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					University of
 Aberdeen



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                                                         Contents


The University ............................................................................................................ 3
The International Education Office ...................................................................... 3
Location ....................................................................................................................... 4
Accommodation ........................................................................................................ 5
Transport ..................................................................................................................... 7
    Getting to Aberdeen ............................................................................................... 7
    Getting Around Aberdeen ...................................................................................... 8
Application Procedures .......................................................................................... 10
    ERASMUS Application Deadlines ...................................................................... 10
Academics ................................................................................................................. 11
    Advising ............................................................................................................... 12
    Grading and Credit Transfer ................................................................................ 13
    A Million-Volume Library .................................................................................. 14
    New Library Project ............................................................................................. 14
    Computing & Help Desk Services ....................................................................... 14
    ASPIRE ................................................................................................................ 15
    Student Learning Service ..................................................................................... 15
    Museums & Special Collections .......................................................................... 15
    High-Tech Language Learning ............................................................................ 15
Student Matters ........................................................................................................ 16
    Student Advice and Support Office ..................................................................... 16
    Looking after your Health .................................................................................... 16
    Religion ................................................................................................................ 16
    International Student Support .............................................................................. 17
    Student Tips ......................................................................................................... 17




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                                   The University

Founded in 1495, the University of Aberdeen is one of the UK's most internationally
distinguished universities. It has a student population of around 14,000 and a large
international community of students drawn from 120 different countries.
Here you'll find study options to suit your academic interests, and social and leisure
activities that will contribute to your overall well-being, enjoyment and personal
growth.

The University has an excellent reputation for teaching quality and research, and, over
the years, four Nobel Prizes have been awarded for work carried out or begun at
Aberdeen. 85% of our departments are recognised as centres of national and
international excellence, with students being taught by people who are at the forefront
of research in their particular fields.

The University is at the forefront in many areas of arts and social sciences, in science,
computing, engineering and technology, and in ground-breaking disciplines focused
firmly on the 21st century, such as Bio-Medical Computing Science.

The University has a beautiful central campus where ancient buildings sit side by side
with modern, newly refurbished laboratories, first-class computing facilities, and the
latest library technology. The University promotes a multi-national, multi-faith
community.


                       The International Education Office

The Erasmus Unit is based in the Registry, University Office, of the University of
Aberdeen. The Erasmus Unit will be your main point of contact for queries regarding
your application to study at Aberdeen and your status during your time in Aberdeen.

You are welcome to e-mail the Erasmus Unit with any queries you may have prior to
or during your time in Aberdeen. You will understand that the Erasmus Unit receives
a large volume of e-mail and staff will respond to enquiries as soon as reasonably
possible.

Once in Aberdeen, if you have documentation to be signed or require a letter
confirming your status as an Erasmus student, you should come to the front counter of
the Student Reception, University Office, King‟s College. You should make it clear
that the request is for the attention of the Erasmus Unit and this will be passed on for
staff to deal with as soon as they are able to do so. You will be able to collect the
documentation from the front counter when it has been prepared.

Please note that you do not need to see the Institutional Coordinator in person to
obtain a signature and should ensure that you leave sufficient time for documentation
to be handed in to be completed.

If you have a serious or difficult problem which you wish to discuss, you may make
an appointment to see the Institutional Erasmus Coordinator in person. Should you


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wish to make an appointment, you may do so via e-mail or at the front counter of the
Student Reception, University Office.

Usual office hours for the University Office are Monday to Friday, from 9.30 am to
4.30 pm. Should you have any queries regarding your academic position, please
address these to your Departmental Erasmus Coordinator/Adviser of Studies.

