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General Plan - Welcome to the City of Lompoc_

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General Plan - Welcome to the City of Lompoc_ Powered By Docstoc
					INTRODUCTION

The Lompoc General Plan is a comprehensive statement of goals and
policies relating to the development of the community, the
management of potential hazards, and the protection of natural and
cultural resources within its study area. The General Plan directs
Lompoc's future by expressing community desires and by providing
the basis for regulations to protect and enhance the community's
quality of life for future generations. The General Plan serves as
a benchmark in a dynamic planning process intended to shape the
City in a manner which reflects the desires of all community
members. These desires are summarized in the vision statement set
forth below.

VISION STATEMENT
Lompoc is committed to protecting the unique and positive existing
aspects of the community for future generations while accepting the
challenges associated with seeking improvement in areas of current
concern. Lompoc's vision is of an economically prosperous, compact
urban place nestled among natural hillsides with undisturbed
ridgelines, adjacent to wide expanses of fertile agricultural land,
and straddling the biologically-rich Santa Ynez River.          The
community will continue to protect its rural setting by promoting
sustainable use of resources. The city will also continue to be a
safe, healthy, attractive, socially-inviting, and affordable place
in which to live, work, gather, and play.        The city will be
composed of a vibrant downtown, varied commercial and industrial
opportunities, plentiful parks and recreational amenities, and
comfortable neighborhoods.      The community will maintain an
integrated transportation network which facilitates safe and
efficient auto, bus, bicycle, air, rail, and pedestrian travel.
The city's public services will continue to be reliable,
convenient, and cost-effective.       Equal opportunity and the
maximization of human potential for all racial, ethnic, and
economic segments will continue to be supported.        The city's
quality of life will continue to be closely guarded by residents
mindful of a rich past and enthusiastic about a promising future.

GOALS, POLICIES, AND IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Goals, Policies, and Implementation Measures set forth in the City
of Lompoc General Plan serve to communicate the objectives of the
General Plan.   Any statements regarding desired service levels,
operational standards, or public improvements are guidelines and
are not intended to create a mandatory duty for the City to provide
such services or improvements.




                           INTRODUCTION - 1
MITIGATION MONITORING PROGRAM

To comply with the requirements of Section 21081.6 of the
California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) which calls for a
mitigation monitoring program, mitigation measures of the Final
Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the General Plan Revisions
(General Plan Amendment No. GP 94-01) have been incorporated into
the City’s General Plan as Policies and Implementation Measures.
Each mitigation measure is referenced in brackets following the
appropriate Policy or Implementation Measure.

Monitoring will be conducted on an annual basis pursuant to Section
65400 of the California Government Code. Inclusion of mitigation
measures in the General Plan and annual monitoring serves to
fulfill the requirements of Public Resources Code 21081.6.

EXISTING CONDITIONS INFORMATION

Prior to preparation of this General           Plan, the City compiled
reports documenting existing conditions         in the community.  This
background information was used in the          process of drafting the
General Plan text and maps, and as the         existing setting for the
Final Environmental Impact Report.

Upon adoption of the General Plan, the City Council directed staff
to consolidate the General Plan into fewer Elements and remove the
existing conditions information to facilitate ease of use. The
existing conditions information is available at the City’s
Community Services Department - Planning Division for the following
topics:


Land Use                               Urban Design
Circulation                            Agricultural Land
Housing (also in General               Air Quality
     Plan Housing Element)             Biological Resources
Parks and Recreation                   Cultural Resources
Public Facilities and Services:        Energy
     Electrical Service                Mineral Resources
     Fire                              Water Resources
     Libraries                         Emergency Preparedness
     Police                            Flooding
     Public Buildings                  Hazardous Materials
     Schools                           Noise
     Sewer Service                     Seismic/Soils
     Solid Waste                       Wildland Fires
     Storm Drainage
     Water Service


                            INTRODUCTION - 2
                             LAND USE

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES


GOALS / POLICIES

Authority

The Land Use Element is a mandatory element of the general plan.
Section 65302(a) of the Government Code states that the Land Use
Element must designate "the proposed general distribution and
general location and extent of the uses of the land for housing,
business, industry, open space, including agriculture, natural
resources, recreation, and enjoyment of scenic beauty, education,
public buildings and grounds, solid and liquid waste disposal
facilities, and other categories of public and private uses of
land.   The land use element shall include a statement of the
standards of population density and building intensity recommended
for the various districts and other territory covered by the plan."

Goal 1         Maintain a compact urban form and growth pattern
               which provides adequate space to meet housing,
               employment, business, and public service needs.

Policy 1.1     The City shall identify an Urban Limit Line which
               delineates the City's future boundaries and service
               area.

Policy 1.2     The City shall encourage development of under-
               developed and vacant land within its boundaries;
               and shall oppose urbanization of agricultural lands
               east of the City and west of Bailey Avenue, unless
               necessary to protect environmental resources.

Policy 1.3     The City shall encourage Santa Barbara County and
               the Local Agency Formation Commission to plan
               urbanization within municipalities in order to
               protect prime agricultural land outside the Urban
               Limit Line and to efficiently utilize public
               infrastructure.


Goal 2         Protect and enhance the quality of life of Lompoc
               residents through the creation and maintenance of
               affordable, attractive, and well-served residential
               neighborhoods.




                             LAND USE - 1
Policy 2.1   The City shall encourage residential developments
             to provide convenient access by pedestrians and
             bicyclists to commercial areas.

Policy 2.2   The City shall protect residential neighborhoods
             from encroachment by adverse or incompatible non-
             residential uses and impacts associated with those
             non-residential uses.

Policy 2.3   The City shall prohibit new land uses within or
             adjacent to residential neighborhoods when such
             land uses would adversely affect the character of
             the neighborhood.

Policy 2.4   The City shall require provision of permanent
             buffer areas as part of new residential development
             adjacent to areas designated for commercial or
             industrial uses.

Policy 2.5   The City shall encourage creative site designs in
             residential developments which address natural
             constraints and protection of aesthetic qualities.

Goal 3       Provide and maintain opportunities for a diversity
             of commercial and industrial enterprises to meet
             the goods, services, and employment needs of Lompoc
             Valley residents, as well as to attain a balance of
             employment and housing within the Lompoc Valley.

Policy 3.1   The City shall ensure that a sufficient and
             balanced supply of land continues to be available
             for residential, commercial, and industrial uses.

Policy 3.2   The City shall encourage mixed-use development in
             appropriate areas to provide opportunities for a
             jobs and housing balance at the community and
             neighborhood level.

Goal 4       Maintain    high-quality     public   facilities   and
             services.

Policy 4.1   The City shall ensure that a sufficient supply of
             land continues to be available for community
             facility and institutional uses.

Policy 4.2   The City shall allow development only in areas
             where adequate public facilities and/or services
             will be available at the time of development.




                           LAND USE - 2
Policy 4.3   The City, in cooperation with the Lompoc Unified
             School District, shall continue to identify
             adequate school sites on the Land Use Element map.

Policy 4.4   The City shall ensure that the effect of airport
             activities on sensitive land uses is minimized.

Policy 4.5   The City shall ensure that land uses in the
             vicinity of the Lompoc Airport are compatible with
             current and planned airport operations.

Policy 4.6   The City shall continue to allow places of
             religious assembly to locate in areas where
             traffic, parking, and neighborhood conditions
             permit.

Goal 5       Protect the Lompoc Valley's natural resources.

Policy 5.1   The City shall maintain Open Space designations for
             areas used for the preservation of scenic beauty,
             natural resources, or outdoor recreation; or the
             managed production of resources; or the protection
             of public health & safety.

Policy 5.2   The City shall protect prime agricultural lands
             east of the City and west of Bailey Avenue.

Policy 5.3   The City shall minimize the density of development
             adjacent to productive agricultural soils.

Policy 5.4   The   City   shall  minimize   conflicts   between
             agricultural and urban uses.

Policy 5.5   The City shall require provision of permanent
             buffer areas as part of new residential development
             adjacent to areas designated for agriculture.

Policy 5.6   The City shall maintain a compact urban form.

Policy 5.7   The City shall designate groundwater recharge areas
             as Open Space and protect those areas from
             incompatible uses.




                          LAND USE - 3
Policy 5.8   Development proposals in the vicinity of natural
             objects that have unique aesthetic significance
             shall not be permitted to block, alter, or degrade
             existing visual quality without the provision of
             suitable visual enhancement. This may include open
             space, eucalyptus groves, or vegetation that serves
             as a view corridor or has important visual
             attributes. Development proposals shall be sited
             to ensure that these features are retained or
             replaced to the extent feasible, resulting in
             minimal view impairment. [Final EIR Urban Design
             Mitigation Measure 1a]

Policy 5.9   Plantings that serve to screen views of residential
             development, or that help to maintain a natural-
             appearing landscape, shall be retained to the
             extent feasible.     Such plants could be thinned
             selectively   if   thinning   would   improve  view
             corridors or protect public health, safety, and
             welfare. If specific trees are removed, such as
             eucalyptus   trees,   replacement   trees   at  the
             appropriate density (native species when possible)
             shall be substituted to provide suitable screening
             while retaining important view corridors. [Final
             EIR Urban Design Mitigation Measure 1b]

Goal 6       Protect the community against natural and man-made
             hazards.

Policy 6.1   The City shall maintain Open Space designations for
             areas that require special management due to
             hazardous, safety, or public health considerations.

Policy 6.2   The City shall maintain an Open Space designation
             for all areas in which topographic, geologic , or
             soil conditions indicate a significant danger to
             future occupants.

Goal 7       Preserve   and   protect    the   highest   quality
             agricultural soils.

Policy 7.1   The City shall encourage Santa Barbara County to
             protect the most productive agricultural (Class I &
             II) soils in the region.

Policy 7.2   The City shall maintain a compact urban form.




                          LAND USE - 4
Goal 8       Protect    and   encourage    agricultural-support
             businesses.

Policy 8.1   The   City   shall    assist   agriculture-support
             businesses to expand and/or relocate in the Lompoc
             Valley.

Policy 8.2   The City shall work with Santa Barbara County to
             protect   agricultural  areas  from   theft  and
             vandalism.

Policy 8.3   The City shall encourage agricultural education
             programs conducted by local farming organizations.

Policy 8.4   The City shall encourage the use of sustainable
             agricultural practices, including organic farming.

Goal 9       Preserve the continued production of    specialty
             crops which are unique to the region.

Policy 9.1   The City shall protect and enhance the flower
             industry, as well as other specialty crops.




                          LAND USE - 5
IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Measure 1      The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
               provide provisions for mixed-use development.
               [Policy 3.2]

Measure 2      The City shall periodically consider the need for a
               development priority system to ensure orderly
               growth and development within the Urban Limit Line.
                The development priority system shall regulate the
               rate, location, and type of urban growth within the
               existing natural resource constraint setting.
               Underdeveloped and vacant land within the existing
               City boundaries would have the highest development
               priority.

Measure 3      The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
               provide performance standards regarding issues such
               as noise, dust, traffic, light, and glare.
               [Policies 2.2, 4.4, 4.5 and 4.6,]

Measure 4     The City shall explore a general plan referral
              agreement with Santa Barbara County to permit the
              City to review proposed developments in the
              unincorporated areas near the City (pursuant to GC
              Section 65919 et seq.). [Policies 1.3, 4.2, 4.5
              5.2, 5.4, and 5.5]

Measure 5      The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
               establish standards for the location of child care
               centers in all appropriate non-residential zones of
               the city. [Policies 3.1, 3.2]

Measure 6      A Specific Plan shall be prepared to ensure the
               coordinated development of the Bailey Avenue
               Corridor, as shown on the map entitled "Bailey
               Avenue Corridor Boundaries", prior to approval of
               any tentative subdivision maps or development plans
               in   the   Bailey   Avenue   Corridor.    Tentative
               subdivision maps and/or development plans may be
               approved for properties which were within City
               Limits as of June 1, 1999 provided the design of
               the development demonstrates compliance with all
               applicable General Plan goals and policies,
               particularly those requiring establishment of
               buffer   areas   between   new    development   and
               agricultural lands.




                            LAND USE - 6
Measure 7    The City shall amend its Zoning Ordinance to
             require that planned industrial and commercial uses
             be buffered by landscaping, parking, distance
             and/or transitional land uses from residential
             uses, open space, and schools. [Final EIR Land Use
             Mitigation Measure 1a]

Measure 8    All property owners located within an Airport
             Safety Area identified in the Santa Barbara County
             Airport Land Use Plan shall be aware through legal
             notice, that runs with the land, that their
             property is within an officially designated Airport
             Safety Area.      [Final EIR Land Use Mitigation
             Measure 4]

Measure 9    Prior to approval, the City shall require proposed
             new development with potential land use conflicts
             (such as noise, light and glare, air contaminants,
             traffic safety) to demonstrate that such conflicts
             can be minimized or mitigated to an acceptable
             level before the development is approved.      The
             zoning ordinance shall be amended to include
             performance standards to mitigate impacts.[Final
             EIR Land Use Mitigation Measure 1b]

Measure 10   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow
             neighborhood gardens in the Open Space Zone and in
             recreational areas of residential developments.
             [Policy 8.4]

Measure 11   The City will undertake an evaluation of the local
             flower-seed and cut-flower industries to determine
             what local actions are available to retain their
             strength and presence and thereby protect the
             "Valley of Flowers" theme. [Policy 9.1]

Measure 12   The City shall assist the Lompoc Unified School
             District, Allan Hancock College, and local farming
             organizations acquire funding or resources for the
             creation of a student experimental farm. [Policies
             8.3 and 8.4]

Measure 13   The City shall encourage the development of
             agricultural education programs conducted by local
             farming organizations to provide water conservation
             information. [Policy 8.4]




                          LAND USE - 7
Measure 14     The City shall contact private land trusts involved
               in the protection of agricultural land to pursue
               long-term protection of agricultural land within
               the Study Area. [Policies 7.1, 8.1, and 9.1]

Measure 15     The City shall ensure a location for the farmers
               market. [Policy 8.4]


[Notes: The following policies are implemented through current City
Codes and procedures: Policies: 1.2, 2.2, 2.3, 4.2, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6,
4.7, 5.4, 8.1, and 8.3

The following policies are implemented through the establishment of
designations on the Land Use Element map: Policies 1.1, 1.2, 2.4,
3.1, 4.1, 4.4, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, and 6.1]




                             LAND USE - 8
LAND USE DEFINITIONS

                         RESIDENTIAL LAND USES

VERY LOW DENSITY (VLDR)

Purpose To provide semi-rural residential areas on the fringe of
urban development at densities which protect the area's natural
features and resources. To provide residential areas suitable for
the development of custom homes in a setting which maximizes
privacy.

Description Large-lot detached single-family homes on prominent
bluffs, steep hillsides, or adjacent to farmland. Appropriate uses
include light agricultural activities and single-family detached
dwellings.

LOW DENSITY (LDR)

Purpose To provide residential areas which promote and encourage a
suitable environment for life on a neighborhood basis.

Description Residential areas free of physical or natural resource
constraints, containing a mixture of housing designs, architectural
styles, physical amenities, and recreational opportunities which
stimulate a sense of neighborhood identification accessed by local
roads and collector streets.     Appropriate uses include single
family dwellings and mobile homes.

MEDIUM DENSITY   (MDR)

Purpose To provide residential areas which are in close proximity
to schools, shopping, and other services; and which are at
densities that are responsive to the economic considerations of
developing affordable ownership housing and rental housing at
various price levels.   This category provides a buffer between
lower-density detached-housing areas, higher-density multiple-
family areas, and commercial areas.

Description This designation allows for a mixture of unit types
among single-family and multiple-family attached housing options
along major roads, generally adjacent to commercial areas.
Appropriate uses include mobile homes, townhouses, duplexes,
triplexes, four-plexes, and low-rise apartments.




                               LAND USE - 9
HIGH DENSITY (HDR)

Purpose   To provide residential areas which offer convenient
pedestrian access to commercial services and give local residents
the opportunity to live near employment centers. This designation
can also stimulate reinvestment in older-established areas which
can accommodate higher densities.

Description This designation provides the greatest proportion of
the community's multiple family housing opportunities and is
located near shopping centers and centers of employment. Access is
provided by major roadways, arterials, and collectors. Appropriate
uses include single-story and multi-story apartment buildings.




                            LAND USE - 10
               COMMERCIAL AND MIXED-USE LAND USES

NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL (NC)

Purpose   To provide commercial areas which promote a sense of
neighborhood identification by satisfying the need for convenient
shopping and retail service opportunities on a neighborhood basis.
 To provide commercial areas adjacent to residential areas which
encourage pedestrian travel to meet basic commercial needs.

Description Commercial areas which offer shopping and services to
satisfy the day-to-day needs of local neighborhoods and work places
accessed by local roads and collector streets. Appropriate uses
include "mom and pop" food stores, convenience stores, barber or
beauty shops, laundromats, cleaners, and shoe repair shops.

OFFICE COMMERCIAL (OC)

Purpose To provide commercial areas for business, medical, and
professional offices outside of the Old Town area which are easily
integrated into adjacent residential areas. This category provides
a buffer between residential areas and major roadways.

Description Commercial areas which offer professional and business
services to the City and region accessed by major roadways and
arterials. Appropriate uses include professional offices, medical
clinics and laboratories, and other commercial facilities which
provide services rather than goods.

OLD TOWN COMMERCIAL (OTC)

Purpose To provide pedestrian-oriented commercial areas made up of
street-front stores and offices that have a sufficient variety and
depth of goods and services to meet the retail, business, and
cultural needs of residents of the City and region. To provide
limited residential opportunities which are in close proximity to
the area's goods, services, and amenities.

Description Commercial areas which provide retail and professional
business services to City and regional residents accessed by major
roadways and arterials in conjunction with Old Town single-level
and multi-level parking areas. Development in these areas will be
integrated with public and private open spaces designed to enhance
the pedestrian experience.      Appropriate uses include general
retail, non-retail services, and offices. Limited residential uses
are also allowed as a secondary use in conjunction with on-site
commercial uses. This category differs from the General Commercial
category by emphasizing pedestrian-oriented businesses.




                               LAND USE - 11
GENERAL COMMERCIAL (GC)

Purpose To provide commercial areas for a wide variety of retail,
office, and service-oriented enterprises which meet the needs of
residents and visitors.    To accommodate commercial uses which
operate more effectively outside the other commercial areas of the
community.

Description Commercial areas characterized by a variety of retail,
office, and visitor-oriented businesses that rely upon automobile
access rather than pedestrian access. This category provides a
wide range of goods and services accessed by high volume roadways.
 Appropriate uses include destination retail, community and
regional shopping centers, visitor-oriented businesses, and
automobile-oriented business.

MIXED-USE (MU)

Purpose To provide areas for a mixture of pedestrian-oriented uses
(e.g. commercial, residential, civic, cultural, and recreational)
where each activity adds to the whole to produce a town center that
is economically vibrant and socially inviting.

Description   Areas which provide a harmonious intermingling of
pedestrian-oriented uses to meet the shopping, business, housing,
and entertainment needs of City and regional residents accessed by
streets, bicycles, and pedestrian ways in conjunction with shared
single-level and multi-level parking areas.       Appropriate uses
include retail shops; business services; residential units; medical
offices; and public and quasi-public uses of a recreational,
educational, or religious type.




                            LAND USE - 12
                           INDUSTRIAL LAND USES

BUSINESS PARK (BP) 1

Purpose   To provide areas for clean and attractive, planned
industrial centers on large, integrated parcels of land upon which
all activities are conducted indoors.

Description Attractive industrial areas for light manufacturing,
research and development activities, storage and distribution
facilities, administrative offices, and accessory uses.      These
areas are accessed by arterials and major roadways. Appropriate
uses include aerospace-related activities and services, assembly
and repair, industrial services, wholesaling, warehousing (with
inside storage only), and administrative facilities. This category
differs from the Industrial category by including commercial
service uses which complement industrial services and operations.

INDUSTRIAL (I)

Purpose To provide areas for a wide range of industrial uses that
involve outdoor activities.

Description Industrial areas which include all uses identified for
the Industrial categories as well as manufacturing and distribution
activities which require separation from residential areas. This
category permits a wide range of industrial activities including
manufacturing, assembling, mechanical repair, product storage,
wholesale trade, heavy commercial (e.g. lumber yards), and
accessory office and services.




1 Resolution No. 5148(07) adopted July 03, 2007, the complete text of the
Resolution can be viewed at the Planning Division.




                                 LAND USE - 13
    COMMUNITY FACILITY, OPEN SPACE, AND AGRICULTURE LAND USES

COMMUNITY FACILITY (CF)

Purpose To provide areas to meet the public service, educational,
recreational, social, and cultural needs of Valley residents.

Description Public and quasi-public service facilities that serve
the   community.       Appropriate   uses   include    governmental
administrative offices, educational facilities, public safety
facilities,   hospitals,   parks,   libraries,   museums,   transit
facilities, airport facilities, utilities, governmental maintenance
yards, correctional facilities, and cemeteries. This designation
may be provided on individual parcels.

Proposed facilities are designated with a dashed border.        The
location of proposed facilities is intended to indicate the general
area within which the respective Community Facility will be
located. The specific size, location, and configuration of the
Community Facility site will only be finalized through acquisition
of a particular parcel.

OPEN SPACE (OS)

Purpose To provide areas which preserve scenic beauty; conserve
natural resources; protect significant biological and cultural
resources; provide opportunities for outdoor recreation and the
enjoyment of nature; permit the managed production of natural
resources; and protect public health and safety.

Description Areas in which sensitive natural resource features,
community concerns, or site constraints limit development. These
areas provide the community with scenic views; provide groundwater
recharge; contain biologically-significant habitats and cultural
resource sites; provide outdoor recreation opportunities; are
suitable for mineral resource extraction; and are subject to flood,
wildland fire, noise, , topographic, soil, or safety hazards.
Appropriate uses include recreation, trails, utility corridors,
flood control facilities, agriculture, and resource extraction
activities. This designation may be used on individual parcels to
protect on-site resources or public health.

Open Space setbacks are provided in the following locations, with
minimum widths from the channel margins as noted: along the Santa
Ynez River - 100 foot setback, and along Salsipuedes, San
Miguelito, Sloans Canyon, and Davis Creeks - 50 foot setback.




                            LAND USE - 14
AGRICULTURE (AG)

Purpose   To provide areas outside the Urban Limit Line for the
protection and preservation of agricultural land as well as the
long-term production of food, fiber, and local specialty crops.

Description Cropland and range land which is intended to remain in
agricultural use. Land in this category must total at least twenty
acres in size (either individual parcels or contiguous parcels).
This category includes a wide range of agricultural activities
including grazing, cultivation, processing, packing, greenhouses,
farm equipment storage, and incidental residential uses.




                            LAND USE - 15
                       OVERLAY DESIGNATIONS
PROPOSED PARK (P)

Purpose   To identify proposed sites for the creation of public
parks which address existing or anticipated community needs for
active and passive recreation opportunities.

Description Areas intended for the establishment of public park
and recreational facilities to serve neighborhood, community, and
regional needs of existing and future Lompoc Valley residents and
visitors. Areas with this designation must have the potential to
fulfill needs identified in the Parks and Recreation Element.

Proposed sites are designated with dashed lines. The location of a
proposed site is intended to indicate the general area where the
proposed park will be located. The specific size, location, and
configuration of the park site will only be finalized upon
acquisition of one or more parcels.

PROPOSED SCHOOL (S)

Purpose   To provide proposed sites for the creation of public
schools which address anticipated educational needs of the
community.

Description    Areas intended for the establishment of     public
educational facilities to serve Lompoc Valley residents.

Proposed sites are designated with dashed lines. The location of a
proposed site is intended to indicate the general area where the
proposed educational facility will be located. The specific size,
location, and configuration of the educational facility site will
only be finalized upon acquisition of one or more parcels.




                            LAND USE - 16
                           BOUNDARY LINES

URBAN LIMIT LINE (ULL)

Purpose The Urban Limit Line defines the ultimate edge of urban
development within the City of Lompoc in order to: protect the
natural features, scenic hillsides, and agricultural economy of the
community; protect the health, safety, and welfare of community
residents by directing development away from areas with hazards;
and ensure that delivery of public services is provided in an
efficient and cost-effective manner.

Description Areas inside the Urban Limit Line are suitable for the
development of residential, commercial, industrial, mixed-use, and
community facility land uses.       Open space and recreational
activities are suitable uses inside and outside of the Urban Limit
Line. Agricultural activities are permitted inside the Urban Limit
Line as an interim use, pending urbanization.            Long-term
agricultural activities shall be outside of the Urban Limit Line.

Urban development inside and adjacent to the Urban Limit Line shall
be designed to incorporate buffer areas with trails or design
features which serve to demarcate the urban edge of the community.
 Buffer areas should be at least 200 feet wide.

SPHERE OF INFLUENCE

Description The probable ultimate physical boundaries and service
area of the City, as determined by the Santa Barbara County Local
Agency Formation Commission (in accordance with GC Section 56076).
 The existing Sphere of Influence is shown on the Land Use Element
Map for informational purposes only.




                            LAND USE - 17
                                 LAND USE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS


      Land Use Category                       Allowable                    Average Population
                                          Building Density*                      Density
                                                                          (Persons/net acre)**

 Residential:
  Very Low Density (VLDR)                  2.2 DU/net acre                          6

  Low Density (LDR)                        6.2 DU/net acre                         17

  Medium Density (MDR)                   6.2 - 14.5 DU/net acre                    41

  High Density (HDR)                    14.5 - 21.8 DU/net acre                    61

 Commercial:

  Neighborhood (NC)                           0.50 FAR                              0

  Office (OC)                                 0.75 FAR                              0

  Old Town (OTC)                  2.00 FAR with up to 25% of floor                 61
                                 area available for residential use
                                     at 14.5 - 21.8 DU/net acre

  General (GC)                                0.50 FAR                              0

 Mixed Use (MU):

  All Commercial                              0.75 FAR                            ----

  All Residential                      14.5 - 21.8 DU/net acre                     61

  Commercial & Residential        1.00 FAR with a minimum of 33% of              Varies
                                      floor area for residential

 Industrial:
  Business Park (BP)                           .75 FAR                         Negligible

  Light (LI)                                   .50 FAR                         Negligible

  General (GI)                                 .50 FAR                         Negligible

 Community Facility (CF)                      1.00 FAR                         Negligible

 Open Space (OS)                                ----                           Negligible

 Agriculture (AG)                           1 DU/20 acres                       Negligible

* DU = Dwelling Unit. The DU/net acre describes the number of DU's permitted on an acre of land
less the area required for streets and public right-of-way. The densities identified for the
VLDR and LDR categories represent the maximum allowable densities in the respective areas. No
minimum density is intended to apply to these categories. Densities which are less than those
designated may be appropriate in some areas due to hazards, resources, or the need to achieve
land use compatibility. In the MDR and HDR categories, the range sets forth both a minimum and
a maximum allowable density in order to ensure a sufficient land supply.

FAR = Floor Area Ratio. The FAR indicates the maximum intensity of development on a parcel.
The FAR is expressed as the ratio of building space to land area. For the purposes of this
document, building space is defined as enclosed gross leasable space.
** Average population density indicates the expected number of persons per net acre living
within residential areas. It is calculated by multiplying the maximum allowable dwelling units
per net acre by the average citywide household size (2.81 according to 1990 Census).




                                      LAND USE - 18
                           CIRCULATION

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES

GOALS / POLICIES

Authority

The Circulation Element is required by the Government Code (Section
65302(b)) which states that the Circulation Element must include
"the general location and extent of existing and proposed major
thoroughfares, transportation routes, terminals, and...facilities,
all correlated with the land use element of the plan."
Goal 1         Maximize the efficiency, quality, and safety of a
               multi-modal circulation system which provides for
               the movement of people, goods, and services to
               serve the internal circulation needs of the City,
               while also addressing through travel needs.

Policy 1.1     The City shall use the Roadway Designations map,
               Bikeway Routes map, and Truck Routes map in
               establishing the location and design of roadways,
               bikeways, and truck routes, respectively.

Policy 1.2     The City shall maintain intersection traffic levels
               of service (LOS) at LOS C or better throughout the
               City, with the exception of intersections monitored
               in accordance with the Congestion Management
               Program (CMP) administered by the Santa Barbara
               County Association of Governments (SBCAG). CMP
               intersections shall maintain a LOS in accordance
               with the most recent CMP standards, when it can be
               demonstrated that all feasible mitigation measures
               have been applied to the project and LOS C, with
               said mitigation, cannot be achieved. [GP 05-02,
               Resolution No. 5267(05)]

Policy 1.3     The City shall assure that all improvements to the
               circulation system necessitated by new development
               are proportionately financed by the project
               sponsor.

Policy 1.4     The City shall only allow development in areas
               where   adequate circulation facilities and/or
               services will be available at the time of
               development.

Policy 1.5     The City shall maximize movement of through-traffic
               on expressways and arterials by encouraging
               efficient utilization of existing roadway capacity,
               and    when    necessary    providing    additional
               transportation capacity.



                           CIRCULATION - 1
Policy 1.6   The City shall continue to require private roadways
             to be constructed and maintained to City standards.

Policy 1.7   The City shall vacate or reduce under-utilized
             rights-of-way, where appropriate, while retaining
             access to utilities.

Policy 1.8   Provide an adequate supply of private and public
             off-street parking to meet the needs of residents
             and visitors to the City.

Policy 1.9   The City shall require developers of new commercial
             areas to provide convenient pedestrian access ways
             into adjacent residential neighborhoods, where
             feasible.
Goal 2       Minimize the public's exposure to       circulation-
             related noise and safety hazards.

Policy 2.1   The City shall designate the roadway network and
             truck routes so as to minimize traffic-generated
             noise impacts upon noise sensitive land uses.

Policy 2.2   The City shall encourage regulatory agencies to
             designate    routes    away   from    urban    and
             environmentally-sensitive areas for transportation
             of hazardous and explosive materials.

Policy 2.3   The City shall seek to ensure a safe transportation
             system for all users within the City.

Policy 2.4   The   City  shall   ensure   that   approaches   to
             intersection crosswalks and all adjacent street
             corners are illuminated by requiring all new
             commercial,   entertainment,   school   and   other
             pedestrian generating uses to provide lighting for
             pedestrians, as part of the development review
             process.
Goal 3       Maximize   the   viability  and   convenience    of
             transportation modes that reduce automobile use.

Policy 3.1   The City shall provide       and maintain a safe and
             convenient circulation       system which encourages
             walking.
Policy 3.2   The City shall provide       and maintain a safe and
             convenient circulation       system which encourages
             bicycle travel.

Policy 3.3   The City shall encourage ridesharing and transit
             use.




                        CIRCULATION - 2
Policy 3.4     The City shall provide safe and convenient transit
               service   which    meets   the    needs   of    the
               transportation-disadvantaged    including    young,
               elderly, disabled, and low-income individuals.

Policy 3.5     The City shall encourage regional transportation
               services to accommodate the needs of commuters and
               ridesharing.

Policy 3.6     The City shall facilitate the provision of lockers
               and secure enclosed long term parking areas for
               bicycles throughout the City and at multi-modal
               stations to extend the range of the bicycle
               commuter.

Policy 3.7     The City shall work cooperatively with appropriate
               jurisdictions and agencies to encourage the timely
               improvement of roadway and transit facilities,
               which address local and regional travel needs.

Policy 3.8     The City shall require dedication of land and/or
               construction of appropriate facilities to ensure a
               safe and efficient public transportation system.
Goal 4         Protect and enhance the visual quality of Lompoc's
               circulation system.

Policy 4.1     The City may allow narrower widths for roadways in
               hillside areas to minimize the amount of grading
               where safety, visibility, and traffic conditions
               permit.
Goal 5         Reduce automobile use and the associated emissions
               by maintaining a compact and well-designed urban
               form which encourages alternative transportation
               modes.

Policy 5.1     The City shall provide and maintain a safe and
               convenient circulation system which encourages
               walking.

Policy 5.2     The City shall provide and maintain a safe and
               convenient circulation system which encourages
               bicycle travel.
Policy 5.3     The City shall encourage ridesharing and transit
               use.

