simulated casualty with obstructed breathing
                                         The symptoms and signs of a casualty with angina pain, heart
                                          attack and heart failure are correctly identified
                                         Symptoms and signs of acute abdominal and pelvic injury are
                                          correctly identified and appropriate immediate first aid
                                          treatment of these conditions is provided in a real or simulated
                                          situation
                                         Facial, ear and eye injuries in a real or simulated first aid
                                          situation are correctly managed in accordance with established
                                          first aid procedures
                                         The symptoms and signs of poisoning, bites and stings are
                                          correctly identified and appropriate immediate management of
                                          these conditions is provided in a real or simulated situation



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                                   A real or simulated conscious casualty with an acute illness
                                    and/or injury is cared for in accordance with established first
                                    aid procedures

 3. Manage wounds and              Severe external bleeding is correctly controlled in a real or
    bleeding                        simulated situation
                                   The symptoms and signs of severe internal bleeding are
                                    correctly identified and appropriate immediate management of
                                    these conditions is provided in a real or simulated situation
                                   The symptoms and signs of shock as a result of severe injury
                                    are correctly identified and appropriate immediate
                                    management of these conditions is provided in a real or
                                    simulated situation
                                   A real or simulated laceration, abrasion and a deep puncture
                                    wound is correctly managed in accordance with established
                                    procedures
                                   The signs of wound infection are correctly identified and a real
                                    or simulated wound infection is correctly managed in
                                    accordance with established procedures

 4. Manage burns                   Immediate rescue procedures are correctly used in real or
                                    simulated first aid situations involving a burned casualty
                                   The severity of a burn is correctly assessed in terms of depth,
                                    position and size in accordance with established first aid
                                    procedures
                                   The correct method of treatment for burns and associated
                                    shock is correctly applied in real or simulated first aid situations
                                    involving a burned casualty

 5. Manage bone, joint and         Symptoms and signs of factures (simple and complicated), are
    muscle injuries                 correctly recognised in accordance with established first aid
                                    procedures
                                   Problems and treatment associated with dislocated joints are
                                    correctly managed in accordance with established first aid
                                    procedures
                                   First aid treatment of pelvic and chest injuries and fractures of
                                    limbs, including immobilisation techniques is correctly
                                    performed in accordance with established procedures
                                   A real or simulated casualty with suspected head, neck and
                                    back injuries is correctly cared for in accordance with
                                    established first aid procedures
                                   The symptoms and signs of sprains and strains are correctly
                                    identified in accordance with established first aid procedures
                                   The RICE method of treatment of sprains and strains is
                                    correctly used in real or simulated first aid situations involving
                                    sprains and strains

 6. Adapt First Aid                Safety precautions needed to prevent accidents, illness and
    procedures for remote           injuries and infection in remote area situations are correctly
    situations                      applied in real or simulated situations
                                   Identify and discuss the factors involved in the prevention of




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                                          heat and cold exposure
                                         The symptoms and signs of a real or simulated casualty
                                          exposed to heat or cold are correctly identified including
                                          hyperthermia and hypothermia and appropriate management
                                          of the casualty carried out in accordance with established first
                                          aid procedures
                                         A real or simulated ill or injured person in remote conditions is
                                          correctly cared for until help arrives, including the monitoring of
                                          airway, breathing and heart beat, the control of pain, hydration
                                          and the maintenance of body temperature
                                         A real or simulated casualty with „severe injuries‟ in a remote
                                          situation is correctly cared for, including the preparation for
                                          transport
                                         First aid and emergency equipment required for remote area
                                          situations is correctly identified and used in real or simulated
                                          situations in accordance with established first aid procedures


Job: Provide First Aid

Scenario:
Now that you have completed your Senior First Aid Certificate, you have been asked to take on the role of
First Aid Officer aboard your vessel.

This position has many responsibilities, some of which are:
     To ensure that all documents and information aboard relating to First Aid are current, reliable and
        practical
     To ensure that all first aid equipment is maintained and items have not expired
     To provide emergency first aid as required aboard your vessel

Some of the incidents you are required to attend to in this new position include:
    The engineer apparently suffering from electrocution
    A passenger that has been bitten by a dangerous marine creature
    A crewmember with an eye injury
    A passenger who has ingested a corrosive chemical
    Injuries to a crew member standing in the bite of a rope
    Burns to a crewmember who was trying to put out a fire in the galley
    One of the crew had his hand crushed while attempting to hold a fender in place

Note: These learning resources and activities will assist you in obtaining the knowledge to provide first aid
on board a vessel however you will need to discuss with your facilitator/training organization how you will
undertake the practical requirements and assessment consistent with a „Level 2 Senior First Aid
Certificate‟.

Task List
    1.   Maritime health
    2.   The first aid kit
    3.   Emergency first aid
    4.   Typical maritime hazards

Task 1 – Maritime health
The standard of safety of a ship is dependent not only on the health of the ship but more so on the health
of the seafarers in charge of the operations of a ship.



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Before you have any incidents to deal with it would be good to be familiar with the maritime regulations
that deal with the administration of First Aid on board a vessel.

Tools
    IMO standards of training and maritime health
    Medical issues

Activities
     Conventions and codes

Task 2 – The first aid kit
If your vessel is likely to operate in remote areas, your reliance on the medical kit will be much greater.
You will need to ensure that its contents have not expired and that it is fully maintained.

For a vessel familiar to you identify which would be the most suitable Marine First Aid kit to have on
board. Post details of type of vessel, operating area and recommended kit to the discussion board and
compare your findings with the other learners.

Task 3 – Emergency first aid
A current Senior First Aid Certificate is compulsory for attaining a Coxswains Certificate from your State
or Territory Authority.

Now that you are ready to take on the role of First Aid officer on the vessel the crew are bringing the
vessel to the wharf to prepare for the three day live aboard trip to the reef.

While manoeuvring the vessel into a tight space on the wharf, a stern spring line was used and when
under strain it snapped. One of the crew was standing in its bite when this occurred and has been injured
as a result. The recoil of the rope acted in a whipping motion and has put a rather large gouge in his
upper arm as well as breaking some ribs and possibly causing internal bleeding.

Please describe what you, as a senior first aid officer would do for this crewmember to:
     Control the bleeding from the gouge in his upper arm
     What symptoms or signs should you be looking for to determine if he has any internal bleeding
       resulting from his broken ribs?
     What symptoms or signs should you be looking for to determine if he is suffering from shock and
       what actions would you take if this does occur?
Send your response to your facilitator for feedback.

Before entering any accident scene you need to first be aware and remove any dangers that may affect
yourself, others or any casualties.

Obtain a copy of the flowchart “Handling an Emergency” PDF document available from the St Johns
website and demonstrate to your course facilitator that you are able to follow its recommended
procedures in a given a situation.

To access this resource
     Go to the St Johns Ambulance website - http://www.stjohn.org.au/
     Click on the link to First Aid Information
     Click on the link to Emergency First Aid – a quick guide
     Select the file Handling an Emergency .PDF

There has been a fire in the galley and one of the crew has been burnt on the forearms while trying to put
out the fire. He has become overwhelmed by the smoke and is now unconscious on the floor with his
overalls on fire.




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Please describe what you, as a senior first aid officer would do for this crewmember in regards to:
     Rescue procedures in relation to burned casualty
     How you would assess the severity of the burn in terms of depth, position and size according to
        first aid procedures
     Correct method of treatment for burns and associated shock
Post your response to the discussion board and compare your response with that of the other learners.

One of the passengers has accidentally ingested a corrosive chemical. Please describe what you, as a
senior first aid officer would do for this passenger and post this information to the discussion board.

Tools
    Emergency first aid
    The DRABC action plan

Task 4 – Typical maritime hazards
Australia is home to some of the most venomous inhabitants on our planet. Symptoms can become life
threatening very quickly so it is important you know how to identify symptoms and administer the
appropriate First Aid procedures. This may save lives including your own.

Just as well you have this knowledge as a passenger on excursion to the reef was walking bare foot in
some rock pools and has been bitten by what she described as a small octopus about the size of a golf
ball. The bite initially didn‟t hurt but she became nauseous and she has now lost her sight. Obviously this
is an extremely urgent emergency situation in a remote location. Use your first aid experience to describe
what you can do to save the life of this passenger. Send your response to your facilitator for feedback.

Research and post to the discussion board symptoms displayed by someone suffering from the venom of
a dangerous marine creature found in your local area and the appropriate steps to take in administering
first aid.

Fortunately no incidents involving exposure have occurred on this trip. To make sure you are prepared
though identify how you could minimise the effects of exposure after vessel abandonment. Post your
response to the discussion board.

While berthing the vessel one of the crew had his hand crushed while attempting to hold a fender in place
on the side of the vessel. He is now free of the situation but is in considerable pain.

Please describe what you, as a senior first aid officer would do for this crewmember in regards to:
     What symptoms or signs should you be looking for to determine if he has any fractured or
       dislocated injuries
     How you would apply the R.I.C.E method of treatment to this patient
Send your response to your facilitator for feedback

First you are called to the engine room where you discover the engineer unconscious on the ground.
Before entering the room you notice the lights are flickering and a burning smell in the air, the engineer
has a welding unit in his hand and it is obvious that the cord has frayed and is in contact with the
guardrail.

Use the DRABC action plan to describe the actions you need to take. (Don‟t just describe the DRABC
action plan)

D–

R–

A–



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B–

C–

Post your answer to the discussion board.

You are also told one of the crew while grinding a metal surface to prepare it for welding a new lug on,
has had a small piece of hot metal embed into his eye from the grinder.

As you need to care for the engineer please describe how you would instruct another person in dealing
with this incident. Post your instructions to the discussion board and comment on the response of one
other learner.

Tools
    Hypothermia
    Hyperthermia

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Ensure learners have access or know they need to obtain a Senior First Aid Certificate as working
through this resource will not provide them with one. Ensure learners are familiar with the International
Conventions and Standards.

Facilitate an online discussion on the standards – encourage students to comment on their interpretation
of these in practice.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment
on each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Organize face to face first aid training with a qualified first aid instructor.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Familiarised yourself with the international codes and conventions applicable to first aid
     Conventions and codes activity
     Posted details of type of vessel, operating area and recommended marine first aid kit to
         discussion board
     Examined the medical kit aboard your vessel, determine if its contents are complete and have not
         expired
     Described actions required in providing first aid to the crewmember injured while standing in the
         bite of a rope and sent your response to your facilitator
     Posted response to burns incident to the discussion board
     Posted response to poisoning to the discussion board
     Obtained a copy of the flowchart „Handling an Emergency‟ and demonstrated to your facilitator
         that you are able to follow the recommended procedures in a given situation
     Researched and posted to the discussion group symptoms displayed by someone suffering from
         the venom of a dangerous marine creature found in your local area and the appropriate steps to
         take in administering first aid
     Sent to your facilitator a description of what you will do for the passenger bitten by a marine
         creature



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      Identified how you could minimise the effects of exposure after vessel abandonment and posted
       to the discussion board
      Sent your response to your facilitator on first aid administered to the crewmember with the
       crushed hand
      Posted actions against DRABC action plan to the discussion board for the engine room incident
      Posted instructions for another person to provide first aid to the crewmember with the eye injury




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TDMMF1101A – Survive at sea in the event of vessel abandonment
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to survive at sea in the event of abandonment.

The unit is consistent with the relevant maritime regulations describing mandatory minimum requirement
for familiarization and basic safety competence required for all seafarers. This includes relevant sections
of the Australian USL Code, Section A VI/1-1 of the STCW 95 Code and AMSA Marine Orders Part 3,
Issue 5, Appendix 4.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Practice survival                    The timing and sequence of individual survival actions are
    techniques                            appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions of
                                          the emergency and minimize potential dangers and threats to
                                          other survivors
                                         Initial actions when boarding survival craft enhance chance of
                                          survival
                                         Jumps safely from a height into the water in accordance with
                                          established survival practice
                                         Swims while wearing a lifejacket and floats without a lifejacket
                                          in accordance with established survival practice
                                         Inverted life raft is righted while wearing a lifejacket in
                                          accordance with established survival practice
                                         Appropriate handling strategies are applied to manoeuvre
                                          survival craft in rough weather and sea conditions
                                         Sea anchors and drogues are deployed in accordance with
                                          accepted nautical practice
                                         Signs of hypothermia or other distress are identified and
                                          treated in accordance with accepted survival medical practice
                                         Exposure cover is deployed on an open lifeboat in accordance
                                          with accepted survival practice and manufacturer‟s instructions
                                         Rationing of food is in accordance with accepted survival
                                          practice

 2. Operate life saving and              Location and accessibility of life-saving and survival
    survival equipment                    equipment is established
                                         Method of boarding survival craft is appropriate and avoids
                                          dangers to other survivors
                                         Survival equipment is operated in accordance with instructions
                                          and accepted survival practice
                                         Survival radio equipment is operated in accordance with
                                          manufacturer‟s instructions and regulatory protocols
                                         Immersion suit, various thermal protective aids, life-jacket and
                                          other life-saving clothing are correctly donned and used in
                                          accordance with instructions

 3. Participate in abandon               Abandon vessel musters and drills are attended in accordance
                                          with regulatory requirements and company procedures




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      vessel drills                        Action taken on identifying muster signals is appropriate to the
                                            indicated emergency and complies with established
                                            procedures
                                           Information is obtained and correctly interpreted on the use of
                                            life-saving equipment and procedures to be followed in the
                                            event of the order to abandon vessel


Job: Survive at sea in the event of vessel abandonment.

Scenario:
The abandon ship signal has been sounded. After an attempt by the crew to fight and contain a fire, the
ships captain has determined that the vessel is to be abandoned for the safety of all aboard. Luckily your
training has prepared you and your fellow crewmates to deal with emergency situations in a fast and
efficient manner by working as a team, communicating well and obeying orders from your captain.

Your job as identified on the ships muster list is to relay the distress signal to try and get help on the
scene. After completing this you put on your life jacket and help to ensure all passengers are wearing
theirs. You are then to assist in preparing the life rafts and help all passengers to abandon the vessel and
enter the life raft.

While awaiting rescue you have been nominated to be leader for your raft and so you allocate duties to
aid in the chances of rescue, increase chances of survival and to occupy people‟s time.