Institutional Erasmus Coordinator: Dr Shona Potts


                                     Erasmus Unit
                              Registry, University Office
                                    King‟s College
                                       Aberdeen
                                   AB24 3FX, UK

                               Tel: +44 (0)1224 273664
                              Fax: +44 (0)1224 273386
                            E-mail: Erasmus@abdn.ac.uk
                           http://www.abdn.ac.uk/Erasmus


                                      Location

Aberdeen (Scottish Gaelic: Obar Dheathain) is Scotland's third largest city, with a
population of about 202,000. Aberdeen is the county town of Aberdeenshire, and the
chief seaport in the northeast of Scotland. Aberdeen is commonly referred to
variously as "the Granite City", or the "Silver City" on account of the grey,
occasionally sparkling building stone used in older buildings in the city; and the
"Flower of Scotland", Aberdeen long having been famous for outstanding parks,
gardens and floral displays. These days, Aberdeen also boasts the title of Oil Capital
of Europe thanks to the supply of crude oil in the North Sea, and stands on a bay of
the North Sea, between the mouths of the rivers Don and Dee.

Aberdeen is a relatively small city. It has a harbour and pleasant beach. It has a
distinct identity from other Scottish cities, especially the two largest, Edinburgh and
Glasgow, in the Central Belt. It has some of the oldest university buildings in Europe
(King's College was founded in 1495).

After the discovery of oil in the North Sea, the city expanded greatly and several new
suburbs were formed. The city has seen continued growth ever since, and a range of
new developments are planned over the next few years. The district of Bridge of Don
has become, in just thirty years, one of the largest suburbs in Europe, and is one of
many areas of the city which retains the feel of a village in parts. Perhaps the best
examples of this are the line of suburbs stretching towards Royal Deeside, including
Cults and Peterculter.

Although English is spoken, accents and local dialects in many parts of the UK can
seem confusing to visitors, even native English speakers. The local Aberdeen dialect



                                                                                          4
is Doric, very different from what is heard in other parts of Scotland. At first hearing,
it may seem utterly impenetrable, even to other Scots. It has its origins in the farming
communities nearby and is not as spoken as widely as it used to be. However, there is
still a good chance you will encounter the dialect on your travels, so here are a few
commonly used words with translations:

      "Fit like?" - A greeting, essentially, "How are you doing?".
      "Nae bad foos yersel?" - A reply, essentially, "Not bad, how about you?".
      "Fit?" - "What?"
      "Fa?" - "Who?"
      "Far?" - "Where?"
      "Aye" - "Yes"
      "Na'" - "No" (usually, an n sound followed by a vowel constitutes "no")
      "Wee" - "Little", though this famous Doric word has become common in other
       areas worldwide nowadays.
      "Dinnae ken" - "Don't know"
      "H'min" - "Excuse me good sir?"
      "Fan"- “When?”
      "far aboot ye fae?" – “Where are you from?
      "ben a / eh hoose" - "Through the house/in the other room"
      "gie" - "Very"

                                  Accommodation

University accommodation is normally available for all visiting students who submit
their application by the deadlines. Students wishing to apply for university
accommodation are required to complete an Application for Accommodation form.
This will be sent to you by post only once your application for admission to the
University of Aberdeen has been approved by the relevant Departmental Erasmus
Coordinator. It is very important that you complete the Application for
Accommodation form and return it to the Erasmus Unit as soon as you receive it. If
you return the forms late, there is no guarantee that accommodation will be available.

Completed application forms for accommodation should be submitted to the Erasmus
Unit. Once it has been recorded, your application form will be passed on to the
Student Accommodation Office, which is responsible for allocating accommodation.
If you have further queries relating to accommodation at this point, you should
contact the Student Accommodation Office directly by e-mailing
studentaccomm@abdn.ac.uk. Please note that staff in the Erasmus Unit are not in a
position to answer any query relating to the progress of your application.

