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					Social Insurance




General Information about Social Insurance
About Social Insurance

Social insurance is an integral part of the
Swedish social security system. The
Swedish social insurance covers everyone
that lives or works in Sweden. It provides
financial protection for families and
children, for persons with a disability and
in connection with work injury, illness and
old age. Through the Swedish member-
ship in the European Union, you may also
be eligible for social insurance benefits in
other EU member states.
Welcome to
Swedish Social Insurance
Agency
This brochure gives a brief introduction to social insurance in Swe-
den. Social insurance is founded on the idea of people helping each
other through a kind of social safety net, which is in place from
birth to retirement. Swedish Social Insurance Agencies (The Swe-
dish Social Insurance Agency) role is to administer social insurance
and to ensure that you get the benefits and allowances to which you
are entitled. To be covered by or to be eligible for a social insurance
benefit, you must, as a rule, either be resident in Sweden or be wor-
king here. Examples of residence-based benefits are child allowance
and housing allowance. If you work in Sweden, you are insured for
employment-based benefits, which include sickness benefit and re-
habilitation allowance. If you plan to move abroad, the brochure “Bo
eller arbeta utomlands” (Living and working abroad) is of relevan-        
ce. As you can see, social insurance is a source of security for most
people. At present you may perhaps be unaware of when or how you
come into contact with it. However, it may be useful to know that it
exists, at whatever stage of your life you are.

Do you wish to know more?
More detailed information on specific benefits for reading and prin-
ting off as an information sheet can be found at www.forsakrings-
kassan.se. See reference at the very back of the brochure. If you do
not have Internet access, you can always contact Swedish Social In-
surance Agency.


   The following always applies
   In order to receive benefit from Swedish Social Insurance Agen-
   cy, you must always satisfy certain requirements. When you
   apply for benefit, you must therefore provide Swedish Social In-
   surance Agency with certain details. Swedish Social Insurance
   Agency will in turn assess this information and decide whether
   or not you get benefit.
    Contents
    Security for everyone _______________________6
      Why do we have a social insurance system? ________________6
      How did social insurance come about? ____________________6
      The development of social insurance ______________________7
    If you fall ill ________________________________8
      How health insurance works ______________________________8
      Disease carriers _______________________________________11
      Care of relatives _______________________________________11
      Activity compensation __________________________________11
      Sickness compensation ________________________________12
      Dormant sickness and activity compensation ______________12
      Rehabilitation __________________________________________12
     Dental care ___________________________________________1
    If you fall ill abroad _______________________ 14
    If you are pregnant _______________________ 14
      Adoption allowance ____________________________________1
      Pregnancy rights _______________________________________16
      Pregnancy benefit ______________________________________16
    For families with children __________________ 16
      Parental benefit ________________________________________16
      Temporary parental benefit ______________________________17
      Paternity leave _________________________________________18
      Child allowance and large family supplement _______________18
      Childcare allowance ____________________________________18
      Maintenance support ___________________________________18
    If you are disabled_________________________ 20
  Disability allowance ___________________________________ 20
  Assistance allowance __________________________________ 20
  Car allowance ________________________________________ 20
About pensions ___________________________21
  Old age pension ______________________________________ 2
  Born between 198 – 19 _____________________________ 2
  Born 197 or earlier ___________________________________ 2
  Survivor’s pension ____________________________________ 2
  Child pension and survivor’s support for children __________ 2
  Pension supplement___________________________________ 26
If you are injured at work __________________ 27
  Occupational injury insurance ___________________________ 27
  Annuity ______________________________________________ 27
If you are taking part in a labour market                           
programme _______________________________28
  Activity support _______________________________________ 28
Help with the cost of housing______________ 28
  Housing allowance ____________________________________ 28
If you are an employer ____________________ 29
  Insurance against sick pay costs ________________________ 29
General rules ____________________________ 30
  Dissatisfied with the decision? __________________________ 0
  Taxation and income tax return _________________________ 0
  Price base amount ____________________________________ 0
Social insurance in practice ________________30
  From proposal to a new law or amendment to a law________ 0
  Who manages social insurance? ________________________ 1
More detailed information _________________ 31
  Information sheet _____________________________________ 1
    Security for everyone
    Why do we have a social insurance system?
    Social insurance aims to provide financial security at every stage of
    life. It therefore mainly gives support to those who are ill, disabled,
    parents and pensioners.