Task List
    1.   Emergencies at sea
    2.   Floatation equipment and immersion suits
    3.   Using the life rafts
    4.   Abandoning the vessel
    5.   Awaiting rescue

Task 1 – Emergencies at sea
To deal efficiently with an emergency on board a vessel you need the right equipment, training and
attitude.

Most vessels with more than four crewmembers will carry out drills at least once a month. Be sure to
participate and learn the skills that may save your life.

Ask the ship's master or your course facilitator to show you a survey document indicating the emergency
equipment to be carried aboard and the frequency of training drills required for your vessel

For a vessel you are familiar with, identify from the survey document the emergency equipment that must
be carried on board, and find out how often training skills are required. Post this information (including
vessel size and type) to the discussion board and compare your findings with the information about other
vessels provided by other learners.

Tools
        Survival at sea
        Essentials for survival
        Emergency signals
        Emergency station list or muster list
        Safety and distress call identification

Activities
     Skills and knowledge


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       Identify emergency signals
       Safety and distress calls
       Emergency station record sheet

Task 2 - Floatation equipment and immersion suits
It is essential to wear a life jacket while involved in vessel abandonment. Lets face it if you are
abandoning the vessel, luck has already turned against you. You must know how to use them correctly
and feel comfortable with their use. If a person feels comfortable in the life jacket and is familiar with what
it can do, chances of survival increase. Remember, a life jacket should NOT be considered a substitute
for swimming ability.

A life jacket is an aid to buoyancy. Swimming skills are still the basic ingredient to water safety. Work
through the following to check your knowledge.

Locate and inspect the condition of life jackets and immersion suits (if applicable). Practice procedures for
donning this equipment and check for fit. Complete the following activity to demonstrate your knowledge
and ability.

Identify from survey documents the requirements for lifebuoys and buoyant apparatus aboard your
vessel. Locate and inspect the condition of these.

Tools
       Types of life jackets
       Donning a life jacket
       Immersion suits
       Lifebuoys and buoyant apparatus

Activities
     Life jackets record sheet
     Lifebuoys

Task 3 - Using the life rafts
The life raft and its equipment are there for your survival. Its correct use is crucial and the time to learn
how is not when an emergency happens.

Check out the life rafts and other emergency equipment so you know how to use it when needed.

Tools
    Life rafts
    Life raft equipment and rations
    Pyrotechnics

Activities
     Life rafts
     Equipment and rations
     Pyrotechnics
     Survival equipment identification

Task 4 - Abandoning the vessel
Small vessels may sink in 15 minutes or less. Big ships may take longer.

Your preparation for abandonment will depend on how imminent the danger is, whether it is a crash
abandonment, for example after a collision or after an emergency such as a fire that you have fought but
are unable to control.




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You will need to work as a team, communicate well and follow the orders from the master of your vessel.

After the abandon ship signal sounded you put your life jacket on, assisted the passengers to put theirs
on and assisted in preparing the life rafts. You have been given one last but important task to complete
prior to abandoning ship. Go to Prepare to Abandon to complete the task above.

Complete an abandon ship exercise drill, where you will be required to work as a team, communicate well
and follow the orders from the master of your vessel.

Tools
       What to do upon hearing the „abandon ship‟ signal
       Prepare to abandon vessel
       Leaving the vessel
       Survival craft drills

Activities
     Abandoning the vessel
     Prepare to abandon

Task 5 - Awaiting rescue
The initial actions have now been completed. Survivors in the water have been hauled in. Everyone is
safely in the survival craft. The actions to be taken next are designed to increase the chances of survival
while awaiting rescue.

To ensure survival on your life raft you need to:
     Allocate duties (refer to the tool above if unsure)
     Occupy peoples time to maintain morale
Outline how you will do both these tasks and submit to your facilitator for feedback.

Tools
    Dangers to survivors
    Allocate duties on the survival craft
    Guidelines for living in a survival craft

Activities
     Dangers

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Provide examples of ships muster list. Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback
and encouraging students to comment of each others postings. Provide feedback on task and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Role play emergency drills. Provide practical experience in abandoning ship.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Identified from the survey documents the equipment aboard and the frequency of training drills
         required for your vessel and posted to discussion board
     Skills and knowledge, identify emergency signals, safety and distress calls and emergency
         station record sheet activities




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      Located and inspected the condition of life jackets and immersion suits (if applicable). Practiced
       procedures for donning this equipment and checked for fit
      Identified from survey documents the requirements for lifebuoys and buoyant apparatus aboard
       your vessel. Located and inspected the condition of these
      Life jackets record sheet and lifebuoys activities
      Described the life raft and Pyrotechnics on your vessel and how you will use them in the abandon
       ship situation. Posted answer to discussion board
      Life rafts, equipment and rations, pyrotechnics and survival equipment identification activities
      Worked as part of a team, communicated well and followed the orders from the master of your
       vessel during an abandon ship drill
      Abandoning the vessel and prepare to abandon activities
      Allocate duties, tasks and responsibilities to each person on your life raft. Provided this to your
       course facilitator
      Dangers activity




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TDMMF201A – Respond to navigational emergencies
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to respond to navigational emergencies such as
beaching, grounding and collision of a commercial vessel, including taking action in emergencies to limit
damage and protect and safeguard all persons on board a vessel.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section AII/2 of the STCW 95 Code, and
relevant sections of the AMSA Marine Orders and the Australian USL Code.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Take action prior to and            Navigational emergencies are recognised and appropriate
    during a navigational                action is taken in accordance with Australian and international
    emergency                            regulations to avoid or minimise the emergency
                                        Radar, effective watchkeeping and other available means are
                                         used to determine and minimise risk of collision with another
                                         vessel
                                        Where a navigational emergency is unavoidable, appropriate
                                         warnings are given to officers and crew and other vessels and
                                         persons who may be affected
                                        Where a navigational emergency has occurred, all possible
                                         action to minimise risk to officers, crew and other persons is
                                         taken in accordance with company procedures and
                                         international regulations
                                        In the event of „man overboard‟, appropriate action is taken to
                                         manoeuvre the vessel and to deploy survival equipment
                                        Directions are given to officers and crew to manage and
                                         control the emergency
                                        Appropriate action is taken to stabilise the emergency situation
                                        Distress signals or calls for assistance are made if required in
                                         accordance with Australian and international regulations and
                                         conventions

 2. Perform damage                      Shipboard equipment and areas are shut down and isolated in
    control measures after               accordance with the nature and extent of the emergency,
    a navigational                       company procedures and limits of responsibility
    emergency                           On-board personnel are mustered in accordance with company
                                         procedures relevant to the identified emergency
                                        On-board personnel and external agencies are notified of the
                                         navigational emergency and action being taken
                                        Emergency equipment and damage control materials are
                                         prepared in accordance with the nature and extent of the threat
                                         or danger
                                        Nature and extent of damage to vessel is assessed and an
                                         appropriate damage control strategy is devised using available
                                         equipment, materials and personnel
                                        Directions are given to officers and crew on action to be taken
                                         to manage and control damage to the vessel




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                                         Records are maintained of damage control measures taken
                                          during the emergency and their outcomes

 3. Manage the                           Where it is assessed that the emergency is a serious risk to
    abandonment of the                    on-board personnel, correct procedures are initiated to
    vessel                                abandon the vessel
                                         On-board personnel are mustered in accordance with company
                                          procedures and international regulations and are given the
                                          required directions and instructions as per practiced drills
                                         Preparation and deployment of survival equipment by officers
                                          and crew is correctly coordinated

 4. Refloat a grounded                   The extent of grounding of the vessel is assessed including
    vessel                                possible damage to the integrity of the hull
                                         The timing of tides are checked and an appropriate plan for the
                                          refloat of the vessel is devised in accordance with company
                                          procedures and maritime principles
                                         External assistance to refloat the vessel is sought where
                                          necessary
                                         Action is taken to control any identified damage to the hull
                                          using appropriate means
                                         Preparations for refloating are made in accordance with
                                          company procedures, good nautical practice and vessel
                                          manufacturer‟s instructions
                                         On-board personnel are advised of refloating plan and their
                                          responsibilities
                                         Vessel is refloated in accordance with company procedures
                                          and plan of action

 5. Coordinate emergency                 Vessel is prepared for towage in accordance with company
    towing operations                     and vessel‟s manufacturer‟s instructions
                                         Towing operation is carried out in accordance with accepted
                                          maritime practice
                                         Towing lines are carefully monitored during towing operation
                                          and appropriate action is taken if there is excessive risk to
                                          either the towing or towed vessel


Job: Respond to navigational emergencies.
One of the vessels from Pete‟s Marina, the “Elizabeth Margaret” has been involved in an accident with
another vessel, called the “Amanda Vee”. One of the crew has been knocked overboard from the impact.
After a quick assessment of the situation you decide to begin an immediate search and rescue operation
in which you will be required to manoeuvre the vessel in line with standard operational procedures for
search and rescue and then act as lookout before deploying survival equipment.

On return to the Amanda Vee you survey the damage to her and determine she has been holed by the
Elizabeth Margaret and grounded. The Amanda Vee is under equipped to handle this situation so you
gain permission to board her and using the collision mats from on board the Elizabeth Margaret you
isolate the affected area, reduce the ingress of water and begin the bilge pumps to attempt to refloat her.

After stabilizing the situation you organise for the crew to abandon ship and transfer to the Elizabeth
Margaret and then you secure the vessel for towing to the nearest safe harbour.


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This job involves developing skills to be competent in:
     Actions to take prior to and during a navigational emergency
     Performing damage control measures after a navigational emergency
     Managing abandonment of a vessel
     Refloating a grounded vessel
     Coordinating towing operations

Task List
    1.   Emergencies at sea
    2.   Collision at sea regulations
    3.   Maintaining a lookout
    4.   Damage control and maintenance
    5.   Grounding and refloating the vessel
    6.   Abandoning the vessel
    7.   Towing a vessel

Task 1 – Emergencies at sea
Ahoy, ready for another challenge? Before you are able to deal efficiently with the emergency situation
between the “Elizabeth Margaret” and the “Amanda Vee”, you need the right equipment, training and
attitude.

Search your State Maritime Authority below or local ship chandler to find at least one unique resource
that you feel is of value when dealing with an emergency at sea, including:
      Safe boating
      Navigation
      General waterway safety
This resource may be a book, magazine or a brochure but must be valid for your state. Post your findings
to the discussion board.

The following practical activity will complete this task. Ask your Supervisor/Master to assess your
knowledge of the vessels “Emergency Station List” by completing the “Record of Emergency Station
Sheet” then forward to your facilitator for final assessment.

Tools
    Equipment training and knowledge
    Emergency signals
    Emergency radio calls

Activities
     Emergency signals and urgency calls
     Record of emergency station

Task 2 - Collision at sea regulations
Ahoy. Mayday Mayday! There has been a collision between the “Elizabeth Margaret” and the “Amanda
Vee”. What are the international regulations that apply to collisions at sea and what you should do in the
event of an accident? How could you minimize the damage of a collision?

Ask the master of your vessel if you can practice „stopping methods‟ and „turning skills‟ under his direct
supervision. If you do not have access to a vessel, you will need to ask your facilitator how you can be
assessed for this task.
Record all your experiences in your notebook.

The collision between the two vessels was unavoidable. Describe what actions you would take in regard
to: -



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    Warnings given to officers, crew and other vessels affected
    Minimising risk to officers, crew and others
    Directions given to manage and control the emergency
    Stopping methods used
    Minimising the damage to the vessels
    Distress signals or calls for assistance made
Send this report to you facilitator for feedback.

Tools
       Collisions at sea regulations
       Taking off speed
       Turning the vessel
       Actions to take after collisions

Activities
     The different stopping methods
     Turning circles
     Collisions at sea

Task 3 - Maintaining a lookout
Ahoy, one of the crew has been knocked overboard from the impact of the collision. You need to be able
to give your skipper accurate verbal directional reports. Use your knowledge of navigational markers,
buoys, lights and ship sounds to give the skipper all the information he needs.

Ask the master of your vessel if you can practice your skills as lookout under the direct supervision of an
experienced seafarer. If you do not have access to a vessel to complete this task, you will need to ask
your facilitator how you can be assessed for this task. Record all your experiences in your notebook.

Tools
    Accurate verbal reports
    Using radar for early warning
    Searching for a missing person overboard

Activities
     Practical activity search and rescue

Task 4 - Damage control and maintenance
Ahoy there! The Amanda Vee has been holed by the Elizabeth Margaret and grounded. She is under
equipped to handle this situation so you gain permission to board her and using the collision mats from on
board the Elizabeth Margaret, you isolate the affected area, reduce the ingress of water and begin the
bilge pumps to attempt to refloat her.

Draw a diagram of a ships hull from a side view imaging it is the Amanda Vee. Indicate on your diagram
where she has been holed. Identify the watertight compartments and hatches to ensure watertight
integrity.

Write a response to each of the following damage control measures taken during the emergency:
     What shipboard equipment and areas need to be shut down and isolated?
     What is the nature and extent of damage to the vessel?
     What emergency equipment and damage control materials need to be prepared to deal with the
        nature and extent of the threat and damage?
     What is the most appropriate damage control strategy using the available equipment, materials
        and personnel?
     What maintenance can you perform on board to contribute to ensuring the vessel remains afloat?
Post your response to the discussion board and comment on one other learner‟s response.


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Tools
    Reserve buoyancy
    Damage control

Activities
     Damage control

Task 5 - Grounding and refloating the vessel
Hi Captain Pete here again. The Amanda Vee has been assessed to establish the extent of the grounding
and preparations for refloating are underway. It is now time for all the crew to be advised of the refloating
plan. Remember to check the tides and assess if external assistance is required. Good luck!

In order to be able to tow the stricken “Amanda Vee” back to her harbour, you need to refloat her. Write
an action plan for refloating the vessel considering the following details:
     The extent of grounding
     Timing of tides
     If external assistance is required
     How to control any identified damage
     What preparations are needed
     What advice is needed for the crew regarding the refloating plan and their responsibilities?
Forward to your facilitator for feedback.