Policy 5.4     The City shall encourage telecommuting and other
               work schedule modifications which reduce vehicular
               use.
IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES




                          CIRCULATION - 3
Measure 1    The City shall control access along expressways and
             arterials    by   controlling    the   number    of
             intersections and driveways. [Policies 1.1, 1.3,
             1.4]

Measure 2    The City shall work with Caltrans to relieve
             congestion on North H Street through traffic
             control measures. [Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4]

Measure 3    The City shall explore options, which do not
             adversely   affect  the  viability  of  existing
             businesses, to relieve congestion at the A
             Street/Ocean Avenue intersection.  [Policies 1.1
             and 1.4]

Measure 4    The City shall pursue funding from Federal, state,
             and regional agencies for: 1) construction of a
             fair-weather crossing across the Santa Ynez River
             using the existing right-of-way along McLaughlin
             Road, and 2) widening of Robinson Bridge on Highway
             246. [Policy 1.2]

Measure 5    The City shall encourage Caltrans to provide
             traffic signals at the Ocean Avenue/V Street
             intersection. [Policies 1.1 and 1.4]

Measure 6    The City shall identify and schedule paving of
             incomplete street widths and alleys where necessary
             to remove safety hazards. [Policies 2.4, 3.1, 3.2,
             and 3.4]

Measure 7    The City shall identify locations where sidewalks
             are missing, or are in disrepair, and shall
             prioritize construction and repair of identified
             locations.   Property owners shall be responsible
             for funding the construction of missing sidewalks.
             [Policies 1.1, 2.4, 3.1]


Measure 8    The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require   the   provision   of   adequate  bicycle
             facilities in development projects. [Policies 1.1,
             1.2, 1.3, 3.2, and 3.4]

Measure 9    The City shall integrate bicycle lanes or separate
             bikeways into street projects located along planned
             bicycle routes. [Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 3.2]

Measure 10   The City shall develop a pedestrian and bicycle
             trail system which connects major park and wildlife
             areas within the Lompoc Valley. [Policies 3.1 and
             3.2]




                        CIRCULATION - 4
Measure 11   The City shall encourage Federal, state, and
             regional agencies to widen the H Street/Highway 1
             Bridge and Robinson Bridge on Highway 246 to assure
             safe bicycle and pedestrian use. [Policies 1.1,
             1.4, 2.4, 3.1, and 3.2]

Measure 12   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require project sponsors to provide bus shelters in
             high-usage     locations,     near     multi-family
             developments,   and   within    commercial   areas.
             [Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 3.4, and 3.5]

Measure 13   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow
             park and ride facilities. [Policies 1.1, 3.2, and
             3.4]

Measure 14   The City shall work with Caltrans to restrict truck
             traffic to city-designated truck routes. [Policy
             2.1]

Measure 15   The City shall review, and update as necessary, the
             Standard   Requirements   for    the   Design   and
             Construction    of   Subdivisions    and    Special
             Developments regarding improvements in the public
             right-of-way (e.g. roads, bikeways, and sidewalks).
             [Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 2.4, 4.3]

Measure 16   The City shall limit on-street parking where
             feasible on certain roadways which are designated
             as bicycle routes in order to create new bicycle
             lanes and encourage bicycle travel. [Policies 1.1,
             1.2, and 3.2]

Measure 17   The City shall pursue funding from Federal, state,
             and regional agencies for the development of park-
             and-ride lots near major arterial roadways in the
             southeast and northern areas of the City. [Policies
             1.1, 3.4, and 3.5]

Measure 18   The City shall ensure that safe and convenient
             pedestrian and bicycle access is provided to the
             Allan Hancock College site. [Policies 1.1, 1.2,
             1.3, 1.4, 3.1, and 3.2].

Measure 19   The City shall examine and, if necessary, amend the
             Development Impact Fee Resolutions to ensure that
             transportation improvement necessitated by projects
             generating additional peak-hour trips are provided
             and improvements to bicycle lanes are funded.
             [Policies 2.4, 3.2, and 3.4]




                        CIRCULATION - 5
Measure 20   The City shall require new developments with high
             pedestrian activity generator areas (such as retail
             centers, government buildings, employment centers,
             and transit stations) to provide walkways which
             maximize pedestrian comfort.

Measure 21   The City shall update roadway cross-sections and
             standards to be consistent with General Plan
             roadway designations.

Measure 22   The City shall pursue funding from Federal, State,
             and regional agencies for funding maintenance of
             the City’s transportation system.

Measure 23   The City shall ensure that crosswalks are provided
             on major access routes to all schools.
Measure 24   The City shall require, as part of the development
             review process, a system of sidewalks or pathways
             for all new development to provide a safe
             environment for pedestrians.

Measure 25   The City shall explore traffic calming techniques
             to enhance pedestrian safety in the Old Town
             pedestrian-oriented business district and other
             places of high volume pedestrian uses.

Measure 26   The City shall adopt and utilize traffic study
             guidelines to evaluate potential traffic impacts
             associated with proposed new development prior to
             project approval, and assure implementation of
             appropriate mitigation measures prior to or in
             conjunction with project development.
Measure 27   The City shall require that future roads and
             improvements to existing roads be designed to
             minimize conflicting traffic movements such as
             turning, curb parking, and frequent stops.

Measure 28   The City shall require that the development of new
             private driveways do not introduce significant
             traffic conflicts along designated expressway and
             arterial roadways.

Measure 29   The City shall establish and enforce weight
             restrictions where necessary on routes traversing
             through residential neighborhoods.

Measure 30   The City shall review the design of all new
             residential neighborhoods to ensure that through
             traffic is minimized.




                        CIRCULATION - 6
Measure 31   The City shall identify and evaluate potential
             local revenue sources and viable state and federal
             funding sources for financing roadway system,
             transit,   pedestrian,  and   bicycle  development
             projects.

Measure 32   The City shall require the construction of bus
             turnouts adjacent to new developments in locations
             which   improve  transit   service,  safety,   and
             efficiency.

Measure 33   The City shall require the installation of
             wheelchair ramps on all new sidewalks and encourage
             their installation in older neighborhoods.

Measure 34   The City shall develop and adopt a Bikeway Master
             Plan that is reviewed every five years and updated
             as necessary. This Master Plan shall evaluate ways
             to encourage bicycle use and specify the locations
             of bicycle amenities which facilitate bicycle use.

Measure 35   An economic impact study shall be undertaken prior
             to funding construction of the Central Avenue
             Extension to study the potential economic effects
             on the Old Town and other areas of the City.

Measure 36   To accommodate the projected buildout traffic
             demands, Central Avenue shall: (1) be widened to
             its full planned width from “O“ Street to a point
             west of “V“ Street to allow for the required
             intersection improvements; and (2) include the
             intersection modifications illustrated in Figure 4
             of the Addendum to the Final EIR for the General
             Plan revision (File No. GP 94-01).       As shown
             therein, the following improvements will be
             necessary:

             •    The intersection of Central Avenue and “H“
                  Street will require the addition of a second
                  southbound left-turn lane.

             •    The intersection of Central Avenue and “A“
                  Street will be modified in conjunction with
                  the construction of the Central Avenue
                  extension for “A“ Street east to Highway 246.

             •    The intersection of “H“ Street and North
                  Avenue will require the addition of an
                  exclusive westbound right-turn lane. [Final
                  EIR Circulation Mitigation Measure 1, as
                  modified in the Addendum to the Final EIR]




                        CIRCULATION - 7
[Notes: The following policies are implemented through current City
Codes and procedures: Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 2.2,
2.5, 3.3, 3.5, and 3.7.]




                           CIRCULATION - 8
                    CIRCULATION ELEMENT DEFINITIONS

ROADWAYS

EXPRESSWAYS

Purpose To provide for the highest proportion of regional travel
by connecting urbanized areas with major activity and employment
centers in the County.

Description High speed/high capacity roadways which have limited-
access and at-grade or grade-separated intersections. Expressways
are divided roadways with a minimum right-of-way width of 110 feet
and at least four auto-lanes.
MAJOR ARTERIALS

Purpose To provide for the highest proportion of travel between
and within the communities of the Lompoc Valley by linking
Expressways to Minor Arterials, Collector Streets, and Local
Streets.

Description Medium speed/high capacity roadways with controlled
access. Major Arterials, with the exception of Central Avenue, are
divided and undivided roadways with a right-of-way width of at
least 100 feet and two or four auto-lanes. Central Avenue shall be
a divided limited-access roadway with a right-of-way width of at
least 110 feet and four auto-lanes.
MINOR ARTERIALS

Purpose To provide for travel between and within the communities
of the Lompoc Valley by linking Major Arterials to Collector
Streets and Local Streets.

Description Medium and high speed, medium capacity roadways with
controlled roadway access. Minor Arterials are undivided roadways
with right-of-way width of at least 80 feet and two auto-lanes.
COLLECTOR STREETS

Purpose To provide for relatively-short distance travel between
and within neighborhoods by linking Major and Minor Arterials to
Local Streets.

Description Low-speed/low volume, undivided, two-lane roadways.
Driveway access from individual parcels may be discouraged.
Collector Streets have a right-of-way width of at least 64 feet.
LOCAL STREETS

Purpose   To provide for short distance travel, to discourage
through traffic, and to provide direct roadway access to abutting
land uses and driveways.

                             CIRCULATION - 9
Description Low speed/low volume, undivided, two-lane roadways.
Driveway access from individual parcels is common. Local Streets
have a right-of-way width of at least 60 feet. However, the right-
of-way width may be reduced to 56 feet for cul-de-sacs less than
350 feet long.
RURAL ROAD

Purpose   To provide for both agricultural vehicles and urban
vehicular travel, to act as a buffer between agricultural and urban
land uses, to discourage through traffic, to provide diret roadway
access to abutting residential land uses and driveways, and to join
with the City’s existing circulation system.

Description Low speed/low volume, undivided, two-lane roadways.
Driveway access from individual parcels should be minimal and may
be discouraged. (Resolution No. 5187 (04), August 4, 2004)
BIKEWAYS

Purpose   To provide safe and convenient routes which encourage
bicycle travel throughout the City and Lompoc Valley for work,
school, shopping, and recreation.

Description

Class I - Bike Path: Routes which provide a completely separated
right-of-way designated for the exclusive use of bicycles and
pedestrians. Cross-flows by motor vehicles are minimized.

Class II - Bike Lane: Routes which provide a right-of-way within
the paved area of a roadway, designated for the exclusive or semi-
exclusive use of bicycles with through travel by motor vehicles or
pedestrians prohibited.    Cross-flows by pedestrians and motor
vehicles are permitted; motor vehicle parking may be permitted.

Class III - Bike Route: Routes which provide a right-of-way within
the paved area of a roadway, designated by signs or markings on the
pavement. The route is shared with pedestrians and motor vehicles.

City bikeways   shall   be   designed   in      accordance   with   Caltrans
standards.


TRUCK ROUTES

Purpose To provide safe and convenient transportation corridors
for the movement of commercial and industrial goods necessary to
meet the needs of Vandenberg Air Force Base and businesses
throughout the region while protecting the health, safety, and
serenity of Lompoc residents.



                             CIRCULATION - 10
Description Routes along Expressways, Arterials, and portions of
Collector Streets to provide convenient access to truck-dependent
commercial and industrial land uses.




                         CIRCULATION - 11
                       Attachment A

                  Roadway Classification
                     Cross References


     SBCAG              Lompoc                 Example
  Designation        Designation                  Roadway

  -------            Expressway            Lompoc-Casmalia

Other Principal    Major Arterial           Ocean Avenue
    Arterial                                 Central Ave
                                               H Street

Minor Arterial     Minor Arterial              A Street
                                           West College Ave

   Collector         Collector              Chestnut Ave

  Local Road        Local Street            Berkeley Drive




                      CIRCULATION - 12
            City of Lompoc




           General Plan
          Housing Element


                   Adopted
               November 18, 2003



      Community Development Department
City Hall · 100 Civic Center Plaza · Lompoc, CA 93436
                 City of Lompoc
                  General Plan
                Housing Element

                      City Council


                 Dick DeWees, Mayor
          DeWayne Holmdahl, Councilmember
            Janice Keller, Councilmember
            Will Schuyler, Councilmember
            Mike Siminski, Councilmember

             Gary Keefe, City Administrator



                Planning Commission


                      Ronald Fink
                     Ralph Harman
               Jack Rodenhi, Chairperson
                      Ann Ruhge
                     Ed Shoemaker



       Community Development Department


Arleen T. Pelster, AICP, Community Development Director
            Lucille Breese, AICP, City Planner
            Peggy Woods, Associate Planner


    Adopted by Lompoc City Council on November 18, 2003
                                           HOUSING ELEMENT
                                          TABLE OF CONTENTS

Goals/Policies ................................................................................................................. 1
Authority .......................................................................................................................... 1
Implementation Measures ............................................................................................... 7
Housing Element Implementation Schedule 2001 – 2008 ............................................ 13
1997 Housing Element Implementation Schedule Progress ........................................ 19

1.0       Introduction........................................................................................................ 23
1.1       Purpose And Intent............................................................................................ 23
1.2       Relationship of Housing Element to Other Elements......................................... 23
1.3       State Review of Housing Elements ................................................................... 24
2.0       Community Profile ............................................................................................. 24
2.1       Population Characteristics ................................................................................. 27
          2.1.1 Population Projections ............................................................................ 28
          2.1.2 Age Distribution ...................................................................................... 28
2.2       Race and Ethnicity............................................................................................. 29
2.3       Employment Characteristics .............................................................................. 30
3.0       Housing Profile .................................................................................................. 32
3.1       Household Characteristics................................................................................. 32
          3.1.1 Household Tenure .................................................................................. 33
          3.1.2 Household Sizes ..................................................................................... 34
          3.1.3 Household Overcrowding........................................................................ 35
          3.1.4 Household Types .................................................................................... 36
          3.1.5 Household Income.................................................................................. 37
3.2       Housing Characteristics..................................................................................... 40
          3.2.1 Housing Quantity and Type .................................................................... 40
          3.2.2 Housing Age ........................................................................................... 42
          3.2.3 Housing Condition .................................................................................. 43
          3.2.4 Vacancy Rate ......................................................................................... 46
          3.2.5 Housing Cost .......................................................................................... 47
          3.2.6 Housing Affordability ............................................................................... 50
          3.2.7 Ownership Affordability ........................................................................... 51
          3.2.8 Rental Affordability.................................................................................. 53
          3.2.9 Assisted Housing .................................................................................... 54
             3.2.9.1 Inventory of Assisted Housing ..................................................... 54
             3.2.9.2 Conservation of Assisted Housing .............................................. 55
             3.2.9.3 Preservation of Assisted Housing ............................................... 58
             3.2.9.4 Financing and Subsidy Resources for Assisted Housing ............ 58
4.0       Housing Needs .................................................................................................. 59
4.1       Existing Housing Needs .................................................................................... 59
          4.1.1 Reduction of Overcrowding..................................................................... 59


                                                                  i
      4.1.2 Housing Rehabilitation ............................................................................ 59
      4.1.3 Housing Affordability ............................................................................... 59
4.2   Special Needs Groups....................................................................................... 60
      4.2.1 Elderly..................................................................................................... 60
      4.2.2 Disabled.................................................................................................. 63
      4.2.3 Large Households................................................................................... 66
      4.2.4 Single-Headed and Female-Headed Households................................... 67
      4.2.5 Farmworkers........................................................................................... 68
      4.2.6 Homeless................................................................................................ 69
4.3   Projected Housing Needs .................................................................................. 73
5.0   Residential Land Resources.............................................................................. 76
5.1   Estimated Dwelling Unit Capacity...................................................................... 76
      5.1.1 Vacant Residential Land ......................................................................... 76
         5.1.1.1 Financial and Regulatory Incentives for High Density Housing on
                        Smaller Parcels ...................................................................... 83
         5.1.1.2 Summary of Estimated Dwelling Unit Capacity on Vacant
                        Residential Land .................................................................... 85
         5.1.1.3 Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial Description of Allowed
                        Uses ...................................................................................... 86
         5.1.1.4 Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial Development Standards . 86
         5.1.1.5 Financial and Regulatory Incentives on Mixed Use Parcels ........ 89
      5.1.2 Underdeveloped Residential Land.......................................................... 89
         5.1.2.1 Inventory of MDR, HDR, MU and OTC Underdeveloped Parcels 91
5.2   Availability of Public Service .............................................................................. 95
6.0   Housing Development Constraints .................................................................... 96
6.1   Governmental Constraints ................................................................................. 96
      6.1.1 Land Use Controls .................................................................................. 96
         6.1.1.1 Planned Development ................................................................ 100
         6.1.1.2 Permitted Uses in Residential Zoning Districts ........................... 101
         6.1.1.3 Conditional Use Permit Process ................................................. 103
         6.1.1.4 Architectural Review (Design Review) ....................................... 104
      6.1.2 Mobilehome Park Standards ................................................................. 106
      6.1.3 Building Codes and Enforcement ......................................................... 107
      6.1.4 On- and Off-Site Improvements ............................................................ 107
      6.1.5 Fees and Exactions .............................................................................. 108
      6.1.6 Permit Processing Procedures ............................................................. 109
      6.1.7 Housing for Persons with Disabilities .................................................... 110
         6.1.7.1 Procedures for Ensuring Reasonable Accommodations ............ 110
         6.1.7.2 Zoning and Land Use..................................................................111
         6.1.7.3 Permits and Processing .............................................................112
         6.1.7.4 Building Codes ...........................................................................113
6.2   Nongovernmental Constraints ..........................................................................113
      6.2.1 Cost of Developable Land......................................................................113
      6.2.2 Construction and Site Improvement Costs.............................................114
      6.2.3 Sales and Marketing ..............................................................................114


                                                           ii
       6.2.4 Financing and Profit ...............................................................................114

7.0    Existing and Available Implementation Measures ............................................115
7.1    Federal Programs.............................................................................................115
       7.1.1 HUD – Homeownership Opportunities for People Everywhere (HOPE)
              Program .................................................................................................115
       7.1.2 HUD – Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME) ...............................115
       7.1.3 HUD – Section 8 Program .....................................................................116
       7.1.4 HUD – Section 202 Program .................................................................116
       7.1.5 HUD – Section 811 Program .................................................................116
       7.1.6 HUD – Shelter Plus Care Homeless Rental Housing Assistance Program ...117
       7.1.7 HUD – Emergency Shelter Program ......................................................117
       7.1.8 Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) ...................................117
7.2    State Programs.................................................................................................118
       7.2.1 California Self-Help Housing Program ...................................................118
       7.2.2 Mobilehome Park Resident Ownership Program (MPROP)...................118
       7.2.3 Multifamily Housing Program (MHP) .....................................................118
          7.2.3.1 California Housing Rehabilitation Program – Owner Component119
          7.2.3.2 California Housing Rehabilitation Program – Rental Component 119
          7.2.3.3 California Rental Housing Construction Program (RHCP) .........119
       7.2.4 California Housing Finance Agency (CalHFA) ......................................119
7.3    Local Programs ................................................................................................120
       7.3.1 Density Bonus Ordinance ......................................................................120
       7.3.2 Second Units .........................................................................................120
       7.3.3 Inclusionary Zoning................................................................................121
       7.3.4 Redevelopment Area Expansion ...........................................................121
8.0    Equal Housing Opportunities ...........................................................................123
9.0    Energy Conservation In Housing ......................................................................125
10.0   Glossary ...........................................................................................................127
11.0   Sources ............................................................................................................130
12.0   Endnotes ..........................................................................................................133

FIGURES

1      Lompoc Housing Market Area ........................................................................... 25
2      General Plan Study Area................................................................................... 26
3      Historic Population Trends ................................................................................ 27
4      Age Distribution ................................................................................................. 29
5      Race/Ethnicity.................................................................................................... 30




                                                            iii
TABLES

1    Population Projections .................................................................................................... 28
2    Lompoc Region Employment Trends .............................................................................. 31
3    Lompoc’s Major Employers – June 2003 ........................................................................ 32
4    City of Lompoc Total Households and Household Tenure.............................................. 33
5    Santa Barbara County Total Households and Household Tenure .................................. 34
6    City of Lompoc Average Household Size........................................................................ 34
7    Distribution of Household Sizes ...................................................................................... 34
8    City of Lompoc Overcrowded Households ...................................................................... 35
9    City of Lompoc Overcrowded Households By Tenure .................................................... 36
10   Distribution of Household Types ..................................................................................... 36
11   City of Lompoc Household Population Distribution ......................................................... 37
12   Santa Barbara County Maximum Household Income Limit – 2002................................. 37
13   1999 Household Income Estimates ................................................................................ 38
14   City of Lompoc Household Income Distribution 1999 ..................................................... 38
15   Housing Costs, Rent as Percentage of Gross Income.................................................... 39
16   City of Lompoc Household Overpayment – 2000............................................................ 40
17   City of Lompoc Housing Supply ...................................................................................... 41
18   Total Housing Stock, 1980-2000 Dwelling Units ............................................................. 41
19   Total Dwelling Unit By Type of Structure ........................................................................ 42
20   City of Lompoc Housing Stock Age................................................................................. 43
21   2003 Housing Condition Study Findings ......................................................................... 45
22   City of Lompoc Vacancy Rates by Tenure ...................................................................... 46
23   City of Lompoc Vacancy Rates by Housing Unit type ..................................................... 47
24   City of Lompoc Owner Occupied Housing Values – 2000 .............................................. 47
25   City of Lompoc Average Home Sale Prices .................................................................... 48
26   City of Lompoc Home Sale Prices – 2002 ...................................................................... 48
27   City of Lompoc Contract Rent – 2000 ............................................................................. 49
28   City of Lompoc Rental Prices – 2002 .............................................................................. 49
29   City of Lompoc Average Monthly Housing Utility Expenses – 2002................................ 50
30   Effect of Interest Rates on Borrowing Capacity............................................................... 52
31   Homeownership Affordability For Median Income Four-Person Household in 2002....... 31
32   Income Needed To Rent Market Rate Housing .............................................................. 32
33   Rental Affordability For Median Income Household ........................................................ 54


                                                             iv
34      Assisted Affordable Units in the City of Lompoc ............................................................ 56
35      Disability Status of the Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population ...................................... 65
36      City of Lompoc Large Households By Tenure ................................................................ 66
37      City of Lompoc Number of Bedrooms in Housing Unit By Tenure .................................. 67
38      Lompoc Household Need Projection By Income Group.................................................. 74
39      Housing Unit Production 2001 – May of 2003................................................................. 75
40      2003 Housing Unit Potential – Vacant Developable Residential Land............................ 76
41      City of Lompoc Adequate Sites Inventory ...................................................................... 78
42      List of Permitted and Conditionally Permitted Uses (MU) .............................................. 87
43      List of Permitted and Conditionally Permitted Uses (OTC) ............................................ 88
44      2003 Housing Unit Potential – Underdeveloped Residential Land.................................. 90
45      Underdeveloped Residential Parcels (MDR/R-2) ........................................................... 92
46      Underdeveloped Residential Parcels (HDR/R-3) ........................................................... 93
47      Residential Land Use Categories.................................................................................... 97
48      Residential Development Standards ............................................................................... 98
49      Residential Parking Standards...................................................................................... 100
50      City of Lompoc Permitted and Conditionally Approved Residential Uses .................... 102
51      Local Development Processing Timeframes................................................................. 109
52      Lompoc Redevelopment Agency Implementation Plan 2003 - 2008
           Five-Year Housing Production Schedule and Cost Estimates ............................... 123


APPENDICES

Appendix A Housing Condition Survey Methodology ..................................................137
Appendix B Underdeveloped Land Resources (MU)...................................................141
Appendix C Underdeveloped Land Resources (OTC) ...............................................145
Appendix D City Residential Development Fees – As of September 2003 .................149
Appendix E Development Fees ..................................................................................153
Appendix F Analysis of Previous Housing Element ....................................................155
Appendix G Public Participation Process ...................................................................169
Appendix H City Council Resolution No. 5134 (03) Adopting Housing Element ......... 171
Appendix I Department of Housing and Community Development Compliance Letter
     dated February 19, 2004 .................................................................................. 175




                                                             v
                                HOUSING ELEMENT

                          GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES

GOALS / POLICIES

Authority

The housing element is among the mandatory elements which must be included in the
general plan. According to Government Code Sections 65580 – 65589, the housing
element must contain a detailed approach for addressing the housing needs of existing
and future residents of the City. This is summarized in Section 65583 which states:

“The housing element shall consist of an identification and analysis of existing and
projected housing needs and a statement of goals, policies, quantified objectives,
financial resources, and scheduled programs for the preservation, improvement, and
development of housing. The housing element shall identify adequate sites for housing,
including rental housing, factory-built housing, and mobilehomes, and shall make
adequate provision for the existing and projected needs of all economic segments of the
community.”

Goal 1              Provide a choice of housing opportunities for all economic
                    segments of the community.

Policy 1.1          The City shall encourage housing development which provides
                    varied housing types, sizes, and tenure opportunities.

Policy 1.2          The City shall encourage the dispersion of rental and ownership
                    housing units for very low- to moderate-income households
                    throughout the City.

Policy 1.3          The City shall assure that housing units are preserved/reserved for
                    very low-, low-, and moderate-income households in publicly
                    assisted developments.

Policy 1.4          The City shall encourage the development of housing for large
                    families in multi-family residential areas.

Policy 1.5          The City shall develop incentives which expand housing
                    opportunities for very low-income, low-income, disabled, and/or
                    senior households.

Policy 1.6          The City shall encourage the development and maintenance of an
                    adequate supply of mobilehomes and manufactured housing to
                    provide opportunities for very low- to moderate-income housing.




                                  HOUSING - 1
Policy 1.7    The City shall protect the current supply of affordable rental
              housing by discouraging its conversion to condominium ownership.

Policy 1.8    The City shall work with the County Housing Authority and non-
              profit housing groups to pursue affordable housing for low-income
              families, and the elderly, disabled, large families, single-headed
              and female-headed households, farm-workers, and the homeless.

Policy 1.9    The City shall periodically evaluate its development review process
              for ways to facilitate the production of new sources of affordable
              housing, while maintaining a commitment to sound planning and
              environmental protection.

Policy 1.10   The City shall continue to provide some residential areas with large
              minimum lot sizes.

Policy 1.11   With the exception of areas within the Old Town Redevelopment
              Project, Amendment No. 2 area, in all residential developments of
              ten units or more, at least 10% of all the units shall be affordable to
              very low-, low-, and median-income households. If it is determined
              to be infeasible to provide 10% of the units within the very low- to
              median-income category on-site, off-site provision of the units shall
              be acceptable or payment of an in-lieu fee shall be acceptable
              provided that the fee shall be applied to housing within the City.

              Residential development projects within the Old Town
              Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 2 area shall provide 15%
              of new housing affordable to low- and moderate-income
              households with at least 40% of those units to be used by very low-
              income households.

Policy 1.12   With the exception of housing within the Old Town Redevelopment
              Project, Amendment No. 2 area, in implementing this Housing
              Element, the City shall take into consideration the current market
              prices for housing. When the median market price for housing, is
              less than the current maximum median income price, the Planning
              Commission may find that median income housing opportunities
              are fulfilling a portion of the requirements of Policy 1.11. In such
              cases, not less than 5 percent of the total units in the project shall
              be affordable to very low-, low-, and moderate-income households.

Policy 1.13   The City shall encourage the development of custom built homes.

Policy 1.14   The City shall monitor previous commitments for very low-, low-,
              and moderate-income publicly assisted housing developed within
              the City.



                             HOUSING - 2
Policy 1.15   The City shall continue to support efforts to promote equal
              opportunity in housing.

Policy 1.16   The City shall continue to support efforts to achieve an employment
              and housing balance within communities throughout Santa Barbara
              County.

Policy 1.17   The City shall support efforts which facilitate homeownership.

Policy 1.18   The City shall work with the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency,
              lending institutions, private developers, the County Housing
              Authority, and nonprofit housing sponsors, to make a good faith
              effort to provide its regional share of affordable housing. To this
              end, the City shall participate with the County in meeting housing
              needs.

Policy 1.19   The City shall provide prospective private developers and nonprofit
              sponsors with information and technical assistance which expedites
              the filing of applications and the preparation of plans and studies in
              order to provide more affordable housing.

Policy 1.20   The City shall tier environmental information whenever possible, to
              prevent duplicate studies and reduce the cost of environmental
              review.

Policy 1.21   The City shall encourage and facilitate the use of vacant and
              underdeveloped lands and the use of local, state, and federal
              monies to help in the development and rehabilitation of long-term
              affordable housing.

Policy 1.22   The City shall continue to pursue and allocate federal funds eligible
              for housing projects and social services which benefit very low-,
              low-, and moderate-income persons and shall utilize at least 33
              percent of these federal monies for the development and
              rehabilitation of affordable housing.

Policy 1.23   The City annually shall review progress on the provision of its
              regional fair share of housing units to determine the effectiveness
              of existing policies and to make necessary changes.

Policy 1.24   The City shall encourage a broad range of rental housing
              opportunities.




                             HOUSING - 3
Objective 1A   From 2001 to June 2008 the City has and shall continue to pursue
               the following affordability distribution for new residential
               development:

                      Household Income1            Distribution (%)2
                          Very Low                         24
                            Low                            17
                          Moderate                         24
                       Above Moderate                      36
                            Total                         101

Objective 1B   From 2001 to June 2008 the City has and shall continue to take
               steps necessary to encourage the development of 890 additional
               housing units affordable for very low- to above moderate-income
               households distributed as follows:

                      Household Income             Additional Units
                          Very Low                       214
                            Low                          151
                          Moderate                       209
                       Above Moderate                    316
                            Total                        890

Goal 2         Restore, protect, and improve the condition of existing
               housing and neighborhoods.

Policy 2.1     The City shall pursue funding for housing rehabilitation programs
               which encourage private and public capital participation, preserve
               the existing housing stock, and provide housing opportunities for
               very low- to moderate income households.

Policy 2.2     The City shall encourage current homeowners to comply with
               Uniform Building Code (UBC) requirements.

Policy 2.3     The City shall protect residential neighborhoods from
               encroachment by adverse non-residential uses and impacts
               associated with those non-residential uses.

Policy 2.4     The City shall prohibit land uses within or adjacent to residential
               neighborhoods when such land uses would adversely affect the
               character of the neighborhood.

Policy 2.5     The City shall encourage the preservation of existing residential
               dwellings in non-residential zoned areas when all of the following
               conditions are met:




                             HOUSING - 4
                     dwellings have continually been used for residential
                     purposes;

                     dwellings have received regular maintenance and contain no
                     serious defects which could result in health or safety hazards
                     to residents; and

                     dwellings can provide necessary amenities and a suitable
                     living environment.

Objective 2A   From 2001 to 2008 the City has and shall continue to seek financial
               assistance necessary to rehabilitate at least 250 residential housing
               units owned by very low- and low-income households.

                      Household Income              Additional Units
                          Very Low                        125
                            Low                           125
                          Moderate                         0
                       Above Moderate                      0
                            Total                         250

Objective 2B   From 2001 to 2008 the City has and shall continue to seek financial
               assistance necessary to conserve at least 40 assisted residential
               housing units occupied by low-income households and 10 assisted
               residential housing units occupied by moderate-income
               households.

                      Household Income              Additional Units
                          Very Low                          0
                            Low                            40
                          Moderate                         10
                       Above Moderate                      0
                            Total                          50

Goal 3         Locate and design housing so as to assure an attractive and
               high quality living environment.

Policy 3.1     The City shall not compromise community design standards, quality
               of life, aesthetics, and access to public services when providing
               affordable housing.

Policy 3.2     The City shall encourage a diversity of housing types to maintain
               and increase opportunities for affordable housing, provided that the
               design of the development is compatible with the surrounding uses.




                             HOUSING - 5
Policy 3.3     The City shall utilize the following criteria when evaluating sites for
               housing:

                      access to adequate public services and facilities;

                      compatibility with adjacent land uses;

                      access to employment centers, neighborhood commercial
                      facilities, schools, and recreational facilities; and

                      avoidance of environmental hazards or sensitive resource
                      areas.

Policy 3.4     The City shall encourage the location of affordable housing in or
               near the Old Town area which supports redevelopment goals and
               requirements.

Policy 3.5     The City shall create incentives to encourage the development of
               new housing units which replace demolished or dilapidated units in
               residential areas.

Goal 4         Maximize energy efficiency in existing and future residential
               development.

Policy 4.1     The City shall continue to encourage the design and installation of
               energy conservation, water conservation, and solid waste reduction
               measures in all construction and rehabilitation projects.

Policy 4.2     The City shall provide financial and technical assistance based
               upon the availability of funding to property owners who desire to
               improve energy and water efficiency of their housing units but are
               unable to afford improvement costs.

Policy 4.3     The City shall encourage the use of active and passive solar
               energy in the design of all new construction projects.

Objective 4A   Maintain the 25 percent reduction in per capita household utility
               consumption achieved between 1990 and 2000, and reduce per
               capita household utility consumption by an additional 5 percent by
               the year 2010.