    How did social insurance come about?
    In earlier periods of social policy, it was known as poor relief and
    was mainly intended to counteract mass death and poverty. In the
    middle of the 19th century Sweden started to become industriali-
    sed. Apace with the growth of industry, people left the old artisan
    and peasant society for employment in factories. Housing conditions
    were very poor, the work was heavy and dirty, and labour protec-
    tion was non-existent. As people became more dependent on inco-
    me in the form of money and not of goods, financial vulnerability
    increased in connection with ill health, accidents at work and old
6
    age. Demands for social reforms grew, and against the background
    of a situation where ordinary people were more vulnerable in socie-
    ty than before, social security as we know it today began to develop.
    This took time, however – more than a hundred years. At the end
    of the 19th century, people started to come together and established
    what were known as sick benefit societies to support each other in
    an emergency.
The development of social insurance
It was not until 1931 that these societies were approved by the state
and given the name health insurance funds, receiving state funding
for their operations. In 1955 today’s first Swedish Social Insurance
Agency came into being. No voluntary membership existed, as in
the case of the old health insurance fund. Since then much has hap-
pened in the area and now everyone who lives or works in Sweden
is covered by social insurance – insurance characterised by the no-
tion that the obligation to pay contributions and taxes brings entit-
lement to a share in social welfare when we are in need of it. The
main aim is to guarantee the population a certain level of security in
their lives. Throughout the 20th century reforms were gradually in-
troduced and many improvements were made. On the next page you
can see some of the most important changes.

Milestones in the 20th century
1901    Act on Compensation in the event of an Accident at
        Work
191    National Old Age Pension Act                                     7

198    Child allowance
19    National health insurance with income-related sickness
        benefit and subsidised healthcare
19    Occupational injury insurance
1960    ATP, national supplementary pension
197    Parental insurance
1977    New occupational injury insurance scheme
1992    Rehabilitation allowance
1999    The new pension system
2001    Regulation of social insurance to cover all now living or
        working in Sweden
    If you fall ill
    How health insurance works

    Sick pay
    If you are employed and fall ill, you must report sick to your em-
    ployer. If you are employed for at least a month or have worked for
    fourteen days without a break, you are entitled to sick pay from your
    employer for the first 14 days of your illness. No payment is made
    for the first day (the “waiting period”). If you are still ill after 14
    days, your employer will notify Swedish Social Insurance Agency
    of your illness. When you are well again, you must provide your em-
    ployer with written assurance stating that you have been ill and spe-
    cifying the extent of your absence from work.

    Sickness benefit
    If you are not entitled to sick pay, you may be able to get sickness
8   benefit from Swedish Social Insurance Agency. In this case you
    must notify the Swedish Social Insurance Agency that you are ill.
    You may also be entitled to sickness benefit when you have been ill
    for 14 days and are no longer receiving sick pay from your employ-
    er. Swedish Social Insurance Agency assesses your entitlement to
    sickness benefit.

    A long period of illness
    If you are ill for more than seven days, you will normally be expec-
    ted to produce a sick note from the doctor in order to continue recei-
    ving sick pay or sickness benefit.

    If you become unemployed
    If you become unemployed, it is important that you register within 3
    months from the day your work ceased with the employment office
    as seeking work. The reason is that when you no longer have income
    from work, the main rule is that your previously fixed SGI (the inco-
    me on which your sickness benefit is based) ceases to apply. In some
    circumstances, however, it is possible to keep your SGI despite your
    not working. This is the case, for instance, when you are unemploy-
    ed and have registered with the employment office as seeking work.
Travel allowance instead of sick pay or sickness benefit
In certain cases you may qualify for a travel allowance instead of
sick pay/sickness benefit. This is the case if your employer or Swe-
dish Social Insurance Office judges that you are able to work but are
unable to get to work by normal means. Your employer or Swedish
Social Insurance Office will then pay a reasonable allowance for ad-
ditional expenses you have for travel to and from work.

Complete or partial incapacity for work
You may draw one-quarter, half, three-quarters or full sickness be-
nefit, depending on the extent to which you are unable to work. Swe-
dish Social Insurance Agency assesses your entitlement to sickness
benefit and decides whether you are able to carry out your work full
time or part time, despite your illness. It also decides whether you
will be able to return to your regular job after your period of illness
comes to an end. If you can go back to work, your disability will be
assessed in relation to your normal work. If not, your disability will
be assessed in relation to other work that your employer can offer
you. If your employer has no other work to offer or if too long a pe-
riod of rehabilitation is needed, your capacity for work will be as-      9
sessed in relation to the needs of the labour market as a whole.

If you are self-employed
If you are self-employed, you must pay your own health insurance
contributions to your health insurance along with your tax. You can
choose between a waiting period of 3 or 30 days (during which time
you will not get any sickness benefit). Your contributions will be lo-
wer if you choose the longer waiting period.

If you are a student
A number of different rules about entitlement to sickness benefit
apply to students. You should therefore contact Swedish Social Insu-
rance Agency, who can tell you exactly what applies in your parti-
cular case, or go to www.forsakringskassan.se.

Voluntary sickness benefit insurance
If you have no income or a low income, you can sign up with Swe-
dish Social Insurance Agency for voluntary sickness benefit insu-
rance. Payments from this insurance are free of tax.
10
Disease carriers
If you have or are suspected of having an infectious disease but are
still fit for work, or if you are carrying or are suspected of carrying
an infection without being ill, you may be able to get benefit from
Swedish Social Insurance Agency in the form of disease carrier’s al-
lowance. You are also entitled to disease carrier’s allowance if you
have to give up work as a result of a decision under the term of the
Communicable Diseases Act or the Food Act.