The Student Accommodation Office will contact you directly regarding the allocation
of accommodation, the deposit required and details of payment methods. Please bear
in mind that the Student Accommodation Office has to process applications from very
large numbers of students, which takes some time. Staff are not in a position to
respond to queries immediately, as their priority at busy times of year is the allocation
of accommodation. You will receive full instructions when your accommodation has
been allocated. You should follow these carefully. It is your responsibility to read
your accommodation contract carefully. If you are unsure of anything, you should
contact the Student Accommodation Office directly. By signing the accommodation


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contract you are entering into a legally binding agreement. Please note that no money
related to accommodation should be sent to the Erasmus Unit.
      You will find information about university accommodation on the University
web-pages at:

                       http://www.abdn.ac.uk/accommodation.shtml

Accommodation contracts can be signed on a term or semester basis. If you are not
sure how long you will wish to stay in University accommodation, it is better to
request a shorter accommodation lease. If you sign a contract for a full year but later
decide that you wish to leave after one semester, you may be charged for the full year.
Should you arrive late after the start of the semester, or leave early, you will be
charged for the full duration of your accommodation lease. You may choose either
self-catering accommodation (an apartment with a shared kitchen) or catered
accommodation (breakfast and dinner provided). Apartments are allocated either to
groups of male or female students. It is not possible for males and females to share an
apartment and double rooms are not available to undergraduate students.
      Most visiting students are offered accommodation in Hillhead Halls of
Residence, the University‟s largest complex of student accommodation, which is
within walking distance of King‟s College and served by a frequent bus service to
King‟s College. Hillhead Halls of Residence have a 24-hour security presence and
each Hall has a sub-warden who can be contacted if you are experiencing difficulties
of a personal or practical nature.
      Further details about accommodation at Hillhead Halls of Residence are
available at the following website:

                  http://www.abdn.ac.uk/accommodation/hillhead5.shtml


Private Accommodation

The University of Aberdeen cannot provide guidance on applying for
accommodation in the private sector. Student accommodation is available in the
private sector, but it can be expensive. Short term leases may not be possible as most
leases will be for a calendar year. Should you be interested in looking for private
accommodation, there are many estate agents and solicitors‟ offices which advertise
property for rent. You may wish to consult the following web pages which contain
information gathered from the individual websites of many companies:
http://www.aspc.co.uk/

The Information and Advice Centre, based in the Hub at King‟s College, will have
details of accommodation available on a private basis. Please see
http://www.ausa.org.uk/advice/accommodation for more information. Many students
also place adverts for rooms available in shared accommodation on noticeboards all
over the University.

Before signing a lease on private accommodation, it is essential that you are fully
aware of the implications of the document, because it will be legally binding.




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When to Arrive

If you are staying in university accommodation, you will be informed by the Student
Accommodation Office of the date when your accommodation is available.
Accommodation is usually available from the Saturday preceding the first day of the
first semester or the Sunday preceding the first day of the second semester. Should
you wish to arrive before these dates, you will need to arrange additional vacation
accommodation by contacting Hillhead Halls of Residence directly
(hillhead.halls@abdn.ac.uk). The Student Accommodation Office and the Erasmus
Unit cannot help you to arrange accommodation outside the semester dates. Please
note that there is no need to arrive a week (or more) before the start of the semester,
as all advising procedures are organised in the first week. You are expected to arrive
in Aberdeen in time for the first Monday of the semester.

Cost of Living

It is estimated that students will require a minimum of £400 per month to cover
accommodation and food, and about £2,000 per academic year to cover all other
costs (for example books, stationery, laundry/cleaning, telephone, postage, travel,
sport/leisure). Please note that these are intended as guidelines only. Aberdeen is
quite an expensive city to live in and how much you spend will depend on your
individual lifestyle.

Please note that as an Erasmus student you may be eligible for an Erasmus Mobility
Grant payable by your home institution; however, you are unlikely to be able to
apply for extra funding in the UK. Additional funding for Erasmus students is not
available from the University of Aberdeen.




                                      Transport
Getting to Aberdeen

If your accommodation is in Hillhead Halls of Residence, it will be possible to gain
access to your room at any time, as there is a 24-hour security presence. If your
accommodation is not in Hillhead Halls of Residence and you intend to arrive outside
working hours (normally 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.), it is advisable to make alternative
arrangements for your first night in Aberdeen.

During the weekend preceding Freshers‟ Week in the first semester, the Students‟
Association normally runs a shuttle bus service from the Airport to Halls of
Residence. Unfortunately, if you arrive at another time, you will have to make your
own way to your accommodation.