                              HOUSING - 6
IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

The following measures constitute a five-year program schedule of actions (2003 –
2008) to implement the policies and objectives set forth within this element. An
implementation schedule is included to provide specific information regarding the
implementation of the measures listed.

Measure 1         The City shall work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance
                  Corporation, or other nonprofit organizations and individuals to
                  identify housing priorities through the Community Development
                  Department’s Needs Assessment process and obtain the following
                  funding, when available, from the State’s Multifamily Housing
                  Program to address the identified priorities:

                  a.     Rental Housing Construction Program (RHCP) for the
                         construction of rental units affordable to low-income
                         households. [Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.8, 1.11, 1.17,
                         1.20, 1.23, 1.24, 3.1, 4.1, 4.3]

                  b.     California Housing Rehabilitation Program – Rental
                         Component (CHRP-R) for the rehabilitation or acquisition
                         and rehabilitation of substandard low-income rental housing.
                         [Policies 1.24, 2.1, 2.2, 2.5, 3.2, 4.1, and 4.2]

Measure 2         The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow emergency
                  shelters in low (R-1), medium (R-2), and high (R-3) residential
                  zones. Facilities with 6 or fewer residents shall be allowed as
                  permitted uses in all three residential zones. Facilities providing
                  shelter for seven or more residents shall be permitted in medium
                  (R-2) and high density (R-3) residential zones subject to a
                  conditional use permit. [Policies 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, and 1.8]

Measure 3        The City shall study the feasibility of allowing emergency shelters in
                 commercial zones subject to a conditional use permit. [Policies 1.1
                 and 1.8]

Measure 4         The City shall work in cooperation with the Lompoc Housing
                  Assistance Corporation, Habitat For Humanity, or other nonprofit
                  organizations to identify housing priorities through the Community
                  Development Department’s Needs Assessment process and obtain
                  funding from the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
                  Development (HUD) programs to address the identified priorities:

                  a.     Section 202 and Section 811 programs to expand the supply
                         of housing with supportive services for elderly persons and




                                 HOUSING - 7
                  persons with disabilities. [Policies 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, 1.20,
                  1.21, 1.24, and 2.1]

            b.    Homeownership For People Everywhere (HOPE) Program to
                  expand Homeownership opportunities for lower-income
                  families and individuals. [Policies 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, 1.18, 1.19,
                  1.23, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, and 4.1]

            c.    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and Santa
                  Barbara County HOME Consortium funds to expand the
                  supply of housing for very low- and low-income families and
                  individuals. [Policies 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, 1.18, 1.19, 1.23, 2.5, 3.1,
                  3.2, 3.4, 3.5, and 4.1]

Measure 5   The City shall work in cooperation with mobilehome park resident
            organizations to pursue State Mobilehome Park Resident
            Ownership Program (MPROP) funds (when available) to preserve
            housing affordability for low-income residents. [Policies 1.1, 1.3,
            1.6, and 1.19]

Measure 6   The City shall notify mobilehome park managers of the City’s
            Needs Assessment hearings by providing flyers to post in common
            areas to facilitate the involvement of mobilehome park residents in
            the Needs Assessment process to consider the feasibility of
            applying for State Mobilehome Park Resident Ownership Program
            (MPROP) funds (when available) in order to preserve housing
            affordability for low-income residents. [Policies 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, and
            1.19]

Measure 7   The City shall cooperate with the County of Santa Barbara, the
            Housing Authority of Santa Barbara, the City of Santa Maria,
            Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, and other faith-based
            and community organizations in the County’s Continuum of Care
            program to pursue HUD, Emergency Shelter Grant Program
            (ESGP) and Supportive Housing Program (SHP) funds (when
            available), to help prevent homelessness in Lompoc. [Policies 1.1,
            1.5, 1.8, 1.20, and 2.1]

Measure 8   The City shall cooperate with the County of Santa Barbara, the
            Housing Authority of Santa Barbara, the City of Santa Maria,
            Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, and other faith-based
            and community organizations in the County’s Continuum of Care
            program to obtain HUD, Shelter Plus Care Homeless Rental
            Housing Assistance (S+C/HRHA) Program, Supportive Housing
            Program (SHP), and Single Room Occupancy Program (SROP)




                          HOUSING - 8
             funds, to provide rental housing assistance for homeless persons in
             Lompoc. [Policies 1.1, 1.5, 1.8, 1.20, 1.24, and 2.1]

Measure 9    The City shall work with the Santa Barbara County Housing
             Authority to:

             a.     Encourage the rehabilitation of rental property in order to
                    meet the minimum requirements of the Section 8 Program.
                    [Policies 1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, 1.24, 2.1, 3.4, and 4.1]

             b.     Secure additional HUD, Section 8 Lower-Income Housing
                    Assistance Program certificates and vouchers to aid very
                    low-income and low-income families in obtaining private
                    accommodations. [Policies 1.2, 1.5, 1.8, 1.18, 3.1, 3.2, and
                    3.4]

Measure 10   The City shall maintain its status as a member of the Santa Barbara
             County HOME Consortium by renewing its agreement for the
             prescribed time period to obtain HUD, Home Investment
             Partnership Act (HOME) funds to retain and expand the supply of
             affordable housing. [Policies 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.8, 1.19, 1.23, 2.1, 3.2,
             and 3.5]

Measure 11   The City shall work with the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara
             County through the Community Development Department’s Needs
             Assessment process to consider the feasibility of participating in
             HUD’s Reverse Equity Mortgage Program in order to help elderly
             homeowners continue to stay in their longtime residences. [Policies
             1.5 and 1.19]

Measure 12   The City shall continue to market the Deferred Single Family
             Rehabilitation Loan Program to low-income senior households to
             make necessary upgrades and structural modifications to their
             homes to facilitate independent living. [Policies 1.5 and 1.19]

Measure 13   The City’s Community Development Department will continue to
             monitor its development review process for ways to facilitate the
             production of new sources of affordable housing. [Policy 1.9]

Measure 14   The City shall amend the Land Use Element Map to provide areas
             with large minimum lot sizes. [Policies 1.10 and 1.15]

Measure 15   The City shall research previously-approved assisted-housing units
             to determine compliance with assisted-housing requirements.
             Conditions of approval shall be placed on future assisted-housing




                            HOUSING - 9
             projects requiring applicants to supply periodic compliance reports.
             [Policy 1.16]

Measure 16   The City shall work in cooperation with local nonprofit corporations
             to identify housing priorities through the Community Development
             Department’s Needs Assessment process and obtain California
             Self-Help Housing Program (CSHHP) funds (when available) to
             assist low-income and moderate-income families build and
             rehabilitate their homes with their own labor. [Policies 1.17, 1.19,
             2.1, 2.5, 3.4, and 4.2]

Measure 17   The City shall prepare an annual progress report on the provision of
             its regional fair share of housing units to monitor the effectiveness
             of existing policies. [Policy 1.23]

Measure 18   The City shall continue to pursue and loan California Housing
             Rehabilitation Program – Owner Component (CHRP-O) funds
             (when available) for the rehabilitation of homes owned and
             occupied by lower-income households. [Policies 2.1, 2.2, 2.5, 3.2,
             4.1, and 4.2]

Measure 19   The City shall amend the Subdivision Ordinance to include design
             considerations which protect solar exposure.

Measure 20   The City and Lompoc Redevelopment Agency shall encourage and
             support the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation and/or other
             nonprofit corporation’s utilization of state and federal tax credit
             programs for very low-income and low-income housing projects
             within the City. [Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.5, and 1.24]


             a. Serving as the local reviewing agency (as opposed to an
                outside agency) for tax credit applications as required by the
                California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (TCAC).

             b. Working with tax credit applicants to identify matching funds
                and additional funding sources.

             c.   Providing gap financing through City/Redevelopment Agency
                  programs.

             d. Providing letters of support and technical assistance.

Measure 21   The City shall continue to promote energy efficiency and water
             conservation. [Policies 2.2 and 4.1]




                           HOUSING - 10
Measure 22         The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to require a finding for
                   any zone changes within or adjacent to residential areas that the
                   zone change is compatible with the character of any affected
                   residential neighborhood. [Policies 2.3 and 2.4]

Measure 23         The City shall disseminate fair housing information to the public and
                   continue to fund fair housing services which promote equal housing
                   opportunity within the community. [Policy 1.17]

[Note: The following policies are implemented through the current City Codes and
procedures: 1.7, 1.12, 1.13, 1.14, 1.21, 1.22, 1.24, and 3.3]



1.    See Glossary for household income definitions. The City utilizes the most recent
      household income thresholds provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and
      Urban Development to determine the relative affordability of housing units.

2.    This housing affordability distribution was obtained from the Santa Barbara
      County Association of Governments, Regional Housing Needs Plan, December
      2002.




                                 HOUSING - 11
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      HOUSING - 12
                                        HOUSING ELEMENT
                                    IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE
                                           2001 - 2008
The City of Lompoc convenes a Needs Assessment Hearing annually in November to receive testimony from community
residents and representatives of nonprofit organizations on the critical human service and housing needs in the community.
As a result of the Needs Assessment Hearing, the City prepares a Request For Proposal (RFP) that identifies the funding
that the City will make available to address the needs assessed from the November hearing. The City sends the RFP to
Santa Barbara County Health Department, adjacent units of local government such as Santa Barbara County and the City of
Santa Maria, mobilehome parks, the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County, local nonprofit and community
representatives, affordable housing developers, faith groups, and representatives of the private sector. The City also
distributes funding applications, one for human services and a second for affordable housing development.


The primary sources of funding that the City makes available include federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG),
HOME Consortium Program funds administered through Santa Barbara County, locally administered 1992 State HOME
Program Income, and Human Service Funds. The human service applications are due in January. These applications are
reviewed by the Lompoc City Council appointed Human Service Commission and recommends funding allocations to the City
Council. The City Council approves allocations annually in May. Applications for affordable housing development are
accepted throughout the year. Applications for affordable housing development are reviewed by the Community Development
Department. Applications which meet the City's affordable housing needs as identified in the City's Implementation Plan for
CDBG funding and the criteria under the federal HOME Program are forwarded to the Santa Barbara County HOME
Consortium for final review and adoption by the Consortium.


                                                  Responsible               Potential
 Priority               Measure                                                                         Timeframe
                                                  Department             Funding Source
    I-A      4c Regional consortia for             Community               Community                     Ongoing
             10 HOME Funds                        Development           Development Block               2003 - 2008
                                                Department (CDD)          Grant (CDBG)

                Action: The City will maintain its status as a member of the Santa Barbara County HOME Consortium
                through an agreement that is reviewed and approved by Lompoc's City Council. The agreement is
                renewable every three years. As a member of the Santa Barbara County HOME Consortium the City will
                maintain its eligibility to receive federal Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME) funds.

                  The City will designate the Community Development Program Manager as the City's representative to bi-
                 annual Consortium Membership Meetings.
                  The City will issue a Request For Proposal for HOME funds during the annual Needs Assessment
                 Hearing process.
                  The City will sponsor joint City/County monitoring site visits of current and proposed HOME funded
                 projects.
    I-B        5 Mobilehome Park Resident                CDD                        CDBG                   Ongoing
               6 Ownership Program Funds             City Attorney                                        2003 - 2008

                Action: The City will notify mobilehome park residents and managers annually of the Needs Assessment
                Hearings.
                  The City will provide flyers to mobilehome park managers to post in common areas of the mobilehome
                park to facilitate the involvement of mobilehome park residents of the Needs Assessment Hearing. The
                flyer will specify the date, time, location, and purpose of the Needs Assessment Hearing.

                  The City will consider the feasibility of applying for State Mobilehome Park Resident Ownership funds
                 annually during the Needs Assessment process.




                                                       HOUSING - 13
I-C   4b Lower-Income                            CDD               CDBG and Lompoc                  Ongoing
         Homeownership (HOPE)                                       Redevelopment                  2003 - 2008
         Funds                                                       Agency (RDA)
         Action: The City will work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, Habitat For Humanity, or other
         nonprofit organizations through the Community Development Department's Needs Assessment process to
         obtain funding for housing for lower-income families and individuals.
           The City will consider the feasibility of applying for Homeownership For People Everywhere (HOPE)
         funds annually during the Needs Assessment process.
          The City will assist the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, Habitat For Humanity, or other nonprofit
         organizations in accessing HOPE funds by providing needed information for funding applications or by
         serving as the applicant if the City qualifys for the funding.
          The City will provide letters of support and technical assistance for applicants of HOPE projects.
I-D   20 Support use of Tax Credits          Administration                RDA                      Ongoing
                                                 CDD                                               2003 - 2008
         Action: The City and the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency will encourage and support the Lompoc Housing
         Assistance Corporation or other nonprofit organization, corporations, and individuals in utilization of State
         and Federal Tax Credit Programs for very low- and low-income housing projects within the City and project
         area.
          The City will review tax credit applications.
          The City will work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation or other nonprofit organization,
         corporations, and individuals to identify matching funds and additional sources for financing development
         projects.
          The City will provide additional gap financing for low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) projects.
          The City will provide letters of support and technical assistance for applicants of LIHTC projects.
I-E   18 Owner-Occupied                           CDD                     CDBG                       Ongoing
         Rehabilitation Funds                                                                      2003 - 2008
         Action: The City will work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, or other nonprofit
         organizations and individuals through the Community Development Department's Needs Assessment
         process to continue to pursue and loan California Housing Rehabilitation Program - Owner Component
         (CHRP-O) funds for the rehabilitation of homes owned and occupied by lower-income households.

          The City will consider the feasibility of applying for CHRP-O funds annually during the Needs Assessment
         process.
           The City will assist nonprofit organizations and individuals in accessing CHRP-O funds by providing
         needed information for funding applications or by serving as the applicant if the City qualifys for the
         funding.
          The City will provide letters of support and technical assistance for applicants of CHRP-O projects.
I-F   1b Renter-Occupied                          CDD                     CDBG                      Ongoing
         Rehabilitation Funds                                                                     2003 - 2008
         Action: The City will work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, or other nonprofit
         organizations and individuals through the Community Development Department's Needs Assessment
         process to obtain funding for the rehabilitation or acquisition and rehabilitation of substandard low-income
         rental housing.
            The City will consider the feasibility of applying for California Housing Rehabilitation Program - Rental
          Component (CHRP-R) funds annually during the Needs Assessment process.
            The City will assist the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, or other nonprofit organizations and
          individuals in accessing CHRP-R funds by providing needed information for funding applications or by
          serving as the applicant if the City qualifys for the funding.
           The City will provide letters of support and technical assistance for applicants of CHRP-R projects.




                                                 HOUSING - 14
I-G      15 Monitor Assisted Housing                 CDD                  General Fund                   Ongoing
            (Required)                                                                                  2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will annually monitor "at-risk" housing units through communications with HUD or other
            agency responsible for tracking assisted housing units and through a data base established by the City and
            prepare a feasibility plan for the preservation of these units as affordable rental housing. The plan will state
            the City's proposed actions for assisting the current property owner in preserving the affordable units or
            assisting in the acquisition of the affordable units by a nonprofit organization to permanently preserve the
            affordabiity of the units.
I-H      1a Rental Housing Construction              CDD                        RDA                      Ongoing
            Funds                                                                                       2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, or other nonprofit
            organizations and individuals through the Community Development Department's Needs Assessment
            process to obtain funding for the construction of rental units affordable to low-income households.

             The City will consider the feasibility of applying for Rental Housing Construction Program (RHCP) funds
            annually during the Needs Assessment process.
              The City will assist the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, or other nonprofit organizations and
            individuals in accessing RHCP funds by providing needed information for funding applications or by serving
            as the applicant if the City qualifys for the funding.
 I-I     4c Rental Property                           CDD                    CDBG                         Ongoing
         9a Rehabilitation Funds                                                                       2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will work with the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County (HASBC) to encourage the
            rehabilitation of rental property to meet the minimum requirements of the Section 8 Program.
              The City will review and provide comments to the HASBC on its Draft Annual Plan.
              The City will provide letters of support and cooperation on applications prepared by HACSB.
              The City will partner with HASBC on housing development projects through the use of HOME, CDBG, and
             other federal funding.
              The City will market its Multifamily Rehabilitation Loan Program to landlords referred by HACSB.
II - A   17 Prepare Annual Progress                   CDD                 General Fund                      2004
            Report (Required)
            Action: The City will prepare an annual progress report on the provision of its regional fair share of housing
            units to monitor the effectiveness of existing policies.
              The City will tabulate housing starts on a monthly basis to determine affordability category and compare
            to targets.
             The City will review housing proposals for consistency with housing targets.
             The City will prepare a table in its Annual Report showing its progress in housing starts.
             The City will monitor its housing policies to determine progress in meeting its regional fair share of
            housing units in each affordability category.
II - B    2 Amend Zoning Ordinance for               CDD                 General Fund                       2004
            Emergency Housing
            Action: The City will amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow emergency shelters in low (R-1), medium (R-2),
            and high (R-3) residential zones.
              Facilities with 6 or fewer residents shall be allowed as permitted uses in all three residential zones.

             Facilities providing shelter for seven or more residents shall be permitted medium (R-2) and high (R-3)
            density residential zones subject to a conditional use permit.
II-C      3 Emergency Housing in                      CDD                 General Fund                   2004
            Commercial Zones
            Action: The City will study the feasibility of allowing emergency shelters in commercial zones subject to a
            conditional use permit.




                                                     HOUSING - 15
II - D   4c Pursue Rental Housing                     CDD                    CDBG                       Ongoing
         9b Subsidies                                                                                 2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will work with the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County (HASBC) to encourage the
            rehabilitation of rental property to meet the minimum requirements of the Section 8 Program.
              The City will review and provide comments to the HASBC on its Draft Annual Plan.
              The City will provide letters of support and cooperation on applications prepared by HACSB.
              The City will partner with HASBC on housing development projects through the use of HOME, CDBG, and
             other federal funding.
              The City will market its Multifamily Rehabilitation Loan Program to landlords referred by HACSB.
II - E   13 Monitor Development                       CDD                 General Fund                  Ongoing
            Review Process                                                                            2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will monitor its development review process for ways to facilitate the production of new
            sources of affordable housing.
              The City will use a proactive approach with housing developers to provide information concerning the
            features in the Zoning Ordinance, such as the Planned Development District and density bonus program,
            which encourage and facilitate affordable housing.
              The City will assist housing developers in accessing state or federal funding by providing needed
            information for funding applications or by serving as the applicant.

 III     4a Elderly and Disabled                    CDD                     CDBG                      Ongoing
            Housing Funds                                                                            2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will work with the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, Habitat For Humanity, or other
            nonprofit organizations through the Community Development Department's Needs Assessment process to
            obtain funding for housing with supportive services for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

              The City will consider the feasibility of applying for Section 202 and Section 811 program funds should
            senior adults,persons with disabilities, and/or senior and/or disabled persons advocacy groups raise this
            need during the annual Needs Assessment Hearing process.
              The City will assist the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, Habitat For Humanity, or other nonprofit
            organizations in accessing Section 202 and Section 811 program funds by providing needed information
            for funding applications or by serving as the applicant if the City qualifys for the funding.

             The City will provide letters of support and technical assistance for applicants of Section 202 and Section
            811 programs, if applicable.
 III      7 Homelessness Prevention                  CDD                     CDBG                        Ongoing
            Funds                                                                                      2003 - 2008
            Action: The City will cooperate with the County of Santa Barbara, the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara,
            the City of Santa Maria, Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, and other faith-based and community
            organizations in the County's Continuum of Care program planning process.
              The City will designate the Community Development Program Manager as the City's representative on the
             Countywide Continuum of Care Application Review Committee.
              The City will consider and, if consistent with the City's HUD approved Consolidated Plan, approve
             "Certificates of Consistency With Consolidated Plan" for homeless funding applications for projects in
             Lompoc submitted by the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation and other local homeless service
             providers.
             The City will consider the feasibility of participating in HUD's Emergency Shelter Grant Program (ESGP)
            and Supportive Housing Program (SHP) should service providers and/or advocacy groups for homeless
            persons raise the need for homeless shelter projects during the annual Needs Assessment Hearing
            process.




                                                    HOUSING - 16
III    8 Rental Housing Assistance               CDD                       CDBG                      Ongoing
         to Homeless Funds                                                                          2003 - 2008

         Action: The City will cooperate with the County of Santa Barbara, the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara,
         the City of Santa Maria, Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation, and other faith-based and community
         organizations in the County's Continuum of Care program planning process.
          The City will designate the Community Development Program Manager as the City's representative on the
         Countywide Continuum of Care Application Review Committee.
          The City will consider and, if consistent with the City's HUD approved Consolidated Plan, approve
         "Certificates of Consistency With Consolidated Plan" for homeless funding applications for projects in
         Lompoc submitted by the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation and other local homeless service
         providers.
           The City will consider the feasibility of participating in HUD's Shelter Plus Care Homeless Rental Housing
         Assistance (S+C/HRHA) Program, Supportive Housing Program (SHP), and Single Room Occupancy
         Program (SROP) should service providers and/or advocacy groups for homeless persons raise the need
         for homeless shelter projects during the annual Needs Assessment Hearing process.


III   12 Deferred Single Family                  CDD                       CDBG                      Ongoing
         Rehabilitation Loan Program                                                                2003 - 2008

         Action: The City will continue to market the Deferred Single Family Rehabilitation Loan Program to low-
         income senior households to make necessary upgrades and structural modifications to their homes to
         facilitate independent living .
           The City will work with and assist community based nonprofit organizations, advocacy groups, and/or
         individuals to access funding in the City's Deferred Single Family Rehabilitation Loan Program.

           The City will continue to post the Deferred Single Family Rehabilitation Loan Program on the City's world
         wide website at www.ci.lompoc.ca.us under Community Development.
           The City will administer a contract with Catholic Charities to operate an Emergency Repair Grant Program
         for minor repairs under $5,000 for elderly homeowners of single family residences and mobilehomes.


III   11 Participation in Reverse                CDD                       CDBG                      Ongoing
         Equity Mortgage Program                                                                    2003 - 2008
         Action: The City will work with the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County (HASBC) through the
         Community Development Department's Needs Assessment process to consider the feasibility of
         participating in HUD's Reverse Equity Mortgage Program to help elderly homeowners continue to stay in
         their longtime residences.
          The City will consider the feasibility of participating in HUD's Reverse Equity Mortgage Program should
         senior adults and/or senior advocacy groups raise this need during the annual Needs Assessment Hearing
         process.
III   14 Provide large lots                    CDD                General Fund                   2004
         Action: The City will amend the Land Use Element Map to provide areas with large minimum lot sizes.

          The City's Land Use Element Map provides for a range of housing densities including parcels that are
         20,000 square feet or larger. The City will continue to consider additional appropriate sites in the project
         area for the opportunity to encourage large lots and will update the Land Use Element Map accordingly.

III   16 Self-Help Housing                       CDD                    CDBG/RDA                       Ongoing
         Construction and                                                                            2003 - 2008
         Rehabilitation Funds
         Action: The City will work in cooperation with local nonprofit corporations to obtain California Self-Help
         Housing Program (CSHHP) funds to assist low- and moderate-income families build and rehabilitate their
         homes with their own labor.



                                                 HOUSING - 17
          The City will consider the feasibility of applying for CSHHP funds annually during the Needs Assessment
         process.
           The City will assist nonprofit organizations in accessing CSHHP funds by providing needed information for
         funding applications or by serving as the applicant if the City qualifys for the funding.
          The City will provide letters of support and technical assistance for applicants of CSHHP projects.
III   19 Amend Subdivision                        CDD                  General Fund                   2004
         Ordinance to protect solar
         exposure
         Action: The City will amend the Subdivision Ordinance to include design considerations which protect solar
         exposure.
III   21 Promote energy efficiency       Building Division and     General Fund/Utility              Ongoing
         and water conservation                  Utility             Division Funds                 2003 - 2008
                                          Department/Water
                                                Division
         Action: The City will promote energy efficiency and water conservation in existing and future residential
         development.
           The City will continue to utilize and enforce the latest editions of the California Administrative Codes
         including the California Building Code and California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards .

          The City will continue to conduct energy autdits and provide technical to Lompoc residents interested in
         reducing their houshold utility consumption.
          The City will continue to administer the low-income electric bill assistance program.
          The City will continue to implement the rebate program to replace energy-inefficient equipment, such as
         refrigerators, dishwashers, and clotheswashers, provided funding is available.
          The City will continue to implement the refrigerator/freezer buy back program provided funding is
         available.
          The City will continue to administer the retrofit program, provided funding is available, for existing non-
         conserving toilets, showerheads and bathroom and kitchen faucet aerators with low flow fixtures.


III   22 Amend Zoning Ordinance to               CDD                  General Fund                      2004
         require compatibility finding
         for any zone change

         Action: The City will amend the Zoning Ordinance to require a finding for any zone changes within or
         adjacent to residential areas the the zone change is compatible with the character of any affected
         residential neighborhood.
III   23 Disseminate Fair Housing                  CDD                     CDBG                       Ongoing
         Information and fund fair                                                                  2003 - 2008
         housing services which
         promote equal housing
         opportunity
         Action: The City will disseminate fair housing information to the public and continue to fund fair housing
         services which promote equal housing opportunity within the community.
           The City will continue to contract with the Legal Aid Foundation to provide fair housing services in the
          City.
           The City will promote equal housing opportunities through availibility of pamphlets on Fair Housing in City
          Hall.
           The City will refer complaints on equal housing opportunities to the Legal Aid Foundation.
           Progress in the area of equal housing opportunities will be included in the Consolidated Plan for
          Community Development Block Grant funding.




                                                 HOUSING - 18
                     1997 HOUSING ELEMENT
              IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE PROGRESS
                                           Housing Element
Priority             Measure                                               Status
                                             Timeframe
  I-A       9 Regional consortia for            Ongoing      Completed - A consortia with
              HOME Funds.                      1992-1999     neighboring Santa Barbara County
                                                             communities was established in
                                                             1996 - 1997 for dispersing HOME
                                                             funds to retain and expand the
                                                             supply of affordable housing. Will
                                                             need to maintain relations with
                                                             consortia to assure opportunities to
                                                             expand supply of affordable
                                                             housing.


  I-B       4 Mobilehome Park Resident          Ongoing      Exploring financing options.
              Ownership Funds.                 1993-1999
  I-C      3b Lower-Income                      Ongoing      City has concentrated on obtaining
              Homeownership (HOPE)             1993-1999     CDBG, HOME, CHFA, and RDA
              Funds.                                         funds during planning period. Will
                                                             explore HOPE funds next planning
                                                             period.
  I-D      22 Utilize State and Federal         Ongoing      Removed - This measure only
              Low Income Housing Tax           1993-1999     appeared in the implementation
              Credits.                                       schedule in the 1997 Housing
                                                             Element and not in the list of
                                                             implementation measures. Most
                                                             likely replaced with Measure 21
                                                             which encourages the support of
                                                             nonprofit organizations to utilize tax
                                                             credit programs for very low- and
                                                             low-income projects within the City.


  I-E       8 Amend Zoning Ordinance              1996       Completed - Density Bonus
              per State Density Bonus                        Ordinance adopted effective June
              Law.                                           of 1997.
  I-F      17 Owner-Occupied                    Ongoing      Ongoing - The City of Lompoc has
              Rehabilitation Funds.            1992-1999     utilized and continues to utilize
                                                             program to disperse funds to owner-
                                                             occupied households for
                                                             rehabilitation purposes.

  I-G      1d Renter-Occupied                   Ongoing      City has concentrated on obtaining
              Rehabilitation Funds.            1993-1999     CDBG, HOME, CHFA, and RDA
                                                             funds during planning period. Will
                                                             explore CHRP-R funds next
                                                             planning period.




                                          HOUSING - 19
I-H    13 Monitor Assisted Housing            Ongoing      Completed - City generally
          (Required).                        1993-1999     monitored assisted housing during
                                                           planning period. City will seek new
                                                           ways to monitor all assisted
                                                           housing including setting up a
                                                           database.
I-J    1a Rental Housing Construction         Ongoing      City has concentrated on obtaining
          Funds.                             1993-1999     CDBG, HOME, CHFA, and RDA
                                                           funds during planning period. Will
                                                           explore RHCP funds next planning
                                                           period.

I-K    7a Rental Property                     Ongoing      Ongoing - The City of Lompoc in
          Rehabilitation Funds.              1993-1999     cooperation with community based
                                                           nonprofit organization has utilized
                                                           and continues to utilize program to
                                                           disperse funds for rental property
                                                           for rehabilitation purposes.


I-L    22 Article 34 Ballot Measure.         1996 - 1997   Removed - This measure is not
                                                           needed at this time, therefore it has
                                                           been removed from the Housing
                                                           Element. The City would revisit this
                                                           inititative if the need is
                                                           demonstrated in the future.

I-M    27 Assisted Housing Protection         Ongoing      Removed - This measure only
          Program.                           1993-1999     appeared in the implementation
                                                           schedule in the 1997 Housing
                                                           Element and not in the list of
                                                           implementation measures. Most
                                                           likely replaced with Measure 13
                                                           which required monitoring of
                                                           assisted housing.
II-A   16 Prepare Annual Progress             Ongoing      Completed for 1999.
          Report (Required).                 1993-1999
II-B   15 Redevelopment Area                  Ongoing      Completed - Redevelopment Area
          Expansion.                         1993-1999     expanded in 1998 and in 2002 to
                                                           incorporate a total of an additional
                                                           1,000 acres.
II-C    2 Amend Zoning Ordinance for            1996       Scheduled for 2004.
          Emergency Housing.
II-D   7b Pursue Rental Housing               Ongoing      Working on with Housing Authority.
          Subsidies.                         1993-1999
II-E   11 Evaluate Development                Ongoing      Completed - Permit Streamlining
          Review Process.                    1994-1999     Report completed in 1996 which
                                                           made recommendations to increase
                                                           efficiency and services to benefit
                                                           applicants. Recommendations
                                                           implemented included permit
                                                           tracking system and Development
                                                           Review Handbook.




                                        HOUSING - 20
III   3a Elderly and Disabled                Ongoing    Ongoing - The City of Lompoc in
         Housing Funds.                     1993-1999   cooperation with community based
                                                        nonprofit organization has utilized
                                                        and continues to utilize program to
                                                        disperse funds to increase the
                                                        supply of housing with supportive
                                                        services for elderly and disabled
                                                        persons.

III    5 Homelessness Prevention             Ongoing    Ongoing - The City of Lompoc in
         Funds.                             1994-1999   cooperation with community based
                                                        nonprofit organization has utilized
                                                        and continues to utilize HUD funds
                                                        to help prevent homelessness.


III    6 Rental Housing Assistance           Ongoing    Ongoing - The City of Lompoc in
         to Homeless Funds.                 1993-1999   cooperation with community based
                                                        nonprofit organization has utilized
                                                        and continues to utilize HUD funds
                                                        to expand rental housing for
                                                        homeless persons. City will explore
                                                        S+C/HRHA funding in next planning
                                                        period.

III   10 Collect Reverse Equity              Ongoing    City has concentrated on obtaining
         Mortgage Information.              1994-1999   CDBG, HOME, CHFA, and RDA
                                                        funds during planning period. City
                                                        will explore program in next
                                                        planning period.
III   12 Provide large lots.                  1996      Scheduled for 2004.
III   14 Self-Help Housing                   Ongoing    City has worked with community
         Construction and                   1993-1997   based nonprofit self-help
         Rehabilitation Funds.                          organization and has concentrated
                                                        on obtaining RDA funds to assist in
                                                        the construction of two housing
                                                        units for very low-income families.
                                                        City will explore program in next
                                                        planning period.


III   18 Provide Energy                      Ongoing    Completed - Audit/Retrofit program
         Audit/Retrofit.                    1993-1997   in place.
III   19 Maintain Energy Efficiency          Ongoing    Completed - Incentives range from
         Program.                           1993-1997   $50 to $130 for replacement of
                                                        energy inefficient appliances,
                                                        including toilets, clothes washers,
                                                        dishwashers, refrigerators, and
                                                        clothes dryers.

III   20 Amend Subdivision                     1996     Scheduled for 2004.
         Ordinance to protect solar
         exposure.
III   21 Support use of Tax Credits.         Ongoing    Completed - Supported tax credits
                                            1993-1997   for three rehabilitation and/or new
                                                        projects.




