Docstoc

Medieval North Africa_ 200-1600

Document Sample
Medieval North Africa_ 200-1600 Powered By Docstoc
					                       History W 4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
                                     
                   Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers:  
                Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 
                                       SYLLABUS 
                                             
                                Prof. Jonathan P. Conant 
                                              
                                  Thursdays 2:10‐4:00 
                                   302 Fayerweather  
                                  Columbia University 
                                        Fall 2004 
                                              
 
Northwestern Africa is the ideal region through which to understand the conflicting 
religious, social, cultural, and political forces that transformed the world of antiquity 
into that of the middle ages.  Divided internally by theological disputes and inter‐
communal violence, and subjected to repeated conquests and reconquests from the 
outside, in this period North Africa witnessed the triumph of Islam over Christianity; 
the rise and fall of ephemeral kingdoms, empires, and caliphates; the gradual desertion 
of once‐prosperous cities and rural settlements; the rising strength of Berber 
confederations; and the continuing ability of trade to transcend political boundaries and 
link the southern Mediterranean littoral to the outside world.  Class meetings will 
interweave discussion of primary sources in translation, the archaeological evidence, 
and modern scholarly debates.  Topics include the Vandals, Byzantines, and Berbers; the 
Islamic conquest; the North African Jewish community; religion and society; conversion; 
identity; the survival of Christianity under Islamic rule; continuity and rupture in city 
life, rural settlement, and trade; North African connections to the larger Mediterranean 
and Sub‐Saharan African worlds; and the notion of African “resistance” to outside 
influences. 
 
 
 
 
GETTING IN TOUCH:  
E‐mail: jc2531@columbia.edu               Office: 502 Fayerweather  
Phone: x4‐3005                            Office Hours: TuTh 11‐12 and by appointment 
 
 
 
 
 
                          History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
       Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:                      
1. Attendance, preparation of required readings, and informed participation at            
   all seminar meetings (including periodic oral reports and other short                  
   assignments on the weekly reading, as assigned by instructor):                        30% 
2. Written assignments:                                                                   
         A short paper (4‐5 pages = 1,200‐1,500 words) presenting a historical            
             critique of a medieval North African primary source in translation,          
             chosen in consultation with the instructor:                                 10% 
         A 3‐page prospectus (900 words) plus a complete bibliography for the             
             research paper:                                                             15% 
         A full, complete draft of the research paper:                                   15% 
         A research paper (15‐20 pages = 4,500‐6,000 words) that will develop,            
             deepen and extend the analysis of the primary source critiqued in the   
             short paper:                                                                30% 
3. There will be no midterm or final exam.                                                
                                                  
Graduate students taking the seminar for graduate credit will be asked to choose 
between either writing an additional 10‐page (3,000 word) historiographical essay on a 
topic worked out in consultation with the instructor or writing a longer research paper 
(25‐30 pp. = 7,500‐9,000 words).  If the former, the percentages will break down as 
follows: Participation in seminars = 25%; short paper = 8%; historiographical essay = 
18%; prospectus and bibliography = 12%; draft = 12%; research paper = 25%. 
 
            ***You cannot pass the class without completing all of the assignments*** 
                                                  
            *** Do not cite a webpage without the explicit consent of the instructor*** 
 
 
REQUIRED TEXTS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE: 
The following texts will be available for purchase at Labyrinth Books, 536 W. 112th Street 
(between Broadway and Amsterdam): 
 
Susan Raven, Rome in Africa, 3d ed. (New York, 1998).  ISBN: 0415081505.  $35.95 new 
Donatist Martyr Stories: The Church in Conflict in Roman North Africa, trans. Maureen A. 
    Tilley (Liverpool, 1996).  ISBN: 0853239312.  $17.95 new 
Victor of Vita, History of the Vandal Persecution, trans. John Moorhead (Liverpool, 1992).  
    ISBN: 0853231273.  $27.50 new 
Wilfred Madelung and Paul E. Walker, The Advent of the Fatimids: A Contemporary Shi‘i 
    Witness (London, 2000).  ISBN: 1860647731.  $24.50 new 
 