Tools
    Grounding the vessel
    Refloating the vessel

Activities
     Grounding of a vessel
     An intentional grounding

Task 6 - Abandoning the vessel
Ahoy. The “Amanda Vee” has been stabilized. You now need to organise for the crew to abandon ship
and transfer to the Elizabeth Margaret.

Decide on the best way for the crew of the Amanda Vee to abandon ship and board Elizabeth Margaret.
Post you answer to the discussion board and comment on at least one other learner‟s response.

Tools
    What to do upon hearing the „abandon ship‟ signal
    How to prepare
    Leaving the ship

Activities
     Additional equipment for survival craft
     Vessel abandonment
     Safety drills record sheet

Task 7 - Towing a vessel
Ahoy. The “Amanda Vee” is secured and ready to be towed to the nearest safe harbour.
Consider the safest way to tow the Amanda Vee and the best way of maintaining contact with the skipper
who has remained on board. Post your answer to the discussion board and comment on the other
learner‟s answers.




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Tools
    Towing a vessel

Activities
     Towing
     Towing and being towed

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Encourage learners to visit local ship chandlery to identify useful resources for dealing with emergencies.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on task and activities.

Ensure learners have access to and are familiar with regulations for preventing collisions at sea.

Facilitate an online discussion on grounding a vessel.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Facilitate practical exercise or role play emergency radio calls. Role play providing verbal reports in role
of lookout.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Posted the emergency at sea resource to the discussion board
     Emergency signals activity
     Forwarded the completed Record of Emergency Station Record Sheet to your facilitator
     Practiced stopping and turning methods
     The different stopping methods, turning circles and collisions at sea activities
     The actions report and forwarded to your facilitator
     Recorded your lookout practical experiences in your notebook
     Practical search & rescue activity
     Posted diagram and response to damage control measures to the discussion board
     Damage control activity
     Posted your planned intentional grounding to the discussion board
     Grounding activity
     Forwarded your Action plan for refloating the vessel to your facilitator
     Practical activity: Abandoning the vessel drills
     Additional equipment for survival craft, and safety drills record sheet activities
     Practical activity: Towing and being towed
     Towing activity




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TDMMF3201A – Apply regulations when operating a small vessel
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to monitor and control compliance with Australian and
international legislative requirements applying to small commercial vessels operating on coastal voyages,
including assessing and interpreting current information on the relevant Commonwealth and State and
Territory Acts, Legislation, Codes and other publications and applying to vessel operations. It also
includes the identification, interpretation and application of information on the responsibilities of vessel‟s
officers and crew under relevant maritime law and the monitoring of the compliance of vessel‟s operations
and maintenance with relevant maritime regulations.

The unit is consistent with the relevant sections in the Australian USL Code.

 Element                          Performance Criteria


 1. Access and interpret                 Current documentation on applicable maritime regulations is
    information on relevant               stored and filed in an accessible location on the vessel in
    Australian and                        accordance with regulations
    international legislation,           Documentation on applicable maritime regulations is updated
    codes and conventions                 with relevant publications
                                         Relevant maritime regulations are accessed and interpreted to
                                          confirm the requirements for vessel‟s operations and
                                          maintenance and personal responsibilities
                                         Certification extensions for the vessel and requirements for
                                          renewals are timely and ensure continuous validity
                                         Survey items and equipment reflect effective programs of tests,
                                          checks and maintenance in accordance with certificate
                                          conditions
                                         Arrangements for renewals and surveys are timely and comply
                                          with enterprise and issuing authority requirements
                                         Vessel‟s documents indicate any effects of damage, alterations
                                          or additions to the vessel or operations in accordance with
                                          certification requirements and the procedures of the relevant
                                          maritime authority
                                         Procedures are developed to ensure that only authorised
                                          personnel access documents
                                         Certificates and documentation are stored in a manner, which
                                          enables their use for the prosecution of vessel‟s business

 2. Ensure operations and                Interpretations of relevant sections of applicable maritime
    maintenance comply                    regulations are applied to day-to-day operations and
    with legal requirements               maintenance of the vessel
                                         Procedures are followed for monitoring operations and
                                          maintenance according to applicable maritime regulations
                                         Areas and plant equipment are checked and inspected in
                                          accordance with planned procedures
                                         Problems that may lead to potential non-compliance are
                                          promptly and fully identified
                                         Remedial action is timely and ensures compliance with
                                          applicable maritime regulations



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                                         Training and instructions on procedures ensure subordinates
                                          comply with regulations
                                         Advice to others on the legitimacy of operations is accurate
                                          and given at an appropriate time
                                         Failure to comply with procedures is identified and dealt with
                                          according to established procedures

 3. Monitor and control                  Records of compliance are clear, concise and accurate
    compliance with                      Records comply with applicable maritime regulations
    applicable maritime
                                         The level and detail is sufficient to meet the objectives for
    regulations
                                          maintaining the records
                                         Documentation is secure and confidentiality is maintained in
                                          accordance with established procedures
                                         Computer backup procedures (where relevant) follow good
                                          operating practices and enterprise procedures
                                         Records and reports are distributed to the required maritime
                                          authority at appropriate times and places
                                         Storage method and duration comply with legal and company
                                          requirements


Job: Apply regulations when operating a small vessel.

Scenario:
Captain Pete‟s Marina has recently purchased a commercial passenger vessel but before it can be
commissioned into operation there are a few tasks we need to complete to ensure that it complies with
State and Commonwealth Legislation and Codes applying to vessel operations.

You will need to do the following:
    Update all documents on board relating to state legislation and ensure all procedures and
         operations comply
    Ensure all certificates and licenses are current
    Develop strategies and procedures for maintaining validity of documentation
    Check all emergency equipment is under current survey
    Outline training the staff will need to ensure their knowledge and skills are up-to-date
    Develop a maintenance program for this vessel that meets the standards in the USL Code

Task List
    1. Checking documents against legislation
    2. Emergency equipment
    3. Marine pollution

Task 1 – Checking documents against legislation
Ahoy there. Before heading to sea, you will need to check that all the documents onboard the vessel are
compliant. To do this you will need to find out about the legislative requirements.

Now that you understand the legislation you can complete the compliance check for our new vessel.

The next step is to check that the licences and certificates on board the vessel are current and valid for a
vessel registered with the Commonwealth of Australia.




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The best way to ensure that all certificates, licences and documentation are current and valid is to have a
procedure in place to track these. Can you develop a procedure for our new vessel so that all
crewmembers know what is required? Go to „Document Procedures Activity‟ for more clues.

Tools
    State legislation
    Certificates and surveys

Activities
     State legislation
     Compliance with legislation
     Certificates and licences
     Document procedures

Task 2 - Emergency equipment
Ahoy. Before we can take the vessel out. I need you to check that all the emergency equipment is
compliant. You will also need to demonstrate your knowledge of the safety procedures on board your
vessel.

Does your vessel comply with the USL code? (Refer to Section 10 of the USL Code). Including:
       Life buoys
       Life jackets
       Distress flares
       EPIRB's
       Inflating life rafts
       Rigid life rafts
If it differs from the USL Code does it comply with the relevant State Marine Act? Email your findings to
your facilitator.

Practical Activity – Crew Training
You are to organise and coordinate an emergency muster with the intension of possible abandonment on
board a vessel. Ensure your crew comply with regulations and record the consequences of failure to
comply with these procedures.

Forward together with a copy of the ships log detailing the procedure in accordance with your state
legislation to your facilitator.

If you are not currently employed or for some other reason this is not possible, contact your course
facilitator to discuss how else you might be assessed.

Tools
    Life saving equipment
    Fire appliances
    Emergency procedures

Activities
     Emergency station

Task 3 - Marine pollution
Ahoy ready for task 3? We will need to advise all of the crewmembers about their obligations under the
Marine Pollution Convention.

Tools
    Marine pollution
    Disposal of garbage at sea


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Activities
     Pollution procedures

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Ensure learners have access to and understand the USL code and conventions as they apply to small
vessels.

Facilitate an online discussion on marine pollution and disposal of items at sea.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on task and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Role play an emergency muster.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Researched the legislation for your State & Territory
     The compliance check
     Developed a procedure for the new vessel
     Emailed details of life saving equipment
     Emailed details of fire appliances
     The practical activity – crew training
     Prepared a memo for marine pollution
     The practical activity – pollution procedures




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TDMMF1201A – Minimise the risk and maintain a state of readiness to
respond to emergency situations involving fire
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to minimise the risk of fire and maintain a state of
readiness to respond to emergency situations involving fire.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section A VI/1-2 of the STCW95 Code,
AMSA Marine Orders Part 3, Issue 5, Appendix 4, and relevant sections of the Australian USL Code. It
forms part of mandatory minimum requirements for familiarisation and basic safety competence required
for all seafarers.

 Element                          Performance Criteria


 1. Carry out fire                       Fire hazards on board vessel are identified and action is taken
    minimisation                          to eliminate or minimise them
    procedures                           Responsibilities for checking fire prevention equipment and
                                          systems are fulfilled and appropriate action is taken to ensure
                                          that they are operational
                                         An awareness and understanding of the causes of fire and its
                                          minimisation is maintained through participation in fire drills
                                          and related instructional programs
                                         A state of readiness to respond to fire emergencies is
                                          maintained at all times

 2. Respond to emergency                 Emergency situations involving fire are correctly identified in
    situations involving fire             accordance with established nautical practice
                                         Type of fire is identified in accordance with the established
                                          classification system for fires
                                         Initial action on becoming aware of fire emergency is in
                                          conformity with established practices and procedures
                                         Action taken is timely and appropriate for seriousness of the
                                          fire emergency
                                         Action taken on identifying muster signals for a fire emergency
                                          is appropriate and complies with established procedures
                                         Appropriate precautions and procedures are implemented
                                          when responding to electrical fires
                                         Appropriate precautions and procedures are implemented
                                          when responding to uptake and hydrogen fires
                                         Communications are clear and concise at all times and orders
                                          are acknowledged in a timely and seamanlike manner


Job: Minimise the risk of fire and maintain a state of readiness to respond to
emergency situations involving fire.

Scenario:
Captain Pete‟s Marina has recently purchased from inter-state a commercial passenger vessel and you
have been asked to assist the engineer in performing a scheduled maintenance of the vessel before it
can be commissioned into operation. The engineer has asked that you conduct a fire risk assessment of



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the vessel and to fulfil the requirements of the fire plan maintenance schedule. You have also been asked
to fuel the vessel.

On the vessels maiden voyage a fire has started in the engine room. It appears to have started when a
water pipe leaked onto an electrical switch. The fire itself is not too serious but the fact that room contains
various fuels, gases and charging batteries has created a significant threat to the fire fighting team and
the vessel itself.

Your job is to follow all appropriate precautions and procedures in fighting this fire as outlined in the fire
plan.

Task List
    1. Identify the fire
    2. Fire detection systems used on board vessels
    3. Identifying fire hazards

Task 1 – Identify the fire
You need to determine what elements need to be present for a fire to start and how they are able spread
throughout a vessel or even to other vessels.

What type or class of fire has occurred onboard the vessel?
Post your answer to the discussion board.

Tools
    Elements of a fire
    How fires spread
    The five classes of fire

Activities
     Fire
     Classes of fire

Task 2 - Fire detection systems used on board vessels
You are required to demonstrate a basic understanding of the types of fire-detection, fire-fighting
equipment and systems used, their features and the principles of operation to maximise constant
vigilance in fire prevention and minimisation on board your vessel.

Which identifies three different fire suppression systems. Describe areas on a commercial vessel where
each of these would be suitable for use. Post your response to the discussion board.

Tools
    An introduction to fire detection, alarm, and automatic fire sprinklers
    Fire suppression systems
    Fire fighting checking procedures

Activities
     Fire detection and alarm system
     Fire sprinklers
     Fire fighting equipment inspection

Task 3 - Identifying fire hazards
Prevention is always better than any cure. You are to identify any potential fire hazard areas on board
your vessel and recommend what can be done to maintain this as a safe environment.

Post to the discussion board:



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Three (3) fire risk areas of the vessel you are either employed or training on and describe what you as a
crewmember can do to prevent an incident from happening in these areas.

Plan an emergency drill including all crew aboard your vessel. Your plan should include a scenario of the
incident starting with an electrical fire in the engine room and list detailed responsibilities for each
crewmember (remember to include shut down, isolation and risk assessment for things like batteries and
fuels). Post your plan to the discussion board and comment on the plan of another learner.

Tools
       Common causes of fire
       Fires in ships
       Causes of explosion
       Fuels
       Arrangements and installations
       Minimise the risk
       Fire and exposure emergencies

Activities
     Fuelling record sheet
     Prevention

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Ensure learners have an understanding of SOLAS Chapter II-2.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on task and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Fire activity
     Classes of fire activity
     Posted type/class of fire to discussion board
     Described areas suitable on board for the 3 types of fire suppression systems identified and
         posted to discussion board
     The inspection of the fire fighting equipment
     Fire detection and alarm system activity
     Fire sprinklers activity
     Posted to your discussion group: Three (3) fire risk areas of the vessel and describe what you as
         a crewmember can do to prevent incident from happening in these areas
     Planned an emergency drill including all crew aboard your vessel and posted to discussion board
     Fuelling record sheet
     Prevention activity




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TDMML201A – Contribute to effective human relationships on board a
vessel
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to contribute to effective human relationships
onboard a commercial vessel, including performance of allocated duties and observation of expected
standards of work and behaviour on board a vessel.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in Section A VI/1-4 of the STCW 95 Code and
AMSA Marine Orders Part 3, Issue 5, Appendix 4. It forms part of mandatory minimum requirements for
familiarisation and basic safety competence required for all seafarers.