                                       HOUSING - 21
III   23 Encourage compliance with             Ongoing      Compliance with Uniform Building
         Uniform Building Code and            1993-1999     Code and Zoning Ordinance
         Zoning Ordinance.                                  checked by the Building and Fire
                                                            Safety Division and Planning
                                                            Division during review of
                                                            construction plans prior to issuance
                                                            of building permits. Field inspected
                                                            to ensure conformity with approved
                                                            plans. City funding Code
                                                            Enforcement program with a full-
                                                            time Code Enforcement Officer.


III   24 Amend Zoning Ordinance to               1996       Scheduled for 2004.
         require compatibility finding
         for any zone change.

III   25 Disseminate Fair Housing              Ongoing      Completed for 2000.
         Information and fund fair            1992-1999
         housing services which
         promote equal housing
         opportunity.
III   26 Prepare a residential                1994 - 1999   Completed - The Building and Fire
         construction and energy                            Safety Division has prepared
         conservation booklet for                           individual handouts illustrating
         homeowners to promote                              construction requirements and
         ongoing maintenance of                             details for various structures and
         existing housing units.                            building sections, and a list of
                                                            energy conservation features that
                                                            are available for homeowners.
                                                            These handouts are updated as
                                                            necessary.




                                         HOUSING - 22
                                 HOUSING ELEMENT


1.0   INTRODUCTION

The City of Lompoc is a diverse community with households of varied socio-economic,
racial, and cultural backgrounds. This Housing Element, which is mandated by
California State law, provides a comprehensive profile of Lompoc households including
their tenure, size, composition, income, and special housing needs. In addition, this
Element analyzes the City’s housing stock in terms of its composition, age, condition,
vacancy rates, costs, and affordability. Future population and overall housing needs
projections for the 2001 through June 2008 time period are also presented.

1.1   Purpose And Intent

The purpose of this Element is to demonstrate that the City is making a diligent effort to
identify, and take steps to alleviate housing problems for all economic segments of the
community. This Element is intended to identify and analyze the Lompoc housing
market and develop a comprehensive strategy for addressing its problems. This
Element also serves as an educational tool to provide citizens and public officials with
an understanding of housing needs and potential solutions. In this manner, the housing
element provides direction for City decision-making in all matters related to housing. A
database is provided which identifies major housing needs and policies and measures
are included to address these needs.

1.2   Relationship of Housing Element to Other Elements

The Housing Element is only one part of Lompoc’s planning program. There are many
inter-relationships with other program activities which augment the goals, policies, and
objectives of this Housing Element. The California Government Code requires that
general plans contain an integrated, internally consistent set of goals and policies. This
Housing Element references related elements of the City’s General Plan to provide
more complete information on certain required topics and to ensure consistency
between elements (e.g. Land Use, Public Facilities and Services, Energy, and Water
Resources).

The Land Use Element and the Circulation Element affect the implementation of the
Housing Element. The Land Use Element establishes the location, type, intensity, and
distribution of land uses throughout the City. In designating total acreage and density of
residential development, the Land Use Element places an upper limit on the number
and types of housing units constructed in the City. The acreage designated for
commercial, office, industrial, and mixed-use is also designated in the Land Use
Element. Assumptions contained in the General Plan are based on existing and
projected population, employment, and housing unit figures that have been generated
from City land use data, Santa Barbara County Association of Governments, and U.S.
Census data.



                                   HOUSING - 23
The Circulation Element establishes policies for providing essential streets and
roadways to all housing and other land uses that are developed. The policies that are
contained in the other elements of the General Plan affect the quality of life that citizens
expect, the amount and variety of open space and recreation areas, acceptable noise
levels in residential areas, and programs to provide for the safety of the residents.

1.3    State Review of Housing Elements

Requirements for housing elements are contained in Government Code (GC) Sections
65580-65589. GC Section 65580 contains directives for preparation of local housing
elements. The California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) is
responsible for reviewing housing elements for compliance with state law requirements
in Article 10.6 of the Government Code. HCD uses three content requirements in their
review:

       Identification and analysis of existing and projected housing needs and an
       inventory of resources and constraints relevant to meeting those needs.
       A statement of goals, policies, and quantified objectives.
       A discussion of scheduled programs for the preservation, improvement, and
       development of housing.

2.0    COMMUNITY PROFILE

This section provides an overview of Lompoc’s population characteristics (see the
Socio-Economics Appendix for further discussion). These characteristics affect the
current demand for housing and influence future housing needs. The demographic
information provided in this section covers the City of Lompoc. However, demographic
information for unincorporated areas of the Lompoc Valley is provided in instances
which affect conditions and circumstances within the City.

For demographic and socio-economic information, the U.S. Census County Division
(CCD) is used to define the Lompoc Valley (see Figure 1). The Lompoc Valley CCD is
coterminous with the “Lompoc Market Area” used for analysis purposes by the Santa
Barbara County Association of Governments and Santa Barbara County. A housing
market area (HMA) is defined as a geographical area which meets the social and
economic requirements of a community and provides its residents with facilities such
that commuting to other housing market areas in order to work or shop is generally
unnecessary.

The majority of the population and housing of the Lompoc HMA is within the City of
Lompoc. The remaining urban areas within the Lompoc Valley HMA are Vandenberg
Village, Mission Hills, and Vandenberg Air Force Base (AFB). The expansive rural areas
of the Lompoc Valley HMA contain relatively low numbers of housing units. The General
Plan Study Area is contained entirely within the Lompoc Valley HMA (see Figure 2).




                                    HOUSING - 24
      1




Lompoc Market Area


            1




        Figure 1
Lompoc Housing Market Area
       Figure 2
General Plan Study Area
   City of Lompoc General Plan
2.1    Population Characteristics

Historically, the population of Lompoc has experienced periods of rapid growth as
portrayed in Figure 3. From the late 1950’s through the mid-1980’s, the growth was
primarily generated by employment at Vandenberg AFB. The most recent episode of
rapid population growth for Lompoc in conjunction with Vandenberg AFB occurred from
1978 to the mid-1980’s when plans were underway for Space Shuttle launches.
However, after the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster in 1986 plans for shuttle launches
from Vandenberg AFB were discontinued. Consequently, employment at Vandenberg
AFB was not as dominant a factor in the City’s growth rate as it had been prior to 1986.
Beginning in the late 1980’s employment growth in the Santa Barbara-Goleta area,
combined with lower housing costs in Lompoc, triggered accelerated population growth.


                                                          Figure 3
                                                Historic Population Trends
                                                      City of Lompoc
       Population                                       1960 - 2005
       46,000
                                                                                                               43,606
       44,000
       42,000                                                                                41,093   41,103

       40,000
                                                                                    37,649
       38,000
       36,000
       34,000
       32,000
                                                                           29,800
       30,000
       28,000
                                                           26,267
       26,000                         25,284
                             24,102             24,237
       24,000
       22,000
       20,000
       18,000
       16,000       14,415
       14,000
       12,000
       10,000
                    1960     1965     1970      1975       1980            1985     1990     1995     2000     2005
                                                                    Year

  Sources: United States Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1960-1990, 2000
           State Department of Finance, 1995
           Santa Barbara County Association of Governments, Regional Growth Forecast 2000-2030


Rapid population growth took place between 1960 and 1965 when the City grew
approximately 10.83 percent annually. By the end of the 1960’s the City had an annual
growth rate of 5.78 percent for the decade. In the 1970’s the annual growth rate was
approximately 0.40 percent. The City’s population again increased rapidly during the
1980’s with an annual growth rate of 3.67 percent. From 1990 to 2000, the City’s
population increased by 9.17 percent. According to the Census 2000, the City
population reached 41,103 in 2000. By January 1, 2002, the City population reached
41,671 (approximately 1.38 percent annual growth rate from 2000 to 2002).3 Latest
estimates from the Department of Finance indicate that the City population is 41,865.4


                                               HOUSING - 27
2.1.1 Population Projections

The population projections for the City of Lompoc and Lompoc Valley, which reflect
2000 Census data, are presented in Table 1. The City is projected to grow by
approximately 5,144 people during the time period 2000 – 2015, or approximately 12.5
percent. Population growth within the unincorporated area of the Lompoc Valley is
expected to be faster than the City. The unincorporated area is projected to grow by
7,640 people, or 44 percent. The County’s population is projected to increase by 88,877
persons, or 22 percent, during this same time period. The City of Lompoc population is
anticipated to grow to 44,988 persons by the year 2010. The 2002 City of Lompoc
population is estimated at 41,671 persons.

                                                Table 1
                                         Population Projections
                                 1990            1995              2000      2005      2010      2015
 City of Lompoc                 37,649          41,885            41,103    43,606    44,988    46,247
 Unincorporated Area            20,827          22,110            17,208    21,907    23,644    24,848
 Lompoc Valley HMA              58,476          63,995            58,311    65,513    68,632    71,095
 Santa Barbara County          369,608         394,165           399,348   435,740   462,808   488,225
 HMA: Housing Market Area

Source: SBCAG, 1994; SBCAG, Regional Growth Forecast 2000-2030


2.1.2 Age Distribution

Examining the age distribution of the population is helpful in assessing the demand for
different housing types. For example, an older population might require smaller housing
units, which are easier to maintain and which accommodate one or two persons per
household. A younger population requires a wider variety of housing unit types. These
housing types may include large units for couples with children which can accommodate
three or more persons per household or smaller units more suitable for young childless
couples and single unrelated adults which can accommodate three persons or less per
household.

The existing age distribution for the City of Lompoc is provided in Figure 4. The median
age of Lompoc residents is approximately 32 years. Approximately 30 percent (12,310)
of the City residents are 17 years or less and approximately 9 percent (3,856) are 65
years or more. Nearly 65 percent (26,176) of the City’s population is under 40 years and
approximately 19.5 percent of the population is 22 to 34 years of age.

The overall youthfulness of the community and large proportion of the population aged
22 to 34 indicates a need for affordable family housing units which can accommodate
three or more individuals and affordable housing units for single adults. City residents
aged 17 or under typically reside in housing units with their parents or guardians.
Residents aged 22 to 34 typically earn less than older members of the work force and
are creating new households, starting families and having children. In 1990 females


                                             HOUSING - 28
      between the ages of 20 and 34 accounted for approximately 78 percent of the annual
      births within Santa Barbara County.5 This trend continued into 1995 decreasing only
      slightly to approximately 74 percent of the annual births. In 1995 births by females age
      40 and older increased slightly from approximately 10 percent of the annual births in
      Santa Barbara County to approximately 13 percent.6

                                                              Figure 4

                                                          Age Distribution
                                                          City of Lompoc
                                                                2000
Age Ranges

  85 & Over

   80 to 84

   75 to 79

   70 to 74

   65 to 69

   60 to 64

   55 to 59

   50 to 54

   45 to 49

   40 to 44

   35 to 39

   30 to 34

   25 to 29

   20 to 24

   15 to 19

   10 to 14

     5 to 9

   Under 5

              0      1      2        3          4     5           6          7        8   9   10   11   12   13

                                                           Percentage of Population


      Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


      2.2         Race and Ethnicity

      Generally, the number of minority residents decreased slightly between 1990 and 2000.
      The City of Lompoc population is primarily comprised of persons classified as White
      (65.8 percent) and not of Hispanic or Latino origin, as shown in the Population Ethnicity
      chart, Figure 5. Approximately 7.3 percent of the population is Black or African
      American, 3.9 percent is Asian, 0.3 percent is Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander,
      1.6 percent is American Indian and Alaska Native, and 15.7 percent is Other. The
      number of Hispanic or Latino residents increased between 1990 and 2000 from 27
      percent to 37 percent. The largest percentage of Hispanic or Latino population are from
      Mexico (31.6 percent).




                                                    HOUSING - 29
                                                                  Figure 5
                                                              Race/Ethnicity
                                                              City of Lompoc
                        80                                          2000



                        70



                        60
Percent of Population




                        50



                        40



                        30



                        20



                        10



                         0
                             W hite   Black or   Asian     American         Native       Some other   Two or more   Hispanic or
                                       African            Indian and     Hawaiian and      race         races         Latino
                                      American           Alaska Native   Other Pacific
                                                                           Islander
                                                                                                                1990
                                                               Race/Ethnicity                                   2000



Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


2.3                          Employment Characteristics

Another factor which contributes significantly to the demand for housing in Lompoc is
the amount and type of employment located within the Planning Area and at
Vandenberg AFB. Lompoc houses those employed within the community as well as
approximately 5 percent of Vandenberg AFB personnel.7 Recent employment trends for
the Lompoc Market Area are provided in Table 2 to assess the availability of capital for
housing expenses.

The Santa Barbara County Association of Governments reports that there were
approximately 179,842 wage and salary jobs in Santa Barbara County during 2001.
This figure is up from 163,247 in 1990.

Between 1980 and 1990 there was an approximately 51 percent increase in the amount
of local jobs available. During the same time period the City’s total population and the
number of residents 18 or over grew by 43 percent. Between 1990 and 2000 there has
been an approximately 5 percent decrease in the amount of local jobs available. During
this same time period the City’s total population and the number of residents 18 years of
age and older grew by 9.17 and 7.7 percent, respectively.




                                                          HOUSING - 30
In 2001, the Services industry employed the largest number of workers in Santa
Barbara County, accounting for 29 percent of the workforce. The governmental entity
was Santa Barbara County’s second largest employer in 2001 with 19.1 percent of the
jobs and the retail trade was the third largest provider of jobs in Santa Barbara County
with 18.8 percent.8

In 1990, the Services industry employed the largest number of workers, accounting for
27.5 percent of the workforce. The governmental entity was the second largest provider
of jobs in the City of Lompoc with 20.8 percent, and the manufacturing industry was
Lompoc’s third largest employer in 1990 with 19.8 percent of the jobs. In 2000, the
governmental entity employed the largest number of workers, accounting for 26.5
percent of the workforce. The Services industry was the second largest provider of jobs
in the City of Lompoc with 22.4 percent, and the manufacturing industry remained
Lompoc’s third largest employer in 2000 with 18.0 percent of the jobs.

                                             Table 2
                                 Lompoc Region Employment Trends
                                                                                                   1990 – 2000
EMPLOYMENT SECTOR                           1980                1990                2000
                                                                                                    % Change
Agriculture                                  465                1,233               1,395             13.14
Mining*                                       0                   60                  27             <-55.00>
Construction                                 392                1,114                800             <-28.19>
Manufacturing                               2,742               4,185               3,640            <-13.02>
Transportation                               350                 483                 468             <-3.11>
Wholesale Trade                              253                 333                 285             <-14.41>
Retail Trade                                1,814               2,949               3,380             14.62
Financial, Insurance & Real
                                             533                 592                 300             <-49.32>
Estate
Services                                    2,959               5,833              4,518             <-22.54>
Government                                  4,519               4,399              5,344              21.48
TOTAL                                      14,027              21,181              20,157            <-4.83>
*Employment at diatomateous earth processing facilities is classified by NAICS codes under the Manufacturing sector
rather than the Mining sector.

Source: APC, 1983, 1989, and SBCAG Regional Growth Forecast, 1994, 2000-2030

The City of Lompoc’s major employers are shown in Table 3. Lompoc’s largest
employers include the Lompoc Unified School District, Vandenberg Air Force Base,
U.S. Department of Justice: Prison and Institute, City of Lompoc, and Lompoc Hospital
District.

The State of California Employment Development Department’s (EDD) average annual
unemployment rate for Santa Barbara County in 2002 was estimated at 4.2 percent,
compared to an average annual unemployment rate for California at 6.7 percent. An
average annual unemployment rate for Lompoc in 2002 was estimated at 5.8 percent.




                                             HOUSING - 31
                                               Table 3
                                 Lompoc’s Major Employers – June 2003
                                       Company                                               Number of Employees
Vandenberg Air Force Base                                                                               7,509
Lompoc Unified School District                                                                          1,745
U.S. Department of Justice: Prison and Institute                                                         739
City of Lompoc                                                                                           549
Lompoc Hospital District                                                                                 500
World Minerals                                                                                           431
County of Santa Barbara                                                                                  364
Wal*Mart                                                                                                 275
Vandenberg Federal Credit Union                                                                          150
Von’s                                                                                                    150
Mervyn’s                                                                                                 120
Albertson’s                                                                                               92
Pactuco                                                                                                   64
U.S. Postal Service                                                                                       64
Foods Co                                                                                                  47
Longs                                                                                                     45

Source: The 2002 North Santa Barbara County Economic Outlook, Telephone Survey April 25 and 28, 2003 and June 6, 2003


3.0      HOUSING PROFILE

The characteristics of the City of Lompoc’s households and housing stock provide
information about how the existing housing supply is being utilized. Consequently, it
helps identify existing community housing needs which pertain to the size, mix,
distribution, condition, and cost of the housing supply. This section provides an
overview and comparison of the housing stock in the City of Lompoc. Analysis of past
trends of the housing stock provides a method of projecting the future housing needs of
Lompoc.

3.1      Household Characteristics

For purposes of evaluating housing supply and demand, it is helpful to translate
information from population figures into household data. The vast majority of Lompoc
residents live in households. According to the 2000 Census approximately 92 percent of
all City residents lived in households. The remaining 8 percent were persons living in
group quarters.9 In 1980, there were 9,380 households in the City and by 1990, this
number had increased by 33 percent to 12,504 total. The 1990 average household size
was 2.81 persons. In 2000, the number of households increased by 4 percent to 13,059
total. This amounts to a 2000 average household size of 2.88 persons, which is an
increase from the 1990 average household size of 2.81 persons and a 1980 average
household size of 2.65 persons.




                                               HOUSING - 32
3.1.1 Household Tenure

Household tenure refers to the status of the occupant, whether he or she owns or rents
the unit. Housing tenure provides information on turnover of occupants in a given
housing unit and the affordability of the housing market. Renters tend to move more
frequently than homeowners and also tend to have less money to spend on housing.
Thus, the prevalence of owner occupied households indicates stability within the
housing market (i.e. less housing unit turnover) and increased homeownership
affordability. Housing tenure data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the
housing stock has been closely split between owner occupants and renters in the City
(see Table 4).

Within the City there has been a small but steady increase in the number of owner
occupied households. In 1970 most households (approximately 51 percent) in Lompoc
were renter occupied. In 1980 there were slightly more owner occupied than renter
occupied households in the City. By 1990 there were almost 500 more owner occupied
than renter occupied households in Lompoc. However, owner occupied units still made
up close to half of the total city-wide households. According to the 1990 Census, owner
occupied units comprised 52 percent of all households and rental units comprised 48
percent. Owner occupancy increased by two percent from 1980 to 1990. Likewise,
according to the 2000 Census, owner occupied units continued to comprise 52 percent
of all households and rental units comprised 48 percent. This trend indicates greater
stabilization with the City’s housing market and increased homeownership affordability.

The homeownership rate within the City has historically been less than in the County as
a whole. In the County, owner occupied households have outnumbered renter
households by at least 6 percent since 1970 (see Table 5). However, although the
proportion of homeowners is greater in the County, the City’s homeownership rate
increased at the same rate as the County’s between 1980 and 1990 (2 percent). The
City’s homeownership rate remained at 52 percent between 1990 and 2000.

                                            Table 4
                     City of Lompoc Total Households and Household Tenure
                               1970       (%)         1980      (%)    1990    (%)    2000    (%)
Owner Occupied                 3,679       49         4,714     50     6,484   52     6,733   52
Renter Occupied                3,885       51         4,666     50     6,020   48     6,326   48
Total Households               7,564      100         9,380     100   12,504   100   13,059   100

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000


Owner-occupants tend to occupy single family dwellings. According to the 2000
Census, approximately 87 percent of all owner occupied units within the City were
single family dwellings. The opposite is true for renters. Approximately 35 percent of
renter occupied units in Lompoc were single family dwellings in 2000.




                                                HOUSING - 33
                                            Table 5
                 Santa Barbara County Total Households and Household Tenure
                              1970       (%)            1980      (%)             1990      (%)         2000      (%)
Owner Occupied              45,146       54            57,867      53            71,053     55         76,611     56
Renter Occupied             38,783       46            51,448      47            58,749     45         60,011     44
Total Households            83,929       100          109,315     100           129,802     100       136,622     100

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000


3.1.2 Household Sizes

Household size is defined as the total number of persons, related or not, living in a
housing unit. Although household size has decreased overall since 1970, it has
increased since 1980 (see Table 6). The recent increase in household size is evidenced
by the greater proportion of households with four or more occupants (see Table 7).
Between 1980 and 1990 the proportion of all households with four or more occupants
has increased by four percent. Similarly, between 1990 and 2000 the proportion of all
households with four or more occupants increased by three percent.

                                                Table 6
                                 City of Lompoc Average Household Size
                                               1970                 1980                     1990               2000
Household Population                          24,090                24,929                  35,123            37,664
Number of Households                           7,564                 9,380                  12,504            13,059
Persons/Household                              3.18                     2.66                 2.81               2.88

Source:   U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000
          SBCAG, Regional Growth Forecast 2000-2030


                                                    Table 7
                                       Distribution of Household Sizes
                                                  City of Lompoc
                                            1980                               1990                     2000
Persons Per Unit                  Households            %         Households          %          Households       %
                                      9,380             100         12,504            100           13,059       100
1 Person                              2,215             24          2,766             22            3,066         23
2 Person                              2,998             32          3,743             30            3,677         28
3 Person                              1,739             18          2,285             18            2,118         16
4 Person                              1,392             15          1,986             16            2,037         16
5 Person                               638              7            957              8             1,178         9
6 or more Persons                      398              4            767              6              983          8

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1980, 1990, and 2000




                                                HOUSING - 34
3.1.3 Household Overcrowding

According to the U.S. Census an overcrowded household is one in which there is more
than one person per room, excluding the kitchen and bathrooms. With the exception of
a slight decrease in the incidence of household overcrowding between 1970 and 1980,
overcrowding in Lompoc has been increasing since 1970. Incidence of household
overcrowding dropped by nearly 2 percent between 1970 and 1980 (see Table 8).
However, it rose by approximately 6 percent between 1980 and 1990 and 4 percent
between 1990 and 2000.

The sharpest rise in household overcrowding between 1970 and 2000 came in the
number of households with 1.51 or more persons per room. Between 1970 and 1980
the incidence of overcrowded households with 1.51 or more persons per room
increased by approximately 42 percent. Between 1980 and 1990 the incidence of
overcrowded households with 1.51 or more persons per room rose sharply by 291
percent and accounted for 52 percent of all overcrowded households. Between 1990
and 2000 the incidence of overcrowding in households with 1.51 or more persons per
room increased by 33 percent.

Between 1990 and 2000 incidences of household overcrowding rose in both the number
of households with 1.01 to 1.50 persons per room as well as with 1.51 or more persons
per room. Incidences of household overcrowding rose 54 percent in households with
1.01 to 1.50 persons per room compared with 33 percent in households with 1.51 or
more persons per room. However, incidences of overcrowding in households with 1.51
or more persons per room still accounts for nearly 50 percent of all overcrowded
households.

The increased overcrowding among Lompoc households demonstrates a need for
additional housing space. Household overcrowding also indicates that there is a
shortage of income necessary to move to larger accommodations. Housing space
appears to be priced at a premium. Households are adjusting by settling for less space
rather than buying more space.

                                                  Table 8
                                  City of Lompoc Overcrowded Households
                                                           1970                1980               1990    2000
Total Households                                           7,564               9,380             12,504   13,059
Households With 1.01 – 1.50 Persons
                                                            396                 311                653    1,004
Per Room
Households With 1.51 or More Persons
                                                            127                 181                708     942
Per Room
All Overcrowded Households1                                 523                 492               1,361   1,946
Percentage of All Households Which Are
                                                            6.9                 5.2               10.9     14.9
Overcrowded
1
    Note: Overcrowded households are households with rooms that exceed 1.0 or more persons per room.

Source:     U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000




                                                  HOUSING - 35
Overcrowding is more prevalent among renter occupied households than owner
occupied households. In 1980 approximately 74 percent of all overcrowded households
were renter occupied. By 1990 the proportion of overcrowded households which were
renter occupied rose to approximately 79 percent. Approximately 18 percent of all renter
households (1,069 of 6,020) were overcrowded in 1990. By 2000 the proportion of
overcrowded households which were renter occupied decreased to approximately 68
percent, however, renter occupied overcrowded households remains high (1,333 of
6,353) as shown in Table 9. This indicates that overcrowded households in Lompoc
tend to be renter occupied and that a substantial number of Lompoc renters
(approximately 3,851) are living in overcrowded conditions.10

                                                Table 9
                           City of Lompoc Overcrowded Households By Tenure
                                                                 2000
                                                 Owner Occupied         Renter Occupied
Total Households                                                   6,711                               6,353
Households With 1.01 – 1.50 Persons
                                                                    374                                630
Per Room
Households With 1.51 or More Persons
                                                                    239                                703
Per Room
All Overcrowded Households1                                         613                                1,333
Percentage of All Households Which Are
                                                                    9.1                                21.0
Overcrowded
1
    Note: Overcrowded households are households with rooms that exceed 1.0 or more persons per room.

Source:     U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


3.1.4 Household Types

The distribution of household types has changed very little over the past twenty years.
The majority of households in Lompoc are family households. In fact family households
make up approximately 71 percent of all households in the City (see Table 10). The
second most common household type are one-person households which make up 24
percent of all households. The remaining households are nonfamily households (two or
more unrelated persons) and account for 5 percent of all households.

                                                    Table 10
                                        Distribution of Household Types
                                                    City of Lompoc
                                                  1990                                        2000
                                         Households                  %              Households                 %
                                              12,504                100                13,059                  100
1 Person                                      2,766                  22                 3,066                  24
2+ Person Family                              8,986                  72                 9,310                  71
Nonfamily                                      752                   6                   683                    5

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 and 2000




                                                  HOUSING - 36
Family household sizes are significantly larger than all other households. According to
the 2000 Census, the average household size for all households citywide was 2.88
persons while the average family household size was 3.42 persons. Family households
composed approximately 71 percent of all households but accounted for approximately
88 percent of the City’s household population (see Table 11) and nonfamily households
composed approximately 29 percent of all households but accounted for approximately
12 percent the City’s household population. Consequently, family households require
more space and larger housing units than nonfamily households to avoid overcrowded
conditions.

                                             Table 11
                          City of Lompoc Household Population Distribution
Household Type                  1980             (%)            1990             (%)            2000        (%)
Nonfamily                       3,407             14            4,546                13         4,640          12
Family                         21,522             86           30,577                87        33,024          88
                               24,929            100           35,123            100           37,664       100

Source:   U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1980, 1990, and 2000


3.1.5 Household Income

The California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) defines
household income groups and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
(HUD) calculates income levels relative to the county median for these groups. There
are four household income group categories: very low-, low-, moderate-, and above
moderate-income. Very low-income households are households with incomes less than
50 percent of the area median income; low-income households are households with
incomes between 51 and 80 percent of the county median income; moderate-income
households are households with incomes between 81 and 120 percent of the county
median income; and above moderate-income households have incomes above 120
percent of the county median income. The 2002 income limits for Santa Barbara County
are listed (see Table 12). The income limits are based on the median family income for
Santa Barbara County of $56,800. HUD, HCD, Santa Barbara County Housing
Authority, and the City use these income limits to determine eligibility for publicly-funded
housing assistance programs.

                                          Table 12
                 Santa Barbara County Maximum Household Income Limit - 2002
                                                       Number of Persons In Household
     Income Group                     1                 2            3             4                       5
Very Low                          $19,900           $22,700           $25,550             $28,400       $30,650
Low                                31,800            36,350            40,900              45,450        49,050
Median                             39,750            45,450            51,100              56,800        61,350
Moderate                           47,700            54,500            61,350              68,150        73,600
Above Moderate                    > 47,700          > 54,500          > 61,350            > 68,150      > 73,600
Source: HCD, 2002 and County of Santa Barbara, Planning and Development Department




                                               HOUSING - 37
Available household income is one of the most critical factors influencing the demand
for housing. The City of Lompoc 1999 household income estimates are provided in
Table 13. Household incomes in Lompoc are lower than countywide incomes.
According to the 2000 Census, the 1999 median household income for Lompoc was
$37,587. This represents approximately 80 percent of the median countywide
household income ($46,677). The income disparity is even greater for family
households. The 1999 median family household income for Lompoc ($42,199)
represents approximately 78 percent of the countywide family household income
($54,042).

The 1990 and 2000 distribution of very low-, low-, moderate-, and above moderate-
income households in Lompoc is provided in Table 14. Lompoc household income
information from the 2000 Census shows that the proportion of very low-income
households within the City has increased by approximately 3 percent between 1990 and
2000 (from 26 to 29 percent). The proportion of low-income households in Lompoc
increased by 2 percent between 1990 and 2000. The proportion of moderate-income
households rose by 7 percent between 1990 and 2000. However, the proportion of
above-moderate households decreased significantly by 11 percent during the same
period. Therefore, there was a shift from the higher income category to the very low-,
low-, and moderate-income households between 1990 and 2000.

                                                 Table 13
                                     1999 Household Income Estimates
                                             City of Lompoc
                                                        % of Total                                % of Total
        Income Category                 Households                   Families
                                                       Households                                 Families
0 - $14,999                                         2,175                  16.6       1,146                12.3
$15,000 - $24,999                                   1,908                  14.6       1,327                14.2
$25,000 - $34,999                                   2,048                  15.7       1,310                14.1
$35,000 - $39,999                                     760                   5.8         574                 6.2
$40,000 - $49,999                                   1,408                  10.8       1,082                11.6
$50,000 - $74,999                                   2,615                  20.0       2,088                22.4
$75,000+                                            2,148                  16.4       1,787                19.2
Total                                              13,062                   100       9,314                100
Median Income                                     $37,587                           $42,199
Average Income                                    $45,958                           $50,059
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 and HCD

                                            Table 14
                        City of Lompoc Household Income Distribution 1999
                                     198011                199012                              199913
Income Level                       Households           Households                           Households
                                 Number       (%)      Number        (%)                    Number    (%)
Very low                             2,720               29              3,251     26         3,766       29
Low                                  1,501              16               2,376     19         2,703       21
Moderate                             1,876               20              1,500     12         2,459       19
Above Moderate                       3,283               35              5,376     43         4,134       32
                                     9,380              100             12,504    100        13,062      100
Based on the 1999 median household income for Santa Barbara County of $46,677           Sources: SBCAG and HCD




                                               HOUSING - 38
Government agencies, lenders, and landlords generally consider a household eligible to
rent or buy if monthly payments do not exceed 30 percent of total household income.
Information released from the 2000 Census indicates that 4,361 households currently
are overpaying (paying over 30% of household income on direct housing costs) (see
Table 15). According to the 1990 Census information, 4,098 households were
overpaying for housing within the City. Although the number of households overpaying
for housing within the City has increased since 1990, the percentage of households
relative to the total number of households within the City has remained the same as in
1990. This represents approximately 33 percent (2000: 4,361 / 13,059; 1990: 4,098 /
12,504) of all households citywide.

                                            Table 15
                       Housing Costs, Rent as Percentage of Gross Income
                                        City of Lompoc
                                0-19%                20-29%         30% or more               Total
        Income
                            Number Percent       Number Percent   Number Percent         Number   Percent
Owner Households
                                                                                                  1
Less than $10,000                12        0.2       38     0.7        84          1.5      169         3.0
$10,000 - $19,999               134        2.3       37     0.6       287          5.0       458        8.0
$20,000 - $34,999               322        5.6      124     2.2       497          8.7       943       16.5
$35,000 - $49,999               344        6.0      266     4.6       356          6.2       966       16.9
$50,000 or more               1,872       32.7      932    16.3       379          6.6     3,183       55.6
                                                                                                1
Subtotal                      2,684       46.9    1,397    24.4     1,603         28.0    5,719       100.0
Renter Households
                                                                                                  2
Less than $10,000                 0          0       54     0.8       714         11.2      916        14.4
$10,000 - $19,999                51        0.8      164     2.6     1,021         16.1     1,236       19.5
                                                                                                3
$20,000 - $34,999               240        3.8      663    10.4       931         14.7    1,852        29.2
                                                                                                4
$35,000 - $49,999               359        5.6      574     9.0        78          1.2    1,035        16.3
                                                                                                5
$50,000 or more               1,056       16.6      213     3.4        14          0.2    1,304        20.6
                                                                                                6
Subtotal                      1,706       26.9    1,668    26.3     2,758         43.5    6,343       100.0
                                                                                                  7
Total                         4,390               3,065             4,361                12,062
1
  Includes 35 owner occupied households not computed.
2
  Includes 148 renter occupied households not computed.
3
  Includes 18 renter occupied households not computed.
4
  Includes 24 renter occupied households not computed.
5
  Includes 21 renter occupied households not computed.
6
  Includes 211 renter occupied households not computed.
7
   Includes 246 owner and renter occupied households not computed.
‘Not computed’ means those households reporting no income or a net loss income.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


Overpayment is more prevalent among renter occupied households than owner
occupied households (see Table 16). According to the 2000 Census information, 2,758
of the 4,361 households overpaying for housing were renter occupied. This accounts
for 63 percent of households overpaying for housing. However, the number of renter
households overpaying for housing within the City has decreased slightly between 1990
and 2000. In 1990, 65 percent of renter households were overpaying for housing
compared to 63 percent in 2000, a decrease of 2 percent. The 2000 Census information


                                            HOUSING - 39
indicates that 1,603 households overpaying for housing were owner occupied. This
accounts for 37 percent of households overpaying for housing which is slightly higher
than in 1990.