By Air
Dyce Airport is situated 7 miles from the city centre. The airport offers a wide range
of domestic and international flights. Buses run from the airport to the city centre


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throughout the day. The nearest railway station is Dyce, and connects to stations in
Aberdeen and Inverness. Taxis are available outside the terminal and will cost around
£20 to Aberdeen City Centre.

At present Ryan Air is the only courier to fly directly from Ireland to Aberdeen on
their Dublin route. However, Air Ryan, Aer Lingus, and Aer Arann all fly from
Dublin, Cork, and Shannon to either of the major two Scottish cities, Edinburgh and
Glasgow, where you can than proceed by train to Aberdeen.

Train
Aberdeen Station is located right in the middle of town, next to the Harbour and Bus
Station, slightly down from Union Street. Services come from the south via Perth, and
the north to Elgin, Inverness and similar places.

The three main operators serving Aberdeen are:

      National Express East Coast: Three trains a day serve the major east coast
       cities (Edinburgh, Newcastle, York and terminate in London‟s King's Cross
       Station.)
      ScotRail: Serves all the major Scottish hubs, including Glasgow, Edinburgh,
       Dundee and Inverness. Also includes the Caledonian Sleeper to London‟s
       Euston Station.
      Virgin Trains: Serves a range of destinations on the cross-country route,
       including Carlisle, Manchester and Birmingham. Some services stretch all the
       way down to Penzance in southwest England - the UK's longest train journey.

A Young Person‟s Railcard, which gives reductions on rail travel, can be purchased at
rail stations or online at:
http://www.youngpersons-railcard.co.uk/

You will be required to provide proof of full-time student status. Taxis from the
railway station to the University cost around £6.00.


Car
Aberdeen lies halfway along the long A90 arterial road that hugs the eastern North
Sea coast of Scotland between Dundee and Peterhead. With relative ease this permits
access by car from points across Britain.




Getting Around Aberdeen

Walking
The main city centre is quite easy to navigate by foot and there are quite a few
pedestrian maps located around the city centre, mainly in points of interest. They are




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very useful for navigating the rather random layout of the city centre, and also give
details of where to go to catch a particular bus.

Train
Aberdeen does not have a particularly good rail service to the local outlying areas, but
it does exist. The station is located on Guild Street next to the bus station (just south
of Union Street). The local services run to:

         Dyce - On the northwest of the city along the Inverness line. This is an
         option for travelling to the airport, but you have to catch a taxi (these are
         generally easily available but a bit pricey). Believe it or not, the day return
         (£2.60) is slightly cheaper than catching the bus (£2.70 for a day pass). This
         is certainly a preferable way to travel in rush hour, too, as the journey time is
         10 minutes as opposed to the hour-plus it takes on the bus. There are plenty
         of trains, though the frequency is quite scattered. The station is located just
         off the main street.

         Inverurie - The next stop up the line from Dyce. Trains are less frequent
         than to Dyce, but the service has benefited recently from the addition of
         some extra journeys. The station is located a short walk from the town
         centre.

         Portlethen - The first stop south on the Dundee/Glasgow/Edinburgh line.
         There are extremely few services stopping here. The station is located on the
         east of the town on the road to the old village. A walk from here to the main
         shopping area will take you around 10-15 minutes; there are buses that run
         every 20 minutes just outside the station if you need to use them.

         Stonehaven - The next stop down from Portlethen. Trains are fairly frequent
         (at least once an hour). Buses to Stonehaven centre depart from the hotel
         across from the station, or you can walk. (10-20 minutes depending on your
         speed).

Bus
Aberdeen has a fairly decent bus network, though it is expensive to use (there are no
multi-operator tickets either). The city is served by 2 operators: First and Stagecoach.
On the whole, buses are modern and fairly comfortable. If you are connecting buses,
it should be noted that you'll probably have to change in the city centre as that's where
the majority of services run through/terminate.