 Element                        Performance Criteria


 1. Contribute to the                  Social responsibilities to other members of the crew onboard a
    effective human                     vessel are fulfilled
    relationships onboard a            Contributes to the achievement of harmonious working
    vessel                              environment onboard a vessel
                                       Assists and encourages others in workplace activities
                                       Contributes to the solution of conflicts by participating in
                                        mediation and negotiations fairly, honestly and effectively
                                       Takes appropriate action to avoid and prevent harassment of
                                        others in the crew
                                       Maintains appropriate standards of hygiene and cleanliness
                                        required when living in a shipboard community
                                       Communicates with others effectively in the course of social
                                        and work activities
                                       Shares credit for achievements with others in the crew
                                       Provides a good example of responsible, fair, sympathetic,
                                        equitable and diligent member of the shipboard team

 2. Observe standards of               Work is carried out individually and in association with others in
    work and behaviour                  accordance with established performance standards
    onboard a vessel                   Feedback on assessed work performance is acknowledged,
                                        discussed and acted upon
                                       Personal skills and knowledge are developed through onboard
                                        training and other means to ensure an effective contribution to
                                        shipboard work activities
                                       Employment conditions are known, understood and followed
                                       Individual rights and responsibilities onboard a vessel are
                                        known, understood and fulfilled
                                       Drug and alcohol abuse are avoided as required by company
                                        and vessel‟s policy and procedures and regulatory
                                        requirements

 3. Resolve conflicts                  Conflict situations are recognised and appropriate assistance
                                        is sought to resolve the conflict with the personnel involved in
                                        accordance with vessel‟s procedures
                                       Contributes to action to solve conflicts by actively participating



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                                           in appropriate mediation and conflict resolution procedures


Job: Contribute to effective human relationships on board a vessel

Scenario:
You are working as the first mate on the passenger vessel owned by Pete‟s Marina and you have two
new crewmembers ready to start work. You have been delegated to familiarise them with their obligations
to maintain the shipboard procedures for housekeeping, stowage and safety.

As representatives of the company, the image you portray to the public is very important. Therefore, you
will need to demonstrate effective and efficient communication skills at all times with customers and other
crewmembers.

They will also need to complete an employment contract and be made aware of their rights and
responsibilities as a crewmember aboard the vessel.

Task List
    1. Housekeeping, stowage and safety
    2. Effective communication
    3. Rights and responsibilities

Task 1 – Housekeeping, stowage and safety
It's your duty to ensure that your own safety, as well as the safety of the people around you, isn't put at
risk. This means being aware of the potential risks in your job and its surroundings.

Every time you carry out a task, ask yourself if there is anything you can do to reduce potential hazards.
Remember that prevention is better than cure!

Carry out a range of food preparation activities onboard your vessel.
Make a list of the duties you have assisted in and include the hygiene and cleanliness standards you
have observed / learnt.
Forward to your facilitator.

        Compile a list of shipboard duties aboard your vessel.
        As you have 2 new onboard, what training & safety drills will be needed?
        Assign each new crewmember to particular duties from your list and indicate how you will assess
         each of their activities.
Post to the discussion board and compare 2 others.

Tools
       The galley
       Food preparation
       Accommodation spaces
       The tourism industry

Activities
     Housekeeping

Task 2 - Effective communication
Working in any aspect of the maritime industry you will be required to get along with people – whether it
be other crew, people who provide services to your vessel or people you provide a service too such as
tourists or markets. In order to do this successfully you need to communicate well with others in either
group situations, one to one, face-to-face or electronically.




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Providing Instruction
One-way communication
Select a simple work task, such as starting the engine, turning on the radar or using the marine radio or
any other task you are authorised to undertake. Write out the instructions for the work task. You can use
diagrams if you wish.
    a) Now give your written instructions to someone else, preferably someone who is not familiar with
         the task. This person is then to follow your instructions under supervision. They are not allowed to
         ask you for clarification of the written instructions.
Two-way communication
    b) Ask another person to use your written notes to complete the task. This time, they are allowed to
         refer back to you for clarification of anything they don‟t understand.
After both partners have finished the above task, you are to discuss which method of communication
worked better (a) or (b)? Why?
Post to the discussion group the responses.

Providing Service
Read through the following scenario and answer the Questions below.

On a day trip charter to see the whales a young woman rushes through the cabin, she is flushed, and
looks around anxiously for a vacant toilet and is obviously not well. The woman approaches a
crewmember (Ben) and informs him she is ill and that there are no vacant facilities.

Ben is busy with some preparations for lunch he looks up and observes the situation, then looks around
for someone to attend to her. When he sees that no one else is available, he turns his head back and
suggests that she goes up on deck where she will not make a mess.

The woman obviously embarrassed says rather crossly and loudly that had she known of the poor
facilities onboard she would not have bought a ticket.

On return the young woman still seething approaches the ticketing counter, throws her boarding pass
down on the counter says she will not only expect a refund but, will also never do business here again.
     What are the signals verbal and non-verbal, the customer, and the crewmember are giving?
     What do you think caused the situation to become disastrous so quickly?
     How do you think Ben could have managed this situation better?
     What could the woman have done to make the situation better?
Post your answers to the discussion group.

Tools
       The process of communication
       Qualities and barriers of communication
       Channels of communication
       Active listening and feedback
       Giving, receiving instructions and provide service

Activities
     Qualities and barriers of communication
     Methods of communication

Task 3 - Rights and responsibilities
Skippers, crew and passengers all have rights and responsibilities aboard your vessel and the
consequences for not adhering to them are generally set out in various codes and conventions which the
commonwealth and each state or territory authority interpret into law.

Your 2 new crewmembers are required to complete an employment contract and need to be made aware
of their rights and responsibilities.



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Click on Captain Pete for an example of a typical “Crewmember Employment Agreement”. Make sure you
read it thoroughly, and then complete the following activity.

Well done, you are now ready to complete practical activity. Click on Record of Human Relationships
skills for a copy of your record sheet. Once completed, forward to your facilitator to finalise this “job”.

Tools
    Conventions, codes and organisations maintaining rights & responsibilities
    Obligations
    Discrimination

Activities
     Codes and conventions
     Rights and responsibilities
     Identify discrimination/harassment

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Role play active listening techniques and effective communication skills.

Ensure learners have an understanding of Navigation Act.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on task and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Forwarded a list of food preparation & hygiene practices to your facilitator
     Posted a list of duties, training, drills & how to assess to the discussion board
     Housekeeping activity
     “Providing Instructions” task and forwarded to facilitator
     “Providing a Service” task and posted to discussion board
     Qualities and barriers of communication and methods of communication activities
     Reviewed Pete‟s Marina‟s Employment Contract
     Practical activity and record sheet for HR skills
     Codes and conventions, rights and responsibilities and identify discrimination/ harassment
         activities




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TDMMR4301A – Assist in mooring and anchor handling activities
This unit involves the skills and knowledge needed to assist the responsible officer in a range of mooring
and anchor handling activities as required of an integrated rating, including preparing for arrival or
departure from an anchorage or mooring, handling mooring lines, carrying out stoppering and heaving
line tasks, anchor operations, securing a vessel to a sea buoy, and securing a tug using either tug‟s or
vessel‟s lines.

 Element                           Performance Criteria


 1. Carry out mooring and                 Tasks required of an integrated rating in preparation for arrival
    anchor handling tasks                  and departure from an anchorage or mooring are completed in
                                           accordance with shipboard procedures
                                          Mooring line handling, stoppering and heaving line tasks are
                                           performed in accordance with shipboard procedures
                                          Mooring and unmooring operations are carried out in
                                           accordance with established procedures
                                          Anchor operations are carried out in accordance with
                                           shipboard procedures
                                          A vessel is secured to a sea buoy in accordance with
                                           shipboard procedures
                                          A tug is secured using tug‟s or vessel‟s lines in accordance
                                           with shipboard procedures
                                          Communications during mooring and anchor handling
                                           operations are clear and timely and involve the correct use of
                                           communications equipment where required

 2. Follow safety and                     All required safety precautions and regulations are followed
    hazard control                         when carrying out routine mooring and anchor handling tasks
    procedures                            Operational hazards are identified and action is taken in
                                           conjunction with the officers, engineers and other team
                                           members to minimise or eliminate risk to personnel, vessel and
                                           the environment
                                          Shipboard emergency and contingency plans are followed in
                                           the event of a failure or emergency associated with mooring
                                           and anchor handling equipment and machinery and associated
                                           systems


Job: Assist in Mooring and Anchor Handling Activities.

Scenario
You are preparing to take a dive group out to “Shipwreck” which is an artificial reef situated approximately
3 km off shore. The artificial reef you will be visiting is one of the largest in Australia and consists of car
bodies, shipwrecks, old barges and car tyres. The vessel you will be taking is new to the Marina and this
is your first voyage.

This job involves assisting your master/supervisor in a range of mooring and anchor handling activities,
including preparing for arrival or departure from an anchorage or mooring, handling mooring lines, carry
out stoppering and heaving line tasks, anchor operations and securing a vessel to a sea buoy.



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Task List
    1. Mooring and anchoring
    2. Carry out mooring and anchor handling activities

Task 1 – Mooring and anchoring
Ahoy me Matey‟s. Your trip to the artificial reef will require you to use ropes and knots to secure the
vessel. There are a few things you‟ll need to know to make sure the vessel holds fast.

Make a list of all details you need to brief the crew on prior to leaving the Marina. What further briefing will
you need to give on arrival at your destination, then finally on returning to the Marina? Record all details
in your notebook ready to forward to your facilitator at the end of the task.

Tools
       Anchors
       Rope and wire
       Care and maintenance
       Knots

Activities
     Types of anchors
     Advantages and disadvantages of different activities
     Anchor procedures
     Types of fibres
     Knots and hitches
     Useful terms

Task 2 - Carry out mooring and anchor handling activities
Ahoy me Matey‟s. You have briefed the crew and prepared the vessel for the trip to the artificial reef.
Remember, the reef you will be visiting is one of the largest in Australia and consists of car bodies,
shipwrecks, old barges and car tyres, this will determine the type of anchors you will use.

Complete the following task and forward to your facilitator for assessment:
   1. Identify: -
            The operational hazards that you experienced or may experience
            What action is necessary to minimise or eliminate risk to personnel, the vessel and the
                environment
            How the officers, engineers and other team members will be affected by the operational
                hazards and actions.
   2. List: -
            Some emergencies that may occur on the vessel while mooring and anchoring
            The contingency plans that need to be followed in the case of failure or emergency
                associated with mooring and anchoring handling equipment and machinery and all
                associated systems.

Consult your supervisor to learn about his/her experiences in emergency situation and what precautions
are necessary.

Ask your Supervisor/Master to observe you in mooring and anchoring a vessel and assess you against
the criteria in the “Record of mooring and anchoring sheet” then forward to your facilitator for final
assessment.

Tools
    Mooring
    Mooring lines
    Anchoring


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       Bitts and cleats
       Safety precautions during berthing and unberthing

Activities
     Prepare for mooring
     Mooring and anchoring
     Record of mooring and anchoring

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Provide feedback on task and activities.

Encourage learners to visit local ship chandlery and inspect different anchors, ropes, wires, bits, cleats
etc.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Check condition of all ropes and anchors
     Choose correct anchors for the trip
     Provided briefing details for your crew in notebook and forwarded to facilitator
     Types of anchors, advantages and disadvantages of different activities, anchor procedures, types
         of fibres, knots and hitches and useful terms activities
     Posted safety precautions and regulations to the discussion board
     Forwarded answers for operational hazards and shipboard emergencies to your facilitator
     Prepare for mooring, mooring and anchoring and record of mooring and anchoring activities
     The practical activity and record sheet




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TDMMR3001A – Operate and carry out basic maintenance on marine
propulsion systems
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to operate and carry out routine basic servicing
checks within the limits of responsibility and skill of a Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3) on propulsion
systems on a small commercial vessel.

The unit is consistent with the section in the Australian USL Code dealing with the competency
requirements of a Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3).

 Element                          Performance Criteria


 1. Operate propulsion                   Propulsion system is operated in accordance with procedures
    systems                               and manufacturer‟s instructions and specifications
                                         Propulsion system is prepared, started and shut down in
                                          accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions

 2. Carry out basic, routine             The operation of propulsion systems is monitored in
    servicing procedures on               accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions and faulty
    propulsion systems                    operation reported or rectified in accordance with procedures
                                         Basic user service checks are carried out on propulsion system
                                          before and during operation in accordance with manufacturer‟s
                                          instructions and within the limits of responsibility and skill of a
                                          Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3)
                                         Faulty machinery and components are identified and are
                                          reported and action is initiated as required for isolation, tagging
                                          and repair or replacement in accordance with company
                                          procedures

 3. Follow safety and                    All required safety precaution and regulations are followed
    hazard control                        when operating and maintaining propulsion systems
    procedures                           Appropriate action is taken in the event of a failure or
                                          emergency involving propulsion systems to isolate and secure
                                          the relevant equipment and the vessel and maintain the safety
                                          of the vessel and persons involved
                                         Emergency and contingency plans are followed in the event of
                                          a failure or emergency involving propulsion systems




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Job: Operate and carry out basic maintenance on small vessel marine
propulsion systems.

Scenario
Basic service checks need to be carried out regularly on all of the vessels propulsion systems. Ted, the
marine engineer at Pete‟s marina, needs you to give him a hand to do these service checks.

To complete this job you will need to:
     Identify the basic features & operating characteristics of propulsion systems used on small
      vessels
     Carry out routine basic service checks on these systems
     Identify and isolate faulty components within these systems and take appropriate action

Task List
    1. Identify basic features & operations of propulsion systems
    2. Operation & service checks
    3. Trouble shooting marine propulsion systems

Task 1 - Identify basic features & operations of propulsion systems
Ted will be your supervisor for this task but before you start you need to be able to identify the different
engine types, determine their major components and understand how they operate.

As you work through the Tools and Activities on marine engines make a list of the features of:
     Diesel
     Petrol
     2-Stroke
     4-Stroke

A table is provided to set this out. Send a completed copy of this to your course facilitator and keep the
original in your record book for evidence.

You should now be able to identify whether your engine is diesel or petrol as well as the major
components of it and the basic principles of operation. Have your supervisor complete the following
record sheet and send a copy to your course facilitator and keep the original in your record book for
evidence.

Identify the gearbox and stern-tube arrangements of a commercial vessel, and compare them to what you
have learnt within the Tools. Discuss any variations with your course facilitator.

Identify the type and components of the cooling system used on a vessel you are familiar with. Post this
information to the discussion board and compare with the information on other systems provided by other
learners.