All other readings will be available on reserve 
 
 


                                                                                               2
                          History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
       Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

RESERVES: 
All of the readings for this course will be held on reserve.  Most will be available either 
at Butler Library (designated R on the syllabus) or through the CourseWorks web page 
for this class at https://courseworks.columbia.edu/ (designated CW).  A few items 
(designated Islamic Studies RR) are available only at the non‐circulating Islamic Studies 
Reading Room, Butler Library 602; one item is available only at the African Studies 
Reading Room, Butler Library 607 and is so marked.  Please note that the copy of Susan 
Raven, Rome in Africa that is being held on reserve at Butler is a slightly older edition 
than the one we are using for this class.  A non‐circulating copy of the edition that we 
will be reading— Susan Raven, Rome in Africa, 3d ed. (New York, 1998)—is available at 
Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, 300Avery Hall. 
 
 
                                               
SEMINAR  SCHEDULE              
 
Week 1              Introduction 
(September 9)       Background Reading: Raven, Rome in Africa, chs. 1‐4, 8‐9 (86 pp.) 
                     
Week 2              Romans and Christians  
(September 16)      Primary Source Readings: 
                         St. Perpetua, The Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, trans. 
                           W.H. Shrewing, in Readings in Medieval History, ed. Patrick J. 
                           Geary (Lewiston, New York, 1992), pp. 82‐88 (R) (on reserve 
                           for History W1061).  Also available online at: 
                           http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/perpetua.html
                         Donatist Martyr Stories, trans. M. Tilley (90 pp.) 
                     
                    Background Reading: 
                         Raven, Rome in Africa, chs. 10‐11 (42 pp.) 
                     
                    Scholarly Debates/Interpretations: 
                         W.H.C. Frend, “The North African Cult of Martyrs,” in 
                           Jenseitsvorstellungen in Antike und Christentum, Gedenkschrift 
                           für Alfred Stuiber, ed. E. Dassmann (Münster, 1982), 154‐167 
                           (CW) 
                         A.H.M. Jones, “Were the ancient heresies national or social 
                           movements in disguise?,” Journal of Theological Studies n.s. 10 
                           (1959), 280‐298 (CW) 
                         B.D. Shaw, “African Christianity: Disputes, Definitions, and 
                           ‘Donatists,’” in his Rulers, Nomads and Christians in Roman 
                           North Africa (London, 1995), essay XI (30 pp.) (R) 
                     
                     


                                                                                          3
                          History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
       Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

Week 3              Augustine 
(September 23)      Primary Source Reading:  
                         Augustine, The City of God, trans. Henry Bettenson (London, 
                            1972; multiple reprintings), books 14 and 19 (90 pp.) (R) 
                     
                    Background Reading: 
                         Raven, Rome in Africa, ch. 12 (10 pp.) 
                     
                    Scholarly Debates/Interpretation: 
                         J.J. O’Donnell, Augustine (Boston, 1985), pp. 1‐13 and 39‐60 (R) 
                           
                    For those who would like to read more about Augustine: 
                          Peter Brown, Augustine of Hippo: A Biography (Berkeley, 1969) 
                     
                     
Week 4              The Vandal Kingdom 
(September 30)      Primary Source Reading:  
                         Victor of Vita, History of the Vandal Persecution (93 pp.) 
                     