First's services are entirely within the city boundary, although they do serve the
suburbs of Dyce, Cults & Culter and Kingswells. The network, branded as „The
Overground‟, is based on a colour-coded system, with all the main lines having a
colour while the secondary lines are left grey on the map, which is in the style of that
of the London Underground. This makes it fairly easy to find your way around.
Services begin around 5am and end close to midnight, with night services running at
weekends.




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Fares are based on a fare-stage system and cost from 70p for a short journey to £1.60
for a longer one. Day passes are available for £3 (£2.70 after 9am). Show a valid
student ID for a discount on the day pass (£2).

Stagecoach runs the services to outside the city boundary. Locations closer to
Aberdeen generally have more frequent services (for example, a 15 minute frequency
to the suburb of Westhill) than those further out. In addition to this, they run 1 service
within the city boundary (the 59).

For single fares, Stagecoach is generally a cheaper option within the city than First,
but they lack the frequency and network of First. Fares are based on destination;
however, there is a day pass called the Explorer which, for £11, allows you unlimited
use of the entire Stagecoach network in the area (as far out as Montrose or Peterhead,
for example).

Taxi
Taxis are widely available from a number of ranks dotted around the city centre. The
main ranks are located on Back Wynd, Market Street and the railway station. There
are more located further up Union Street. Taxis can be difficult to come by at night
due to a shortage of them (ranks are patrolled by marshals at night on special nights)
and can actually be difficult to flag down on the street as many drivers do not give
any indication if they're available for hire. Fares are expensive.

Bicycle
Due to the many narrow roads and inadequate lane provisions, riding a bicycle can be
rather treacherous at times. Cycle lanes are appearing, as are cycle „boxes‟ at traffic
lights, so the situation is getting better for those who cycle. It's getting easier to park a
cycle, too; the council is beginning to provide loops for chaining bikes within the city
centre streets and within the municipal multi-storey car parks.

It is possible to cycle from Aberdeen city centre to Peterculter along the Old Deeside
Railway line. The line begins just outside Duthie Park and passes through Garthdee,
Cults, Bieldside and Milltimber before ending at Station Road. It is mostly paved,
with very few breaks where it is necessary to cross the road. It is very scenic and
relaxing, and is also used by people walking dogs, riding horses, other cyclists, and
other people just enjoying a stroll, so being courteous is a must. There are signs
placed along the line with bits of history about the line and how it came to be.




                                Application Procedures


Erasmus Application Deadlines
Erasmus applications for study at the University of Aberdeen in the first semester
should be submitted before 15 June and well in advance of this date if possible.
Applications for the second semester should be submitted before 1 November and
well in advance of this date if possible.


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The University of Aberdeen reserves the right to reject applications submitted after
these dates. Late applicants should note that they will have difficulty in gaining places
in university accommodation and may have a restricted choice of courses.



                                      Academics

     First Semester

     Freshers‟ Week & Registration:
     Tuesday 23 September 2008 – Friday 26 September 2008

     Teaching:
     Monday 29 September 2008 – Friday 19 December 2008

     Vacation:
     Saturday 20 December – Sunday 11 January 2009

     Private Revision (no classes)
     Monday 12 January 2009 – Friday 16 January 2009

     Exams:
     Saturday 17 January 2009 – Friday 30 January 2009

      Second Semester

     Registration for second semester arrivals & Teaching:
     Monday 2 February 2009 – Friday 27 March 2009

     Vacation:
     Saturday 28 March 2009– Sunday 19 April 2009

     Teaching:
     Monday 20 April 2009 – Friday 15 May 2009

     Private Revision (no classes)
     Monday 18 May 2009 – Friday 22 May 2009

     Exams:
     Saturday 23 May 2009 – Friday 12 June 2009

It is important to note that examinations for the first semester take place in January. If
you are registered as a student at Aberdeen for the first semester only, or for the full
academic year, you will be expected to return to Aberdeen after the vacation period in
order to sit the January exams. You must be prepared for this and arrange your travel
and budget accordingly. You must not expect special assessment arrangements to be
made for you.