Approximately 97 percent of renter households which overpay are lower-income
households (households in the very low- and low-income categories). Slightly more than
half (approximately 57 percent) of owner households which overpay are lower-income
households.

                                            Table 16
                          City of Lompoc Household Overpayment – 200014
                                     Renter                      Owner
                                    Occupied                    Occupied                  Total
 Household Income
                                   Households                  Households          Households
                              Number             (%)        Number         (%)   Number           (%)
Very low                        1,942            70          482            30    2,424           56
Low                              736             27          442            27    1,178           27
Moderate                          66             2           301            19     367            8
Above Moderate                    14             1           379            24     393            9
                                2,758            100         1,603         100    4,361           100

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 and HCD, 2003


Household overpayment has a direct effect upon the standard of living for community
residents. Households which overpay for housing have fewer dollars available for other
necessities such as food, clothing, and healthcare. Very low- and low-income residents
have the tightest budgets and are more adversely affected by housing overpayment
than higher income households. That is, above-moderate households can afford to
spend more than 30 percent of household income on housing since they have more
discretionary dollars which are not earmarked for basic necessities. Consequently,
above moderate-income households normally overpay for housing by choice. In
addition, lower-income renter occupied households do not have the option of selling
their home (or borrowing against equity) to raise additional capital in the event of an
emergency. Owner occupied households have the option of selling or renting a portion
of their home to offset unexpected expenses.

3.2     Housing Characteristics

The housing characteristics discussed below identify the existing and future needs
associated with the City’s housing supply.

3.2.1 Housing Quantity and Type

The supply of housing in Lompoc increased sharply between 1970 and 1990 but only
minimally between 1990 and 2000 (see Table 17). Between 1970 and 1980 the housing
stock increased by approximately 24 percent. Between 1980 and 1990 the supply


                                             HOUSING - 40
increased by 3,384 units or an additional 34 percent. However, recent data from the
U.S. Census Bureau indicates that the housing stock in the City of Lompoc increased by
360 units between 1990 and 2000, from 13,261 to 13,621 units. This change represents
a 2.7 percent increase in the supply of housing in Lompoc.

The data summarized in Table 17 indicates the slow growth of the housing inventory in
the City during the 1990s. The period from 1980 to 1990 showed a 34.3 percent
increase in total housing units, with an average increase of 338 units per year, while
during the period between 1990 and 2000 an average increase of 36 units per year was
experienced, yielding an increase of 2.7 percent. The actual growth of the housing
inventory varies from year to year, however, there has been a marked decline in the
units since the year 1991.

                                                   Table 17
                                        City of Lompoc Housing Supply
                                1970                      1980             1990                2000
Total Units                     7,997                     9,877           13,261               13,621
Units Added                       -                       1,880            3,384                360
Percent Change                     -                      23.5             34.3                 2.71

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000


The slow increase in housing unit production experienced in the City of Lompoc
between 1990 and 2000 is consistent with the slow increase experienced in Santa
Barbara County. Table 18 shows that housing unit production in Santa Barbara County
increased by approximately 3.4 percent between 1990 and 2000 a decrease from 20.2
percent between 1980 and 1990. Furthermore, housing unit production in the City of
Lompoc and Santa Barbara County contrasted to some extent with the production of
housing units in California which increased by approximately 9.2 percent. However, as
shown in Table 18, housing unit production declined markedly overall at local, County,
and State levels.

                                                    Table 18
                                              Total Housing Stock
                                            1980-2000 Dwelling Units
                                                 % Change                                      % Change
                                       1980                      1990               2000
                                                 1980-1990                                     1990-2000
California                       9,279,036               20.5     11,182,882      12,214,549       9.2
Santa Barbara County              114,910                20.2      138,149         142,901         3.4
City of Lompoc                     9,877                 34.3       13,261          13,621         2.7

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1980, 1990, and 2000


In 2000, according to the U.S. Census, there were approximately 13,582 housing units
within the City (see Table 19). There are three basic types of housing units for which
data is presented: single family detached units (including planned unit developments),




                                               HOUSING - 41
multiple-family units ranging from duplexes to large apartment developments, and
mobilehomes located in mobilehome parks and on individual lots.

The predominant type of dwelling unit continues to be the conventional single family
residence in the City. The majority (approximately 53 percent) of these units were single
family detached units. However, single family units (detached and attached) made up
approximately 61 percent of the housing supply. Multi-family units comprised
approximately 33 percent of the housing stock and mobilehomes accounted for
approximately 6.6 percent. Between 1990 and 2000 the City’s housing supply increased
by 451 units or approximately 3.4 percent.

                                                         Table 1915
                                                      City of Lompoc
                                    Total Dwelling Unit By Type of Structure
    Dwelling Type                19901                   1990-2000                     20001                         (%)
                               Total Units               Units Added                 Total Units
Single Family:
Detached                           6,876                       335                       7,211                       53.1
Attached                            905                        139                       1,044                       7.7
Multi-Family:
2-4 Plexes                         1,833                         27                      1,860                       13.7
5 or more units                    2,636                       (-66)                     2,570                       18.9
Mobilehomes                         881                         16                        897                        6.6
Totals                            13,131                       451                      13,582                      100.0
1
  There are 130 housing units for 1990 and 39 housing units for 2000 reported to the U.S. Census Bureau that include boat,
tent, RV, and van which showed obvious signs of use as living quarters. These 130 units and 39 units are not included in the
total number of units shown in Table 19.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990, and 2000


3.2.2 Housing Age

According to the 2000 Census, approximately 50 percent (6,711 units) of the City’s
housing unit stock was built prior to 1970 (see Table 20). Although regular maintenance
can prolong the life of the older homes beyond 30 years, the passage of time will
increase the cost and magnitude of needed housing repairs. Generally, housing units
over 40 years old require large financial expenditures to prolong their useful life and
prevent substantial deterioration. Older homes may need electrical rewiring, modernized
plumbing systems and new foundation work. Approximately 21 percent (2,848 units) of
the City’s housing unit stock was built prior to 1960 and would be in this category. Given
the age of the existing housing stock, periodic ongoing maintenance is critical to prevent
significant deterioration and protect the existing housing supply.

In addition to the housing age, information included in Table 20 indicates that nearly all
of the City’s housing units (99.4 percent) had complete plumbing facilities in 2000.




                                                   HOUSING - 42
                                           Table 20
                               City of Lompoc Housing Stock Age
           Year of Construction                      Units               Percent
             1999 – March 2000                        131                   1.0
                1995 - 1998                           307                   2.2
                1990 - 1994                           863                   6.3
                1980 – 1989                          3,147                 23.1
                1970 - 1979                          2,466                 18.1
                1960 - 1969                          3,863                 28.4
                1950 – 1959                          1,898                 13.9
                1940 – 1949                           478                   3.5
                Before 1940                           472                   3.5
                     Total                           13,625                100.0
                                                                    Category as Percent
            Plumbing Facilities                 All Housing Units
                                                                         of Total
      Units With Complete Plumbing
                                                     13,547                99.4
      Facilities
      Units Lacking Complete Plumbing
                                                       78                   0.6
      Facilities
                    Total                            13,625                100.0

      Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


3.2.3 Housing Condition

The City conducted a comprehensive housing conditions survey in November, 1991
(see Appendix A). The 1991 survey found that:

      · Eighty-four (84%) percent of the City's dwelling units were categorized
        as Condition A;
      · Fourteen (14%) percent of the City's dwelling units were categorized as
        Condition B;
      · Two (2%) percent of the City's dwelling units were categorized as
        Condition C; and
      · Less than one (.01%) percent of the City's dwelling units were
        categorized as Condition D.

Since the survey was completed in 1991, several changes have occurred in the City
which lead staff to conclude that housing conditions in the community have improved for
units determined to be categorized as Conditions C and D. The City has worked closely
with a local nonprofit Community Development Housing Organization to fund
rehabilitation of multi-family housing. Approximately 74 housing units have been or are
currently undergoing substantial rehabilitation work. The Housing Authority has


                                          HOUSING - 43
rehabilitated 220 housing units. The City has also funded a comprehensive Code
Enforcement program with a full-time Code Enforcement officer. Through this program,
the City has compelled owners of dilapidated housing to improve its condition. Finally,
demand for housing has increased substantially in the City, which has led to
improvements to the housing stock to increase marketability.

Since it is unlikely that housing conditions in the City have degraded extensively since
1991, a survey was conducted in August and September of 2003 which focused on the
Census Tracts that contained the housing units categorized in 1991 as Conditions C
and D. A general less focused survey was conducted during this same period of time on
the housing units in the remaining Census Tracts. The survey found that:

       · Eighty-three (83%) percent of the City's dwelling units were categorized
         as Condition A;
       · Fifteen (15%) percent of the City's dwelling units were categorized as
         Condition B;
       · One (1%) percent of the City's dwelling units were categorized as
         Condition C; and
       · Less than one (0.1%) percent of the City's dwelling units were
         categorized as Condition D.

The findings of the survey performed in August and September, 2003 were very similar
to the survey performed in 1991 and are summarized as follows:

Although a large proportion (approximately 49 percent) of the City’s housing unit stock
was constructed prior to 1970, it appears to be well-maintained. The City updated its
1991 study in 2003 to evaluate the condition of the existing housing stock (see
Appendix A for methodology). Housing unit conditions were rated using four
classifications: A, B, C, or D. Generally, units rated “A” were in satisfactory condition or
better, with no visible existing repair needs; units rated “B” required minor rehabilitation
to be restored to an “A” condition; units rated “C” required major rehabilitation to be
restored to an “A” condition; and units rated “D” were dilapidated and required
replacement.

A total of 9,177 housing units or approximately 66 percent of the City’s 2003 housing
stock was surveyed. Units built after 1980 (approximately 4,615) were not surveyed,
since they were assumed to be rated “A” because they were less than 20 years old and
hence were built in compliance with the Uniform Building Code. The findings of the
study are provided in Table 21.




                                    HOUSING - 44
                                      Table 21
                        2003 Housing Condition Study Findings
                                    Housing Condition
  Housing Type            A              B               C             D       Total Units
                        6,833          1,333            82             4
   Single Family                                                                  8,252
                        83%            16%              1%           .05%
                        3,859           647             88             6
   Multi-Family                                                                   4,600
                        84%            14%              2%           0.1%
                         826            109              5            N/A
   Mobilehome                                                                     940
                        88%            11%              1%             -

                       11,518          2,089            175           10         13,792
     All Units
                        83%             15%             1%           0.1%        100%

The 2003 housing condition study found that 83 percent of the City’s housing stock was
well-maintained and appeared in adequate or better condition. Most of these units have
been recently built and received steady maintenance. The regularity of future
maintenance will determine whether these units remain in “A” condition or slip to “B”
condition.

Approximately 16 percent of the City’s housing (2,264 units) appeared in need of some
form of rehabilitation (“B” and “C” units). The vast majority of units requiring
rehabilitation were in “B” condition and appeared in need of relatively small financial
expenditures (under $10,000) to be considered in “A” condition. However, these “B”
condition units (2,089) are in the early stages of deterioration. They are units which can
be repaired and provide a long-term source of quality housing or can deteriorate further
and become beyond reasonable economic repair. Various factors determine whether
“B” condition units slip to “C” condition. These factors include: the severity and urgency
of the repair needs, the willingness of owners to make needed repairs before they
become critical, the availability of private funds to spend on housing repairs, and the
ability of the City to obtain and allocate public funds for those in need of financial or
technical assistance.

Approximately one percent of the City’s housing stock (175 housing units) in 2003 was
severely deteriorated, requiring a large expenditure of funds (more than $10,000) to
repair. In fact, in at least 13 cases housing units appeared to have deteriorated beyond
reasonable economic repair and needed to be replaced.

The presence of severely deteriorated and dilapidated housing creates many negative
side effects. These units can pose a safety hazard to their occupants and neighbors.
They may become abandoned and serve as dangerous playgrounds for children or in
some cases centers for criminal activity. In addition, “C” and “D” condition units can
decrease property values of adjacent units and deter private investment within a
neighborhood. This in turn, decreases housing supply, hinders marketability of nearby
units, deters new development, and creates a disincentive for nearby property owners


                                   HOUSING - 45
to maintain their residences. Consequently, a larger number of units become
susceptible to neglect within a concentrated area. As a result, housing deterioration may
spread throughout a block or neighborhood.

3.2.4 Vacancy Rate

Vacancy rates provide a quantifiable measurement of excess housing supply. Vacant
units are the portion of the City’s housing stock which is unoccupied. The rule of thumb
is that a 4.5% to 5.0% vacancy rate indicates a good balance of supply and demand in
the housing market. Vacancy rate information is provided by the U.S. Census Bureau
and is monitored monthly by the City via its electric meters (electric meters are turned
off when a unit is vacant). The total overall vacancy rate in the City was 4.1 percent
according to the 2000 Census (see Table 22). The Census data also indicates that
vacancy rates have customarily been higher for renter occupied units than owner
occupied units. The vacancy rate as reported in the 2000 Census is lower than the 5.7
percent vacancy rate reported in 1990 indicating that there are less housing units
available compared to population in 2000 than in 1990. Furthermore, the 2000 vacancy
rate is lower than the 4.5 percent to 5.0 percent vacancy rate range indicating an
imbalance between the supply and demand of housing in the City.

                                               Table 22
                                City of Lompoc Vacancy Rates by Tenure
                                                        1970    1980     1990    2000
Homeowner Vacancy Rate                                  2.1%    4.9%     1.4%    0.8%
Rental Vacancy Rate                                     6.9%    5.1%     7.6%    4.0%
Overall Vacancy Rate                                    5.4%    5.0%     5.7%    4.1%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000


Information from the City’s Electric Meter Vacancy Rate Program shows a great deal of
vacancy rate variation by housing type in the 1995 to 2002 time period (see Table 23).
Multi-family dwellings had the highest vacancy rate (between 3.9 and 9.1 percent).
However, the vacancy rate for these units steadily decreased by approximately 5
percent during this period. Single family attached dwellings and mobilehomes had the
next highest vacancy rate, in that order, (between 2.5 and 5.2 percent and between 1.6
and 4.5 percent, respectively) during the same period. Single family detached dwellings
had a relatively low vacancy rate (between 1.2 and 2.7 percent). Overall, the City’s
vacancy rate decreased by 2.3 percent between 1995 and 2002.




                                              HOUSING - 46
                                                Table 23
                            City of Lompoc Vacancy Rates by Housing Unit Type
                                  ------------------- Percent Vacant -------------------
              1
Unit Type                           1995        1996      1997    1998       1999        2000             2001   2002
SFD Detached                          1.9%      2.0%        1.8%         1.7%        2.7%          1.4%   1.2%   1.2%
SFD Attached                          4.1%      5.1%        5.2%         4.2%        2.7%          2.6%   2.5%   2.6%
MFD                                   9.1%      8.6%        7.1%         7.3%        6.7%          6.1%   3.9%   4.1%
Mobilehomes                           4.5%      3.1%        3.5%         2.4%        1.6%          1.6%   2.0%   2.2%
Total Vacancy Rate2                   4.7%      4.6%        4.0%         3.9%        3.4%          3.2%   2.3%   2.4%
1
    Does not include approximately 0.2% uncoded housing units (approximately 30 housing units).
2
    Includes uncoded housing units.

Source: City of Lompoc, 2003


3.2.5 Housing Cost

Housing cost includes the market price of housing units available to prospective buyers
and renters as well as the cost of basic utility expenses (i.e. electric, gas, water, and
refuse). The 2000 Census identifies the median value of owner occupied units in the
City as $148,300. The majority of housing units (54 percent) were valued between
$125,000 and $175,000 (see Table 24).

                                                Table 24
                           City of Lompoc Owner Occupied Housing Values - 2000
                                Value                                                         Percent
                                < $100,000                                                         7.5
                                $100,000 – 124,999                                                13.3
                                $125,000 – 149,999                                                31.4
                                $150,000 – 174,999                                                22.4
                                $175,000 – 199,999                                                13.7
                                > $200,000                                                        11.7
                                                                                                  100.0

                  Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000


Home sales information indicates that the average home sale prices have increased by
approximately 4.2 to 7.4 percent annually between 1990 and 2000 (see Table 25). The
rate of price appreciation varied during this ten-year period depending on the number of
bedrooms in the home. The rate of appreciation for two bedroom homes during the ten-
year period between 1990 and 2000 was 4.2 percent, 7.4 percent for three bedroom
homes, and 7.2 percent for four bedroom homes.




                                                     HOUSING - 47
                                                Table 25
                                City of Lompoc Average Home Sale Prices
                                                                                      Average Annual
   No. of Bedrooms                  1985                1990               2002
                                                                                     Percent Change16
        2 Bedrooms                $77,920             $126,661           $189,981          4.2
        3 Bedrooms                $89,966             $146,308           $275,394          7.4
        4 Bedrooms                $101,113            $164,696           $307,034          7.2

Source: Lompoc Valley Board of Realtors


There are wide housing price ranges within Lompoc for two, three, and four bedroom
homes (see Table 26). These ranges provide prospective homeowners with a high
degree of financial flexibility and choice when shopping for homes. Although two
bedroom units average approximately $190,000, there is a $68,000 range between the
least-costly and most-costly housing unit. The housing price ranges are even more
substantial for three and four bedroom units. Housing prices vary by $189,000 for three
bedroom units and $135,000 for four bedroom units.

                                                Table 26
                                 City of Lompoc Home Sale Prices – 2002
                  Unit Type           Average Price               Price Range            Range Size
                 2 Bedrooms               $190,000           $159,000 - $227,000            $68,000
                 3 Bedrooms               $275,000           $180,000 - $369,000           $189,000
                 4 Bedrooms               $307,000           $250,000 - $385,000           $135,000
Note:          Home sale prices have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars.

Source: Lompoc Valley Board of Realtors


Housing costs increased between 15 percent and 40 percent during the 10 year period
from 1990 to 2000. In 1990 the median rent (excluding utilities) for housing within
Lompoc was $463 per month. Most rental housing in Lompoc (67 percent) was priced
from $350 to $650. The largest proportion of rental housing (42 percent) was priced
between $350 and $500. According to the 2000 Census the median rent (excluding
utilities) for housing within Lompoc was increased by 38 percent to $639 per month.
Most rental housing in Lompoc (65 percent) was priced from $400 to $750 (see Table
27), a 15 percent increase. However, the largest proportion of rental housing (48
percent) was priced between $450 and $700, a 29 to 40 percent increase.




                                              HOUSING - 48
                                            Table 27
                               City of Lompoc Contract Rent – 2000
                                      Contract Rent                           Percent
                                          < $200                                 4.7
                                        $200 – 249                               2.4
                                        $250 – 299                               1.6
                                        $300 – 349                               2.8
                                        $350 – 399                               5.9
                                        $400 – 449                               9.6
                                        $450 – 499                              12.3
                                        $500 – 549                               7.9
                                        $550 – 599                              11.5
                                        $600 – 649                               8.3
                                        $650 – 699                               8.1
                                        $700 – 749                               6.9
                                        $750 – 799                               6.1
                                          > $800                                11.9
                                                                                100.0

               Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000.


Two important factors which influence the price of rental housing are housing size
(number of bedrooms) and type of housing (e.g. detached house, condominium, or
apartment). A rental housing price survey was conducted in February 2003 to evaluate
how prices vary by size and type of unit (see Table 28). As expected, larger units are
generally more expensive than smaller units. In addition, condominiums and detached
houses tend to be more expensive than apartments with the same number of
bedrooms. The widest price ranges were found among three and four bedroom units.
Rental prices for three and four bedroom units varied by $990 and $1,228, respectively.
Consequently, the highest degree of choice in terms of price is available to those
seeking three and four bedroom units.

                                         Table 28
                            City of Lompoc Rental Prices – 200217
Housing Size             Apartments                    Condominiums                     Detached Houses
1 Bedroom                $359 - $875                      $695 - $950                         $650
2 Bedroom               $439 - $1,040                    $895 - $1,000                    $900 - $1,025
3 Bedroom                $510 - $900                     $995 - $1,100                   $1,250 - $1,500
4 Bedroom                $572 - $910                           -                         $1,350 - $1,800
Note:           Prices are monthly rate ranges at different rental development locations.


Rental housing cost is also influenced by utility costs. Water is the only utility that is
currently being included in the apartment rents in the City of Lompoc. Sewer, Electric,
Gas and Refuse are all paid by the renter on an individual basis. In condominiums and



                                         HOUSING - 49
detached houses, the renter is responsible for the cost of all utilities. Average monthly
utility expenses for the City are provided in Table 29.

                                          Table 29
                City of Lompoc Average Monthly Housing Utility Expenses – 2002
Housing Type                   Water            Sewer           Electric          Gas *           Refuse            Total
Single Family                  $28.42           $20.20           $39.58           $31.18           $14.86          $134.24
Multi-Family                   $18.38           $14.14           $22.42           $31.18           $14.86          $100.98
Mobilehome                     $24.00            $9.30           $23.38           $31.18           $14.86          $102.72

Sources: City of Lompoc, Utility Records, 2002, and State of California, Department of Community Services and Development


Monthly utility expenses can account for as much as 10 to 20 percent of the total rental
housing cost of certain units. For example, the average monthly utility cost for a single
family dwelling ($134.24) renting for $825 accounts for approximately 16 percent of the
total monthly housing cost. The average monthly cost of utilities (minus water) for a
multi-family dwelling ($82.60) renting for $600 accounts for approximately 13.8 percent
of the total monthly housing expenses.

3.2.6 Housing Affordability

In 2000, State and Federal standards for housing overpayment were based on an
income-to-housing ratio of 30 percent and above. Households paying greater than this
amount have less income left over for other necessities, such as food, clothing, and
health care. It is recognized, however that upper income households are generally
capable of paying a larger proportion of their income for housing, and therefore
estimates of housing overpayment generally focus on lower income groups.

The 2000 Census identifies households paying greater than 30 percent of income for
housing. As expected, the lower the income group, the greater the proportion of
households overpaying for housing. Among households earning less than $10,000, 74
percent overpaid for housing; whereas 77 percent in the $10,000 - $19,999 category
overpaid; 51 percent in the $20,000 - $34,999 category overpaid; and only 13 percent
earning more than $35,000 overpaid. In total, an estimated 36 percent of Lompoc’s
households in 2000 were overpaying for housing. According to the 2000 Census, the
percentages of households overpaying for housing in each income bracket are the
same as those in 1990, however, the overall percentage of households overpaying has
increased between 1990 and 2000 by three percent, from 33 percent to 36 percent.

The distinction between renter and owner housing overpayment is important because
while homeowners may overextend themselves financially to afford the option of home
purchase, the owner always maintains the option of selling the home. Renters on the
other hand, are generally limited to the rental market, and need to pay the rent
established by the market. According to the 2000 Census, of the 902 households with
incomes less than $10,000, 768 were renter households and only 134 were owner




                                                 HOUSING - 50
households. This discrepancy reflects the tendency of renter households to have lower
incomes than owner households.

3.2.7 Ownership Affordability

Homeownership affordability is a function of two variables: a buyer’s borrowing capacity
and the market price of homes for sale. The majority of prospective homeowners
finance acquisition of housing by obtaining a mortgage. The process of qualifying for a
mortgage includes an assessment of a variety of financial factors, including personal
credit history, outstanding debt, and employment stability. The three most important
factors influencing borrowing capacity and hence homeownership affordability are
discussed below.

The first factor is the household’s expense ratio. This ratio is the percentage of gross
household income that is needed to pay housing expenses. It is an important measure
of borrowing capacity and thus helps determine a prospective homebuyer’s price range.
Government agencies, lenders and real estate industry officials generally consider a
household eligible to buy if monthly payments (including mortgage payments, taxes,
and insurance) do not exceed 30 percent of a household’s gross adjusted income
(gross income less any outstanding debt).18

A second factor is the amount of money available for a down payment. The size of the
down payment establishes the initial buyer’s equity level in the property which in turn
affects the size of the amount financed. A conventional loan requires a 10 to 20 percent
down payment. This requirement can be extremely formidable. Based upon 20 percent,
the down payments required on average priced two, three, and four bedroom housing
units in Lompoc (refer to Table 25) are approximately $38,000, $55,000, and $61,000
respectively. However, a household with a sufficiently large monthly income may be
allowed to decrease necessary down payments to 5 or 10 percent provided that
mortgage insurance is purchased. In addition, the Federal Housing Administration
(FHA) and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs provide qualified first-time home buyers
with reduced down payments.19 These programs are frequently utilized by Lompoc
households. Consequently, down payments made within Lompoc average between 5 or
10 percent.

A third factor is the prevailing interest rate. The interest rate establishes the cost of
borrowing and determines the size of monthly housing payments over the life of the
loan. Traditionally, home loans have been made at a fixed rate for a 30-year period.
However, since the early 1980’s adjustable rate mortgages have become more
common. The main advantage of adjustable rate mortgages is that they provide home-
owners with lower interest rates than fixed interest loans during the early years of the
loan. This enables buyers who expect their incomes to rise to qualify for higher
mortgages than would be possible with a fixed interest loan. In exchange for this
benefit, adjustable rate borrowers accept greater uncertainty about the size of future
monthly mortgage payments. Yet regardless of the type of loan, interest rates help
determine the amount of money a prospective buyer can afford to borrow.



                                  HOUSING - 51
Loan amounts are extremely sensitive to changes in interest rates. The effect of interest
rates on loan amounts is illustrated in Table 30. Higher interest rates decrease
borrowing capability while lower interest rates expand borrowing capability. A one
percent change in interest rates can increase or decrease loan amounts by as much as
$5,000 to $23,000. The larger a household’s maximum affordable payment the larger
the effect of interest rate fluctuations. For example, a one percent increase in interest
rates from 9 to 10 percent would decrease the loan amount available to a household
with maximum affordable payment of $800 by $7,000 (from $85,000 to $78,000). The
same one percent increase would decrease the loan amount available to a household
with a maximum affordable payment of $1,400 by $11,000 (from $148,000 to $137,000).

                                              Table 30
                          Effect of Interest Rates on Borrowing Capacity
Maximum           5%              6%            7%            8%       9%          10%            11%            12%
Affordable              -------------------------------------- ($ 0 0 0 ’ s) -----------------------------------
$800              120            109          100          92         85           78            73            68
$1,000            153            139          125          114        106           98            91            86
$1,200            185            168          150          137        127          118           110           103
$1,400            217            197          175          160        148          137           128           120
$1,600            250            227          207          189        174          161           149           139
Notes:         Calculations are based on a 30 year mortgage.
               The maximum affordable payment is equal to 30% of monthly income and includes the cost of
               insurance and taxes.

Source: Wells Fargo Bank, 1989


During previous planning periods, homeownership in Lompoc was affordable for low-
and moderate-income households (provided a sufficient down payment is available). In
1995, the median income for a four-person household in Santa Barbara County was
$49,500. The average 1994 prices for two, three, and four bedroom housing units were
approximately $118,000, $135,000, and $165,000, respectively. Since the late 1990s
and 2000, housing starts have drastically declined leading to decrease in housing
supply resulting in an increase in housing prices. In 2002, the median income for a four-
person household in Santa Barbara County was $56,800.20 Average 2002 prices for
two, three, and four bedroom housing units were approximately $190,000, $275,000,
and $307,000 respectively (see Table 26). The average price for a two bedroom home
in Lompoc was affordable for a household earning less than 94.8 percent of the Santa
Barbara County median household income (see Table 31). The average price for a
three or four bedroom home in 2002 was affordable for a four-person household earning
less than 138 percent and 152 percent of the County median income, respectively.




                                             HOUSING - 52
                                                 Table 31
                                   Homeownership Affordability
                    For Median Income Four-Person Household in 2002
                                                              Gross                              Percent of
                    Down-          Loan     Total Monthly
    Home Price             1            2            3       Monthly                               Median
                   payment       Amount         Cost
                                                             Income4                              Income5
     $135,000        $13,500            $121,500             $970               $3,233              68.3
     $150,000        $15,000            $135,000            $1,073              $3,577              75.6
     $190,000        $19,000            $171,000            $1,346              $4,487              94.8
     $220,000        $22,000            $198,000            $1,550              $5,167              109.2
     $250,000        $25,000            $225,000            $1,755              $5,850              123.6
     $280,000        $28,000            $252,000            $1,960              $6,533              138.0
     $310,000        $31,000            $279,000            $2,164              $7,213              152.4
     $350,000        $35,000            $315,000            $2,438              $8,127              171.7
1
                 Down payment = 10% of home price.
2
                 Loan amount = 90% of home price.
3                Total monthly cost is rounded to the nearest dollar and includes the monthly loan payment (30
                 year fixed loan at 7% interest rate for 2002), property taxes (1%), and homeowner’s insurance
                 (estimated $600.00 per year or $50.00 per month).
4
                 Gross monthly income = total monthly cost divided by .30 and rounded to the nearest dollar.
5                2002 median household income provided by HCD for Santa Barbara County was $56,800.
                 Lompoc’s median household income was 80.5% of the County’s according to the 2000 Census.


3.2.8 Rental Affordability

Rental housing affordability is primarily a function of market prices, gross household
income, and household size. Rental prices are discussed above (see Table 28). As
mentioned previously, the accepted income-to-housing ratio for rental housing
affordability is 30 percent. Although affordability assessments do not always include a
utility allowance, it is more realistic to do so because the cost of utility expenses can
make up a significant proportion of monthly rental housing cost.

                                         Table 32
                         Income Needed To Rent Market Rate Housing
                                                                                                    Monthly
                               Rent             Utility          Gross         Affordability
                                                                                                    Income
                               Level         Allowance           Rent           Standard
                                                                                                    Needed
1 Bdrm Apt                      $360            $75               $435              30%              $1,450
2 Bdrm Apt                      $450            $80               $530              30%              $1,767
3 Bdrm Apt                      $500            $85               $585              30%              $1,950
3 Bdrm House                   $1,250           $130             $1,380             30%              $4,600
4 Bdrm House                   $1,350           $130             $1,480             30%              $4,933

The affordability of a housing unit can be determined by the gross monthly income
needed relative to the proportion of the countywide median income. Table 32 provides
gross monthly incomes needed for rental housing at 2002 market rates ($360 - $1,350)


                                          HOUSING - 53
in Lompoc given utility costs within the City. For example, a two bedroom apartment
with a gross rent of $530 per month would require a minimum monthly income of $1,767
to be affordable. Table 33 shows rental housing affordability in terms of needed monthly
incomes relative to countywide median income levels for different household sizes.
Thus, the two bedroom apartment which requires a monthly income of $1,767 would be
affordable to a low-income one-person household (earning 53% of median income) or a
very low-income three-person household (earning 41% of median income).

                                         Table 33
                   Rental Affordability For Median Income Household
Monthly                   ------------- Proportion of Median Income -------------
Income           1 Person          2 Person       3 Person        4 Person        5 Person
Needed          Household        Household       Household       Household       Household
$1,450              44%               38%               34%               31%               28%
$1,767              53%               47%               41%               37%               35%
$1,950              59%               51%               46%               41%               38%
$4,600             139%              121%              108%               97%               90%
$4,933             149%              130%              116%              104%               96%
Note:          This table uses 2002 HCD median income limits for Santa Barbara County. Lompoc’s median
               household income was 80.5% of the County’s according to the 2000 Census.


3.2.9 Assisted Housing

Housing element law requires that localities identify and develop a program in their
housing elements for the preservation of assisted, affordable multi-family units including
units developed pursuant to inclusionary housing and density bonus programs. In the
preservation analysis, localities are required to provide an inventory of assisted,
affordable units that are eligible to convert to market-rate housing within the five-year
planning period of the housing element and the subsequent five-year period following
the planning period. As part of the analysis, an estimation of the cost of preserving
versus replacing the units is to be included, as well as programs designed to preserve
the affordable units.