                    Background Readings: 
                         Raven, Rome in Africa, ch. 13 (13 pp.)  
                         Averil Cameron, “Vandal and Byzantine Africa,” in The 
                           Cambridge Ancient History, ed. A. Cameron et al., vol. 14 
                           (Cambridge, 2000), 552‐569 (CW) 
                     
                    Scholarly Debates/Interpretations: 
                         Frank M. Clover, “Carthage and the Vandals,” in Excavations at 
                           Carthage 1978, ed. J.H. Humphrey, vol. 7 (Ann Arbor, 1982), 1‐
                           22 (CW) (additional copy on reserve in his Late Roman West 
                           and the Vandals [Aldershot, 1993], essay VI) 
                         F. M. Clover, “The Symbiosis of Romans and Vandals in 
                           Africa,” in his Late Roman West and the Vandals, essay X (17 
                           pp.) (R) 
                         W.E. Fahey, “History, Community and Suffering in Victor of 
                           Vita,” in Nova Doctrina Vetusque, ed. D. Kries and C. Brown 
                           Tkacz (New York, 1999), 225‐241 (R) 
                     
                     
Week 5              The Byzantine Province 
(October 7)         Primary Source Readings:  
                         Procopius, The Vandalic War, trans. H.B. Dewing (Cambridge, 
                           Massachusetts, 1990), pp. 271‐459 (English only; 94 pp.) (R) 
                           (additional non‐circulating copy available in the Ancient and 
                           Medieval Studies Reading Room, 603 Butler) 
                         “The Trial of Maximus,” trans. George C. Berthold in Maximus 
                           Confessor: Selected Writings (New York, 1985), 15‐33 (R) 


                                                                                           4
                          History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
       Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 
                     
                    Background Reading: 
                         Raven, Rome in Africa, pp. 209‐224 
                     
                    Scholarly Debates/Interpretations: 
                         Averil Cameron, “Byzantine Africa—The Literary Evidence,” 
                           in Excavations at Carthage 1978, ed. J.H. Humphrey, 29‐62 
                           (CW) 
                         J.F. Haldon, “Ideology and the Byzantine State in the Seventh 
                           Century: The ‘Trial’ of Maximus Confessor,” in From Late 
                           Antiquity to Early Byzantium, ed. Vladimír Vavřínek (Prague, 
                           1985), 87‐91 (CW) 
                         R.A. Markus, “Donatism: the Last Phase,” Studies in Church 
                           History 1 (1964), 118‐126 (CW)(additional copy on reserve in 
                           his From Augustine to Gregory the Great [London, 1983], essay 
                           VI) 
                         R.A. Markus, “Reflections on Religious Dissent in North Africa 
                           in the Byzantine Period,” in his From Augustine to Gregory the 
                           Great [London, 1983], essay VII (10 pp.)(R) 
                     
                           Short paper (4‐5 pp.) due at the beginning of class 
                     
                     
Week 6              Islam: Conquest and Conversion 
(October 14)        Primary Source Readings:  
                         Ibn Abd al‐Hakam, The conquest of the Maghrib, available online 
                           at: http://www.diafrica.org/nigeriaop/kenny/nwafr/a03.htm
                         Ibn Idhari, The conquest of the Maghrib (a later, greatly 
                           embellished version), available online at: 
                           http://www.diafrica.org/nigeriaop/kenny/nwafr/AIdhari.htm
                     
                    Background Reading:  
                         Raven, Rome in Africa, pp. 224‐231 
                     
                    Scholarly Debates/Interpretations: 
                         W.H.C. Frend, “The end of Byzantine North Africa: Some 
                           evidence of transitions,” Bulletin archéologique du Comité des 
                           Travaux Historiques et Scientifiques n.s. 19B (1985), 387‐397 
                           (CW) 
                         R.G. Goodchild, “Byzantines, Berbers and Arabs in Seventh‐
                           Century Libya,” Antiquity 41 (1967), 115‐124 (CW) 
                         Michael Brett, “The Spread of Islam in Egypt and North 
                           Africa,” in Northern Africa: Islam and Modernization, ed. 
                           Michael Brett (London, 1973), 1‐13 (R) 
                         Michael Brett, “The Islamisation of Morocco from the Arabs to 
                           the Almoravids,” in his Ibn Khaldun and the Medieval Maghrib 


                                                                                          5
                          History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
       Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