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If you are coming to Aberdeen for the second semester only, please note that there is
no gap between semester one and semester two. For this reason, university-managed
accommodation for the second semester cannot be made available until Sunday 1
February and teaching begins on Monday 2 February 2009. It is therefore important
that you see your Departmental Coordinator/Adviser of Studies as soon as possible
after your arrival in order to complete the registration process and begin attending
classes without any delay.



Advising

When they arrive in Aberdeen to register at the University, all Erasmus students must
meet their Departmental Erasmus Coordinator, who is also their Adviser of Studies.
The details of your Departmental Coordinator/Adviser of Studies will be included in
your acceptance letter. They are the first person you should make contact with when
you arrive and will remain your main academic contact throughout your period of
study in Aberdeen. They will be able to discuss your final course choice with you.
This is known as Advising.

Before your arrival you should contact your Erasmus Coordinator to arrange an
appointment. If you have not been able to make an appointment in advance, you
should go to the appropriate School office when you arrive in Aberdeen to do so. The
Erasmus Unit cannot complete the matriculation process or make an appointment for
you; therefore you must see your Departmental Coordinator as soon as possible after
you arrive.

You are advised to bring with you any correspondence received from your home
university regarding your studies (including a most recent transcript of your academic
record) and at least two passport-size photographs for your Departmental Erasmus
Coordinator.



      Academic Subjects                                 Erasmus Coordinator

      ACCOUNTANCY                                       Mr Alex Arthur
      AGRICULTURE & FORESTRY                            Dr Steve Woodward
      ANTHROPOLOGY                                      Prof Tim Ingold
      CELTIC                                            Dr Clare Downham
      CHEMISTRY                                         Prof Jőrg Feldmann
      COMPUTING SCIENCE                                 Dr Roly Lishman
      ECONOMICS                                         Dr David McCausland
      EDUCATION                                         Mr Rob Grant
      ENGINEERING                                       Prof Tim Spracklen
      ENGLISH                                           Mr J Derrick McClure
      FRENCH                                            Dr Nikolaj Lübecker
      GEOGRAPHY                                         Dr John Loder


                                                                                    12
     GERMAN                                            Dr Gundula Sharman
     HISTORY                                           Dr Christoph Dartmann
     HISTORY OF ART                                    Mr John Gash
     LAW                                               Mr David Lessels
                                                       Prof Robin Evans-Jones (Germany)
     MANAGEMENT STUDIES                                Prof Jeff Hyman
                                                       (08-09 to be confirmed)
     MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES                             Prof Rob Archbold
     MEDICAL SCIENCES/                                 Dr Allison Carrington
     MOLECULAR & CELL BIOLOGY
     MEDICINE & THERAPEUTICS                           Dr Frank Thies
     PHILOSOPHY                                        Dr Peter Baumann
     PLANNING (Formerly Land Economy)                  Dr Bärbel Tress
     PLANT & SOIL SCIENCE                              Dr Michael Swaine
     POLITICS & IR                                     Prof David Arter
     PSYCHOLOGY                                        Dr Peter McGeorge
     SOCIOLOGY                                         Dr Chris Kollmeyer
     SPANISH                                           Dr Nerea Arruti
     ZOOLOGY                                           Dr Jeremy Sternberg


Grading and Credit Transfer


   Aberdeen Credit Point                                  ECTS Credit Value

                             5                                      2.5
                            10                                      5.0
                            15                                      7.5
                            20                                     10.0
                            25                                     12.5
                            30                                     15.0
                            60                                     30.0
                           120                                     60.0


All coursework, class assessments and end of semester examinations at the University
of Aberdeen are graded using the Common Assessment Scale (CAS). The Common
Assessment Scale is comprised of 21 discrete points: 0 to 20, which are grouped into
seven bands. A CAS mark of 9 or above is required to achieve a “Pass” in the course
and to gain the credits for the course. The table below shows how Aberdeen CAS
grades convert to the relevant ECTS grades.