Care of relatives
If you give up work to look after a seriously ill relative, you may be
able to get an allowance for the care of close relatives from Swedish
Social Insurance Agency and be entitled to time off work.

Activity compensation
If you are aged between 19 and 29, you may be eligible for activity        11
compensation if your capacity for work is reduced permanently or
for a limited period (at least a year) by at least a quarter. The reduc-
tion in working capacity must be due to illness or other impairment
in your physical or mental performance. You may have full, three-
quarters, half or one-quarter activity compensation, depending on
how much your capacity for work is reduced and your opportunities
of supporting yourself through work.

Extended schooling due to disability
If you have a disability which obliges you to attend compulsory
school or upper secondary school for a longer period, you will be
entitled to activity compensation while you are at school, without
your capacity for work being assessed.

Activities
While you are receiving activity compensation, you have an opp-
ortunity to take part in activities which are aimed at providing you
with the means to improve your capacity for work. A condition of
this is that the activities can be presumed to have a beneficial ef-
fect on the circumstances causing the reduction in your capacity for
work.
     Sickness compensation
     If you are aged between 30 and 64, you may be able to get sickness
     compensation if your capacity for work is permanently reduced by
     at least a quarter. The reduction in working capacity must be due
     to illness or other impairment in your physical or mental perfor-
     mance. If your capacity for work is reduced for a limited period (a
     minimum of one year), you may be able to get temporary sickness
     compensation. This can be full, three-quarters, half or one-quarter
     sickness compensation, depending on how much your incapacity for
     work is reduced and your opportunities of supporting yourself th-
     rough work.

     Size of sickness and activity compensation
     Sickness or activity compensation is paid as an income-related be-
     nefit and as a guarantee benefit. Both these apply on condition that
     you satisfy certain requirements in regard to work or residence. In-
     come-related benefit is based on your income from employment.
     You get guarantee benefit if you have or have had a low or no in-
12   come. Guarantee benefit is designed to provide financial basic pro-
     tection, regardless of your previous income from employment. The
     amount depends on how many years you have lived in Sweden.

     Dormant sickness and activity compensation
     If you are receiving sickness or activity compensation, you have the
     possibility to work without losing your entitlement to compensation.
     This is called dormant sickness or activity compensation. When
     you have received sickness or activity compensation for at least a
     year and want to try to see whether you can cope with working, you
     can apply for a trial period in which you receive compensation and
     pay at the same time. If your attempt to work is successful, you can
     apply to have your compensation made dormant. The trial period
     and the period of dormant compensation may together last for up to
     24 calendar months or for the remaining period for which you have
     been granted compensation.

     Rehabilitation
     Sometimes when on sick leave you need support in order to begin
     work again. Rehabilitation is a generic term for all measures of a
     medical, psychological, social and work-related nature that are gea-
red to helping ill and injured people to regain the best possible func-
tion capacity and conditions for a normal life.
Different authorities are responsible for different areas. Healthcare
is responsible for medical treatment and rehabilitation. The employ-
er or the employment office is responsible for work-related measures
and the municipality is responsible for social measures.
Swedish Social Insurance Agency coordinates society’s various me-
asures for your rehabilitation and is responsible for attending to your
need for rehabilitation to return to work. Swedish Social Insurance
Agency should also take the initiative and coordinate the measures
needed. Swedish Social Insurance Agency can support you where
necessary in your contact with authorities and others so that you re-
ceive the rehabilitation help you require.

Dental care
Everyone who lives or works in Sweden receives some form of sub-
sidised dental care. It briefly works as follows: up to and including
the year in which you reach the age of 19, you receive free dental
care, which is financed by the county councils.                           1
From the year in which you reach the age of 20, you are covered by
dental care insurance. Under this scheme you do not need to pay
the full cost of your dental treatment. You pay a patient charge and
Swedish Social Insurance Agency compensates the dentist directly
for the remaining cost. You should bear in mind that the cost of den-
tal care is not fixed and that the dentist decides on the price of tre-
atment. The cost varies considerably between dentists, so it may be
worth comparing what different dentists charge. You should always
ask your dentist, therefore, how much the treatment will cost before
it starts.
     If you fall ill abroad
     If you travel abroad for a short period, you may be entitled to some
     free treatment in certain countries. The countries in question are
     those with which Sweden has an agreement.
     It can be a good idea to supplement the basic protection provided by
     social insurance with travel protection from your home insurance or
     a private travel insurance.

     In EU and EEA countries and Switzerland
     If you are insured in Sweden, you are entitled to medical treatment
     that you need during a temporary stay in another EU/EEA country
     or in Switzerland. If you visit a public healthcare facility, you will
     be entitled to treatment on the same financial conditions as others
     who are insured in the country where you are seeking treatment.
     You must therefore pay the same relevant charges as the country’s
     own inhabitants. The requirement is that you must use a care facility
     which is affiliated to the general healthcare system. Don’t forget to
1   take your European health insurance card on your journey!