3.2.9.1   Inventory of Assisted Housing

The inventory of assisted units includes a review of all multi-family rental units under
federal, state and/or local programs, including HUD programs, state and local bond
programs, redevelopment programs, and local in-lieu fees (inclusionary, density bonus,
or direct assistance programs). The inventory also covers all units that are eligible for
change to non-low-income housing units because of termination of subsidy contract,
mortgage prepayment, or expiring use restrictions.

The California Housing Partnership Corporation provides an inventory of federally
subsidized rental units at risk of conversion. The 2001 update, which identifies units at
risk through the year 2020, identified one assisted housing development within the City
in which affordability controls are due to expire during the five-year planning period of


                                      HOUSING - 54
this Housing Element. This affordability control currently applies to a total of 31 units in
the Rainbow Plaza development. Rainbow Plaza is located at 220 West Pine Avenue
and contains a total of 31 assisted units (27 one bedroom and 4 two bedroom units).
This project is funded by HUD and is managed by a property management company.
These units were required to be set-aside for occupancy by low-income individuals who
are handicapped, disabled, or elderly (age 62 or older). Federal Preference Guidelines
allow persons about to lose their homes or those living in substandard housing, who
meet the other qualifying criteria, to have preference on the waiting list. Although the
original Section 8 contract expired in 2001, the contract was renewed in that same year
for a one year period. In 2002, the contract expired but was subsequently renewed for a
five year period. The contract will expire again in 2007 but the risk of conversion is low.
Each contract is subject to annual review by Congress. Five years is the maximum
renewal period allowed by Congress.

Additionally, Laurel Springs Apartments is an assisted housing development in which
affordability controls are due to expire during the subsequent five-year period of the
housing element planning period. Laurel Springs Apartments (88 two bedroom units and
6 three bedroom units) currently contain 19 assisted units. These units were required to
be set aside for occupancy by low- and moderate-income households. These units are
affordability restricted until 2010.

Table 34 shows a complete listing of all of the assisted multi-family rental housing
complexes in the City of Lompoc and their funding status and dates the units are eligible
to convert to market-rate housing.

3.2.9.2   Conservation of Assisted Housing

The cost of conserving the assisted units is estimated to be significantly less than that
required to replace the units through new construction. Conservation of assisted units
generally requires subsidizing the difference between market-rate and assisted rents.
Since land prices and land availability are generally the limiting factors to development
of low-income housing, it is estimated that subsidizing rents to preserve assisted
housing is more feasible and economical than new construction.

A search of similar multi-family properties for sale in the City of Lompoc revealed
acquisition costs per unit of approximately $82,000.21 At this price, acquisition costs of
the 31 multi-family units at Rainbow Plaza and the 19 multi-family units at Laurel
Springs Apartments would be approximately $2.5 and $1.5 million, respectively,
excluding closing costs and property repair costs that may be necessary. The estimated
minimum cost to construct similar new units (one, two, and three bedroom units) would
be approximately $180,000 per dwelling unit, without profit, depending on land and
improvement costs, and permit and impact fees.21 At this cost per unit, the total cost to
replace 31 units and 19 units would be $5.6 and $3.4 million, respectively, if a non-profit
housing provider was to develop the project.




                                    HOUSING - 55
                                                                                  Table 34
                                                               Assisted Affordable Units in the City of Lompoc

                                                                                                                                                 Affordability
                                                                                                          Total   Total Assisted                 Restriction Type of Assistance/
Project Name                              Address                          Property Owner                                             Type
                                                                                                          Units       Units                      Expiration       Program
                                                                                                                                                    Date


Assisted affordable units eligible to convert between 2003 and 2013

                                                                                                                                     Elderly/                Direct Loan - 40 Years,
Rainbow Plaza                        220 W. Pine Street                   Rainbow Plaza Inc.               31        31 Low                         2007
                                                                                                                                   Handicapped                  Deed Restriction

                                                                                                                      9 Low*                                  Multi-Family Housing
Laurel Springs Apartments          812 W. Laurel Avenue               Laurel Springs Associates            19*                       Family         2010
                                                                                                                   10 Moderate*                                 Revenue Bond

* These numbers were derived from City of Lompoc, 1997 Housing Element, Table 27, page 42.


Assisted affordable units not eligible to convert between 2003 and 2013

                                                                                                                       18                                      Rental Housing
Parkside Apartments                 240 W. Pine Avenue                      682 Associates                 48                        Elderly        2016
                                                                                                                  Very Low/Low                               Construction Program

                                                                                                                   24 Very Low      Elderly/                      Tax Credit
Casa Serena                          130 S. Fifth Street               Casa Serena Associates              48                                       2050
                                                                                                                     24 Low         Disabled                    Redevelopment



Janaki Apartments                      536 N. U Street                        Rajan Ryyar                  11      14 Very Low       Family         2055           Tax Credit




                                                                                                                  177 Very Low
Kailani Village                  200 - 310 W. North Street                Kailani Village Ltd.            188                        Family         2056           Tax Credit
                                                                                                                     11 Low



West Creek Villa                       222 N. T Street                    Lompoc Village 88                88      88 Very Low       Family         2056           Tax Credit

                                                                                                                   10 Very Low
Arbor Square (Valli-Hi)                800 N. G Street             Pacific American Properties Inc.       125                        Family         2031           Tax Credit
                                                                                                                     115 Low




                                                                                                 HOUSING - 56
                                                             Lompoc Housing Assistance                                                      City/State HOME
T & College                      521-537 N. T Street                                  1         35        35 Very Low     Family   2031
                                                                Corporation (LHAC)                                                             State CHFA


                                 501-513 N. S Street                                                                                             CDBG
Jay Apartments                                                         LHAC                     26        26 Very Low     Family   2032
                                   508 N. T Street                                                                                            State CHFA

Courtyard                          733 N. E Street                     LHAC                     18        18 Very Low     Family   2037     Redevelopment

Portabello                       305-309 N. K Street                   LHAC                     12        12 Very Low     Family   2030       State CHFA

                                                                                                                                          City HOME      State
Southern Court                   709-713 N. E Street                   LHAC                     12        12 Very Low     Family   2031
                                                                                                                                                 CHFA
                                                                                                                                          City HOME      State
Casa Con Tres                    434-438 N. L Street                   LHAC                     12        12 Very Low     Family   2058
                                                                                                                                                 CHFA

Voelker                          500-504 N. T Street                   LHAC                     8          8 Very Low     Family   2032          CDBG

                                                                                                        3 Very Low/Low/
North B Street               503, 507, 507 1/2 N. B Street             LHAC                     3                         Family   2029          CDBG
                                                                                                           Moderate
                                                                                                                                          CDBG      City/State
Courtyard South                  717-721 N. E Street                   LHAC                     6          6 Very Low     Family   2029
                                                                                                                                                 HOME

K Street                         328-330 N. K Street                   LHAC                     2          2 Very Low     Family   2031       State CHFA

                                                                                                                                              Direct Loan
Chestnut Apartments          401-405 W. Chestnut Avenue                LHAC                     3          3 Very Low     Family   2030
                                                                                                                                          Redevelopment Funds


                                                                                                                                              Direct Loan
K Street Cottages              120 & 120 1/2 S. K Street               LHAC                     2          2 Very Low     Family   2029
                                                                                                                                          Redevelopment Funds

                                                                                                                                          Inclusionary Housing
                                                                                                           1 Very Low
L Street Triplex                    115 S. L Street                Frank Signorelli             3                         Family   2032    Program; Recorded
                                                                                                             2 Low
                                                                                                                                                Covenant
1
    Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation (LHAC) is a certified Community Housing Development Corporation (CHDO).




                                                                                      HOUSING - 57
3.2.9.3   Preservation of Assisted Housing

Housing element law also requires that localities identify local public agencies, public or
private nonprofit corporations, and for-profit organizations with the legal and managerial
capacity to acquire and manage at-risk projects resulting in the preservation of at-risk
units.

Preserving at-risk units can be accomplished through purchase or management of the
project by a nonprofit organization. This preservation method would eliminate the costs
associated with new construction of comparable housing and would eliminate
displacement of households while the units are constructed.

The City currently works with one nonprofit community-based service organization to
provide affordable housing in Lompoc. This organization is the Lompoc Housing
Assistance Corporation (LHAC). LHAC is a certified Community Housing Development
Organization (CHDO). LHAC is in the process of becoming a Community Based
Development Organization (CBDO). The City has approved funding for LHAC to acquire
and rehabilitate a total of 189 dwelling units primarily for very low- and low-income
families but also for moderate-income families. LHAC will manage the units following
rehabilitation and occupancy of the dwelling units. LHAC owns a total of 227 units
affordable to very low-, low-, and moderate-income families in addition to the Mark’s
House transitional housing.

The City has not directly participated in the acquisition of at-risk units to date, but this
should be considered in light of LHAC’s status as a certified CHDO.

Additionally, the City works with Habitat for Humanity and the Santa Barbara County
Housing Authority to provide affordable housing and these organizations could assist in
the acquisition of at-risk units.

3.2.9.4   Financing and Subsidy Resources for Assisted Housing

As noted in the preceding paragraphs, two types of resources used in efforts to
preserve affordable units at risk of conversion to market rate in the City of Lompoc are
nonprofit organizations that can acquire and manage assisted units and City funding.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding, California Housing Finance
Agency (CalHFA) and Redevelopment (RDA) set-aside funds, and Federal HOME
funds are the primary sources of potential funding for preservation efforts. CDBG funds
are used to provide community facilities, services, and residential acquisition and
rehabilitation programs, as well as economic development programs in low- and
moderate-income areas. CalHFA and Redevelopment set-aside funds and Federal
HOME funds provide a variety of housing financing opportunities including residential
acquisition and rehabilitation programs.




                                    HOUSING - 58
Since the year 2000 to present, the City of Lompoc appropriated $5,314,400 in CDBG,
CHFA and RDA set-aside funds, and HOME funds toward acquisition of affordable
housing units. These funds assisted a total of 141 units that are currently or will be
affordable to very low- and low-income families. These same financing and subsidy
resources are available for the preservation of at-risk units.

As noted in Policy 1.14, the City will monitor previous and new commitments for very
low-, low-, and moderate-income publicly assisted housing through quarterly reports
published by the City’s Community Development Department. These reports will be
generated from a database that has been established for tracking assisted projects. As
projects are identified as being “at-risk” the City will investigate available funding
sources from programs such as CHFA, HOME, CDBG, and California Multifamily
Housing Program, and HUD’s Office of Multifamily Housing Assistance Restructuring
program, and will work with property owners and nonprofit organizations to acquire
these units.

4.0    HOUSING NEEDS

4.1    Existing Housing Needs

4.1.1 Reduction of Overcrowding

Household overcrowding currently affects approximately 15 percent of the households
within the City. Nearly half (48 percent) of these households live in units with more than
1.5 persons per room (excluding bathrooms and kitchen). In past planning periods, a
sufficient supply of vacant housing units existed to alleviate overcrowded conditions
among smaller household sizes. However, an insufficient supply of housing units and
insufficient income is available for these households to move to larger units. In addition,
household size has begun to rise after a steep decrease between 1970 and 1980 which
has compounded overcrowding conditions. This is most apparent among large
households with five or more occupants. Job creation and assistance with down
payments and security deposits are needed to promote homeownership and relieve
overcrowding.

4.1.2 Housing Rehabilitation

More than 2000 housing units are currently in need of at least minor rehabilitation.
Approximately 200 of these units require major rehabilitation with expenditures of more
than $10,000.

4.1.3 Housing Affordability

Citywide average per capita household income is currently approximately 67 percent of
the average countywide figure. Consequently units considered affordable to certain
income groups countywide are not affordable to Lompoc households. This is evident to
many households in Lompoc who currently overpay for housing (i.e. spend in excess of



                                   HOUSING - 59
30 percent of household income on housing). Approximately 33 percent of all Lompoc
households or one in every three households citywide overpays for housing.
Additionally, 83 percent of the households which overpay are very low- and low-income
households which can least afford to spend more than 30 percent of household income
on housing. Mortgage refinancing (during periods of historically low interest rates) can
help improve housing affordability for homeowners. However, new job creation, higher
wage jobs, as well as a greater supply of lower cost housing are needed to improve
housing affordability for renters and homeowners.

4.2    Special Needs Groups

Certain segments of the population have traditionally experienced a more difficult time
finding decent, affordable housing due to special circumstances. In Lompoc, these
“special needs” households include the elderly, the disabled persons, large family
households of five or more persons, single-headed and female-headed households,
farmworkers, and homeless persons.

4.2.1 Elderly

The special needs of many elderly households result from low fixed-incomes, physical
disabilities, and dependence needs. Consequently, the elderly often have increased
needs for housing which incorporates enhanced accessibility features (e.g. hand rails or
no stairs), provides security, and requires minimal maintenance. Additionally, locating
housing for the elderly near neighborhood shopping, medical services, churches, and
senior recreation and service facilities will help meet the special needs of a portion of
the elderly population. For the purposes of this Housing Element, “elderly” are defined
as those persons 65 years of age and older.

The 2000 Census counted 3,856 elderly Lompoc residents which accounted for
approximately 9.4 percent of the City’s total 2000 population. Approximately 94 percent
(3,645) of the elderly population live in households and the remaining 6 percent (211)
live in group quarters (e.g. elderly residential care facilities). The majority of the elderly
population (67 percent or 2,435 individuals) living in households, live within family
households (e.g. with a spouse or other relatives) which can provide a support system
to assist with household chores or errands. The remaining nonfamily household
population (1,210 individuals) is comprised primarily of females who live alone (812
individuals out of 1,210 or 67 percent). The majority of the elderly population (57
percent) are aged 65 to 74. The remaining 1,659 individuals are aged 75 or more. This
older segment of the elderly population is more likely to be frail and require mobility
friendly housing design.

Most elderly individuals in Lompoc own their residences. In fact, approximately 75
percent (1,858 of 2,467) of the housing units occupied by the elderly are owner
occupied and 25 percent (609) are rented. In contrast, the homeownership rate is 52
percent for the community as a whole. However, due to fixed incomes the elderly
sometimes have difficulty financing needed home repairs.



                                    HOUSING - 60
Lompoc’s elderly population is adversely affected by disabilities and to a lesser extent
by financial hardship. A significant portion of the elderly population experiences mobility
difficulty or problems which adversely effect their self-sufficiency. According to the 2000
Census 1,697 elderly individuals or approximately 44 percent of the total elderly
population reported one or more types of disabilities, including a self-care type of
disability. One type of disability was reported for 847 (50 percent) elderly individuals
who experienced a disability. The types of disabilities included sensory (23 percent),
physical (49 percent), mental (1 percent), self-care (0.4 percent), and go-outside type of
disability (12 percent). Moreover, two or more types of disabilities were reported for 850
(50 percent) elderly individuals. Of the elderly individuals reporting two or more
disabilities, 38 percent reported self-care disabilities. These individuals need housing
designed or modified to address their physical disabilities in order to protect their
independence. In addition, the 2000 Census documented 253 elderly individuals
earning annual incomes below the poverty level ($7,990 for 1 person elderly households
and $10,075 for 2 person elderly households). This represents approximately 6 percent
of the total elderly population. Although most elderly have incomes above the poverty
level, many have low fixed-incomes. Consequently, housing affordability for the elderly
becomes more tenuous when housing costs rise.

The City’s elderly population has a range of housing options designed and structured to
meet their needs. As of 2002, there were 99 publicly-assisted housing units for the
elderly which receive federal housing funds located within the City. These units are
distributed among three different complexes: Miller Plaza, Stanley Horn Homes, and
Rainbow Plaza. Although no medical services are available within the complexes, the
City provides on-demand transit service to all City residents.

Miller Plaza, located at 301 West Maple Avenue, contains 24 units. These one bedroom
rental units were developed, and are owned and managed by the Santa Barbara County
Housing Authority for low- and very low-income eligible individuals 62+ years of age.

Stanley Horn Homes is located at 640 North Q Street and provides 44 units (40 one
bedroom and 4 two bedroom). The County Housing Authority developed this complex
and now owns and operates it for eligible low- and very low-income residents 62+ years
of age.

Rainbow Plaza is located at 220 West Pine Avenue and contains a total of 31 units (27
one bedroom and 4 two bedroom units). This project was funded by HUD and is
managed by a property management company. The facility is intended to serve low-
income individuals who are handicapped, disabled, or elderly (age 62 or older). Federal
Preference Guidelines allow persons about to lose their homes or those living in
substandard housing, who meet the other qualifying criteria, to have preference on the
waiting list.

Additionally, there are four privately owned facilities which serve the housing needs of
the elderly population in Lompoc: Parkside Gardens, Casa Serena, The Lodge of
Lompoc (formerly Franciscan Manor), and Lompoc Convalescent Care Center. These



                                   HOUSING - 61
facilities provide a combined 96 units and 240 beds and offer a broad range of services
for elderly residents.

Parkside Gardens is located at 240 West Pine Avenue. The 48 unit (38 one bedroom
and 10 two bedroom) complex contains units for independent elderly residents. No
medical services are provided.

Casa Serena is located at 130 South Fifth Street. The 48 unit (also comprised of 38 one
bedroom and 10 two bedroom units) complex contains units for independent elderly
residents. Likewise, no medical services are provided.

The Lodge of Lompoc is located at 1420 West North Avenue. The facility is privately
owned and contains 65 bedrooms with 130 beds. It provides long term residential care
services including room and board, some personal care assistance, monitoring of
medication taking, and social opportunities. No medical services are provided.

Lompoc Convalescent Care Center, owned by the Lompoc Hospital District, is located
at 216 North Third Street. The facility provides 57 bedrooms with 110 beds. Skilled
nursing care is available on a 24-hour basis at the level prescribed by a resident’s
physician. In addition to medical nursing care, physical and occupational therapy may
be provided. The facility is licensed by the State Department of Health.

Other services for the elderly in Lompoc include the Lompoc Valley Senior Community
Center, Family Service Agency, and Lompoc Valley Haven – Senior Day Care. The
Lompoc Valley Senior Community Center is a multi-purpose facility that provides
recreation activities and supportive services for elderly persons in Lompoc. Meals are
provided at the Center through a contract administered by the Community Action
Commission of Santa Barbara County and Lompoc Hospital. Over 197 elderly persons
received meals through the use of this program in 2001 to 2002. In addition, the City of
Lompoc Parks and Recreation Department provides a number of social and recreation
programs, classes, workshops, and special events for elderly persons at the Lompoc
Valley Community Center. Seniors can participate in the nutrition program, exercise
classes, dance classes, and yoga classes. Health care and legal services are available
on a monthly basis.

The Family Service Agency’s Lompoc Homemaker Program promotes the
independence of persons who can remain living in their homes with assistance. Trained
homemakers provide basic housekeeping tasks, grocery shopping and other errands,
such as picking up medication prescriptions, respite and caregivers, and
companionship/emotional support services and community referrals. This program
served a total of 40 elderly persons in 2001 to 2002.

The Lompoc Valley Haven – Senior Day Care provides a unique place for dependent
elderly persons who suffer from social isolation, Alzheimer’s Disease, are memory
impaired or physically limited to gather in a safe, supervised, and caring environment.
Elderly persons at the Lompoc Valley Haven enjoy stimulating mental and physical



                                  HOUSING - 62
activities, hot, nutritious meals and snacks, and a chance to socialize. This program
served 18 elderly persons in 2001 and 2002.

4.2.2 Disabled

Housing assistance need for the disabled is a function of the nature and severity of
handicap, income or wealth, and family or other support services within the community.
For purposes of this element, disability includes, but is not limited to, any physical or
mental disability as defined in Section 12926 of the California Fair Employment and
Housing Act. Mental disability is defined in Section 12926 of the California Fair
Employment and Housing act as:

  (1) Having any mental or psychological disorder or condition, such as mental
retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, or specific learning
disabilities, that limits a major life activity. For purposes of this section:
  (A) “Limits” shall be determined without regard to mitigating measures, such as
medications, assistive devices, or reasonable accommodations, unless the mitigating
measure itself limits a major life activity.
  (B) A mental or psychological disorder or condition limits a major life activity if it makes
the achievement of the major life activity difficult.
  (C) “Major life activities” shall be broadly construed and shall include physical, mental,
and social activities and working.
  (2) Any other mental or psychological disorder or condition not described in paragraph
(a) that requires special education or related services.
  (3) Having a record or history of a mental or psychological disorder or condition
described in paragraph (1) or (2), which is known to the employer or other entity
covered by this part.
  (4) Being regarded or treated by the employer or other entity covered by this part as
having, or having had, any mental condition that makes achievement of a major life
activity difficult.
  (5) Being regarded or treated by the employer or other entity covered by this part as
having, or having had, a mental or psychological disorder or condition that has no
present disabling effect, but that may become a mental disability as described in
paragraph (1) or (2).

Physical disability is defined in Section 12926 of the California Fair Employment and
Housing act as:

 (1) Having any physiological disease, disorder, condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or
anatomical loss that does both of the following:
 (A) Affects one or more of the following body systems: neurological, immunological,
musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory, including speech organs,
cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin, and
endocrine.




                                    HOUSING - 63
  (B) Limits a major life activity. For purposes of this section:
  (i) “Limits” shall be determined without regard to mitigating measures such as
medications, assistive devices, prosthetics, or reasonable accommodations, unless the
mitigating measure itself limits a major life activity.
  (ii) A physiological disease, disorder, condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical
loss limits a major life activity if it makes the achievement of the major life activity
difficult.
  (iii) “Major life activities” shall be broadly construed and includes physical, mental, and
social activities and working.
  (2) Any other health impairment not described in paragraph (1) that requires special
education or related services.
  (3) Having a record or history of a disease, disorder, condition, cosmetic
disfigurement, anatomical loss, or health impairment described in paragraph (1) or (2),
which is known to the employer or other entity covered by this part.
  (4) Being regarded or treated by the employer or other entity covered by this part as
having, or having had, any physical condition that makes achievement of a major life
activity difficult.
  (5) Being regarded or treated by the employer or other entity covered by this part as
having, or having had, a disease, disorder, condition, cosmetic disfigurement,
anatomical loss, or health impairment that has no present disabling effect but may
become a physical disability as described in paragraph (1) or (2).

Many disabled individuals have no housing assistance need since they are able to
support themselves and utilize existing market rate housing. Other disabled individuals
receive continuing care from family or friends, though many of these people would seek
living situations outside the family home if any were available, while still others have
their needs met by housing assistance not specifically designed for the disabled. Yet for
some, physical handicaps can hinder access to housing units of normal design as well
as limit the ability to earn adequate income. Thus, two major housing needs of the
disabled are access and affordability.

The disabled population in Lompoc includes physically disabled, blind, deaf,
developmentally disabled, mentally ill, and medically disabled persons, where the
disabling condition is expected to be of “long duration.” The Social Security
Administration provides Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to very low-income
individuals who are aged (65 or older), blind, or disabled. According to the Social
Security Administration, there were 1,427 SSI recipients as of May 2003, who were
blind or disabled living within Lompoc (zip codes 93436 and 93438).22 This population is
expected to increase by two to three percent annually according to Social Security
officials. The Social Security Administration also provides disability benefits to aged
disabled persons (disabled persons over 65 years of age). The total number of aged-
disabled persons residing in Lompoc receiving Social Security benefits as of May 2003
was approximately 198. Thus, the combined total of disabled individuals receiving
Social Security assistance is approximately 1,625.




                                    HOUSING - 64
Comprehensive information is not available regarding the number of persons with
disabilities living independently and not requiring supportive services within the City.
The 2000 Census contained data on civilian noninstitutionalized persons who are 5
years of age and older who have physical disabilities see Table 35). The Census
identified 7,247 such persons or approximately 21 percent of said 2000 population. This
equates to approximately 17 percent of the City’s total 2000 population. According to
the Census, 3,337 persons have disabilities that restrict them from working,
representing 15 percent of the City’s noninstitutionalized population aged 16 to 64.
Persons whose mobility was restricted solely due to limitations and/or the ability to care
for themselves represent 10 percent of the City’s noninstitutionalized population aged
five and older. Approximately 23 percent of the disabled population was elderly.

                                               Table 35
                  Disability Status of the Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population
                                     Population                       Employed Population
          Age
                       With Disability     Without Disability   With Disability Without Disability
                                        7,867
          5-15
                            365                  7,502
                                        2,844                                  657
         16-20
                            414                  2,430               183                474
                                       19,839                                 13,832
         21-64
                           4,771                15,068              2,589              11,243
                                        2,145
         65-74
                            856                  1,289
                                        1,639
          75+
                            841                   798
                                       34,334                                 14,489
          Total
                       7,247    21%        27,087      79%      2,772      19%    11,717      81%

   Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


In 2002 there were two housing developments in Lompoc which were developed to help
disabled persons live independently: La Paloma and Rainbow Plaza. La Paloma is a
project of the Lompoc Option Vocational and Resource Center (LOVARC), providing six
bed-spaces in a six bedroom home as a training facility for independent living for
developmentally-disabled persons. “Graduates” of the program often move to, the
second Lompoc housing development for disabled persons, Rainbow Plaza. Rainbow
Plaza is a 31-unit apartment project, funded under Section 202 of the National Housing
Act. Rainbow Plaza is a “normalization” facility, providing independent living apartments,
with project-based rental assistance, for elderly, physically disabled, mentally ill, and
developmentally-disabled households. In addition to La Paloma and Rainbow Plaza,
Miller Plaza, Stanley Horn Homes, and Casa Serena (mentioned above) provide
housing for income eligible disabled individuals.

Housing opportunities for the disabled can be maximized through housing assistance
programs, single-level units, ground floor units, and units which incorporate design
features such as widened doorways, access ramps, and lowered countertops.



                                             HOUSING - 65
4.2.3 Large Households

For the purposes of the Housing Element, large households are defined as households
that contain five or more persons. 2000 Census data indicate that 17 percent (2,161 of
13,059) of all Lompoc households were large households. Within the City, 1,178
households contain five people, 513 households contain six persons, and 470
households have seven or more residents. The median household size in Lompoc is
2.83 owner occupied and 2.94 renter occupied, an average household size of 2.88
persons.

Table 36 shows that there are 1,197 large households occupying rental units. This
number represents 18.9 percent of all renter households. There are 964 large
households occupying owner occupied units. This number represents 14.3 percent of all
owner occupied households.

                                             Table 36
                            City of Lompoc Large Households By Tenure
Number of Persons in
                                Owner Occupied               Renter Occupied   Total
Household
Five                                    545                       633          1,178
Six                                     225                       288           513
Seven or More                           194                       276           470
Total                                   964                       1,197        2,161

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


Among the City’s 13,625 housing units identified in the 2000 Census, 710 reportedly
have eight or more rooms. Bathrooms and kitchens do not qualify as sleeping quarters
yet are considered rooms, therefore the actual number of bedrooms may be as low as
five. Because of their size, a large family household may experience a greater incidence
of overcrowding. Overcrowded households are usually a reflection of the lack of
affordable housing. Most apartments, mobilehomes, and single family attached units
cannot adequately house five or more people, therefore renting a large home may be
the only alternative when owning a home is not financially possible. Table 37 shows
that there are 1,552 renter occupied units with three or more bedrooms compared to
5,184 owner occupied units. These numbers represent 24 percent and 77 percent of
renter occupied and owner occupied housing units, respectively, living in units with
three or more bedrooms. This means that 76 percent of renter occupied households live
in housing units with one or two bedrooms compared to 23 percent of owner occupied
households. Households who cannot afford suitably sized housing units are often
compelled to live in housing that is too small for their needs.




                                              HOUSING - 66
                                         Table 37
               City of Lompoc Number of Bedrooms in Housing Unit By Tenure
Number of Bedrooms in
                                   Owner Occupied            Renter Occupied   Total
Housing Unit
Three                                     3,485                   1,296        4,781
Four                                      1,614                    232         1,846
Five or More                                85                      24          109
Total                                     5,184                   1,552        6,736

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


4.2.4 Single-Headed and Female-Headed Households

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a single-headed household contains a household
head and at least one dependent, which could include a child, an elderly parent, or non-
related child. The 2000 Census indicates that there are 2,650 single-headed
households in the City of Lompoc. Female-headed households in Lompoc accounted for
approximately 73 percent of all single-headed households, or 1,928 households, and
14.8 percent of all households in 2000. Approximately 67 percent of the 2000 female-
headed households (1,301 of 1,928) included one or more children under the age of 18.
According to the 2000 Census, the number of children under 18 years living within
female-headed households totaled 2,521, representing 20 percent of children under 18
years of age.

Female single-parents normally do not enter the labor force when children are small and
later seek employment when children are older. According to the 1990 Census, the
majority of single mothers (approximately 60 percent) in Lompoc with children aged
under 6 years were counted as not in the labor force. In contrast, 68 percent of Lompoc
mothers with children aged 6 to 17 years were in the labor force. This trend reversed
according to the 2000 Census which showed that only 33 percent of single mothers in
Lompoc with children aged under 6 years were counted as not in the labor force. The
majority of single mothers (approximately 67 percent) with children aged under 6 years
were counted as being in the labor force. Moreover, 73 percent of Lompoc mothers with
children aged 6 to 17 years were in the labor force.

Female-headed single-parent households tend to have low incomes. Mothers with small
children who choose to stay at home forgo income from working outside the home and
may rely on public assistance or child support to support their family. Mothers who do
work outside the home often incur high childcare costs while their children are young.
The financial difficulty encountered by female single parents is evidenced by the high
incidence of poverty among children within female-headed households in Lompoc.
According to the 2000 Census, children in Lompoc living within female-headed
households accounted for 34 percent of all Lompoc children (under 18 years of age)
who were living below the annual poverty threshold.23 This is particularly significant
given that children (under 18 years of age) living in female-headed households make up
only 20 percent of all children living in Lompoc (2,521 of 12,310).


                                              HOUSING - 67
Obtaining suitable housing can be difficult for female single-parents. Expenses for
childcare, low household income, and large spatial requirements limit the range of
available housing choice. Consequently, many of these households may have to settle
for smaller housing units and endure overcrowded conditions. In addition, the location of
housing for this need group should be near recreational facilities, shopping, and
schools, to ease the problem of transportation and after-school supervision.

4.2.5 Farmworkers

Farmworkers have a difficult time finding and affording housing due to a combination of
limited English language skills, traditionally larger family size, low household incomes,
and a consequent inability to obtain housing loans. Reliable data on the size of the
farmworker population and its housing needs is difficult to obtain for the agricultural area
immediately surrounding Lompoc.

According to the Migrant and Seasonal Farm Worker Enumeration Profiles Final Study
for California dated September, 2000, Santa Barbara County ranks ninth in the state for
persons permanently and seasonally employed in agriculture. The study indicates that
in Santa Barbara County there are an estimated 24,461 migrant and seasonal
farmworkers. Of this number, 11,326 are migrant farmworkers and 13,136 are seasonal
farmworkers. The study further estimates there are 4,162 non-farmworkers in migrant
households and 14,906 non-farmworkers in seasonal households, for a total figure of
43,529 migrant and seasonal farmworkers and their families in Santa Barbara County.

The Bureau of Census reported in 2000 that agriculture workers represent
approximately six percent (6.2%) of the total employed persons aged 16 years and over
in Santa Barbara County (180,716 workers in Santa Barbara County; 11,189 workers in
agriculture). Further, the Census reported in 2000 that 776 workers in agriculture
resided in the City of Lompoc, approximately seven percent of the total number of
agriculture workers in the County. The number of farmworkers has decreased over the
last ten years since the 1990 Census which reported 942 farmworkers. However, the
proportion of farmworkers to the total number of persons employed who reside in the
City of Lompoc has increased by one percent since 1990.

Migrant farmworkers often experience the most difficulty securing affordable housing
because of the absence of income when work is not available. Most of the farmworkers
who reside in Lompoc are non-migrant due to the Lompoc Valley’s long growing
seasons which produce steady annual crop production activity.

Special housing needs for this population include: security deposit or down payment
assistance, legal advice, flexible occupancy agreements, and group quarter living
arrangements.

The City of Lompoc’s existing Zoning Ordinance allows for various residential dwelling
types in both residential and commercial zones that can accommodate migrant and
seasonal farmworkers. Thus, farmworker households are typically able to find housing



                                    HOUSING - 68
within the affordable housing stock or other forms of living arrangements allowed by
right or conditionally through a use permit.

The R-A (Residential Agricultural) zone is established for use in areas particularly suited
for light agricultural activities. Permitted uses include “crops, field, tree, bush, berry and
row, including nursery stock, the growing of.” “Agricultural workers’ living quarters for
persons employed and deriving the major portion of their income from employment on
the premises” is a use permitted subject to obtaining a use permit (of which there are a
total of 22 conditionally listed uses in the R-A zone).