Tools
       Diesel and petrol engines
       Typical engine components
       Engine timing
       Gearboxes and controls
       Stern tubes
       Engine cooling systems
       Engine lubrication systems
       Engine fuel systems




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Activities
     Marine engine review
     Marine engine inspection record sheet
     Cooling systems
     Lubrication and fuel systems

Task 2 - Operation & service checks
Now that you can identify the features & operating characteristics of propulsion systems, you are ready to
help Ted carry out the basic service checks. Best to start with the pre-start checks. These should be
performed each time you are preparing a vessel to go to sea.

It is now mandatory for a commercial operator to keep a Log of all maintenance done on board their
vessel. Obtain a maintenance log for a vessel with an inboard engine. Identify and post to the discussion
board an outline of the maintenance carried out on the propulsion system in the last 12 months.

Detail a safety precaution procedure in point form, for operating an outboard engine. You may refer to
handbooks, internet sources, marine outboard dealers or include precautions you have learnt through
your own experience or that of others. Send a copy of this to your course facilitator and keep the original
for yourself.

Use the “Operating Checks” activity listed below to develop a checklist specific for pre-start, operating and
shut down of the propulsion system aboard your vessel. Ask the master or engineer to supervise you
performing these checks.

Tools
    Routine checks and maintenance for inboard engine operations
    Routine checks and maintenance for outboard engine operations

Activities
     Operating checks

Task 3 - Trouble shooting marine propulsion systems
Correct operation and maintenance of routine checks will reduce the risk of and severity of breakdown. If
a system breakdown should occur, following a logical approach to identify and isolate the problem may
save time, money and even the vessel.

Complete the next activity so you can advise Ted of the problems you have found during the service
checks today.

Ask the Master/Skipper or engineer from your vessel the types of mechanical failure they have
experienced while at sea that affected the propulsion system. Post to the discussion group one of the
major breakdowns that could not be repaired at sea and what was done to get the vessel back to port for
repair.

Tools
    Troubleshooting

Activities
     Breakdown troubleshooting

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Ensure learners have a sound knowledge of different marine engines.



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Facilitate an online discussion on the features of various marine engines.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Made a list of the features of: Diesel, Petrol, 2-Stroke, 4-Stroke engines & sent your course
         facilitator a copy
     Had your supervisor complete the Marine Engine Inspection record sheet and sent a copy to your
         course facilitator
     Identified the gearbox and stern-tube arrangements of a commercial vessel, and compare them
         to what you have learnt within the Tools. Discussed any variations with your course facilitator
     Drew a diagram and identified the type and components of cooling system used on your vessel
     Marine engine review activity
     Cooling systems activity
     Lubricate and fuel systems activity
     Obtained a maintenance log for a vessel with an inboard engine. Identified and posted to the
         discussion board maintenance carried out on the propulsion system in the last 12 months
     Detailed a safety precaution procedure for operating an outboard engine. Sent a copy of this to
         your course facilitator
     Operating checks activity
     Asked the Master/Skipper or engineer from your vessel the types of mechanical failure they have
         experienced while at sea that affected the propulsion system. Posted to the discussion board one
         of the major breakdowns that could not be repaired at sea and what was done to get the vessel
         back to port for repair
     Troubleshooting activity




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TDMMR3101A – Operate and carry out basic servicing on auxiliary
systems
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to operate and carry out routine basic servicing
checks on auxiliary systems on a small commercial vessel, including the steering, pumping and any
refrigeration systems on the vessel.

The unit is consistent with the section in the Australian USL Code dealing with the competency
requirements of a Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3).

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Operate auxiliary                   Auxiliary systems are operated in accordance with procedures
    systems                              and manufacturer‟s instructions and specifications
                                        Auxiliary systems are prepared, started and shut down in
                                         accordance with manufacturers‟ instructions

 2. Carry out basic, routine            The operation of auxiliary systems is monitored in accordance
    checking and servicing               with manufacturer‟s instructions and faulty operation reported
    procedures on auxiliary              or rectified in accordance with procedures
    systems                             Faulty equipment and components are identified and are
                                         reported and action is initiated as required for isolation, tagging
                                         and repair or replacement in accordance with company
                                         procedures

 3. Follow safety and                   All required safety precaution and regulations are followed
    hazard control                       when operating and maintaining auxiliary systems
    procedures                          Operational hazards are identified and action is taken to
                                         minimise or eliminate risk to personnel, ship and the
                                         environment
                                        Where relevant, procedures and precautions necessary for
                                         entry into confined spaces on a vessel are correctly followed
                                        Appropriate action is taken in the event of a failure or
                                         emergency involving auxiliary systems to isolate and secure
                                         the relevant equipment and the ship and maintain the safety of
                                         the ship and persons involved
                                        Shipboard emergency and contingency plans followed in the
                                         event of a failure or emergency involving auxiliary systems


Job: Operate and carry out basic maintenance on auxiliary systems

Scenario:
Ted, the marine engineer at Pete‟s marina, needs you to give him a hand too check the operation and
perform some of the basic service checks on the bilge, the steering and refrigeration systems aboard your
vessel.

To complete this job you will need to:
     Identify the basic features & operating characteristics of the auxiliary systems used on small
      vessels
     Carry out routine basic service checks on these systems



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       Identify and isolate faulty components within these systems and take appropriate action

Task List
    1. Identify basic features & operations of auxiliary system
    2. Procedures for auxiliary systems
    3. Maintenance checks & trouble shooting auxiliary systems

Task 1 - Identify basic features & operations of auxiliary system
Ted will be your supervisor for this task but before you start you need to be able to identify the auxiliary
systems aboard your vessel, determine their major components and understand how they operate.

Identify if your vessel has strums, strainers or a mud box.

Ask the master/engineer of your vessel if you can dismantle a simple bilge pump and check the condition
of the impeller under their supervision.

See if you can identify the different types of valves used aboard your vessel.

Draw a diagram of the bilge system in a vessel you have access to. Make sure you identify all
components as set out in the “Bilge System” Tool listed above. Send a copy of this to your course
facilitator and keep the original in your record book.

Inspect the steering system of a small commercial vessel, and the arrangements for the rams and then
draw a diagram making sure to outline the major components of this system. Send a copy of this to your
course facilitator and keep the original in your record book.

Draw a diagram of the refrigeration plant in a vessel you have access to. Make sure you identify all
components listed in the Tools provided above. Send a copy of this to your course facilitator and keep the
original in your record book.

Tools
       Bilge systems
       Strums, strainers and mud boxes
       Bilge pumps
       Valves
       Bilge system specifications
       Cable and mechanical steering
       Hydraulic steering systems
       Ram arrangements
       The basic mechanics of a refrigeration plant
       Refrigeration temperatures and controls

Activities
     Identify hydraulic system components
     Identify refrigeration system components
     Refrigeration systems

Task 2 - Procedures for auxiliary systems
Now that you are able to identify the auxiliary systems aboard your vessel, you now need to be familiar
with the procedures for using these systems and contingency plans in emergency situations.

Ask the master of your vessel to demonstrate the start up and shut down procedure for operating the
bilge pump, including how (if any) bilge pump alarms are operated. Document these and provide your
course facilitator a copy, keeping the original in your record book.




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Locate the emergency tiller arm aboard your vessel and ask the master or engineer aboard your vessel to
explain the procedures for its use.

Tools
    Emergency bilge pump operation
    Emergency steering
    Refrigeration plant operations

Activities
     Bilge duty to fire main
     Operate auxiliary systems

Task 3 - Maintenance checks & trouble shooting auxiliary systems
Correct operation and maintaining routine checks will reduce the risk and severity of breakdown. If a
system breakdown should occur, following a logical approach to identify and isolate the problem may
save time, money and even the vessel.

Record a maintenance routine you have performed on the bilge system aboard your vessel and send a
copy of this to your course facilitator.

Discuss these pre-departure checks with the master of your vessel and customise them as required. Post
any changes you have made to the discussion group.

Record in your logbook a maintenance routine you have performed on the steering system aboard your
vessel and send a copy of this to your course facilitator.

Record in your logbook:
    the cut in/out temperatures
    the type of refrigerant used
    the safety equipment available for the refrigeration system aboard your vessel
Send a copy of this to your course facilitator.

Tools
       Preventing back flooding in bilge systems
       Maintaining a healthy bilge
       Troubleshooting the bilge system
       Steering pre-departure checks
       Maintain steering systems
       Troubleshooting steering systems
       Refrigerant leaks
       Troubleshooting refrigerant systems

Activities
     Bilge troubleshooting
     Steering troubleshooting

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.


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To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Sent a copy of your diagram of the bilge system to your course facilitator and kept the original in
         your record book
     Inspected the steering system of a small commercial vessel. Sent details to your course facilitator
         and keep the original in your record book
     Sent a copy of your diagram of the refrigeration plant in a vessel to your course facilitator and
         kept the original in your record book
     Identify hydraulic system components, identify refrigeration system components and refrigeration
         systems activities
     The start up and shut down procedure for operating the bilge pump. Provided your course
         facilitator a copy, keeping the original in your logbook
     Located the emergency tiller arm aboard your vessel and had the master or engineer aboard your
         vessel explain the procedures for its use
     Located the main switch for the refrigeration plant and familiarised yourself with start up and shut
         down procedures
     Bilge duty to fire main and operate auxiliary systems activities
     Sent your facilitator a copy of a maintenance routine you have performed on the bilge system
     Posted any changes you have made to pre-departure checks to the discussion group
     Sent your facilitator a copy of a maintenance routine you have performed on the steering system
         aboard your vessel
     Sent your facilitator a copy of the cut in/out temperatures, the type of refrigerant used and safety
         equipment available for the refrigeration system aboard your vessel
     Bilge troubleshooting and steering troubleshooting activities




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TDMMR3201A – Operate and carry out basic routine servicing of
marine extra low and low voltage electrical systems
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to safely operate and carry out routine basic servicing
of extra low voltage and low voltage electrical systems and be aware of the safety precautions when
using 50 volt systems used on a small commercial vessel, including operation and service checks of
systems, basic care and servicing of batteries and charging systems and basic operation and servicing of
starter motors, alternators and associated equipment.

Note: All installation, servicing and repair of AC (50 volts or above) or DC (above 115 volts) must be
carried out only by a suitably qualified engineer or licensed tradesman. Relevant State/Territory electrical
licensing requirements must be fulfilled by any persons carrying out installation, servicing and repair of
electrical circuits and systems at such voltages on a vessel.

The unit is consistent with the section in the Australian USL Code dealing with the competency
requirements of a Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3).

 Element                          Performance Criteria


 1. Operate extra low                    Extra low voltage (ELV) electrical systems are safely operated
    voltage electrical                    in accordance with procedures and manufacturer‟s instructions
    systems                               and specifications and within the limits of responsibility of a
                                          Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3)
                                         Appropriate precautions are taken when operating 50 Volt
                                          electrical systems in accordance with established company
                                          procedures
                                         Basic servicing of extra low and low voltage systems is carried
                                          out in accordance with vessel‟s procedures within the limits of
                                          responsibility and skill of a Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3)

 2. Operate and carry out                The operation of starter motors, alternators and associated
    basic servicing of                    equipment is monitored in accordance with manufacturer‟s
    starter motors,                       instructions
    alternators and                      Faulty equipment and components are identified and are
    associated equipment                  reported and action is initiated as required for isolation, tagging
                                          and repair or replacement in accordance with the limits of
                                          responsibility and skill of a Marine Engine Driver (Grade 3)

 3. Follow safety and                    All required safety precautions and regulations are followed
    hazard control                        when operating and servicing extra low voltage and low
    procedures                            voltage electrical systems and associated equipment
                                         Operational hazards are identified and action is taken to
                                          minimise or eliminate risk to personnel, ship and the
                                          environment
                                         Where relevant and in consultation with relevant officers,
                                          procedures and precautions necessary for entry into confined
                                          spaces on a vessel are correctly followed
                                         Appropriate action is taken in the event of a failure or
                                          emergency involving starter motors, alternators and extra low
                                          voltage electrical systems to isolate and secure the relevant
                                          equipment and the ship and maintain the safety of the ship and



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                                           persons involved
                                          Shipboard emergency and contingency plans followed in the
                                           event of a failure or emergency involving starter motors,
                                           alternators and extra low voltage electrical systems


Job: Operate and carry out basic routine servicing of marine extra low and low
voltage electrical systems

Scenario:
Ted, the marine engineer at Pete‟s marina, needs you to give him a hand to check the operation and
perform some of the basic service checks on the low and extra low voltage electrical systems aboard your
vessel.

To complete this job you will need to:
     Identify the basic features & operating characteristics of the electrical systems used on small
      vessels
     Carry out routine basic service checks on these systems
     Identify and isolate faulty components within these systems and take appropriate action

Task List
    1. Identify basic features of extra low voltage electrical systems
    2. Electrical safety and troubleshooting procedures

Task 1 - Identify basic features of extra low voltage electrical systems
Ted will be your supervisor for this task but before you start you need to be able to identify the extra low
voltage systems aboard your vessel, determine their major components and understand how they
operate.

Detail the battery arrangements on a vessel you have access to, are they connected in parallel or in a
series. What is the voltage and amps of each battery and their combined total? Post this to your
discussion group.

Draw a diagram of a main circuit board on a vessel you have access to and identify each circuit breaker,
switch and the circuit they control. Send a copy of this to your course facilitator and keep the original in
your record book.

Ask the master/engineer of your vessel to help you identify ignition systems, starter motors, alternators or
generators & ammeters aboard your vessel.

Tools
       Batteries as a power source
       Fuses, switches and lamps
       Ignition systems and starter motors
       Alternators, generators, regulators and ammeter

Activities
     Power source
     Circuit breakers
     Ignition and generators/alternators




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Task 2 - Electrical safety and troubleshooting procedures
Correct operation and maintaining routine checks will reduce the risk and severity of breakdown. If a
system breakdown should occur, following a logical approach to identify and isolate the problem may
save time, money and even the vessel.

Inspect the condition, storage and safety of battery arrangements aboard a vessel you have access to.
Discuss any potential issues you determine with your master/engineer or supervisor.

Review the Record of Low Voltage Maintenance & Operation record sheet and when you feel confident
have your master or engineer assess you and complete this record. Send a copy of this to your course
facilitator, keep the original in your record book.