     Outside the EU/EES area
     In countries outside the EU/EEA you may also be entitled to healt-
     hcare benefits. This is the case in countries with which Sweden has
     an agreement. You should always contact Swedish Social Insurance
     Agency well in advance of your journey and ask for the certificates
     you need.



     If you are pregnant
     Adoption allowance
     If you are adopting a child from abroad, you can apply to Swedish
     Social Insurance Agency for an adoption allowance. You are eligible
     for an allowance for adoptions for which a Swedish court has given
     permission and for adoptions approved by the National Board for In-
     tercountry Adoptions (NIA). A decision from the country of origin
     relating to an adoption which applies in Sweden under the terms of
     the Hague Convention is of equal validity as a decision made by a
     Swedish court.
1
     Pregnancy rights
     If you are pregnant, you are entitled to be transferred to other du-
     ties if you have a physically demanding job that you cannot continue
     doing as a result of your condition or if you have been suspended
     from your job under the Work Environment Act.

     Pregnancy benefit
     If your employer is unable to relocate you, you may be able to draw
     pregnancy allowance if
     •   your capacity for work is reduced by at least a quarter owing to
         your pregnancy and you have a physically demanding job
     •   you have a job that you are not able to do because of risks in the
         work environment.
     If you have physically demanding work, you can draw pregnancy
     benefit for up to 50 days, starting at the earliest 60 days from the
     date on which you are expected to give birth. If you have been for-
     bidden to continue working under the terms of the Work Environ-
16   ment Act, you may draw pregnancy benefit for each day to which
     this prohibition applies. In the ten days before the expected date of
     delivery, you are not eligible for pregnancy benefit. If your duties al-
     low you to work for part of the day, you may apply for three-quar-
     ters, half or one-quarter pregnancy benefit.
     Read more about which rules apply for prospective parents in the
     brochure “Blivande förälder” (Prospective Parents) which can be
     obtained from Swedish Social Insurance Agency or at www.for-
     sakringskassan.se.



     For families with children
     Parental benefit
     If you have children, you are also entitled to parental benefit if you
     give up gainful employment in order to look after them. Parental be-
     nefit is payable for 480 days for children born in 2002 or later and
     for 450 days for children born before 2002. The days of parental be-
     nefit are always shared equally between both parents. One parent
     may give up the right to parental benefit to the other parent, apart
from 30 days for children born before 2002 and 60 days for child-
ren born in 2002 or later. If you are a lone parent, you are entitled to
all these days yourself. If you are the mother, you can start drawing
parental benefit 60 days before you are expected to give birth. Both
parents can draw parental benefit in connection with parental train-
ing. Parental benefit may be drawn until the child reaches the age
of eight or when the child comes to the end of his or her first year at
school. You can choose to draw full, three-quarters, half, one-quar-
ter or one-eighth parental benefit.

Temporary parental benefit
If you have to stay at home from work in order to look after a sick
child under the age of twelve, you may be entitled to temporary pa-
rental benefit. This also applies if the person who normally looks
after the child falls ill. Parents together are eligible for temporary
parental benefit for sixty days per child and year. After these six-
ty days have been used up, a further sixty days can be taken out. It
should be noted, however, that these extra days cannot be taken out
in the event of illness or infection of the normal carer. You can also
draw temporary parental benefit for visits to a doctor or child healt-     17
hcare centre.

Special need of care and supervision
Parents can also draw temporary parental benefit for children who
are 12 and below the age of 16. This may be the case if the child,
when ill, is in special need of care and supervision. A certificate
from a doctor that the children are in special need of care and su-
pervision is required. Special rules apply in the case of children co-
vered by the Act concerning Support and Service for Persons with
Certain Functional Impairments (LSS). Read more in the brochure
“Funktionshindrad” (Disabled Persons) which can be obtained from
Swedish Social Insurance Agency or at www.forsakringskassan.se.

Payment
Benefit is payable for all, three-quarters, half, one-quarter or one-
eighth of a day, depending on the degree to which you need time off
work. Note that it is not possible to receive temporary parental bene-
fit for non-working days.
     Paternity leave
     If you have recently become a father, you are entitled to ten days’
     leave on temporary parental benefit in connection with the birth of
     the child. You may take these days within sixty days of when the
     child comes home from the hospital. If you are adoptive parents, you
     are eligible for five days each, unless you have agreed to divide the
     days up otherwise. You can take these days within sixty days after
     the child has entered your care.

     Child allowance and large family supplement
     If you have a child under the age of 16, you will receive child allo-
     wance if the child lives in Sweden. When your child reaches the age
     of 16, the child allowance ceases and is replaced by extended child
     allowance if the child is still attending compulsory school. Extended
     child allowance is paid up to and including the month in which the
     child finishes compulsory school. If you have two or more children,
     you may be able to get large family supplement. Children who con-
     tinue their studies without interruption after the age of 16 also entit-
18   le the family to large family supplement.