                           (Aldershot, 1999)(Islamic Studies RR) 
                          M. Elfasi and I. Hrbek, “Stages in the Development of Islam 
                           and its dissemination in Africa,” in General History of Africa, 
                           vol. 3, 56‐67 (R) 
                          M. Shaban, “Conversion to Early Islam,” in Conversion to Islam, 
                           ed. N. Levtzion (London, 1979), 24‐29 (CW) 
                          A.D. Taha, The Muslim Conquest and Settlement of North Africa 
                           and Spain (London, 1989), pp. 19‐31 and 55‐83 (R) 
                     
                    For those who would like to read more about the Islamic conquest:  
                          Elizabeth Savage, A Gateway to Hell, a Gateway to Paradise. The North 
                            African Response to the Arab Conquest (Princeton, 1997) 
                           
                     
Week 7              Cities and Towns in Early Medieval North Africa 
(October 21)        Primary Source Reading:  
                          Morris Rosenblum, A Latin Poet among the Vandals (New York, 
                            1961), “Part Two: The Poems” (selections, to be announced) 
                            (R) 
                     
                    Background Reading:  
                          Raven, Rome in Africa, ch. 7 (22 pp.) 
                     
                    Scholarly Interpretations/Debates: 
                          S.J.B. Barnish, “The Transformation of Classical cities and the 
                            Pirenne debate,” Journal of Roman Archaeology 2 (1989), 385‐
                            400 (CW) 
                          C. Lepelley, “The survival and fall of the classical city in Late 
                            Roman Africa,” in The City in Late Antiquity, ed. J. Rich 
                            (London, 1992), 50‐76 (R) 
                          S. Ellis, “Carthage in the seventh century: an expanding 
                            population?,” Cahiers des Etudes Anciennes 17 (1985), 30‐42 
                            (CW) 
                          Sauro Gelichi and Marco Milanese, “The transformation of the 
                            ancient towns in central Tunisia during the Islamic period: 
                            the example of Uchi Maius,” Al‐Masaq: Islam and the Medieval 
                            Mediterranean 14 (2002), 33‐45 (CW) 
                          Hugh Kennedy, “Military pay and the economy of the early 
                            Islamic state,” Historical Research 75 (2002), 155‐169 (CW) 
                     
                     
Week 8              Berbers 
(October 28)        Primary Source Reading:  
                          Ibn Khaldun, The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to History, trans. 
                            Franz Rosenthal (Princeton, 1967), pp. 33‐70 and 91‐122 (R) 
                     


                                                                                                   6
                         History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
      Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

                   Scholarly Debates/Interpretations: 
                        Brent D. Shaw, “Fear and loathing: the nomad menace and 
                          Roman Africa,” in his Rulers, Nomads, and Christians, essay VII 
                          (22 pp.) (R) 
                        D.J. Mattingly, “The Laguatan: a Libyan tribal confederation in 
                          the late Roman Empire,” Libyan Studies 14 (1983), 96‐108 (CW)
                        H. Monès, “The Conquest of North Africa and Berber 
                          Resistance,” in The General History of Africa, ed. M. Elfasi, vol. 
                          3 (London, 1988), 224‐245 (R) 
                        E.W.B. Fentress, “Forever Berber?” Opus 2 (1983), 161‐175 (CW)
                        Nehemia Levtzion, “`Abd Allāh b. Yāsīn and the Almoravids,” 
                          in The cultivators of Islam, ed. J.R. Willis, Studies in West 
                          African Islamic History 1 (London, 1979), 78‐112 (R) 
                    
                    
Week 9             Religion, Politics, and the Origins of the Fatimid Caliphate 
(November 4)       Primary Source Reading:  
                        Madelung and Walker, The Advent of the Fatimids, pp. 61‐175 
                    
                   Background Reading:  
                        Michael Brett, “The Fatimid revolution (861‐973) and its 
                          aftermath in North Africa,” in The Cambridge History of Africa, 
                          ed. J.D. Fage, 8 vols., vol. 2 (Cambridge, 1978), 589‐636 
                          (African Studies Reading Room, 607 Butler) 
                    