The R-3 (High Density) zone allows multiple family uses at a density range between
14.5 and 21.8 dwelling units per acre. Multiple family use means a building designed or
used for occupancy by three or more families, living independently of each other. Other
permitted uses include apartments, duplexes, triplexes, and group dwellings.

The C-2 (Central Business District) zone allows hotels and motels. A hotel, as defined in
the City’s Zoning Ordinance, means “any building or portion thereof used, arranged, or
designed so as to provide six or more rooms or suites of rooms without kitchens, for
rent or hire.” Hotel includes “motor hotel and motel.” Lompoc has a higher number of
hotels and motels located within the City compared to other cities of similar size
because of the build-up of business employment and tourism associated with the
activities at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) from the late-1970’s to the mid-1980’s.
As noted in the section on population characteristics, the 1986 Space Shuttle
Challenger Disaster caused a decrease in employment at VAFB. The need to house
contract employees decreased and tourism associated with VAFB decreased resulting
in high vacancy rates in existing hotels and motels.

In summary, farmworker households in Lompoc can be served through housing
provided on agriculturally zoned land, the City’s affordable housing, existing affordable
housing projects, and existing motels and hotels.

4.2.6 Homeless

The size of the Lompoc homeless population is difficult to identify. This segment of the
population becomes homeless for a wide variety of reasons and remains homeless for
vastly differing lengths of time. One person may be homeless for just a few nights, while
another may be homeless for years at a time. Some homeless are ashamed of their
condition and strive to remain unseen and undetected. In addition, the homeless are an
extremely transient population. Their presence is influenced by such factors as the
availability of homeless services, very low-income housing, local job opportunities, and
climate.

In June of 1990, the County of Santa Barbara, in conjunction with the City of Lompoc
and other cities in the County completed the Comprehensive Homeless Assistance Plan
(CHAP) for Santa Barbara County.24 This CHAP has been the most comprehensive
study of the homeless within Santa Barbara County. The CHAP defines a “homeless



                                    HOUSING - 69
individual” as one who lacks a regular, legal, nighttime residence; is in a supervised,
temporary shelter (congregate shelter or welfare hotel); temporarily in the residence of
another individual; or a place not designated for or ordinarily used for housing (e.g. a
car, hallway, bus station, lobby, street, campground, or park). For the purposes of this
Housing Element, individuals without permanent shelter (as described above), except
those living temporarily in the residence of another individual, are considered homeless.

Homelessness is the result of many economic and personal factors. Factors
contributing to homelessness cited by the CHAP include: the scarcity of lower-income
housing, job loss, long term unemployment, underemployment, no health insurance
coverage, prolonged illness, long term disability, divorce, family violence, substance
abuse, mental illness, lack of awareness of entitlement program benefits, and the
refusal or cessation of benefits. Different economic and personal crises often
exacerbate one another and can result in homelessness. Housing overpayment is an
economic constraint that is compounded when housing prices escalate and wages
decrease, resulting in evictions and removals. A serious accident or illness can drain a
savings account and can keep an employed individual out of work, thus starting a
homelessness cycle.

The CHAP estimated that there were approximately 4,000 homeless in Santa Barbara
County in 1990. Yet, the CHAP did not provide an estimate for the homeless population
within the City of Lompoc. The homeless population within Santa Barbara County,
according to the CHAP, was young, predominantly Anglo, with an increasing Latino
representation. Families represented 30 percent of the homeless population, 20 percent
were working poor, 30 percent were mentally ill, and 30-50 percent had a substance
abuse problem.

More recent data on homelessness in California comes from the 1999 Statewide
Housing Plan, prepared by the Department of Housing and Community Development
(HCD). HCD estimates that on any given day there are 5,400 homeless in Santa
Barbara County, an increase of 35 percent (1,400 people) since 1990. According to
HCD’s data, approximately 58 percent of homeless in Santa Barbara County are single
adults, while 42 percent are families.

Estimates of homeless persons in the City of Lompoc are derived from the 2000
Census. According to the 2000 Census, 178 persons in the City of Lompoc were
described as “either not having a usual home elsewhere,” “people without conventional
housing,” or “other noninstitutional group quarters.” Of the 178 persons, two persons
lived in homes or halfway houses for drug/alcohol abuse and 13 persons lived in “other
group homes” which include communes, foster care homes, and maternity homes for
unwed mothers. The remaining 163 persons either lived in “other nonhousehold living
situations” or “other noninstitutional group quarters.” “Other nonhousehold living
situations” includes people with “no usual home elsewhere enumerated at locations
such as YMCA’s, YWCA’s, and hostels.” According to the Census, the number of
persons living in the City of Lompoc in this situation totals 59. The remaining 104




                                  HOUSING - 70
persons identified by the Census lived in “other noninstitutional group quarters.” “Other
noninstitutional group quarters” include the following:

   °   Emergency and transitional shelters (with sleeping facilities) includes people
       without conventional housing who stayed overnight on March 27, 2000, in
       permanent and emergency housing, missions, Salvation Army shelters,
       transitional shelters, hotels and motels used to shelter people without
       conventional housing, and similar places known to have people without
       conventional housing staying overnight. Also included are shelters that
       operate on a first come, first-serve basis where people must leave in the
       morning and have no guaranteed bed for the next night OR where people
       know that they have a bed for a specified period of time (even it they leave
       the building every day). Shelters also include facilities that provide temporary
       shelter during extremely cold weather (such as churches). If shown, this
       category also includes shelters for children who are runaways, neglected, or
       without conventional housing.

   °   Shelters for abused women (shelters against domestic violence or family
       crisis centers) includes community-based homes or shelters that provide
       domiciliary care for women who have sought shelter from family violence and
       who may have been physically abused.

   °   Regularly scheduled mobile food vans includes mobile food vans which are
       regularly scheduled to visit designated street locations for the primary
       purpose of providing food to people without conventional housing.

   °   Soup kitchens includes soup kitchens, food lines, and programs distributing
       prepared breakfasts, lunches, or dinners on March 28, 2000. These programs
       may be organized as food service lines, bag or box lunches, or tables where
       people are seated, then served by program personnel. These programs may
       or may not have a place for clients to sit and eat the meal.

   °   Targeted nonsheltered outdoor locations includes geographically identifiable
       outdoor locations open to the elements where there is evidence that people
       who do not usually receive services at soup kitchens, shelters, and mobile
       food vans lived on March 29, 2000, without paying to stay there.

Additional estimates of the Lompoc homeless population have been collected by
members of the Homeless Coalition who indicate there are an estimated annual
average of 50 persons in the City of Lompoc identified as homeless.

In 1998, the Marks House Transitional Shelter opened its doors in the City of Lompoc
for homeless families with children. This facility provides shelter for five to six family
households for a maximum length of stay of 90 days. The City of Lompoc provided a
deferred loan of HOME funds to cover a portion of property acquisition costs and a low
interest loan of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program income funds


                                   HOUSING - 71
for rehabilitation of the shelter. The Marks House has just completed its fourth year of
operation in 2002 during which time approximately 154 homeless were assisted. The
City continues to support the ongoing operation of the Marks House through CDBG and
City Human Service Funds.

Domestic Violence Solutions (formerly Shelter Services for Women, Inc.) operates a
publicly-assisted shelter which directly provides housing for twelve homeless women
and children. In 2001, the Lompoc Shelter provided emergency safe housing for 185
unduplicated women and their children.

The City also supported the efforts of the Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation to
acquire a 10.9-acre parcel on the outskirts of the City in Santa Barbara County for
rehabilitation and expansion of an existing transitional facility. The project, called the
Bridgehouse Homeless Shelter and Transitional Facility (formerly The Farmhouse),
involves substantial rehabilitation of a large commercial building, a former 16-bed
transitional facility, and several dilapidated greenhouses. The project when completed
will feature a 40-bed year round shelter for single adult males, a 20-bed long-term
transitional shelter for women and children, and a vocational training component for
residents. The 20-bed facility opened December 1, 2002 and currently houses 20 men,
women, and children.

The Courtyard South Apartments play an important role in housing homeless. In 1999-
2000, the City of Lompoc provided funding to the Lompoc Housing Assistance
Corporation to acquire and rehabilitate the Courtyard South Apartments. Families
residing at the Marks House can transition to permanent housing at Courtyard South
Apartments. During 2001, one formerly homeless household of four persons moved into
the apartment complex from the Marks House Transitional Housing Program.

Additionally, temporary housing in local motels is arranged to assist the homeless. The
Lompoc Police Department, in cooperation with the Salvation Army, operates a fund to
assist families and individuals with temporary housing and meals. Assistance is limited
to two days housing or three days if the need occurs over the weekend. In 2002, the
Lompoc Police Department assisted 124 persons with nightly lodging arrangements.

The Lompoc Homeless Shelter Program (LHS) provides emergency motel vouchers to
homeless families and individuals in Lompoc. The vouchers provide up to three nights
stay in local area motels. In 2001, the Lompoc Homeless Shelter assisted 187
unduplicated persons.

Catholic Charities also operates a program that provides vouchers for lodging in local
motels, food, clothing and household goods to homeless families and individuals and to
households at risk of becoming homeless.

Local churches occasionally open their doors to allow the homeless to sleep in their
facilities.




                                   HOUSING - 72
Lastly, the Lompoc Homeless Shelter received City financial support toward the
development and operation of a walk-in center (Hope Center) for the homeless in
Lompoc. The HOPE Center was started with City Community Development Block Grant
funding. The program provided through the HOPE center includes a safe drop-in
location for homeless persons to receive services. The HOPE Center provides laundry
services (machines on-site), a community clothes closet, U.S. mail center, a message
center, and health care services provided by a County of Santa Barbara Public Health
nurse twice a week. The center also provides a referral for emergency shelter and
assistance in locating longer-term shelter. The HOPE Center assisted 402 unduplicated
homeless persons in Lompoc during 2002. Out of the 402 persons assisted, 157 were
homeless children. Out of the 157 children assisted, 111 of these children participated
in the Center’s After School Program that provided school tutoring by the County of
Santa Barbara Education Office.

Although estimates vary considerably on the size of the Lompoc homeless population,
the provision of additional temporary housing units appears necessary to alleviate
existing need.

The City is currently working on updating the Zoning Ordinance. As noted in Measure 2,
the City will amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow emergency shelters in low (R-1),
medium (R-2), and high (R-3) density residential zones. During the process of updating
and amending the Zoning Ordinance, the City will study allowing emergency housing in
certain commercial zones.

4.3   Projected Housing Needs

In accordance with the Government Code (Section 65584), the Santa Barbara County
Association of Governments (SBCAG) prepared the Regional Housing Needs Plan
(RHNP) for the Santa Barbara County region in December 2002. The plan allocated
projected regional household growth as assigned by HCD to jurisdictions and among
income groups within the county. This process ensured equal participation by all
jurisdictions in the region in meeting state affordable housing goals.

The City’s regional fair share allocation within the 2002 RHNP is provided in Table 38.
The allocation was derived from the most currently available demographic and housing
information (in many cases 2000 Census information). The distribution of the allocation
among the four income categories was adjusted to avoid impaction in the concentration
of very low- and low-income residents in any one particular area of the county. Areas
with higher than average concentrations of very low- and low-income residents were
assigned more higher-income households. Conversely, areas with more higher upper
income residents were assigned more very low- and low-income households. The
housing allocation provides an estimate of the new construction need for Lompoc
through June of 2008. Consequently, it forms the basis for the development of housing
programs to help meet projected housing needs of all income groups. The RHNP set
the City’s allocation at 402 additional households (out of a total of 890 households) from




                                   HOUSING - 73
2001 through June of 2008.25 The third column of Table 38 also provides the planned
distribution of these households by income group.

                                        Table 38
                     Lompoc Household Need Projection By Income Group
Income                         2000                 June of 2008          Change
Group             Number              (%)        Number        (%)   Number      (%)
Very Low            3,766             29          3,980        29     214         24
Low                 2,703             21          2,854        20     151         17
Moderate            2,459             19          2,668        19     209         24
Above
                    4,134             31          4,450        32     316         36
Moderate
Total              13,062             100         13,952       100    890        101

Source: SBCAG, 2002 and 2003


Approximately 14 percent of the City’s fair share allocation (128 units) was constructed
from 2001 to May, 2003 (see Table 39). Most of these new units (53 percent) were
above moderately priced single family dwellings. Nevertheless, the majority of the City’s
remaining housing need (58 percent) is in the moderate- and above moderate-income
affordability categories. Approximately 42 percent of the City’s remaining housing need
is in the very low- and low-income affordability categories. Table 39 on the following
page shows the residential units produced in the City of Lompoc since 2001 by location
and respective sales or rental prices, assessed value, or indication of subsidized
project.




                                            HOUSING - 74
                                                      Table 39
                                      Housing Unit Production 2001 – May 2003
                                                               Units Added                 Remaining Need
      Income Group Affordability1
                                                             2001 – May 2003              2001 – June of 2008
      Very low                                          41              32%               173            23%
      222 W. North Avenue                               35           Tax Credit Development - Very Low-Income
      222 N. T Street                                    2            Tax Credit Development - Very Low-Income
                                                                          Habitat for Humanity – Direct Loan of
      518 W. Laurel Avenue                               1             Redevelopment Funds, Very Low-Income
                                                                           affordability commitment until 2047
                                                                          Habitat for Humanity – Direct Loan of
      520 W. Laurel Avenue                               1             Redevelopment Funds, Very Low-Income
                                                                           affordability commitment until 2047
                                                                   Inclusionary Housing Program; Very Low-Income;
      115 S. L Street                                    1
                                                                             Recorded Covenant until 2032

      1000 Blk E. Airport                                1                       Rental price $5502

      Low                                                5              4%               146             19%
                                                                                                     2
      600 Blk. N. Third Street                           1                       Rental price $700
      600 Blk. N. Second Street                          1                       Rental price $7503
      400 Blk S. H Street                                1                       Rental price $7003
                                                                     Inclusionary Housing Program; Low-Income;
      115 S. L Street                                    2
                                                                            Recorded Covenant until 2032
      Moderate                                          14             11%               195             26%
      Signorelli Apartments – 14 unit
                                                                                 2 Bedroom/2 Bath
      apartment complex, 127, 135,                      14
                                                                                    $1,100/mo
      and 139 S. B Street
      Above Moderate                                    68             53%               248             32%

      La Purisima Highlands – LOM
      472, 67 units of a 121 unit single
                                                                                 Sales price range
      family residential subdivision,                   67
                                                                                $350,000 - $520,000
      southwest corner of State
      Highway 1 and Purisima Road
      908 Clemens Way                                    1                    Assessed value $341,2734
      Total                                            128             100%              762             100%
1
    This table uses the HCD median income limits for Santa Barbara County.
2
    Rent established from personal phone call to property owner.
3
    Rent established from survey of similar units in the area.
4
    Assessed value obtained from the Santa Barbara County 2003-2004 Assessor Secured Roll Books 81-89.

Source: Fire Department, Building Division, 2003




                                                       HOUSING - 75
5.0      RESIDENTIAL LAND RESOURCES

5.1      Estimated Dwelling Unit Capacity

5.1.1 Vacant Residential Land

Currently, the City has approximately 153 gross acres of vacant developable residential
land within its boundaries. This acreage is located throughout the City on 72 parcels.
The supply of vacant residential land has a dwelling unit potential of between 923 and
1,102 units at existing densities and can accommodate 100 percent of the City’s
remaining 2001 to 2008 regional housing need allocation (see Table 40). A parcel by
parcel list of vacant parcels is contained in Table 41.

                                             Table 40
                2003 Housing Unit Potential – Vacant Developable Residential Land
  General Plan
                                                        Density                 Vacant Net               Dwelling Unit
   Land Use                     Zoning
                                                       (DU/Acre)                  Acres                   Potential26
  Designation
       VLDR                      R-A                       2.2                      29.75                     65
        LDR                     10-R-1                       4                       1.33                      5
        LDR                     7-R-1                      6.2                      99.51                    616
       MDR                       R-2                    6.2 - 14.5                  10.93                  67 - 158
       MDR                        T                          7                        0                        0
       HDR                       R-3                   14.5 – 21.8                   8.15                  118 - 177
                                 C-2                   14.5 – 21.8                                          17 – 27
         MU                                                                          1.24
                                 C-2                      Varies                                            Varies
        OTC                       OTC                  14.5 – 21.8                   2.48                   35 - 54

       Totals                                                                      153.39                 923 – 1,102

Note: The densities identified for the VLDR, LDR, and MDR (T) categories represent the maximum allowable densities in the
respective areas. No minimum density is intended to apply to these categories. In the MDR (R-2) and HDR (R-3) categories, the
range sets forth both a minimum and a maximum allowable density in order to ensure a sufficient land supply.


The inventory of vacant land by parcel size in the R-2 and R-3 zoning districts (Table
41) indicates there are 29 parcels in Lompoc - 24 are less than one acre in size, one is
1.36 acres, one is 1.81 acres, one is 1.85 acres, one is 3.32 acres, and one is 3.44
acres in size Table 41. An evaluation of the impact of parcel size on the development
feasibility and capacity within the planning period revealed that parcels currently zoned
for medium and higher densities are of a sufficient size as not to result in a significant
constraint to the development of affordable housing. Oftentimes, larger parcels require
lengthy environmental review and permit processing procedures that result in high costs
and time delay. Larger parcels typically require many acres of the property to be
encumbered by streets, parks and open spaces, and drainage basins. On the other
hand, smaller parcels are generally infill projects that can qualify as an exemption under
the California Environmental Quality Act and therefore exempt from environmental
review and also exempt from discretionary permit procedures. Smaller parcels generally


                                                 HOUSING - 76
have street frontages and access and improvements such as water, sewer, drainage,
and electric. Generally, smaller parcels do not require areas for parks or open space.
Therefore, smaller lots are generally less constrained and the entire lot area can be
utilized toward placement of multiple units.

The calculation of the dwelling unit potential on vacant land within each zone district that
allows residential uses (R-A, 10-R-1, 7-R-1, R-2, R-3, MU, and OTC) was based on
either the minimum parcel size or minimum land area required for each dwelling unit in
each of the respective zoning districts, the actual number of units in an approved or
pending project, or on an evaluation of existing conditions of similarly developed
properties. Each parcel was evaluated individually and in most cases, all three methods
were utilized to confirm the results of the calculations that were obtained using only one
of the methods. A search of the City’s land use database revealed that residential
development in Lompoc typically occurs at a density of 12.2 dwelling units per acre in
the R-2 district and 19.7 dwelling units per acre in the R-3 district. Residential
development in the MU district generally occurred at a density of 10 dwelling units per
acre but these residential uses/mixed uses were established in the 1920’s to the 1950’s,
some as early as 1890. If residential and mixed use developments were to occur today
in the MU district, the residential use has the potential to develop at a density of
approximately 21 dwelling units per acre.

Additionally, the calculation of the dwelling unit potential in the OTC zoning district was
based on an actual analysis of a commercial project under construction. The project
was hypothetically revised to include residential units. An analysis of the hypothetical
project is given in Section 5.1.2, Underdeveloped Residential Land. Coincidentally, the
dwelling unit potential on property zoned OTC was equivalent to the minimum land area
requirement per dwelling unit in the R-3 zoning district (2,000 square feet of land area
per unit).

As shown in Table 41, the City of Lompoc has ten vacant parcels zoned R-2 totaling
10.93 acres that could potentially accommodate between 67 and 158 new residential
units and 19 vacant parcels zoned R-3 totaling 8.15 acres that could potentially
accommodate between 118 and 177 new residential units. Additionally, the City has five
vacant parcels zoned MU totaling 1.24 acres that could potentially accommodate
between 17 and 27 new residential units and 13 vacant parcel zoned OTC totaling 2.48
acres that could potentially accommodate between 35 and 54 new residential units.




                                    HOUSING - 77
                                                  TABLE 41
                                  CITY OF LOMPOC ADEQUATE SITES INVENTORY
         POTENTIAL                                                                                INCOME CATEGORY
DWELLING                             LAND
         DWELLING       APN                       ZONE       PROJECT NAME                                            ABOVE
 UNITS                                USE                                              VERY LOW   LOW   MODERATE
           UNITS                                                                                                    MODERATE
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
                                                                                                                    54 REMAINING
   121                  various        LDR         7-R-1    LA PURISIMA HIGHLANDS         2        2       2
                                                                                                                       (OF 115)
                                  TOTAL                                                   2        2       2             54
APPROVED BY PLANNING COMMISSION
                       85-110-27       MDR         R-2 PD       WALNUT SQUARE
    39                                                                                    2        2       2             33
                         3.44 ac           (vacant)              E. Walnut Avenue
                     87-132-01,-04     HDR         R-3 PD             LHAC
    35                                                                                    35
                      1.85/0.35 ac         (vacant)            East College Avenue
                       91-022-17                                      LHAC
    4                                  HDR         R-3 PD                                 4
                         0.24 ac                                328-330 N K Street
                       85-150-47       HDR         R-3 PD         LAS CASITAS
    15                                                                                    1                1             13
                         0.96 ac           (vacant)               S. Third Street
                       87-132-05       HDR          R-3        PEDEGO/PORTMAN
    9                                                                                              9
                         0.54 ac           (vacant)          213 East College Avenue
                     91-021-11,-16     HDR         R-3 PD            DONATE
    8                                                                                              8
                      0.20/0.20 ac         (vacant)             310/314 N. L Street
                       91-071-05                                      LEWIS
    3                                  HDR          R-3                                                    3
                         0.24 ac                                  121 N. N Street
                     91-013-09 0.24
    1                                  HDR          R-3         322 N. M STREET                    1
                            ac
                     89-232-06 0.24
    2                                  HDR          R-3      413 & 415 N. J STREET                 2
                            ac
                     87-243-15 0.15
    1                                  MDR          R-3         401 N. F STREET                    1
                            ac
                     89-191-11 0.16
    3                                  HDR          R-3         522 N. L STREET                    3
                            ac
                     87-251-05 0.16
    2                                  MDR          R-3        423 N. E STREET                     2
                            ac
                     87-243-23 0.14
    1                                  MDR          R-3         426 N. G STREET                    1
                            ac
                       91-062-11       HDR          R-3
    3                                                           214 N. K STREET                    3
                         0.16 ac           (vacant)
                                   TOTAL                                                  42       32      6            46



                                                              HOUSING - 78
APPLICATION SUBMITTED/UNDER REVIEW
                       91-110-58        HDR             R-2       OCEANWOOD APTS
    8                                                                                                                         8
                        7.34 ac       (existing 134 unit apts)     101-217 S. U Street
                       93-111-18        LDR              7-R-1         BODGER
    85                                                                                      3                3                3                  76
                        28.51 ac              (vacant)              W. Olive Avenue
                       93-070-63        LDR              7-R-1    SEABREEZE SOUTH
   150                                                                                      5                5                5                 135
                        39.44 ac              (vacant)               Bailey Avenue
                       93-070-62      LI/Park         PM          SEABREEZE NORTH
   216                                                                                          Project requires zone change - count not included.
                        37.82 ac             (vacant)                Bailey Avenue
                                   TOTAL                                                    8                8               16                 211
VACANT PARCELS BY LAND USE/ZONE
           POTENTIAL                                                                                        INCOME CATEGORY
  ACRES    DWELLING      APN        LAND USE          ZONE        PROJECT NAME                                                              ABOVE
                                                                                         VERY LOW          LOW         MODERATE
             UNITS                                                                                                                         MODERATE
   29.75       65      83-60-17        VLDR               R-A     SE CORNER 1 & 246
   0.34        1       93-400-14        LDR              10-R-1      Avalon Street                                            1
   0.31        1       93-400-18        LDR              10-R-1      Avalon Street                                            1
   0.34        1       93-400-19        LDR              10-R-1      Avalon Street                                            1
   0.34        1       93-400-20        LDR              10-R-1      Avalon Street                                            1
   26.31       1       99-141-21        LDR              7-R-1         GREFCO               6                5               64                  88
   0.56        1       93-162-11        LDR              7-R-1        S. C Street                                                                1
   0.70        1       93-162-12        LDR              7-R-1        S. C Street                                                                1
   0.24        1       93-162-13        LDR              7-R-1        S. C Street                                                                1
   0.26        1       93-162-28        LDR              7-R-1        Cambridge                                                                  1
   0.35        1       85-271-08        LDR              7-R-1           Olive                                                                   1
   0.33        1       85-260-54        LDR              7-R-1          Hickory                                                                  1
   0.19        1       85-260-55        LDR              7-R-1          Hickory                                                                  1
   0.20        1       85-260-56        LDR              7-R-1          Hickory                                                                  1
   0.26        1       85-260-51        LDR              7-R-1     S. Seventh Street                                                             1
   0.22        1       85-260-52        LDR              7-R-1     S. Seventh Street                                                             1
   0.22        1       85-260-53        LDR              7-R-1     S. Seventh Street                                                             1
   0.74        1       85-260-07        LDR              7-R-1      Cypress Avenue                                                               1
   0.21        1       85-272-24        LDR              7-R-1        Sixth Street                                                               1
   0.25        1       85-273-05        LDR              7-R-1        Valley View                                                                1
   0.21        1       85-470-09        LDR              7-R-1       Clemens Way                                                                 1
   0.17        1       85-470-24        LDR              7-R-1       Clemens Way                                                                 1
   0.14        1       87-183-13        LDR              7-R-1        Sixth Street                                                               1




                                                                  HOUSING - 79
0.16   2    85-091-02   MDR   R-2      233 N. E Street           2
0.16   2    85-101-12   MDR   R-2      204 N. C Street           2
0.16   2    85-201-13   MDR   R-2       226 S. I Street          2
0.22   3    89-143-08   MDR   R-2    W. College Avenue           3
0.15   2    89-151-02   MDR   R-2    W. College Avenue           2
0.15   2    89-151-03   MDR   R-2    W. College Avenue           2
1.81   26   91-110-34   MDR   R-2   1212 W. Ocean Avenue     2   24
3.32   48   91-110-35   MDR   R-2   1300 W. Ocean Avenue     3   45
1.36   19   91-110-47   MDR   R-2   1038 W. Ocean Avenue     1   18
0.32   6    85-141-11   HDR   R-3        S. C Street             6
0.26   4    85-163-15   HDR   R-3      136 S. G Street           4
0.22   4    85-171-08   HDR   R-3      134 S. F Street           4
0.28   6    85-203-01   HDR   R-3   220 E. Cypress Avenue        6
0.16   3    87-122-18   HDR   R-3   1120 E. Airport Avenue       3
0.40   8    87-251-01   HDR   R-3    302 E. Maple Avenue         8
0.32   6    89-161-12   HDR   R-3      516 N. T Street           6
0.95   20   91-040-93   HDR   R-3   909 W. Ocean Avenue      1   19
0.26   5    91-061-08   HDR   R-3      211 N. K Street           5
0.16   3    91-072-16   HDR   R-3      118 N. N Street           3
0.40   8    91-073-15   HDR   R-3   521 W. Ocean Avenue          8
0.16   3    91-082-12   HDR   R-3      114 N. K Street           3
0.10   2    85-122-10   OTC   OTC     E. Ocean Avenue            2
0.46   10   85-122-22   OTC   OTC     E. Ocean Avenue        1   9
0.08   1    91-083-09   OTC   OTC     W. Ocean Avenue            1
0.32   7    91-082-10   OTC   OTC     W. Ocean Avenue            7
0.40   8    91-103-07   OTC   OTC         S. I Street            8
0.24   5    91-103-08   OTC   OTC         S. I Street            5
0.16   3    91-103-13   OTC   OTC         S. J Street            3
0.12   2    91-103-18   OTC   OTC         S. J Street            2
0.28   6    91-103-19   OTC   OTC         S. J Street            6
0.08   1    85-161-10   OTC   OTC        S. H Street             1
0.08   1    85-161-11   OTC   OTC        S. H Street             1
0.08   1    85-162-18   OTC   OTC        S. H Street             1
0.08   1    85-162-19   OTC   OTC        S. H Street             1
0.20   4    85-123-03   MU    C-2        N. F Street             4
0.32   7    85-131-13   MU    C-2        N. F Street             7



                                    HOUSING - 80
      0.08                 1            85-131-14           MU            C-2               N. F Street                                 1
      0.40                 8            85-021-14           MU            C-2            E. Laurel Avenue                               8
      0.24                 5            85-122-06           MU            C-2               N. G Street                                 5
                                                    TOTAL                                                               14             252               68                 105
The calculation for the potential dwelling unit capacity on vacant HDR and MDR sites is based on actual cases rather than simply dividing the parcel size by 2,000 square feet for each
dwelling unit; on vacant OTC and MU sites potential dwelling unit capacity is based on the hypothetical example cited in the General Plan under Section 5.1.2.1 of which the end result
is to divide the land area of each paracel by 2,000 square feet for each dwelling unit.




                                                                                                                                      INCOME CATEGORY
                                                                                                                                                                       ABOVE
                                                                                                                  VERY LOW            LOW         MODERATE
                                                                                                                                                                      MODERATE
2000 - 2007 REGIONAL HOUSING NEEDS PLAN                                                                                214             151              209              316

UNITS COMPLETED                                                                                                         41               5               14                 68

UNITS NEEDED                                                                                                           173             146              195                 248

UNITS UNDER CONSTRUCTION                                                                                                 2               2               2                  54

UNITS APPROVED BY THE PLANNING COMMISSION/CITY COUNCIL                                                                  42              32               6                  46

POTENTIAL UNITS ON APPLICATIONS SUBMITTED THAT ARE UNDER REVIEW                                                          8               8               16                 211

POTENTIAL UNITS ON VACANT LAND                                                                                          14             252               68                 105

POTENTIAL UNITS ON UNDERDEVELOPED LAND                                                                                 611             684              409                 54

                                              TOTAL                                                                    677             978              501                 470




                                                                                       HOUSING - 81
Recent projects approved in the City of Lompoc in the higher density zoning districts (R-
2 and R-3) have been approved at densities closer to the higher end of the density
range. Of three applications for projects in the R-2 zoning district (6.2 to 14.5 dwelling
units per acre) on parcels less than one acre processed during the last year, all three
were approved at densities of 12.5 or higher. Of eleven applications for projects in the
R-3 zoning district (14.5 to 21.8 dwelling units per acre) on parcels less than one acre
processed during the last two years, one project was approved at 21.8 dwelling units
per acre, two projects at 20 dwelling units per acre, one project at 18.9 dwelling units
per acre, two projects at 18.8 dwelling units per acre, two projects at 16.7 dwelling units
per acre, and one at 15.7 dwelling units per acre. Two of the eleven were approved at
12.5 dwelling units per acre. Variations in densities in the R-2 and R-3 zoning districts
can be attributed to the fluctuations in land costs over the years and not on any imposed
governmental constraints. In ideal situations, vacant parcels less than one acre in size
that are adjacent to one another offer a prime opportunity to maximize densities through
lot consolidation. An example of this situation is the Signorelli Apartment project which
was originally comprised of four small 7,000 square foot parcels. The project included a
lot consolidation combining the four parcels into one parcel totaling 28,000 square feet.
The project was approved at the maximum high density of 21.8 dwelling units per acre.

The following projects received administrative review but are examples of the multi-
family housing projects approved on parcels less than one acre in size located within
the medium density (R-2) zoning district, which permits a density range between 6.2
and 14.5 dwelling units per acre:

      426 N. G Street was approved at 14.3 dwelling units per acre and consists of
      the addition of one new dwelling unit on 0.14 acres (6,160 square feet). There
      is an existing single family residence on the property.

      401 N. F Street was approved at 12.5 dwelling units per acre and consists of
      the addition of one new dwelling unit on 0.16 acres (7,000 square feet). There
      is an existing single family residence on the property.

       423 N. E Street was approved at 12.5 dwelling units per acre and consists of
       a new duplex on 0.16 acres (7,000 square feet).

Examples of the multi-family housing projects approved on parcels less than one acre in
size located within the high density (R-3) zoning district, which permits a density range
between 14.5 and 21.8 dwelling units per acre, include the following:

      Signorelli Apartments was approved by the Planning Commission at the
      highest number of units in the high density range, 21.8 dwelling units per
      acre. This project includes a lot consolidation of four parcels, each parcel is
      0.16 acres (7,000 square feet) in size for a total of 0.64 acres of property
      (150,000 square feet). The project is a multi-family apartment complex
      consisting of 14 dwelling units and two-car garages.




                                   HOUSING - 82
      Donate Apartments (APNs 91-021-11, -16) was approved at 20 dwelling units
      per acre and consists of the development of eight new dwelling units on 0.40
      (17,500 square feet).