     Childcare allowance
     If you are a parent and are looking after a sick or disabled child at
     home, you may be able to get childcare allowance. A condition of
     this is that the child needs special supervision and care for at least
     six months or that you have special additional costs as a result of the
     child’s disability.

     How it works
     Childcare allowance is payable as soon as the child is born. The al-
     lowance remains payable up to and including June of the year when
     the child reaches the age of nineteen, when the child becomes eli-
     gible for disability allowance. If your child is being cared for in hos-
     pital or other institution, you may continue receiving child allowan-
     ce for a maximum of six months. If the child is seriously ill, you
     may continue receiving the allowance for a further six months.

     Maintenance
     If you are parents who are not living together, the parent who is not
living with the child must contribute towards the care of the child
by paying maintenance. You can agree on the maintenance between
yourselves. If you are unable to reach agreement, the matter can be
settled in court.

Maintenance support
If the parent liable for maintenance fails to pay it or pays an insuf-
ficient amount, Swedish Social Insurance Agency may pay mainte-
nance support to the parent with whom the child is officially regis-
tered as living. This parent must also have parental responsibility
for the child and the child must be officially registered as living with
him/her.
When Swedish Social Insurance Agency pays out full maintenan-
ce support, the parent who does not live with the child must fully or
partly reimburse the maintenance support costs taken from public
funds. The amount to be paid depends, among other things, on the
size of this person’s income. Maintenance support can also be paid
out as supplementary allowance if you pay child support direct to
the other parent.                                                          19
Maintenance support can also be paid to a child who is resident in
Sweden and registered in the population register with one or two
specially designated persons with custody or to a child who has
been adopted by only one person.

How long?
Maintenance support can be paid until the child reaches the age of
18. Extended maintenance support may be payable up to and inclu-
ding June of the year that the child reaches the age of 20 (provided
that the child is still studying at compulsory school or upper secon-
dary school level). The child must be resident in Sweden and regis-
tered at the address of one of his or her parents or someone who had
parental responsibility for the child before he or she reached the age
of 18.

Changes must be notified to Swedish Social Insurance
Agency

It is important for you to notify any changes which may affect
entitlement to maintenance support. This includes the situation, for
     example, where the child goes to live with the other parent.
     Read more about which rules apply for families with children in the
     brochure “Barnfamilj” (Families with Children) which can be ob-
     tained from Swedish Social Insurance Agency or visit www.for-
     sakringskassan.se.



     If you are disabled
     Disability allowance
     You may be able to get disability allowance from July of the year in
     which you reach the age of 19, provided you become disabled be-
     fore the age of 65. To qualify for the allowance, you must need as-
     sistance from another person that is demanding in terms of time in
     order to manage in your day-to-day life, your work or your studies,
     or else you must be faced with substantial extra costs as a result of
     your disability. You must also be in need of support for at least one
20   year. In some cases you may continue to receive this allowance after
     reaching the age of 65.

     Assistance allowance
     You are entitled to assistance allowance if you are severely disabled
     and require personal assistance to help you manage in your day-to-
     day life. Personal assistance is defined as a programme of personally
     designed support to be given in specific situations by a limited num-
     ber of people. Although entitlement to this allowance is not subject
     to a lower age limit, you must not be over 65 when the allowance is
     granted. You must need personal assistance with basic needs (e.g.
     with personal hygiene, dressing and undressing, eating, communi-
     cating with others) for an average of more than 20 hours per week.

     Car allowance
     You may be able to get car allowance if you have considerable dif-
     ficulty as a result of permanent disability in getting around on your
     own or using public transport. Parents with a disabled child may
also be entitled to car allowance in some cases if they need the car
to travel somewhere with the child. Car allowance may also invol-
ve a grant for another means of transportation, such as a moped or a
motorcycle.
Read more about help with disability in the brochure “Funktions-
hinder” (Disability) which can be obtained from Swedish Social In-
surance Agency or at www.forsakringskassan.se.



About pensions
Old age pension

National basic pension for those born in 1938 or later
This pension consists of income/supplementary pension, premium
pension and guarantee pension and is administered by Swedish So-
cial Insurance Agency and the Premium Pension Authority (PPM).
The pension is based on the income you have had during your life        21
(from the age of 16 up to and including 1998). If you have worked
for a long time and earned a lot, you will receive a higher pension.
Similarly, you will receive less pension if your income has been low.
18.5% of your income is paid into the pension system, 16% to the
income pension and 2.5% to the premium pension. These contribu-
tions are recorded as pension entitlements. You also receive pensi-
on entitlements for sickness benefit, parental benefit, unemployment
benefit, and sickness and activity compensation. You get additional
pension entitlements for years when your children were small, stu-
dies with study assistance and national service.
The ceiling for pensionable income is 7.5 income base amounts. For
income above this amount, you pay no contributions and also get no
pension entitlement. You can start drawing your pension from the
age of 61. The longer you wait and continue to earn pension entitle-
ments, the higher your pension will be. You can also choose to take
out full, three-quarters, half or one-quarter pension. Similarly, you
can draw different proportions of your income pension and premi-
um pension. As long as you have an income, you will continue to
earn pension entitlements, regardless of whether or not you draw
your pension. The old age pension is liable to tax.
22
Income pension
The bulk of the pension entitlements you have earned go towards
your income pension. Your pension entitlements earn interest in
line with the growth of incomes in Sweden. When you retire, your
pension is determined by the pension entitlements you have earned
throughout your life and by the life expectancy for your age group.
In the case of persons born between 1938 and 1953, supplementary
pension forms part of the income pension. The older you are, the
larger the proportion of income pension you get as supplementary
pension.