                   Scholarly Debates/Interpretations: 
                       Farhad Daftary, “The Ismaili da’wa outside the Fatimid dawla,” 
                          in L’Egypte fatimide: son art et son histoire, ed. Marianne 
                          Barrucand (Paris, 1999), 29‐43 (Avery Library)(CW) 
                    
                    
                           Prospectus and full bibliography for research paper due at 
                           the beginning of class 
                    
                   For those who would like to read more about the Fatimids:  
                        Heinz Halm, The Empire of the Mahdi: The Rise of the Fatimids (Leiden, 
                           1996) (Islamic Studies RR) 
                         Michael Brett, “The Realm of the Imam: the Fatimids in the Tenth 
                           Century,” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 59 
                           (1996), 431‐449 (CW) 
                    
Week 10            Settlement and Production 
(November 11)      Primary Source Reading:  
                         Ibn Khaldun, The Muqaddimah, pp. 263‐333 (R) 
                    
                    



                                                                                                  7
                         History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
      Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

                   Scholarly Interpretations/Debates:  
                        R. Bruce Hitchner, “The Organization of Rural Settlement in 
                          the Cillium‐Thelepte Region (Kasserine, Central Tunisia),” 
                          L’Africa romana 6 (1989), 387‐402 (CW) 
                        Brent D. Shaw, “Water and society in the ancient Maghreb: 
                          technology, property and development,” in his Environment 
                          and Society in Roman North Africa (Aldershot, 1995) (53 pp.) 
                          (R) 
                        Isabella Sjöström, Tripolitania in Transition: Late Roman to Early 
                          Islamic Settlement, (Aldershot, 1993), introduction and 
                          chapters 4‐5 (46 pp.) (R) 
                    
                   Recommended Background Reading: Raven, Rome in Africa, chs. 5‐6 (46 pp.)
                    
                    
Week 11            Jewish communities in Christian and Islamic North Africa 
(November 18)      Primary Source Reading: 
                        Letters of Medieval Jewish Traders, trans. S.D. Goitein (Princeton, 
                           1973), nos. 1, 4, 12‐14, 18, 22‐28, 33‐34, 63, 70‐72 (87 pp.) (R) 
                    
                   Scholarly Interpretations/Debates: 
                        R. Gonzalez‐Salinero, “The anti‐judaism of Quodvultdeus in 
                           the Vandal and catholic context of the 5th century in North 
                           Africa,” Revue des Etudes Juives 155 (1996), 447‐459 (CW) 
                        J. Starr, “St. Maximos and the forced baptism at Carthage in 
                           632,” Byzantinisch‐Neugriechische Jahrbücher 16 (1940), 192‐196 
                           (CW) 
                        H.Z. Hirschberg, “The Problem of the Judaized Berbers,” 
                           Journal of African History 4 (1963), 313‐339 (CW) 
                        Menahem Ben‐Sasson, “The emergence of the Qayrawan 
                           Jewish community and its importance as a Maghrebi 
                           community,” in Judaeo‐Arabic Studies: Proceedings of the 
                           Founding Conference of the Society for Judaeo‐Arabic Studies, ed. 
                           Norman Golb (Amsterdam, 1997), 1‐13 (CW) 
                        Elizabeth Savage, “Ibadi‐Jewish parallels in early medieval 
                           North Africa,” Al‐Masaq: Studia arabo‐islamica mediterranea 5 
                           (1992), 1‐15 (CW) 
                        Nehemia Levtzion, “The Jews of Sijilmasa and the Saharan 
                           trade,” in Communautés juives des marges sahariennes du 
                           Maghreb, ed. M. Abitboi (Jerusalem, 1982), 253‐263 (CW) 
                    
                           Full draft of research paper due at the beginning of class 
                    
                    



                                                                                              8
                         History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
      Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

Week 12            No Seminar: Thanksgiving Holiday 
(November 25)       
 