Tools
       Correct battery installations and maintenance
       Marine battery safety
       Isolation procedures
       Unsafe electrical components
       Identifying faults in electrical systems

Activities
     Marine batteries
     Low voltage checklist

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Posted battery voltage and amp‟s details to discussion board
     Sent a copy of main circuit board details to your course facilitator and kept the original in your
         record book
     Identified ignition systems, starter motors, alternators or generators & ammeters aboard your
         vessel
     Power source, circuit breakers and ignition and generators/alternators activities
     Inspected and discussed the condition, storage and safety of battery arrangements aboard a
         vessel you have access to
     Been assessed and completed the record of low voltage maintenance & operation record sheet
         and sent a copy to your course facilitator.
     Marine batteries and low voltage checklist activities




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TDMMB601A – Monitor condition and seaworthiness of a small vessel
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to monitor the condition and seaworthiness of a small
commercial vessel, including an awareness of the fundamental principles of vessel construction, load
lines conditions of assignment, structural elements to restrain fires, design characteristics that contribute
to watertight integrity and regulatory requirements for seaworthiness. It also includes the ability to identify
structural components on drawings and on an actual vessel, and indications of any deterioration in the
hull and fittings of a vessel.

The unit is consistent with the relevant sections in the Australian USL Code dealing with the competency
requirements of a coxswain, Master (Class 4) and Master (Class 5).

 Element                           Performance Criteria


 1. Monitor the condition of              Work to monitor condition and seaworthiness of the vessel is
    the vessel                             planned and carried out in accordance with procedures and
                                           safety regulations
                                          Coverage and frequency of checks and inspections on the
                                           vessel complies with the procedures
                                          Checks of the integrity of the vessel‟s hull are correctly carried
                                           out including the use of a testing tank where required
                                          Action taken in anticipation of environmental changes is timely
                                           and appropriate to the change
                                          Action taken in emergency situations is appropriate to the
                                           significance of the situation and ensures watertight integrity
                                          Precautions are taken to ensure that vessel and on-board
                                           powered equipment is operated in accordance with
                                           manufacturer‟s instructions and regulations

 2. Rectify identified                    Any deterioration of the vessel‟s hull or structure is examined
    problems with the                      and reported and appropriate action is initiated to fix the
    condition of the vessel                identified problem
                                          Repairs and corrosion control are initiated and coordinated in
                                           accordance with procedures and manufacturer‟s instructions
                                          Communication with owners, officers, crew and others
                                           concerning the condition and seaworthiness of the vessel and
                                           related action is clear, concise and made at an appropriate
                                           time and place
                                          Records on problems identified and actions taken to carry out
                                           repairs and corrosion control and to ensure watertight integrity
                                           are complete, accurate and comply with requirements




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Job: Monitor Condition and Seaworthiness of a Small Vessel.

Scenario:
Pete‟s Marina is equipped with an 88-ton travel lift that can handle most vessels up to 85' in length and
23' wide. It is used for vessels owned by Pete‟s Marina as well as being commercial leased to other
vessel operators wishing to utilise the dry dock facilities.

Between charters, you are required to work at the dry dock assisting various boat owners in completing
their maintenance, repairs and survey requirements.

This job involves gaining an awareness of vessel construction, design characteristics regulatory
requirements for seaworthiness of a vessel. It will also give you the ability to identify structural
components and indications of any deterioration of the vessel.

Task List
    1. Monitor the condition of the vessel
    2. Rectify identified problems with the condition of the vessel

Task 1 - Monitor the condition of the vessel
Ahoy me Matey‟s. This task involves working to check and monitor the condition and seaworthiness of the
vessel. One of the vessels owned by Pete‟s Marina is for sale. There is a potential buyer, so the vessel
has been scheduled to go to dry dock to be repainted. The potential buyer has a copy of the vessels
structural plans and will be asking a few questions at the end of the task.

You may work on your own or with another learner or workmate.
Visit a marina or boat sale yard in your area and find out the following: -
      What procedures should be in place to ensure the condition and seaworthiness of vessels are
         monitored?
      How often are checks and inspections carried out and what is covered in the checks?
      How are checks for the integrity of the vessels hull carried out? Include details of the use of a
         testing tank where applicable.
      What environmental changes could affect the condition of the vessel?
      What actions should be in place to ensure watertight integrity in the case of an emergency?
      What precautions are needed to ensure that the vessel and on-board powered equipment are
         operated in accordance with manufacturers instructions and regulations?
When you have completed this task, post your findings to the discussion board or send to your facilitator.

Tools
       Major structural components
       Corrosion control
       The graving dock
       The floating dock
       The floating cradle (patent slip)
       The synchrolift
       Careening
       Heaving down
       The travel lift
       General procedures for docking and shipping

Activities
     Vessel structure
     Vessel structure record sheet




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Task 2 - Rectify identified problems with the condition of the vessel
Ahoy me Matey‟s, ready for another challenge? Task 2 involves rectifying problems with the condition of
the vessel. While the vessel has been on dry dock for repainting, a number of problems were identified. It
is your task to report on the problems, initiate action to fix the problems and communicate to all
concerned accordingly. Work through the following information and then complete the task at the end.

After inspecting the vessel, compile a report on the deterioration of the vessel‟s hull or structure, giving
full details of what problems you identified.

Your report should include:
    The identified problems
    The repairs or corrosion control that is required
    Identify the actions required to carry our repairs and fix the identified problem/s
    Details of each person you need to contact
    Timeframes of when you need to contact each person concerned

NB: You will need to communicate with a variety of people concerning the condition and seaworthiness of
the vessel including owners, officers, crew and workmate etc. Ensure all communication is clear and
concise.

Forward your report to you facilitator for assessment then complete the Practical Activity below to
complete the task.

Tools
    Watertight subdivision
    Routine maintenance

Activities
     Watertight subdivision
     Maintenance of vessel structure
     Record of maintenance

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Encourage learners to visit local shipbuilders, boat sales yards, dry dock facilities and inspect hulls of
various vessels.

Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Facilitate discussion on boat yard or marine visits. Post questions for learners to answer.

Alternative approaches
Activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Facilitate discussion on corrosion control and maintenance and implications for safety at sea.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
The Vessel Structure Activity
     Answered all the questions for task 1 & posted your findings to the discussion board
     The practical activity and the record of vessel structure?
     Compiled a checklist for repairs needed
     The report of actions required
     Forwarded report and checklist to facilitator


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      Practical activity & maintenance record sheet




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TDMMC701A Apply seamanship skills and techniques when operating
a small vessel
This unit involves the seamanship skills, knowledge and techniques required when operating a small
commercial vessel, including splicing ropes; using ropes and chains; maintaining ropes, wire and chain;
rigging gear and loads; operating winches and windlasses; safe handling hawsers and moorings; stowing
and securing anchors for sea; securing vessel for rough weather; maintaining watertight integrity; lashing
and securing equipment; and towing and being towed.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in the Australian USL Code, dealing with the
competency requirements of Coxswain and Master (Class 5).

 Element                          Performance Criteria


 1. Use and maintain                     Knots, hitches and bends using fibre and synthetic ropes are
    ropes, wire and chains                correctly made and used in the course of deck operations
                                          onboard vessel
                                         Eye splices and short splices are made in fibre and synthetic
                                          rope in accordance with established nautical practice
                                         Rope, wire and cables are checked and maintained in
                                          accordance with company procedures and manufacturer‟s
                                          instructions
                                         Breaking strain and safe working loads of ropes are
                                          determined and applied as load limits in the course of deck
                                          operations
                                         Loads are correctly rigged using appropriate ropes, chains and
                                          rigging gear in accordance with regulations
                                         Rigging gear is checked prior to use and/or going to sea and
                                          faulty gear reported and replaced or repaired
                                         Maximum load limits are determined and applied when lifting
                                          equipment and loads using ropes, chains and rigging
                                         Lines are made up in preparation for berthing of vessel
                                         Lines are handled as directed to assist in berthing and
                                          unberthing a vessel
                                         A warping drum is used to heave in surge and veer lines
                                         Berthing lines are turned up and secured to bitts, staghorns
                                          and cleats as required
                                         Moorings and hawsers are safely handled in accordance with
                                          established nautical practice

 2. Operate winches and                  Winches, capstans and windlasses are checked and prepared
    windlasses                            for operation prior to use
                                         Winches, capstans and windlasses are safely operated to carry
                                          out deck operations in accordance with operational
                                          requirements and manufacturer‟s instructions

 3. Tow and be towed                     Preparations for towing are safely made in accordance with
                                          established nautical practice




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                                         Correct towing procedures and precautions are applied when
                                          towing and being towed

 4. Secure a small vessel                Anchors, cables and deck fittings are correctly identified and
    for sea                               selected for use when required
                                         Accommodation spaces and personnel facilities onboard the
                                          vessel are checked for cleanliness, hygiene and tidiness and
                                          correctly secured for sea in accordance with established
                                          procedures and tourism or operational standards
                                         Equipment and items on deck and in equipment and galley
                                          spaces are secured in accordance with regulations
                                         Watertight integrity of vessel is checked and appropriate action
                                          is taken to prepare for prevailing and forecast weather and sea
                                          conditions
                                         Anchor tasks are carried out in accordance with established
                                          nautical practice


Job: Apply Seamanship Skills and Techniques When Operating a Small Vessel.

Scenario:
You will be going out with your skipper to take a group of up to eight divers on a day trip to “Shipwreck”
which is an artificial reef situated approximately 3 km off shore. The vessel is called the “Cargo III” and
the radio Station call sign “VNC 8144”. The vessel is 8-metres in length with a centre console helm with
twin outboard engines. You have 8 diving clients and a dive master who will be boarding your vessel.
Each of these divers will bring on board two air tanks and a 20-litre tub containing their personal diving
equipment.

During your day charter, your clients are wishing to visit a variety of dive locations, which will involve
mooring and anchoring the vessel a number of times. This will also be a great opportunity to practise your
skills and techniques using ropes.

On your return, you will experience a number of events. You have just delivered an ill passenger safely
into the ambulance and are returning to the Marina, when you see a vessel in the distance requiring
assistance. On reaching the vessel you discover that they will require a tow back to the marina. The
weather has turned bad, so you will need to employ the correct techniques for towing in heavy weather.

Task List
    1.   Use and maintain ropes, wire and chains
    2.   Operate winches and windlasses
    3.   Tow and be towed
    4.   Secure a small vessel for sea

Task 1 - Use and maintain ropes, wire and chains
Ahoy me Matey‟s. Your trip to the artificial reef will require you to use ropes and knots to secure the
vessel. Prior to leaving the harbour with your clients, you need to make sure you have the correct anchors
and equipment needed for the trip. The artificial reef you will be visiting is one of the largest in Australia
and consists of car bodies, shipwrecks and car tyres. Work through the tools and activities then give
details of the ropes and wires you need to choose for the trip.

        Now you have learnt all about ropes, wires and chains you need to prepare your vessel for the
         dive trip
        Prior to leaving the harbour with your clients, you need to make sure you have the correct ropes
         and equipment needed for the trip, and that they are in good condition



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        Make recommendations of what ropes you will need for this particular trip – keep in mind the
         information given about the artificial reef you are visiting
Post to the discussion board and comment on the posting of one other student.

Tools
       Record of maintenance
       Steel wire rope construction
       Strength of ropes
       Care and maintenance
       Cleaning of ropes

Activities
     Cordage
     Types of construction (lay)
     Safety precautions when working with ropes
     Coiling
     Knots, bends and hitches in common use on board a boat

Task 2 - Operate winches and windlasses
Ahoy again. This next task involves the use of anchors, winches, capstans and windlasses. Prior to
leaving the harbour with your clients, you need to make sure you have the correct anchors and equipment
needed for the trip. The artificial reef you will be visiting is one of the largest in Australia and consists of
car bodies, shipwrecks and car tyres. Work through the tools and activities then give details of the
anchors you have chosen for the trip.

Now you have learnt all about anchors winches and windlasses it is time to gain experience using as
many different types of anchors as possible. Remember the initial task? You need to make sure you have
the correct anchors and equipment for the trip. Make a list of what you need to prepare and post it to the
discussion board.

Your next task is to practice the following:
    1. Checking and preparing winches and windlasses prior to operation
    2. Operating winches and windlasses
    3. Stowing and securing anchors at sea
    4. Lashing and securing equipment
    5. Safely operating all equipment while carrying out deck operations
Write a report of your experiences and forward to your facilitator.

Tools
    Capstans and warping drums

Activities
     Anchor types

Task 3 - Tow and be towed
Ahoy me Matey‟s, ready for another challenge? You are on your return to the marina, when you see a
vessel in the distance requiring assistance. On reaching the vessel you discover that they will require a
tow back to the marina. The weather has turned bad, so you will need to employ the correct techniques
for towing in heavy weather. Work through the information and activities then complete the task at the
end.

       With the permission of your master, practise towing and being towed
       List the procedures you followed, giving details of any incidents, concerns you encountered
        including what safety precautions were needed




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       What techniques would be needed for towing in heavy weather? Post your findings to the
        discussion board; compare your experiences with one other student, then forward to your
        facilitator for assessment

Task 4 - Secure a small vessel for sea
Ahoy Matey‟s this is your last task to complete the “Apply Seaworthiness Job”. During your day charter,
your clients are wishing to visit a variety of dive locations, which will involve mooring and anchoring the
vessel a number of times.

Prior to leaving the harbour with your clients, you need to make sure you have the correct anchors,
cables, ropes and deck fittings needed to secure the vessel at sea. Make a list of what you need for this
dive trip and forward to your facilitator at the end of the task.

       When you arrive at your first dive location. Make sure you chose the correct anchor cables and
        deck fittings
       Give a description of the full procedure you have practiced and note any hazards or problems you
        experienced, then post it to the discussion board

You have returned from your day trip, now it is time to moor the vessel for the evening. What do you need
to check to ensure the vessel is secure? Develop a checklist covering all areas for securing a vessel and
forward to your facilitator. Your checklist should cover the following areas:
     Accommodation spaces and personnel facilities on board the vessel are checked for cleanliness,
        hygiene and tidiness and correctly secured
     Equipment and items on deck and in equipment and galley spaces are secured
     The vessel is checked to make sure it is watertight and appropriate action is taken to prepare for
        prevailing forecast weather and sea conditions

You are now required to put all you have learnt into practise. Ask your Facilitator/Master to observe you in
manoeuvring a commercial vessel of less than 12 meters in length and assess you against the criteria in
the Record of Manoeuvring a Vessel.