Premium pension
2.5 per cent of your pensionable income goes towards your premi-
um pension. For those born between 1938 and 1953 this percenta-
ge is less. You may choose to invest your pension capital in any of
the various funds registered with the Premium Pension Authority.
If you decide not to choose your own investments, the money will
be invested in the Premium Saving Fund administered by the 7th
Pension Insurance Fund. Married or registered couples can transfer
their pension entitlements to each other. On retirement, the pension     2
is calculated basically in the same way as income pension. The pre-
mium pension scheme is managed by the Premium Pension Autho-
rity (PPM).

Guarantee pension
If you have had a low or no income during your life, you may be en-
titled to guarantee pension. To qualify, you must have been resident
in Sweden for at least three years. To qualify for full guarantee pen-
sion, you must have been resident in Sweden for 40 years. An excep-
tion may be made in the case of refugees. Guarantee pension is pay-
able from the age of 65. A foreign pension and widow’s pension can
affect your entitlement to a guarantee pension.

Born between 1938 – 1953
If you were born between 1938 and 1953, you are guaranteed at least
the pension you would have received under the ATP scheme, based
on the amount you have earned for this scheme up to and including
1994. Should your national basic pension give you a smaller amount,
it will be topped up. This top-up amount is known as guarantee
supplement; it is calculated automatically and is payable from the
age of 65.
     Born 1937 or earlier
     From the beginning of 2003 everyone receives their pension under
     the reformed pension scheme. This means that national retirement
     pension is paid in the form of supplementary pension and/or guaran-
     tee pension. As with all income, your pension is liable to tax. The
     rules governing basic pension, pension supplement and ATP have
     ceased to apply and the special basic tax deduction (SGA) has been
     abolished.

     Supplementary pension
     Those who have earned pension points for at least three years are
     entitled to supplementary pension. Those with pension points for
     only one or two years in Sweden may be credited with insurance
     periods accumulated elsewhere in the EU/EEA or in countries with
     which Sweden has a convention. Supplementary pension replaces
     ATP and employment-based national basic pension and thus con-
     sists of two parts:
     •   One part corresponds to your national supplementary pension
2       (ATP) according to rules which applied before January 200.
     •   One part corresponds to basic pension based on the number of
         years of pension points.
     In the case of someone who, for example, has earned pension points
     for twenty years, twenty-thirtieths of the previous national basic
     pension will form part of the supplementary pension. The size of
     the supplementary pension you get thus depends on how many years
     you have worked and how much you have earned each year.

     Guarantee pension
     If you have a low or no supplementary pension, you may be able to
     get guarantee pension. Guarantee pension is also payable to those
     with a higher supplementary pension to compensate for a previous
     residence-based national basic pension. Guarantee pension replaces
     the residence-based national basic pension, the pension supplement
     and the special tax deduction (SGA).

     Survivor’s pension
     If you are a relative of someone who is deceased, you may be able to
     get social insurance benefits, namely child pension, adjustment pen-
sion and widow’s pension. You may also be able to get an occupatio-
nal injury annuity for survivors and funeral allowance if the death
was caused by a work injury or an accident on the way to or from
work. Survivor’s support for children is payable in addition to child
pension, and guarantee pension is payable in addition to adjustment
pension and widow’s pension.

Adjustment pension and guarantee pension
You may be able to get adjustment pension and guarantee pensi-
on if your spouse has died. Adjustment pension is paid for twelve
months to men or women below the age of 65. If you are living with
a child under the age of 18, the pension is payable for another twelve
months (“extended adjustment pension”). The latter is always paid
up to and including the month in which the youngest child reaches
the age of 12.

Widow’s pension and guarantee pension
You may be able to get widow’s pension and guarantee pension if
your spouse has died. You must fulfil certain conditions and you
must have been married at the end of 1989 and at the time of death.      2
Different rules apply to women born in 1944 or earlier and to wo-
men born in 1945 or later. For example, women born in 1945 or later
are not eligible for guarantee pension.

Child pension and survivor’s support
for children
Children under the age of 18 are entitled to child pension on the dea-
th of one or both of their parents. Child pension is payable to child-
ren over 18, provided they are studying at compulsory school, upper
secondary school or a similar establishment qualifying for extended
     child allowance or study assistance. The pension is then payable up
     to and including June of the year in which the child reaches the age
     of 20.
     You can read more about survivor’s pension in the brochure ”Efter-
     levande” (Survivors) which can be obtained from Swedish Social In-
     surance Agency or at www.forsakringskassan.se.