Week 13            Worlds without End: Trade in the Maghrib, the Mediterranean, 
(December 2)         and Sub‐Saharan Africa 
                   Scholarly Interpretations/Debates:  
                        M.G. Fulford, “Carthage: Overseas Trade and the Political 
                          Economy, A.D. 400‐700,” Reading Medieval Studies 6 (1980), 66‐
                          80 (CW) 
                        Brent D. Shaw, “Rural markets in North Africa and the political 
                          economy of the Roman Empire,” in his Rulers, Nomads and 
                          Christians, essay I (47 pp.) (R) 
                        Elizabeth Savage, “Berbers and Blacks: Ibadi slave traffic in 
                          eighth‐century North Africa,” Journal of African History 33 
                          (1992), 351‐368 (CW) 
                        Michael McCormick, Origins of the European Economy. 
                          Communications and Commerce, A.D. 300‐900 (Cambridge, 
                          2001), pp. 508‐515 and 244‐254 (R) 
                        Dmitrij Mushin, “The Saqaliba slaves in the Aghlabid state,” 
                          Annual of Medieval Studies at the CEU (1998), 236‐244 (CW) 
                        Michael Brett, “Ifriqiya as a Market for Saharan Trade from the 
                          Tenth to the Twelfth Century AD,” in his Ibn Khaldun and the 
                          Medieval Maghrib, essay II (Islamic Studies RR) 
                        Michael Brett, “Islam and Trade in the Bilad al‐Sudan, Tenth‐
                          Eleventh Century AD,” in his Ibn Khaldun and the Medieval 
                          Maghrib, essay V (Islamic Studies RR) 
                    
                    
Week 14            Christian communities in Islamic North Africa 
(December 9)       Primary Source Reading: 
                        Einhard, Life of Charlemagne c. 27, in Readings in Medieval 
                          History, ed. Geary, p. 317 (R) (on reserve for History W1061) 
                        Gregory VII, Letter 3.21, in The Correspondence of Pope Gregory 
                          VII, trans. Ephraim Emerton (New York, 1912), pp. 94‐95 (R) 
                        Giovanni Boccaccio, The Decameron, trans. Mark Musa and 
                          Peter Bondanella (New York, 1982), ch. 3.10, pp. 235‐239 (R) 
                    
                   Scholarly Interpretations/Debates: 
                        W.H.C. Frend, “North Africa and Europe in the Early Middle 
                          Ages,” Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th ser., 5 
                          (1955), 61‐80 (CW) 
                        Maureen A. Tilley, “The Structure of the Episcopate and the 
                          Eclipse of Christianity in North Africa,” Practice of 



                                                                                         9
                          History W4059 (Undergraduate Seminar) 
       Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, A.D. 300‐1050 

                            Christianity in Roman Africa, American Academy of Religion 
                            (November 22, 1999) (to be distributed; 11 pp.) 
                          Richard W. Bulliet, Conversion to Islam in the Medieval Period. An 
                            Essay in Quantitative History (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
                            1979), chapter 8 (12 pp.) (R) 
                          Savage, Gateway to Hell, pp. 89‐111 (R) 
                          Ronald A. Messier, “The Christian community of Tunis at the 
                            time of St. Louisʹ crusade, A.D.1270,” in The Meeting of Two 
                            Worlds. Cultural Exchange Between East and West during the 
                            Period of the Crusades, ed. Vladimir P. Goss (Kalamazoo, 
                            Michigan, 1986), 241‐255 (R) 
                          Review McCormick, Origins of the European Economy, pp. 244‐
                            254 (from last week) (R) 
                           
                            Final draft of research paper due at the beginning of class 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT DATES: 
    October 7:             Short paper due  
    November 4:            Prospectus and complete bibliography due 
    November 18:           Draft of research paper due 
    December 9:            Final text of research paper due 
 
                    ***All assignments are due at the beginning of class*** 
 




                                                                                          10

				
DOCUMENT INFO