When you successfully complete all of these tasks have your Facilitator/Master sign it off. You will need to
keep this as a record of evidence.

Tools
    Safety precautions during berthing and unberthing
    Sharing wharf ballards

Activities
     Securing the vessel alongside
     Mooring over a post
     Securing lines to bitts, cleats and staghorns
     Bitts
     Cleats

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Encourage learners to visit a ship chandlery to familiarize themselves with various ropes, wires and
chains.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.




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Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Facilitate a practical workshop on tying ropes, knots etc.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Practised using ropes, hitches and splicing techniques
     Prepared your vessel for the dive trip
     Listed the ropes & equipment needed for the trip
     Posted your findings to the discussion board
     Listed the anchors you need for the dive trip and post to the discussion board
     Practised operating winches and windlasses
     Forwarded your report to your facilitator
     Practised towing and being towed
     Listed procedures, any incidents, concerns and/or safety procedures for your practical activity
     Posted your findings to the discussion board and compared others findings
     Forwarded all details to your facilitator
     Listed the anchors, cables, ropes and deck fittings needed for the dive trip
     Post your procedure for anchoring the vessel (including any hazards or problems)
     A checklist for mooring the vessel for the evening
     The final practical activity and record sheet
     Forwarded all of the above to your facilitator for final assessment




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TDMMC901A – Manoeuvre a vessel of less than 12 metres in length
within inshore limits
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to manoeuvre a commercial vessel of less than 12
metres within inshore limits, including berthing, mooring and anchoring operations and manoeuvring
during emergencies and exceptional circumstances.

The unit is consistent with the relevant sections of the Australian USL Code dealing with the competency
requirements of a Coxswain.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Manoeuvre the vessel                Manoeuvres are made to safely progress the operation and
    for required operations              keep the vessel in safe water
    in normal conditions                Vessel‟s heading is maintained within acceptable limits with
                                         respect to the requirements of the manoeuvre, weather, tide,
                                         headreach and stopping distances
                                        Alterations of heading or power are smooth and controlled at
                                         all times
                                        Communication is clear, concise and acknowledged at all
                                         times according to good seamanship
                                        Suitable mode of steering is selected for the manoeuvre with
                                         respect to the area, wind, tide and sea conditions
                                        Vessel propulsion units are controlled as required to progress
                                         the operation and complement steering movements
                                        Safe operating limits of vessel propulsion, steering and power
                                         systems are not exceeded
                                        Adequate resources are organised prior to and during
                                         operations
                                        Communication during manoeuvres is clear, concise and
                                         acknowledged at all times

 2. Manoeuvre the vessel                Manoeuvres are made to safely progress the operations during
    during exceptional                   the emergency or exceptional circumstance and to keep the
    circumstances and                    vessel in safe water
    emergencies                         Vessel‟s heading is maintained within acceptable limits with
                                         respect to the requirements of the manoeuvre, the nature of
                                         the emergency or exceptional circumstance and the existing
                                         sea, tide and weather conditions
                                        Risks to the vessel and the safety of persons on board are
                                         assessed during manoeuvres and appropriate risk
                                         minimisation strategies are developed and applied
                                        Alterations of heading or power are smooth and controlled at
                                         all times and are appropriate to the emergency or exceptional
                                         situation
                                        Action is taken in the event of collision, grounding or other
                                         marine casualty to secure the vessel and maintain the safety of
                                         the vessel and those on-board and of any other vessels and



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                                          persons involved
                                         Communication during the emergency is clear, concise and
                                          acknowledged at all times


Job: Manoeuvre a commercial vessel of less than 12 meters in length within
shore limits

Scenario:
You will be going out with your skipper to take a group of up to eight divers on a day trip to “Shipwreck”
which is an artificial reef situated approximately 3 km off shore. The vessel is called the “Cargo III” and
the radio Station call sign “VNC 8144”. The vessel is 8-meters in length with a centre console helm with
twin outboard engines.

On today‟s charter you have 8 diving clients and a dive master who will be boarding your vessel. Each of
these divers will bring on board two air tanks and a 20-litre tub containing their personal diving equipment.

You will be required to notify the Volunteer Marine Rescue before leaving the port, giving details of you
destination for the day.

On return, the weather has turned extremely bad, strong winds and large swells. One of the divers is
suspected of suffering from the bends, immediate medical attention is required. Using the Marine Radio
you call the Volunteer Marine Rescue for assistance. An ambulance has been arranged to meet the
vessel inside the river mouth on the beach.

After beaching the vessel and getting the ill passenger safely into the ambulance, you now have to refloat
the vessel and return it to the mooring at the marina.

Task List
    1.   Effect of load on manoeuvrability of a vessel
    2.   Marine radio transmission
    3.   Berthing and unberthing the vessel
    1.   Prepare for mooring and anchor
    4.   Manoeuvring the vessel in bad weather
    5.   Beaching and refloating the vessel

Task 1 - Effect of load on manoeuvrability of a vessel
Ahoy me Matey‟s, ready for another challenge? This task requires you to position your passengers and
their cargo to ensure the vessels stability and trim is maintained. You will discover what happens when
you don‟t do it right. Don‟t forget to do the activities along the way.

You are required to give 5 examples of what can happen when your vessel is loaded incorrectly, then
draw a diagram of the deck of a vessel as viewed from above; the vessel should be based on the
description of the vessel outlined in the scenario. Make sure to detail features such as the centre console
or helm, hatches, machinery, safety equipment and any other identifiable features on deck. Once you
have completed your diagram you can detail where you would position your passengers and their cargo
to ensure the vessels stability and trim is maintained. Forward all your work to your facilitator for
assessment.

Tools
    Boat handling under power

Activities
     Position passengers and load their cargo




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Task 2 - Marine radio transmission
Ahoy again. Now it is time to practise using a Marine Radio.
Let me know what type of radio and other communications equipment you have on board your vessel.

Now: are you ready to start on your voyage? Before you leave the port you must notify the Volunteer
Marine Rescue (VRM) of your intended destination for the day, your route of passage, your call sign etc.
Visit or contact your VRM to gain information on your local area, including the role of the VMR, contact
details, membership fees and local radio channels etc. List all details in your notebook and have your
master or facilitator assess your practical competence in completing the task.

Activities
     Marine radio transmission

Task 3 - Berthing and unberthing the vessel
Ahoy. Now we are going to berth and unberth your vessel.
You need to collect Cargo III from her mooring so that you can load your cargo and prepare the vessel.
Don‟t forget to leave the dingy at the Marina before you leave for your journey!!

In this task you will need to demonstrate your skills at berthing and unberthing a vessel from a variety of
locations. "Berths" include all berths, docks, wharves, anchorages or moorings. In order to prepare for
your dive trip, you will need to take your dingy out to the swing mooring to collect “Cargo III” and bring her
back to the jetty at Pete‟s Marina. Write a report giving details of what is required to complete the task,
make particular reference to safety aspects. When completed, submit to your facilitator for assessment.

Tools
    Berthing tool

Activities
     The underwater profile
     Berthing and unberthing the vessel

Task 4 - Prepare for mooring and anchor
Make a list of all details you need to brief the crew of “Cargo III” prior to leaving the Marina. What further
briefing will you need to give on arrival at your destination, than finally on returning to the Marina? Record
all details in your notebook.

Tools
    Selecting and securing an anchorage
    Mooring lines
    Mooring to a buoy

Activities
     Prepare for mooring and anchor

Task 5 - Manoeuvring the vessel in bad weather
Well now Matey‟s, we are in for some bad weather. How are you going to handle manoeuvring your
vessel in extreme situations or if the weather turns bad while at sea? Complete the next task to learn how
and fair weather sailing to you.

You will need to gain knowledge of the vessel‟s stability, how to handle the vessel in adverse weather
conditions and what steps to take to prepare the vessel for heavy weather. If you are expecting to
encounter heavy weather, you should have your vessel well prepared using the checklist.




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Now, you need to practice these stopping methods (with the permission of your master). If you do not
have access to these facilities, you will need to ask your on-line facilitator how you can be assessed for
this task. Record all your experiences in your notebook.

Tools
    Actions to take after collision

Activities
     Heavy weather handling checklist
     Manoeuvring the vessel in bad weather
     Turning in heavy weather
     Manoeuvring the vessel to cross coastal bars
     Stopping the vessel
     Collisions at sea regulations

Task 6 - Beaching and refloating the vessel
You are in for a spot of bother.
You are returning from your day trip to the artificial reef and the weather has turned extremely bad, with
strong winds and large swells. One of the divers is suspected of suffering from the bends, immediate
medical attention is required. You will need to beech the vessel inside the river mouth on the beach in
order to get the ill passenger safely to an ambulance. Then refloat the vessel and return it to the mooring
at the mariner. Good luck and safe travelling!

At the end of this task you will be required to complete the procedure you would follow to beach and
refloat the “Cargo III” Vessel from the scenario and post your findings to the discussion group. Work your
way through the task then go to the Beaching and refloating activity at the end of the task to complete
your report.

Ahoy there. Do you remember the original scenario? It is now time to put all you have learnt into practise.
For a final assessment you will need to complete a Practical demonstration. Click on Pete for a copy of
the Record Sheet. When you have successfully completed all of these tasks, have your master sign off on
them, and then forward to your on-line facilitator.

Activities
     Beaching and refloating the vessel
     Record sheet

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Facilitate an online discussion on the effect of load on maneuverability.

Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Encourage learners to visit a boat sales yard and inspect underwater profiles of different vessels.

Alternative approaches
Activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Role play marine radio transmissions.

Facilitate a practical workshop on berthing and unberthing, mooring and anchoring a vessel.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:



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      Provided examples of incorrect loading your vessel
      Diagram of vessel correctly loaded
      Position passengers and load their cargo activity
      Given detail of communication equipment
      VRM information
      All details of your journey to notify VMR
      Marine radio transmission activity
      Your report for berthing details
      The underwater profile and berthing and unberthing the vessel activities
      Provided briefing details for your crew
      Practiced using spring lines
      Prepare for mooring and anchor activity
      Check the anchor is secured, the stopper fitted, winch brake on, spurling pipe and any other
       openings made watertight
      Heavy objects or cargo that could be safely stowed below decks should be shifted and properly
       secured
      Deck cleared of any loose debris or equipment. All equipment on deck is made secure
      All watertight doors, hatch covers and openings to below deck secured and water tight
      Freeing ports and scuppers checked to see they are free and working and a deck lifeline rigged
      Bilges should be pumped, and any tanks, if possible, either emptied or pressed up to reduce loss
       of stability through “free surface” effect
      Perform routine checks and maintenance on the engine and steering gear
      Life saving and fire fighting appliances, flares, grab bag and lifejackets within easy reach
      Put position on chart and report to a shore station with a radio check
      Have a meal and prepare simple food for later
      The beaching and refloating activity
      The procedure for beaching and refloating a vessel and posted to the discussion board
      The practical activity and forwarded record sheet to your facilitator




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TDMMH701A – Apply weather information when navigating a small
vessel
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to predict meteorological and ocean conditions and
apply them to ensure the safe navigation of a small commercial vessel, including deciphering and
applying information obtained from observations, reports and instruments, reliably and accurately
calculating tides in accordance with official tide charts and forecasting weather for an intended near
coastal voyage using all available data.

The unit is consistent with the relevant functional standards in the Australian USL Code.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Obtaining and                       Ocean and weather conditions are observed and correctly
    deciphering weather                  interpreted in accordance with established nautical and
    and oceanographic                    meteorological practice
    information                         Basic measurements of meteorological parameters are
                                         correctly made and recorded using established procedures
                                        Relevant meteorological charts, publications and related
                                         documentation are updated, stored and maintained
                                        Weather information is accessed on the Internet, where
                                         applicable
                                        Relevant navigational charts, nautical publications and related
                                         documentation are used for voyage planning and identification
                                         of navigational hazards in accordance with established
                                         procedures

 2. Applying weather and                Weather and ocean condition hazards relevant to a proposed
    oceanographic data to                voyage are identified using relevant forecasts based on
    safe navigation                      interpretation of meteorological observations, reports and
                                         measurements
                                        The route for a voyage is modified as required to take into
                                         account weather and sea condition hazards in accordance with
                                         established navigational practice

 3. Maintain records of                 Meteorological measurements, observations, reports and
    weather and                          forecasts are recorded and filed in accordance with company
    oceanographic                        procedures and regulatory requirements
    information and                     Modifications to the routing of a planned coastal voyage due to
    forecasts                            forecast weather and ocean condition hazards are recorded
                                         and filed in accordance with established procedures




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Job: Apply weather information when navigating a small vessel

Scenario:
Final preparations are underway for your clients, Mr & Mrs Jones who have booked the 21-metre yacht
“Seaspray” for a 1-week voyage along the inshore passage. Before they arrive, you are required to
observe and interpret weather conditions, apply weather conditions to the planned voyage and record
your observations and measurements in the meteorological section of the ships logbook.

Task List
    1. Observing weather conditions
    2. Apply and record weather and ocean conditions

Task 1 – Observing weather conditions
Ahoy me Matey‟s, ready for another challenge? To ensure the safe navigation of the vessel, Mr & Mrs
Jones need to know how to observe ocean and weather conditions and interpret this information.

Your task is to provide a list of the following information:
     Where to access information about the weather
     How to observe ocean and weather conditions
     How to correctly take basic measurements of meteorological parameters and record the
         information using established procedures
     How to interpret this information in relation to the proposed voyage of Mr & Mrs Jones
     How often they will need to check forecasts
You will need to prepare the information you source as a document for your clients to be able to refer to in
the course of their voyage.

As Mr. & Mrs Jones will arrive next week, collect the relevant weather information you need to plan their
voyage, from the Bureau of Meteorology's web site at:
http://www.bom.gov.au and post it to the discussion board.