     Pension supplement

     Housing supplement for pensioners
     If you are a pensioner, you may be able to get housing supplement,
     which is a means-tested supplement. This means that the amount
     payable depends on your housing costs and your income. Mainte-
     nance support for the elderly
     If you have a low pension, e.g. due to a short period of residence in
     Sweden, you may be eligible for maintenance support for the elder-
     ly. Your accommodation costs and your income will affect the size
     of this benefit.
26
     Special pension supplement
     If you have given up work for at least six years in order to care for a
     sick or disabled child, you may be able to get special pension supp-
     lement. The child must have been receiving full disability pension/
     sickness compensation and disability allowance or similar benefits.
     A minimum of six and a maximum of fifteen care years since 1964
     may be taken into account. For the period before 1 July 1992, a mi-
     nimum of ten care years is required in order to qualify for this supp-
     lement. If you are not entitled to full basic pension, your pension
     supplements will be reduced in the same way as for basic pension.
     Read more about different pension types in the brochures “Arbe-
     te eller pension?” (Work or Pension?) and ”Pensionär” (Pensioner)
     which can be obtained from Swedish Social Insurance Agency or at
     www.forsakringskassan.se.
If you are injured at work
Occupational injury insurance
If you are injured at work or on your way to or from work, you may
qualify for compensation from occupational injury insurance. This
insurance also covers occupational diseases such as skin conditions
brought on by contact with certain substances or back trouble cau-
sed by unsuitable work postures. Certain infectious diseases such
as nosocomial (hospital) disease and jaundice may also be regarded
as work injuries. If you are injured at work, you should notify your
employer without delay. The employer must then report the injury to
Swedish Social Insurance Agency.

Annuity
If you are injured and can no longer work or are receiving less ear-
ned income than previously because of your injury, you may quali-
fy for an annuity. The annuity compensates you for the income you
                                                                        27
have lost as a result of the injury. If you are also awarded sickness
or activity compensation, the latter will be coordinated with the an-
nuity.

Death
If a person dies as a result of a work injury, his or her surviving
spouse and children under the age of 18 will be entitled to an an-
nuity. The size of the annuity depends on the earned income of the
deceased. The annuity will be coordinated with survivor’s pension
and survivor’s support for children. The survivors are also entitled
to help in meeting the funeral expenses.
     If you are taking part in a
     labour market programme
     Activity support
     If you are taking part in a labour market programme, such as em-
     ployment training, occupational rehabilitation, practical job expe-
     rience, work at a datortek [computer centre], business start-up or
     youth guarantee, you may be able to get activity support.

     How it works
     Activity support is normally equal to the daily allowance you would
     otherwise have been paid from your unemployment insurance fund.
     It is payable for five days a week. The County Employment Board/
     Employment Office will help you to find the labour market pro-
     grammes which entitle you to activity support. The amount payable
     is calculated and paid out by Swedish Social Insurance Agency. Ac-
28   tivity support is a taxable benefit.



     Help with the cost of
     housing
     Housing allowance
     Families with children and also young people without children aged
     18–28 may be able to get housing allowance. In order to be able to
     apply for housing allowance, you must be living and officially regis-
     tered in Sweden. As a rule, you must also be registered as living in
     the accommodation for which you are applying for the allowance.
     Families with children may receive a contribution towards housing
     costs, a separate grant for the children living at home and an allo-
     wance for children who sometimes live at home. Young people wit-
     hout children can receive the housing contribution.
How it works
The amount payable will depend, among other things, on the size
of your household, your income, your housing costs and the size of
your accommodation. Housing allowance is a provisional payment
and is based on the income you expect to receive in any one calen-
dar year. The final allowance is not established until your actual in-
come for that year has been assessed for tax purposes. The provi-
sional and final allowances are then compared. If your provisional
allowance was too low, you will receive a supplementary payment
with interest. Similarly, if your provisional allowance was too high,
you will have to repay the amount to which you were not entitled
plus a charge.



If you are an employer
Insurance against sick pay costs
If your total wage costs for a calendar year do not exceed 130 price
base amount, you as an employer may insure yourself against sick          29
pay costs. The calculation disregards the charges you pay in accor-
dance with the Social Insurance Act, the Payroll Charges Act and
tax costs according to the Special Wages Tax (Certain Acquired In-
come) Act.
The insurance compensates the employee’s sick pay costs according
to the Sick Pay Act from the fourth day of the sick pay period. Com-
pensation is also paid for costs incurred for contributions for the So-
cial Security Contributions Act and the Wage Tax Act and also the
Special Wages Tax (Certain Acquired Income) Act.
Note that the insurance does not apply for employees covered by the
special high-risk protection.
The charge for the insurance is calculated from the company’s wage
cost and applicable percentage as determined annually by Swedish
Social Insurance Agency.