 Aberdeen       Equivalent ECTS      ECTS Definition
 CAS Mark            Grade
   18-20               A             EXCELLENT: outstanding performance with only minor
                                     errors



                                                                                  13
    15-17                 B             VERY GOOD: above the average standard but with some
                                        errors
    13-14                 C             GOOD: generally sound work with a number of notable
                                        errors
    11-12                 D             SATISFACTORY: fair but with significant shortcomings
     9-10                 E             SUFFICIENT: performance meet the minimum criteria
      7-8                FX             FAIL: some more work is required before the credit can be
                                        awarded
      0-6                 F             FAIL: considerable further work is required



A Million-Volume Library

The Library, on four sites over two campuses, is one of the largest and best equipped
in Scotland, offering the very best learning resources to support your studies.
The largest site is Queen Mother Library (arts, social sciences, including the stock of
the former Education Library, and science), with nearly 700 study spaces on six
floors. A further 600 seats are available at the other sites. Also on the Old Aberdeen
campus, the Taylor Library and European Documentation Centre cover law, with
official UK and EU publications; Special Libraries and Archives are housed in King‟s
College. The Medical Library on the Foresterhill Campus is for students of medicine
and medical sciences. All library sites have facilities for disabled users.
We have over one million volumes in our collections, from fascinating ancient papyri
to electronic journals, all easily accessible through our online catalogue. You‟ll find
an extensive range of electronic resources, and, in addition to the clusters of PCs in all
libraries, you can borrow wireless laptops for use within the Queen Mother and
Taylor Libraries, or use your own laptop via the Hotspot service.
For more information visit www.abdn.ac.uk/library.


New Library Project

For five hundred years the library has been at the heart of the University of Aberdeen,
and its collections have provided a focus for our academic community and for
scholars from around the world. As the university has grown, so the existing library
has reached the limit of its resources. The University now plans to create a new,
integrated library which will spearhead our 10-year development programme to
expand our facilities to meet our academic aspirations. To read more on this exciting
development visit www.abdn.ac.uk/newlibrary

Computing & Help Desk Services

Computers are very much a part of student life: word-processing assignments,
communicating via e-mail and searching for information on the Internet are essential
skills. We support a variety of web and computer-based resources, complementing
your studies and allowing you to manage and review coursework at your pace and in
your own time. Our resources include: wireless network access in halls of residence
and all campus buildings by the end of 2007; a student portal through which you can



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view your course enrolments, timetable, accommodation fees, library loans and exam
results; over 1,130 high spec computers distributed across campus and in halls of
residence, many of which have 24-hour access; and your own e-mail account and
200MB on which to store your files. And, you'll be relieved to hear, our IT Help Desk
staff will be there to give you help whenever you need it! There is a Help Desk in the
computing centre and in all the main libraries. Visit www.abdn.ac.uk/dit for more
information. Also, if you wish to purchase your own laptop, we have an agreement
with manufacturers which allows our students to enjoy a significant discount on
certain brands. Visit www.studentstore.co.uk/aberdeen for more information.

ASPIRE

(Aberdeen Skills for Postgraduate Innovation, Research and Employability)

To assist PhD research students with their work, we offer free generic skills courses
run through our ASPIRE programme. These courses aim to provide you with the
skills that are not only relevant to the completion of your PhD, but also to prepare you
for the workplace. Courses on offer include: Academic Writing, Career Planning and
Public Speaking.

Student Learning Service
Critical thinking? Effective assignment writing? Presentation skills? The Student
Learning Service offers individual appointments to postgraduate students to meet with
an Academic Skills Adviser to discuss particular study issues. For more information,
visit www.abdn.ac.uk/sls

Museums & Special Collections
We are very proud of our museums and collections, which are open to both students
and the public and are well worth a visit. Special Libraries and Archives hold over
200,000 printed volumes and 4,000 archive collections, including a great deal of rare
and unusual material. It is complemented by Marischal Museum, which holds
collections of international importance, built up over several centuries. Students from
many departments visit the museum during their studies, and also just to view the
permanent and changing exhibitions and art collections. The University has six other
internationally important museums and collections (Anatomy Museum, Geological
Collections, Herbarium, Natural Philosophy Collection of Scientific Instruments,
Pathology & Forensic Medicine Collections, Zoology Museum), which support taught
courses. Together, the University has the 6th most important museum collection in the
country.
For more information visit www.abdn.ac.uk/diss/historic/museums