Tidal Features
     Are there any special tidal features, which occur in your area that will be affected by changes to
        weather and ocean conditions?
     Think about and note any that you may tell Mr. & Mrs Jones about.
     Go to the following website for a brief explanation of the basic astronomical factors: co-
        ops.nos.noaa.gov.
     What sources of information would be most suitable for Mr & Mrs Jones‟s voyage?
     Prepare notes to be able to explain to Mr & Mrs Jones how to use the instruments needed for the
        voyage.
     Post these to the discussion board and compare with other students.

Tools
       Introduction to meteorology
       A guide to Australia‟s marine forecasts and warnings
       Air masses
       High and low pressures
       Tidal effects
       Calculation tide heights

Activities
     Introduction to meteorology
     High and low pressure




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Task 2 - Apply and record weather and ocean conditions
Ahoy, fair weather sailing? To complete this task you will need an understanding of gale conditions and
cyclones; the appropriate actions and solutions needed under these conditions and the means of
securing a vessel in a cyclone warning.

What impact will the information you have learned in task 1 have on the planned voyage for Mr & Mrs
Jones?
    Identify safe anchorage points in the area
    Complete a contingency plan for their voyage in case of weather and ocean condition hazards
Forward to your facilitator for assessment.

Practical Activity:
     Go to the Bureau of Meteorology's web site at: http://www.bom.gov.au
     Locate 2 weather maps depicting good weather conditions and 2 maps depicting bad weather
        conditions for your region
     Explain how the relevant pressure systems are influencing this in each scenario
     With the assistance of your Master/Facilitator, tune into a marine radio broadcast for a “routine
        coastal waters and high seas forecasts and warnings”
Record the relevant weather information announced for your region and forward to your facilitator.

Now you need to compile all the information you need to keep on file for the planned voyage, including:
    Meteorological measurements, observations, reports and forecasts
    Details of how you would instruct Mr & Mrs Jones to radio in to give details of changes to their
        planned voyage due to forecast weather and ocean condition hazards
    Record all these modifications to the route planned and include a copy of the contingency plan
Then forward to your facilitator.

Tools
    Instruments and observations
    Tropical revolving storms (TRS)

Activities
     Tropical revolving storms (TRS)
     Tide tables

Teachers role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Moderate posting to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment of
each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Provide learners with a weather map and facilitate a group discussion on interpreting the map in relation
to planning a voyage.

Post tide table and tidal depth calculations questions to discussion board.

Facilitate discussion on impact of weather and ocean conditions on voyage planning.

To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
The information list for weather conditions in a document for your clients
     The relevant weather information from the Bureau of Meteorology to plan the voyage


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      Posted your tidal features findings to the discussion board
      Introduction to meteorology and high and low pressure activities
      Identified the impact on the planned voyage, safe anchorage & contingency plan. Forwarded to
       your facilitator
      Practical weather map activity
      Compile all the information needed for the voyage and forwarded to your facilitator
      Tropical revolving storms (TRS) and tide tables activities




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TDMMH801A – Plan and navigate an inshore passage
This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to plan and navigate an inshore passage for a small
commercial vessel and determine the vessel‟s position. This includes the use of coastal navigational
charts to plan and conduct the passage and the application of coastal navigational techniques involving a
range of instrumentation and navigational aids.

The unit is consistent with the related functional standard in the Australian USL Code.

 Element                         Performance Criteria


 1. Use and care for coastal             Coastal navigational charts, nautical publications and related
    navigational charts,                  documentation are handled and used in ways that ensure
    nautical publications                 continued availability, utility and length of life
    and related                          Navigational charts, nautical publications and related
    documentation                         documentation are stored and maintained in accordance with
                                          established procedures and chart/publication publisher‟s
                                          instructions
                                         Navigational charts, nautical publications, notices to mariners
                                          and related documentation are filed in accordance with
                                          established procedures
                                         Coastal navigational charts, nautical publications, notices to
                                          mariners and related documentation are correctly used for
                                          voyage planning and identification of navigational hazards

 2. Plan route for inshore               Navigational hazards relevant to a proposed inshore voyage
    voyage                                are identified using relevant navigational charts, nautical
                                          publications and related documentation
                                         The route for an inshore voyage is determined in accordance
                                          with operational instructions and navigational principles and
                                          taking due account of identified navigational hazards
                                         Critical points along the proposed route of the voyage are
                                          identified and recorded
                                         Appropriate actions to deal with the identified critical points
                                          are developed
                                         Potential navigational contingencies and problems that may
                                          occur along the planned inshore route are identified and
                                          appropriate strategies for dealing with them are developed
                                          and recorded

 3. Conduct an inshore                   Measurements and observations of sea and weather
    passage                               conditions are accurate and appropriate to the planned
                                          inshore passage of the small vessel
                                         Meteorological information and observations of sea and
                                          weather conditions are correctly interpreted and applied to
                                          decisions on the vessel‟s speed and direction
                                         Information from navigation systems is interpreted and
                                          applied to identify navigational hazards and to fix the small
                                          vessel‟s position and to enable decisions to be made
                                          concerning the vessel‟s speed and direction



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                                        The selection of the mode of steering is the most appropriate
                                         for the prevailing weather, sea and traffic conditions and
                                         intended manoeuvres
                                        Required alterations to the small vessel‟s course or speed
                                         are made taking into account prevailing weather and sea
                                         conditions, the proximity and course of other vessels,
                                         relevant navigational hazards, buoyage, signage and overall
                                         passage plan requirements
                                        Alterations to the small vessel‟s course and speed are
                                         appropriate to prevailing circumstances and conditions,
                                         comply with relevant maritime regulations and do not put at
                                         risk the safety of the small vessel or its passengers and crew
                                         or that of other vessels, passengers or crew
                                        Signals relevant for navigational manoeuvres are made at
                                         the appropriate time in accordance with Australian and
                                         international regulations
                                        Operational limits of vessel propulsion, steering, power
                                         systems and overall trim and stability are not exceeded
                                         during navigational manoeuvres

 4. Fix small vessel‟s                  Primary position fixing method is selected in accordance with
    position within a limited            prevailing conditions
    area                                Position is fixed using the selected method using information
                                         derived from relevant navigational systems
                                        Checks are made for random, instrument, system and data
                                         errors and appropriate corrections and allowances are made
                                         to derived courses and bearings
                                        Time interval between fixes is appropriate to the prevailing
                                         navigational conditions
                                        Verification of primary position fixing is regularly carried out
                                         using appropriate methods
                                        Performance checks and tests of navigation position fixing
                                         instruments and systems are carried out in accordance with
                                         company procedures and manufacturer‟s instructions
                                        Position of small vessel is recorded in accordance with
                                         regulations and established procedures

 5. Document and report          Planned route for a small vessel‟s inshore voyage is recorded and
    planned route and            reported in accordance with procedures and regulations
    passage                      Plans and strategies for dealing with critical situations and
                                 contingencies along the route of an inshore voyage are recorded
                                 Details of an inshore passage including navigational incidents and
                                 related action taken are recorded in the vessel‟s log in accordance
                                 with relevant maritime regulations

Job: Plan & Navigate an Inshore Passage.

Scenario:
Mr & Mrs Jones will be arriving at the end of the week. They have booked the 21-metre yacht, “Sea
Spray”, from your marina for a 1-week inshore voyage. In preparation, you will need to use navigational
charts to plan the passage; this will involve using a range of instrumentation and navigational aids.




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Your plan should consist of charts to be used for the voyage clearly showing the intended course. A
notebook containing information relevant to the passage will need to be prepared for Mr & Mrs Jones and
should be forwarded to your master/facilitator at the end of the “Job”.

Notebook Plan - Include as a minimum:
    The proposed course and the distance on each leg of the voyage
    Tidal data
    Waypoint positions
    A list of navigation hazards in the passage
    A list of navigation aids that Mr & Mrs Jones should use
    An outline of possible problems and a contingency plan to deal with them

Tasks
    1.   Selecting charts & publications
    2.   Plan, document & report on route for inshore voyage
    3.   Fix small vessel‟s position within a limited area
    4.   Conduct an inshore passage

Task 1 – Selecting charts & publications
Hi, I am Captain Pete, your “Marine Master” & supervisor for today‟s tasks. Your overall task is to plan the
navigation of the inshore passage for Mr & Mrs Jones‟s upcoming voyage.

You will need to be able to explain to Mr & Mrs Jones how to use and care for Navigational charts,
nautical publications and related documents.

Go to http://www.hydro.gov.au/ and locate a chart for your local area and write down its Chart No., Title,
Scale, current edition date, recommended retail price. Locate the nearest chart agent listed. Post this
information to the discussion board. Look at the information provided by the other learners and comment
on the findings of at least one other person.

When navigating an inshore passage within different States or Territories throughout Australia, various
publications are required to supplement your charts. Your local State Authority determines these
publications. Find out which publications are required in your state and their purpose. Post this
information to the discussion board. Compare your findings with learners from other areas.

Visit the website for your state/territory that provides Notices to Mariners and identify the information that
would be useful to you in ensuring that your chart is current. Add your findings to your notebook.

DISTANCE & BEARING
    Using various local charts, identify a distance of one nautical mile, i.e. 1 minute of latitude
    Compare one minute of latitude to one minute of longitude
    Determine a course bearing
Ask your master/facilitator to assess you.

Tools
        Navigational charts
        Nautical publications
        Chart maintenance
        Notice to mariners
        Using charts

Activities
     Chart corrections
     Storage and maintenance
     Updating corrections


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       Notice to mariners

Task 2 - Plan, document & report on route for inshore voyage
Hi again from Captain Pete! Ready for your next task? For this Task, you will need to use your charts
from the previous section to identify navigational hazards for the proposed voyage for Mr & Mrs Jones‟s
inshore passage. Ensure your route for the inshore voyage is planned in accordance with operational
instructions and navigational principles.

Next, you need to prepare a record book for the Seaspray. Download COMMERCIAL AND FISHING
SHIP OPERATING DOCUMENTS to determine which documents are not relevant to your vessel, and
then complete the necessary documentation for your vessel type.

Your Record Book should contain information relevant to the passage.
This information should include as a minimum:
     List of crew/passengers
     Weather conditions
     Course deviation and reason
     Compass checks
     Fuel consumption
     Any problems or variations to the voyage plan and the reason for it

Tools
       Buoyage
       Safe water marks
       Cardinal marks
       Lateral marks
       Isolated danger marks
       Record books
       Selection of route

Activities
     Cardinal marks
     Lateral marks
     Identify marks
     Determining route of passage

Task 3 - Fix small vessel’s position within a limited area
Hi! In this task you will demonstrate your understanding of primary fixing method in accordance with
prevailing conditions, using information from relevant navigational systems.

Plot your position
While your clients are aboard “Seaspray”, you will need to be able to plot their position on a chart from a
given longitude and latitude. Before they arrive, I want you to practice plotting the position of another
vessel. Use your GPS readings to plot the position of a vessel on your chart. Ask your Master for
assistance.

Post your findings on the discussion board showing the degree of reliance that can be placed on the GPS
system. Review and comment on one other posting from another student.

Tools
       Plotting position
       Fixing position
       Compass error
       Speed and distance



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Activities
     Speed and distance
     Deviation
     Magnetic variation

Task 4 - Conduct an inshore passage
Hi there this is Captain Pete again, with a final check to see if you are ready to put everything you have
learnt into practice. Before we do, there are just a few more tasks to complete. In this section we will look
at the effects of the tide, currents and water depths.

Proceeding at 6 knots or slow ahead, apply 15 of starboard helm and complete a 360° turn. Provide your
Facilitator or Master the following observations during the turn:
     How far did the vessel advance and transfer before it was 90° off the original track?
     How far are you displaced off your original track half way through the turn (known as tactical
         diameter)?
     Complete the turn. Has your vessel turned inside the wake? (Final diameter)
Complete the same manoeuvre, using 10 or 12 knots.

Monitor your vessel's log speed or GPS speed over the ground whilst altering course to determine the
speed loss whilst turning.

Tools
       Tidal effects
       Calculating tide heights
       Manoeuvring a vessel
       International regulations for preventing collisions at sea
       Sound and light signals

Activities
     Tide tables
     Head on – manoeuvring and warning signals
     Manoeuvring through buoys and marks
     Intending to overtake – manoeuvring and warning signals
     Sound signals in restricted viability
     Manoeuvring a vessel
     Navigation record sheet

Teacher’s role
Become familiar with the job and tasks. Make sure you have read the tools and are familiar with the
activities.

Provide feedback on tasks and activities. Direct learners to appropriate learning tools to further develop
their skills as required. In this case, you should be sure students plan is clear, logical and appropriate for
the voyage intended

Moderate postings to the discussion board by providing feedback and encouraging students to comment
of each others postings. Provide feedback on tasks and activities.

Alternative approaches
The discussion board activities may be used for small group discussions in face to face classes.

Instead of using the graphical representation of the inshore passage you may like to use a chart of your
local area or another one more relevant to your learners.



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To finalise this unit of competency the learner will need to complete the following:
     Started your notebook (see Scenario) and included the following:
              o Care & use of charts for the Jones‟s
              o Storage & Maintenance procedures for Seaspray
              o Your explanation for Mr & Mrs Jones regarding navigational hazards
              o Noted details of correct chart & where to purchase it
              o Identified useful information from mariners website
     Obtained all necessary charts required
     Publications posted to discussion board
     Been assessed by your master for distance & bearing
     Chart corrections, storage and maintenance, updating corrections and notice to mariners
         activities
     Record of critical points recorded in notebook
     Prepared your record book for the Seaspray
     AMSA form for your notebook
     Added your record of strategies for navigational contingencies to your notebook
     Cardinal marks, lateral marks, identify marks and determining route of passage activities
     Posted your GPS findings on the discussion board & recorded your review in notebook
     Added the following to your notebook:
              o Noted your radar ranges & compass bearings
              o Noted bearings from coastal features
              o Your calculations for speed & distance
     Speed and distance, deviation and magnetic variation and activities
     Sourced your local & current tide table
     Added the following to your notebook:
              o Special tidal features in your area
              o Depth of water at arrival & departure times
              o Your explanation on how to use lights, buoyage & coastal features
              o Signal Mr & Mrs Jones are required to use
     Tide tables, head on – manoeuvring and warning signals, manoeuvring through buoys and
         marks, intending to overtake – manoeuvring and warning signals, sound signals in restricted
         viability, manoeuvring a vessel and navigation record sheet activities




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