Inform employees who have been given notice!
If you give notice to employees or if employees receive severance
pay, it is important for you to inform them that they must register
with the employment office as seeking work. This is very important
for any future social insurance benefits.
     General rules
     Dissatisfied with the decision?
     If you are dissatisfied with the decision of Swedish Social Insuran-
     ce Agency, you can ask for it to be reviewed or appeal to the Coun-
     ty Administrative Court. If you also consider the court’s decision to
     be incorrect, you can refer the matter to the Administrative Court of
     Appeal. If you also consider the decision of the appeal court to be
     wrong, you may appeal to the Supreme Administrative Court, which
     is the final court of appeal. The Supreme Administrative Court con-
     siders only cases involving important matters of principle or prece-
     dence.

     Taxation and income tax return
     Most of the benefits from Swedish Social Insurance Agency are tax-
     able and many are also pension-based. In January each year you will
     receive from Swedish Social Insurance Agency a statement of the
0
     payments you have received to help you with your tax return. The
     statement shows how much money you received from Swedish So-
     cial Insurance Agency in the previous year and the amount deducted
     for tax purposes.

     Price base amount
     The price base amount is an amount fixed by the Government for
     one year at a time on the basis of figures provided by Statistics Swe-
     den. It is adjusted annually. When Swedish Social Insurance Agen-
     cy calculates, for example, the size of your pensions and allowances,
     it makes use of the price base amount.



     Social insurance in
     practice
     From proposal to a new law or amendment to a law
     The Government proposes several times a year new laws and
amendments to laws in the area of social insurance. These proposals
are then voted on by the Swedish parliament, the Riksdag.

Who manages social insurance?
Swedish Social Insurance Agency manages social insurance. So-
cial insurance is uniform throughout the country and funded by the
State. The State therefore controls activities through, among other
things, the appointment of boards.



More detailed information
Information sheet
The following is a list of references to more detailed information
which you can find at www.forsakringskassan.se in the form of an
information sheet for printing out. If you do not have access to the
Internet and a printer at home or at work, you can always contact
Swedish Social Insurance Agency for help. See also the page refe-      1
rence behind each sheet for the benefits in this brochure.
Adoption allowance                                          page 14

Activity compensation                                       page 11

Activity support                                            page 25

Occupational injury insurance                               page 25

Assistance allowance                                        page 19

Children covered by LSS                                     page 16

Child allowance and large family supplement                 page 17

Car allowance                                               page 19

Housing allowance                                           page 26

Housing supplement for pensioners                           page 24
     Voluntary sickness benefit insurance           page 9

     Parental benefit                               page 16

     Guarantee pension                              page 23

     Disability allowance                           page 19

     Pregnancy benefit                              page 14

     Income pension                                 page 20
     Kindred allowance/benefit for
     care of relatives                              page 11

     Paternity leave                                page 17

     Premium pension                                page 20

     Rehabilitation                                 page 12

2   Sickness compensation                          page 11
     SGI (income on which sickness benefit
     entitlement is based)                          page 8

     Falling ill while living abroad                page 13

     Falling ill while staying temporarily abroad   page 13

     Sick pay                                       page 8

     Sickness benefit                               page 8

     Disease carrier allowance                      page 9

     Temporary parental benefit                     page 16

     Maintenance support                            page 18

     Dormant sickness and activity compensation     page 12

     Childcare allowance                            page 17
Anteckningar




               


6
Obligations
What happens if you receive
too much benefit?
If you receive a benefit to which you are not
entitled, you will in general be obliged to repay
the money. This is the case even if it was not
your fault that you received the payment.

It is a criminal offence to give false
information
The Swedish Social Insurance Agency takes a
serious view of fraud. By fraud we mean when
someone deliberately tries to get round the rules
for obtaining benefit. What happens then if
someone commits fraud, for example by leaving
false information or by not reporting a
change in his or her circumstances? Anyone
who commits fraud is liable to repay the money
received, and also runs the risk of punishment
by fine or imprisonment.

Always notify the Swedish Social Insurance
Agency of any changes
You are obliged to notify changed circumstances
that may have a bearing on your right to benefit.
Social Insurance




                                                                                                         FOTO: JØRGEN REIMER
Fk 4002. 06.05




                                                                                                         GRAFISK FORM: BLOMQUIST ANNONSBYRÅ

A guide to authorities
Below we have compiled a list of addresses to the websites of some of the most common authorities.
At www.forsakringskassan.se you can find general information on the social insurance scheme as well
as more detailed informtion on certain benefits. The employment office, www.ams.se and the municipal
business secretaries are useful if you have questions about work or the labor market. On www.foreta-
garguiden.se you can get in touch with many diffrent authorities. If you have questions about taxation
you might find answers at www.skatteverket.se. On the website of the National Board of Health and
Welfare, www.socialstyrelsen.se, you can read more about maintenance grants.



This broschure provides only general information and should not be regarded as an authoritative state-
ment of the law. Additional information can be obtained from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency on
www.forsakringskassan.se