High-Tech Language Learning

Our Language Centre is open to all students and staff. The Centre offers excellent
audio, video, computer and satellite television facilities, an extensive library covering
up to 50 different languages, courses for students whose native language is not
English and all the language learning advice and support you need, whether you are
aiming for a degree in languages, planning an exchange visit, have an eye on your


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CV, or are fascinated by other cultures and languages.
www.abdn.ac.uk/languagecentre



                                   Student Matters


Student Advice and Support Office

The University Disability Advisers offer support and guidance and are a first point of
contact for disabled students. You are welcome to contact the Disability Advisers via
e-mail or telephone to discuss your application. You may also choose to visit the
University, to meet academic and support staff and to assess for yourself the facilities
and support structures which are available.

Our International Student Advisers provide specialist guidance on visa/immigration
and other matters. The Student Support Adviser offers confidential, independent
advice and information on a wide range of matters.

Our on-campus Counselling Service is a free, confidential and professional service for
students who have personal, social, emotional or educational concerns.


Looking after your Health
The health and wellbeing of our students is very important to us. We want to help you
make the most of your time at Aberdeen, and that means not only being free of ill-
health, but also having the help you need to be as healthy as possible. Full NHS
medical services are available to students. The Old Aberdeen Medical Practice, a
comprehensive NHS health practice, has many years of experience in providing
advice and treatment to students. The Practice is located close to King's College
campus in a new purpose-built Health Centre.

Religion
Aberdeen is a multi-national, multi-faith community, and our team of Chaplains is
drawn from a range of denominations and faiths. The University Chaplaincy is open
weekdays and most evenings and provides a welcoming meeting place for groups and
individuals of any religious persuasion, or of none.




Childcare - The Rocking Horse Nursery
The campus-based Rocking Horse Nursery provides childcare for preschool aged
children of students and staff. The nursery has three „departments‟ which cater for 0-
2, 2-3 and 3-5 year olds respectively.




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International Student Support
Prospective and current international students can access information on non-
academic issues relevant to studying in the UK by visiting:
www.abdn.ac.uk/central/international.


Student Tips
Erasmus is full of excitement and adventure, but also uncertainty and nerves.
Although the International Education Office in UCC and the International Relations
Department in Aberdeen will help you as much as possible, nothing can beat the
experience of being in your shoes. So here are some tips and tricks from UCC
students who have studied in Aberdeen.

Academic Matters:
    Take the chance to learn new things.
    Try and takes some courses that allow you to learn more about Scottish life,
      culture, history, or literature. You‟ll never have quite the same opportunity in
      Ireland.
    Keep up with your reading.
    Remember the grade is marked out of 20.
    Use the advising service.

Accommodation:
    Look into all accommodation options before you decide.
    Bed linen is not supplied. A sleeping bag is handy when you arrive, and for
     travelling.
    Always look through the peephole before answering the door.
    Bring pictures of home to put on the walls.

Travel:
    Remember generally the earlier you book the flights, the cheaper they are.
    Some clubs organise really cheap day and overnight trips.
    If you are coming home for Christmas, it is a good time to bring back excess
        luggage.
    Visit the Highlands.

Bureaucracy:
    Bring multiple photocopies of any documentation you might need.
    Bear with the bureaucracy. The majority of form-filling will be finished by the
      end of the first month.
    Patience is helpful.
    It is a good idea to carry some sort of ID with you at all times.

Social:
    Immerse yourself in the culture.
    Get to know some Scottish students.
    Join clubs or societies.
    There is a great international student community.



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General:
    Unlock your mobile phone before you leave Ireland if you want to put a
       British SIM card in it.
    Look into phone cards – they are one of the cheapest ways to phone home.
    If you have a laptop and internet access in your accommodation, look into
       getting Skype or other internet phone packages.
    Set up Internet banking.




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