      Popma Townhomes (APN 87-251-01) was also approved at 20 dwelling units
      per acre and consists of the development of eight new dwelling units on 0.40
      acres (17,500 square feet). Although this project had City approval, it was
      never developed.

      Pedego/Portman Apartments was approved at 18.9 dwelling units per acre
      and consists of the development of ten new dwelling units on 0.53 acres
      (23,480 square feet). Although this project had City approval for ten units, the
      project owner reduced the number of dwelling units to nine.

      Lewis Condominiums was approved at 16.7 dwelling units per acre and
      consists of the development of three new dwelling units on 0.24 acres (10,500
      square feet). The site contains an existing single family dwelling. Thus, the
      total number of dwellings on the property once construction is completed will
      be four.

      Las Casitas was approved at 15.7 dwelling units per acre and consists of the
      development of fifteen new dwelling units on 0.95 acres (41,650 square feet).

The following projects received administrative review but are also examples of the multi-
family housing projects approved on parcels less than one acre in size located within
the high density (R-3) zoning district, which permits a density range between 14.5 and
21.8 dwelling units per acre:

      214 N. K Street was approved at 18.8 dwelling units per acre and consists of
      three new dwelling units on 0.16 acres (7,000 square feet).

      522 N. L Street was also approved at 18.8 dwelling units per acre and
      consists of three new dwelling units on 0.16 acres (7,000 square feet).

      328 N. K Street was approved at 16.7 dwelling units per acre and consists of
      four new dwelling units on 0.24 acres (10,500 square feet).

5.1.1.1   Financial and Regulatory Incentives for High Density Housing on Smaller
          Parcels

There are a number of financial and regulatory incentives the City of Lompoc provides
to encourage and facilitate development of high density housing on parcels less than
one acre in size including density bonuses, financial assistance, relaxed development
standards, and an administrative review process.




                                  HOUSING - 83
Density Bonus

Pursuant to state law, if a developer allocates at least 20 percent of new residential
units for lower-income households, 10 percent of the units for very low-income
households, or 50 percent of the units for senior citizens, the City will either grant a
density bonus of 25 percent, a density bonus of 25 percent with an additional incentive,
or grant incentives of equivalent financial value. Additional incentives include the
reduction of site development standards, modification of zoning code or architectural
design requirements, or any other regulatory concession or incentive which will result in
identifiable project cost avoidance or reduction. The minimum reservation period for
density bonus units is ten years. However, this may be extended to 30 or more years
depending on any incentive granted.

Financial Assistance

Through the California Housing Finance Agency (CHFA) and Home Investment
Partnership Act (HOME) programs, the City can provide funding for a range of
community development activities including new construction of housing for very low-
and low-income families. The Lompoc Redevelopment Agency (the “Agency”)
administers CHFA and HOME funds. The Agency will deposit approximately $1.47
million in the Low- and Moderate-Income Housing Fund over the next ten years for use
in providing low- and moderate-income housing.

In addition to the funds available in the Low- and Moderate-Income Housing Fund, the
Agency presently has a total of $1.75 million available for lower income housing
programs as a result of loans from the CHFA. The Low- and Moderate-Income Housing
Fund may be used in conjunction with the CHFA funds.

Currently, 44 new units are proposed using CHFA and HOME funds. These new units
consist of two projects, one of 35 units and a second of four units for very low-income
families, and five single family units for first-time homebuyers.

Planned Development District

The Lompoc City Code includes a Planned Development (PD) District that is intended to
allow the City Council and the Planning Commission to consider a certain amount of
flexibility from the strict adherence of the requirements and regulations contained in the
Zoning Ordinance, and other regulations of the City, in order to develop a quality project
for the benefit of the community. The PD District can be used in conjunction with the R-
A, R-1, R-2, R-3, and T zoning districts to encourage more creative and efficient
approaches to the use of the land. The PD District is typically used by developers of
smaller lots in residential zones in order to accommodate a higher number of units on
the lot. The PD District could allow a relaxation of the following requirements and
regulations. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list but is provided as a reference
to some of the more common requests for a relaxation of requirements and regulations.
A complete list is contained in the Lompoc City Code.



                                   HOUSING - 84
   °   The number of residential dwelling units per acre, which will not exceed the
       residential density limitations of the Land Use Element of the Lompoc General
       Plan or the residential density limitation, as established by the lot size
       requirement, of the present district classification.

   °   Percent of coverage of land by buildings and structures.

   °   Height and bulk limitations, arrangements and spacing of buildings and other
       improvements.

   °   Traffic control and arrangement, design, and dimensions of streets, alleys,
       pedestrian ways, parking and loading areas.

   °   Architectural design and color of buildings and structures.

Administrative Project Review

High density developments are permitted by right in the R-3 (High Density) residential
zones. Therefore, high density developments on smaller parcels require only an
administrative architectural review. With the exception of single family homes in R-1
Districts which are not part of a parcel map or subdivision map, applications for permits
for construction of any building or structure are required to be reviewed for consistency
with the architectural guidelines of the City. For developments on smaller lots, the City
Planner conducts the required review. (For a detailed discussion of the architectural
review process, refer to Section 6.1.1.4.)

In light of these incentives and recent approvals of developments of new and additional
units on smaller parcel sizes, the City believes that the ability to develop smaller parcel
sizes accommodating housing for low- and moderate-income households is feasible.

The effective date of the City’s mixed use designation is 1998. To date, the City has not
received any applications for new mixed use development on vacant land. However,
several property owners of existing residences in the mixed use areas have converted
portions of the residence to a commercial use while maintaining the remainder of the
structure as a residence. This trend allows the existing residential use to stay while also
benefiting from the commercial use of the property. In many instances the rent for the
residential use is affordable to very low- and low-income families. In addition, the City’s
land use database indicates that existing mixed use properties with residential uses
have a development density of 10 dwelling units per acre.

5.1.1.2   Summary of Estimated Dwelling Unit Capacity on Vacant Residential Land

Vacant properties located in the R-A, 10-R-1, and 7-R-1 zoning districts could
accommodate 686 new dwelling units. Vacant properties located in the R-2, R-3, MU,
and OTC zoning districts could accommodate between 237 and 416 new dwelling units
at densities potentially affordable to very low- and low-income households. The City’s


                                   HOUSING - 85
regional allocation for very low- and low-income households is 365 dwelling units.
Between the period of January 1, 2001 (date for beginning of period for documenting
units constructed for City’s Regional Housing Needs Determination) and 2002 (present
cut-off date for purposes of completing the Housing Element) the City has documented
the construction of 46 units affordable to very low- and low-income households. After
subtracting the units constructed to date (46) from the City’s regional allocation for very
low- and low-income households (365), the remaining need is 319 units. As noted
above, the City can accommodate between 237 and 416 new dwelling units at densities
potentially affordable to very low- and low-income households.

5.1.1.3   Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial Description of Allowed Uses

Allowed uses for Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial land use designations are
included in Tables 42 and 43. In summary, they include single or multiple residential
uses when combined with permitted commercial uses. In order to encourage more
intense developments, single family and two family dwellings by themselves are
prohibited on the OTC zoning district.

5.1.1.4   Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial Development Standards

Development standards for Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial land use
designations are included in Table 48. In summary, they include the following:

Mixed Use, Central Business District:

   ·   14.5 to 21.8 dwelling units per acre;
   ·   minimum of 33% of the floor area;
   ·   maximum height 50 feet or 4 stories;
   ·   7,000 square foot minimum lot area;
   ·   60 foot minimum lot width;
   ·   no requirement for maximum lot coverage, lot depth, minimum front or rear yard
       setback, or landscaped/open area;
   ·   no requirement for side yard setback unless the lot or parcel of land in the
       Central Business District has a side lot line adjoining property in a residential
       zone. If the lot or parcel of land in the Central Business District has a side lot line
       adjoining property in a residential zone the side yard of the Central Business
       District parcel is required to have a side yard setback of a minimum of 10 feet;
       and,
   ·   residential uses must provide on-site parking for the residential use in
       accordance with the residential parking standards included in Table 49 for multi-
       family dwellings.




                                    HOUSING - 86
                                                      TABLE 42
                                LIST OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONALLY PERMITTED USES
                                IN THE MIXED USE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION
                                          CENTRAL BUSINESS ZONING DISTRICT
Mixed Use General Plan Land Use/Central Business District Zoning District
  Land Use Designation Description:
    Purpose: To provide areas for a mixture of pedestrian-oriented uses (e.g. commercial, residential, civic, cultural, and recreational) where each activity
    adds to the whole to produce a town center that is economically vibrant and socially inviting.
    Description: Areas which provide a harmonious intermingling of pedestrian-oriented uses to meet the shopping, business, housing, and entertainment
    needs of City and regional residents accessed by streets, bicycles, and pedestrian ways in conjunction with shared single-level and multi-level parking
    areas. Appropriate uses include retail shops; business services; residential units; medical offices; and public and quasi-public uses of a recreational,
    educational, or religious type.

  Permitted Uses:                                                                    Conditionally Permitted Uses:
    Auditoriums, auto parts and accessories (retail sales), auto sales                  Amusement arcades, automobile service stations, bus terminals, taxi
    (new & used), cocktail lounges and beer bars, boat sales,                           terminals, machine shops limited to repair and modification, in
    commercial schools (secretarial, business, dance, beauty),                          conjunction with a retail auto part sales operation, provided that such
    community centers, department stores, draperies and yardage                         use shall be clearly subordinate and accessory to the auto part sales
    stores, electronic parts and supplies (retail sales), furrier shops,                use (generally, a maximum of 15% of the total floor area of the
    furniture stores (including rugs and appliance sales), hotels, jewelry              business) subject to adjustments for specific proposals through review
    stores, lodges and clubs, locksmith shops, millinery shops,                         by the Planning Commission during the Conditional Use Permit
    mortuaries, motels, music schools, newspaper printing                               process, caretakers residences and churches
    establishments, paint and wallpaper stores, commercial parking lots,
    pet shops, photographic studios, pottery shops, print shops and other
    reproduction services, professional offices, public utility offices,
    restaurants (whether or not including the sale and consumption of
    alcoholic beverages on the premises), shoe stores (retail sales),
    smoke shops, sporting goods stores, stationary and office supplies
    stores, tailor shops, theaters (walk-in), trailer, camper and mobile
    home sales, variety stores




                                                                          HOUSING -87
                                                                         TABLE 43
                                LIST OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONALLY PERMITTED USES
                                    IN THE OLD TOWN COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT
Old Town Commercial Zoning District
  Permitted Uses:                                                                   Conditionally Permitted Uses:
     Eating and Drinking Establishments                                               Communications and Transportation
      Alcohol service in conjunction with restaurant; Bakery - less than                Parking Structures; Transit Centers and Stations
      5,000 square feet; Coffeehouse; Delicatessen/Sandwich Shops;
                                                                                      Eating and Drinking Establishments
      Ice Cream/Yogurt Shops; Restaurants - Without Drive-Throughs
                                                                                        Night Clubs/Bars/Lounges; Microbreweries; Wine Tasting; Sidewalk
                                                                                        Cafes
    Recreation, Community Services, Education                                         Recreation, Community Services, Education
      Court Facilities; Dance, Gymnastics, Martial Arts Studios;                        Arcades, limited to five (5) games/machines when located as an
      Educational Institutions; Health/Athletic Clubs; Live or Movie                    auxiliary use in an otherwise permitted use; Billiard parlors; Child
      Theater; Parks/Playgrounds/Community Gardens; Public/Quasi-                       care; Community Service Facilities, Clubs, Lodges, Meeting Halls
      Public Uses; Public Safety Facilities

    Retail Commercial                                                                 Cultural Facilities
      Art Galleries and Studios; Auto Parts Sales, with any repair and                  Schools - Business/Trade Schools
      installation incidental and fully enclosed within a building - less
                                                                                      Retail Commercial
      than 5,000 square feet; Flower/Gift Shops; Clothing; Handicraft-
                                                                                        Building Material Sales, indoor; Convenience stores; Grocery
      Type Industries (furniture, saddles, sculptures, stained glass, etc. -
                                                                                        Stores; Liquor Stores; Pet Stores; Sidewalk Vendors; Thrift Stores,
      less than 5,000 square feet); Hardware store, less than 5,000
                                                                                        Antique Shops, Used Merchandise (No Pawn Shops)
      square feet; Office Supplies/Equipment; Retail Stores, general
      merchandise; Specialty Food Sales; Furniture Stores; Motorcycle
      Sales, with any repair and installation incidental and fully enclosed
                                                                                      Residential
      within a building
                                                                                        Multiple-Family Dwellings - No more than 4 dwelling units

    Service Uses                                                                      Service Uses
      Banks, Credit Unions, and Financial Institutions without drive-                   Bed and Breakfast Inns; Computer manufacturer and repair; Hotels
      throughs; Offices, Governmental; Offices, Professional (restricted                and Motels; Internet Provider
      from ground floor on Ocean Avenue and "H" Street; Personal
      Services (I.e. barber, beauty, and nail shops; tailor shops, dry
      cleaners/Laundromat, travel agency

    Residential Uses
      Mixed Use Developments, including residential and
      office/retail/service components within the same structure.
      Residential must be located above the first floor and shall be built
      with a 2.00 FAR with a minimum of 25% of floor area for
      residential.




                                                                             HOUSING - 88
Old Town Commercial

   ·   14.5 to 21.8 dwelling units per acre;
   ·   2.0 maximum floor area ratio;
   ·   25% maximum floor area for residential use;
   ·   minimum height 20 feet; Maximum height 45 feet or 3 stories;
   ·   5,000 square foot minimum lot area;
   ·   25 foot minimum lot width;
   ·   no requirement for lot depth, minimum front or side yard setback, or
       landscaped/open area;
   ·   10 foot minimum side yard setback; and,
   ·   no parking requirement for commercial uses or existing residential developments;
       developments which include new housing units must provide on-site parking for
       the residential use in accordance with the residential parking standards included
       in Table 49 for multi-family dwellings.

5.1.1.5   Financial and Regulatory Incentives on Mixed Use Parcels

The types of financial and regulatory incentives the City of Lompoc provides to facilitate
and encourage development of mixed use, residential units include financial assistance
and relaxed development standards. These incentives are the same as described for
the development of high density housing on parcels less than one acre in size. Since
mixed use, residential units would generally be located in areas with parcels or lots
fronting on Ocean Avenue and “H” Street north of Cypress Avenue, the developments
would require architectural review and this review would be performed by the Planning
Commission. (For a detailed discussion of the architectural review process, refer to
Section 6.1.1.4.) However, as noted in Section 6.1.1.4, projects acted upon by the
Planning Commission are required by ordinance to be approved, conditionally
approved, or disapproved within 30 working days of the date of receipt of a complete
application and after consideration by the Planning Commission during a regularly
scheduled meeting.

5.1.2 Underdeveloped Residential Land

Underdeveloped sites or sites having the potential for redevelopment were identified
utilizing the City’s computerized mapping system. Underdeveloped residential parcels
were identified which would accommodate an additional 1,654 to 1,894 housing units at
allowable densities (see Table 44). This represents approximately 117 to 148 percent
over the City’s remaining 2001 to 2008 fair share allocation (890 units allocated – 128
units produced = 762 units). The underdeveloped acreage is located throughout the City
on 762 parcels. In deriving the additional dwelling unit capacity, each identified parcel
was reviewed as to its lot size, existing number of dwelling units, and its potential
capacity. Properties identified as “built-out” were not included in the parcel acreage or in
the count toward additional dwelling unit capacity.




                                    HOUSING - 89
                                          Table 44
               2003 Housing Unit Potential – Underdeveloped Residential Land
General Plan                                                     Current     Additional
                                    Density           Parcel
Land Use            Zoning                                      Number of   Dwelling Unit
                                   (DU/Acre)         Acreage
Designation                                                       Units      Capacity27
    VLDR               R-A             2.2             8.15         2             15
     LDR             10-R-1              4              3.73        13             1
     LDR              7-R-1            6.2           1,157.11     6,144           21
    MDR                R-2          6.2 - 14.5        195.64      2,232          339
    MDR                 T                7             68.99       687            0
    HDR                R-3         14.5 – 21.8        228.44      4,030          878
                       C-2
                                   14.5 – 21.8                                 119 - 215
                 All Residential
     MU                C-2                            13.20        72
                 Commercial &        Varies                                     Varies
                  Residential
    OTC               OTC          14.5 – 21.8        19.68         4          281 - 425
    Total                                            1,694.94    13,184     1,654 – 1,894

The Mixed Use (MU) and Old Town Commercial (OTC) land use designations allow
residential uses to be developed with commercial, service, and office uses on the same
parcel. Generally, the intent of this mixed-use land use is to allow housing units on the
second or third story of a commercial storefront. To that end, commercial developments
with housing above the first floor would typically be the most feasible way to develop
needed housing while maintaining the economic vitality of the commercial area. In the
Mixed Use land use areas, residential uses may occupy the property as the sole use or
may occupy the property as a secondary use to the main commercial use. There are
presently 76 dwelling units in the MU and OTC land use areas. These 76 dwelling units
are a mixture of single family dwellings, single or multiple units with commercial uses, or
solely multiple units. The current Old Town Commercial zoning district prohibits single
family and two family dwelling units in order to encourage multi-family dwelling units.

The City has approximately 160 underdeveloped mixed use property in the MU and
OTC land use designated areas. A description of existing uses on mixed use and Old
Town Commercial (OTC) parcels is shown in Appendices B and C. The parcels are all
located within the boundaries of the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency. A search of
Building Division records indicates that more than half of the structures in the mixed use
area are 72 years to 113 years of age; 77 percent are 50 years and older. This same
data search of parcels in the OTC District indicates that half of the structures are 50 to
113 hears old; all structures are at least 27 years or older. Although the City has no
comprehensive plan to redevelop the mixed use or the OTC areas, the potential to do
so exists. In light of the fact that the mixed use and OTC parcels are in the Lompoc
Redevelopment Agency area, a developer could utilize outside funding sources as an
incentive towards redevelopment of these areas.




                                      HOUSING - 90
The following projects are examples of multi-family housing projects approved on
parcels less than one acre in size located within the medium density (R-2) zoning
district, which permits a density range between 6.2 and 14.5 dwelling units per acre and
the high density (R-3) zoning district, which permits a density range between 14.5 and
21.8 dwelling units per acre:

      426 N. G Street (R-2) was approved at 14.3 dwelling units per acre and
      consists of the addition of one new dwelling unit on 0.14 acres (6,160 square
      feet). There is an existing single family residence on the property.

      401 N. F Street (R-2) was approved at 12.5 dwelling units per acre and
      consists of the addition of one new dwelling unit on 0.16 acres (7,000 square
      feet). There is an existing single family residence on the property.

      Lewis Condominiums (R-3) was approved at 16.7 dwelling units per acre and
      consists of the development of three new dwelling units on 0.24 acres (10,500
      square feet). The site contains an existing single family dwelling. Thus, the
      total number of dwellings on the property once construction is completed will
      be four.

5.1.2.1   Inventory of MDR, HDR, MU and OTC Underdeveloped Parcels

Currently, the City has approximately 300 underdeveloped medium density residential
parcels and 277 underdeveloped high density residential parcels within its boundaries
(Tables 45 and 46). Most of the underdeveloped medium and high density residential
parcels are also located within the boundaries of the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency.

As shown in Tables 45 and 46 and Appendices B and C, the supply of
underdeveloped MDR, HDR, MU, and OTC parcels has a dwelling unit potential of
between 1,654 and 1,894 unit. As noted in the discussion under vacant land resources,
a search of the City’s land use database revealed that residential development in
Lompoc typically occurs at a density of 12.2 dwelling units per acre in the medium
density district and 19.7 dwelling units per acre in the high density district. Residential
development in the MU district generally occurred at a density of 10 dwelling units per
acre.




                                   HOUSING - 91
                                                                 Table 45
                                          Underdeveloped Residential Parcels
                                        Medium Density Residential (MDR/R-2)
Parcel Size           Potential 1 unit             2 unit          3 unit          4 unit          5 unit           6 unit          Total
(square feet)          Units deficit               deficit         deficit         deficit         deficit          deficit         Units
6000 - 8,999                2           266                                                                                           266
9,000 - 11,999              3           10       9 (18 units)                                                                          28
12,000 - 14,999             4            1       2 (4 units)      3 (9 units)                                                          14
15,000 - 17,999             5            3             0          2 (6 units)     1 (4 units)                                          13
18,000 - 20,999             6            0             0               0               0          1 (5 units)                           5
21,000 - 23,999             7            0             0         1 (3 units)           0               0               0                3
> 24,000                                                                                                                               10
              Total                                                                                                                   339
The number of deficit units is based on Medium Density Residential (R-2) requirement of a minimum land area of 3,000 square feet for each
dwelling unit.




                                                           HOUSING - 92
                                                                                            Table 46
                                                                               Underdeveloped Residential Parcels
                                                                               High Density Residential (HDR/R-3)
Parcel Size             Potential        1 unit        2 unit         3 unit        4 unit        5 unit        6 unit        7 unit        8 unit    9 unit      10 unit   11 unit   12 unit   Total
(square feet)            Units           deficit       deficit        deficit       deficit       deficit       deficit       deficit       deficit   deficit     deficit   deficit   deficit   Units
4,000 - 5,999                 2             51                                                                                                                                                   51
                                                          68
6,000 - 7,999                 3             53                                                                                                                                                  188
                                                      (135 units)
                                                           7             11
8,000 - 9,999                 4              3                                                                                                                                                   50
                                                       (14 units)    (33 units)
                                                           9             10            21
10,000 - 11,999               5              8                                                                                                                                                  140
                                                       (18 units)    (30 units)     (84 units)
                                                                                                      2
12,000 - 13,999               6              0             0              0             0                                                                                                        10
                                                                                                  (10 units)
                                                           2              2             2             2             4
14,000 - 15,999               7              3                                                                                                                                                   55
                                                       (4 units)      (6 units)     (8 units)    (10 units)    (24 units)
                                                                                        1                           1             4
16,000 - 17,999               8              0             0              0                           0                                                                                          38
                                                                                    (4 units)                   (6 units)     (28 units)
                                                                                        1
18,000 - 19,999               9              0             0              0                           0             0             0             0                                                4
                                                                                    (4 units)
                                                                                        1                                                                1
20,000 - 21,999              10              0             0              0                           0             0             0             0                                                13
                                                                                    (4 units)                                                         (9 units)

22,000 - 23,999              11              0             0              0             0             0             0             0             0        0          0                            0

24,000 - 25,999              12              0             0              0             0             0             0             0             0        0          0         0                  0
> 26,000                                                                                                                                                                                        329
                Total                                                                                                                                                                           878
The number of deficit units is based on High Density Residential (R-3) requirement of a minimum of 2,000 of land area for each dwelling unit.




                                                                                                    HOUSING - 93
The inventory of underdeveloped land by parcel size in the Mixed Use and Old Town
Commercial land use areas indicates there are 68 underdeveloped parcels in Lompoc in
the Mixed Use area and 92 underdeveloped parcels in the Old Town Commercial area.
Generally, the parcels in the Mixed Use and Old Town Commercial areas are less than
one acre in size (Appendices B and C). However, using the methodology described
above for calculating the dwelling unit potential on vacant land within the R-A, 10-R-1,
7-R-1, R-2, R-3, MU, and OTC, the City estimated that the development potential for
residential units in the MU and OTC areas was equivalent to one dwelling unit for each
2,000 square feet of land area on the property. This is confirmed by the following
example:

      Given:   5,000 square foot parcel in OTC zone
               Parcel size is 50 feet by 100 feet
               Mixed Use Development

      Development Standards:
             No requirement for front or side yard setback
             Rear yard setback is 10 feet
             FAR 2.0
             Maximum height is 3 stories
             25% for residential use

      For a 5,000 square foot parcel with a FAR of 2.0, the maximum building area is 10,000
      square feet. A three story height restriction would allow approximately 3,300 square feet for
      each of the three stories, however, the residential use is restricted to 25% of the floor area.
      This would allow 2,500 square feet for the residential use with the remainder 7,500 square
      feet for the first and second story. Thus, the first and second story would each be 3,750
      square feet in area and the third story, the residential use, would be 2,500 square feet. The
      parcel size is large enough to accommodate the square footage while maintaining the
      required rear yard setback, floor area ratio, and height. A building of this size would
      actually allow a 25 foot rear setback.

      Residential use: 2,500 square feet of which an assumed 800 square feet would be
      assigned to covered parking. Required parking for the residential use is based on the
      number of bedrooms. A four bedroom unit requires two covered spaces per unit
      approximately 18 feet by 20 feet or 360 square feet. Approximately 800 square feet of
      covered parking is more than sufficient to meet the parking requirement for the residential
      use. Thus, the living area of the residential use is approximately 1,700 square feet. This
      square footage is adequate enough to accommodate two residential units each of which
      would be approximately 850 square feet.

      In conclusion, this example illustrates that a 5,000 square foot parcel can accommodate
      two residential units, each unit approximately 850 square feet in area, which is sufficient in
      size for a studio or a one or two bedroom unit. Additionally, this example substantiates that
      a conservative estimate for calculating the number of potential units that could be
      accommodated on parcels zoned OTC is roughly equivalent to a minimum of 2,000 square
      feet of land area per residential unit.

In addition to the example above, other factors that support the conclusion that a
conservative estimate for calculating the number of potential units that could be
accommodated on parcels zoned OTC and MU is roughly equivalent to a minimum of
2,000 square feet of land area per residential unit include the following:



                                         HOUSING - 94
  °   All but two of the OTC parcels have alley access with 20 and 25 foot wide alleys
      and could easily accommodate parking for the residential uses in the rear of the
      parcel. One of the two parcels is a corner lot with two street frontages and the
      remaining lot is an interior lot accessed only from the street frontage.

  °   All but five of the MU parcels have alley access with 20 foot wide alleys; the five
      are corner lots with two street frontages. All parcels could accommodate parking
      for the residential uses in the rear of the parcel.

  °   Many of the existing buildings are two stories and could accommodate multiple
      residential units depending on the size of the building.

Underdeveloped or redevelopment properties located in the MU and OTC land use
areas could accommodate up to an additional 640 new dwelling units at unit sizes
potentially affordable to very low- and low-income households. Together with
underdeveloped properties in the R-A, 10-R-1, 7-R-1, R-2, and R-3 zoning districts, the
City estimates the underdeveloped and/or redevelopment properties could
accommodate up to an additional 1,894 new dwelling units.

There are no significant environmental or infrastructure constraints on any of the
underdeveloped land shown in Tables 45 and 46 and Appendices B and C that would
prevent these sites from being developed for residential use. Water, sewer, and other
necessary public facilities and services are either available, or can be readily expanded,
to serve these underdeveloped sites. The City has developed in a fairly compact form
with the underdeveloped residential, Old Town Commercial, and Mixed Use commercial
areas identified in Tables 45 and 46 and Appendices B and C in the central portions
of the City. New or redeveloped properties would be largely infill. Environmental
concerns, such as endangered species or wetlands, do not affect the underdeveloped
properties within the City’s boundaries as these properties already have existing
development. Therefore, underdeveloped properties would not be constrained by
environmental factors.

Development proposals affecting any vacant or underdeveloped sites are included in
Table 41 under either “Units Approved By The Planning Commission/City Council” or
“Application Submitted/Under Review.”

The 923 to 1,102 potential dwelling units from vacant developable land and the
additional 1,654 to 1,894 potential dwelling units that could be built on existing
underdeveloped parcels exceeds the City’s remaining fair share allocation of 762 units
by 1,815 to 2,234 units. (2,577/2,996 – 762).

5.2   Availability of Public Services

The availability of necessary public services such as water, sewer, electrical, and solid
waste disposal to accommodate the additional housing units within the City are fully
discussed within the Public Facilities and Services Element of the General Plan.


                                   HOUSING - 95
General Plan build-out is anticipated for the year 2015. Information within this element
and the General Plan indicates that adequate public service capability exists to
accommodate the housing units planned for within the Housing Element.

6.0    HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CONSTRAINTS

Housing development constraints take many forms. They can be institutional, financial,
or environmental and may be necessary to protect public health and safety or enhance
the quality of life within a community. However, unnecessary constraints may
discourage the development or conservation of needed housing and result in
detrimental social consequences including:        dilapidated housing, household
overpayment, overcrowding, and homelessness.

6.1    Governmental Constraints

While governmental regulation is necessary to protect the quality of development in a
community, it increases the cost of development and thus the cost of housing. Existing
governmental constraints include: land use controls, building codes and enforcement,
on/off site improvements, fees and exactions, permit processing procedures, and State
and Federal requirements.

Land use controls limit the type and density of development, thus increasing the cost
per housing unit. Building Code standards may require more expensive construction
methods and materials. On-site and off-site improvements, like undergrounding of
utilities, road widenings, installation of traffic signals, or sewer line extensions increase
a project’s cost. Fees and exactions contribute directly to the increase in costs.
Processing and permit requirements delay construction, increasing financing costs and
other overhead costs associated with housing development. The following describes
governmental constraints which may affect the cost of housing in Lompoc.

6.1.1 Land Use Controls

The City of Lompoc currently has no growth control ordinance designed to limit
residential development. The City’s General Plan and Zoning Ordinance provide for a
range of housing types and density allowances. The General Plan has the following six
land use designations and permitted densities that allow residential uses: Very Low,
Low, Medium, and High Density residential, as well as Mixed-Use and Old Town
Commercial. The Mixed-Use land use designation allows for residential development as
a primary or secondary use on a proportion of the total floor area, at High Density
residential range. The Old Town Commercial land use designation allows for residential
development as a secondary use at High Density residential range. The density ranges
and average population density according to each of these designations are shown in
Table 47.




                                    HOUSING - 96
                                         TABLE 47
                             RESIDENTIAL LAND USE CATEGORIES
                                    Density          Average
Designation                          Range          Population                   Description
                                                             1
                                   (DU/Acre)         Density
                                                                 Semi-rural large-lot detached single family
Very Low Density (VLD)                2.2               6        homes on prominent bluffs, steep hillsides,
                                                                 or adjacent to farmland.
Low Density (LD)                      6.2              18        Single family dwellings and mobilehomes.
                                                                 Mixture of unit types such as townhouses,
Medium Density (MD)                6.2 – 14.5          42        duplexes, triplexes, four-plexes, low-rise
                                                                 apartments, and mobilehomes.
                                                                 Single-story and multi-story apartment
High Density (HD)                 14.5 – 21.8          63
                                                                 buildings.
Mixed-Use (MU)
                                                                 Mixture of pedestrian-oriented uses,
· Residential                     14.5 – 21.8          63        including commercial, residential, civic,
                                                                 cultural, and recreational uses, combined
· Mixed-Use Commercial &           Footnote 2        Varies      to produce a town center that is
Residential                                                      economically vibrant and socially inviting.
                                                3                Residential uses in conjunction with on-site
Old Town Commercial (OTC)         14.5 – 21.8          63
                                                                 pedestrian-oriented commercial uses.
1
    Average population density indicates the expected number of persons per net acre living within
residential areas. It is calculated by multiplying the maximum allowable dwelling units per net acre by the
average citywide household size (2.88 according to the 2000 Census).
2
    Allowable building density for commercial is 1.00 FAR with a minimum of 33% of floor area for
residential use.
3
   Mixed Use Developments: Allowable building density is 1.00 FAR with a minimum of 33% of floor area
for residential use; Residential Developments: Allowable building density is 2.00 FAR.

The City of Lompoc Zoning Ordinance contains seven zones that permit residential
uses. The Zoning Ordinance regulates such features as lot coverage, building height, lot
area, lot dimensions, setbacks, and        landscaped open space requirements.
Development standards for the eight zones are provided in Table 48 on the following
page.




                                         HOUSING - 97
                                                                                 TABLE 48
                                                                   RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS
                                                                                             Minimum Lot
                                                  Lot                        Minimum                                                   Minimum Setback1                                 Landscaped
  District     District Name DUs Per Lot                       Height                         Dimensions
                                                Coverage                     Lot Area                                                                                                    Open Area
                                                                                            Width     Depth               Front                    Side                 Rear
                                                                                                                                             10% lot width;
                Residential                                                                                                                 min 5 ft, max 10
    R-A                             One             nr           35 ft       20000 sf        100 ft       nr               20 ft                                        15 ft                nr
                Agriculture                                                                                                                  ft; 10 ft corner
                                                                                                                                                   side
    R-1
                                                                                              65 ft                                                               20 ft; may be 5 ft
                                                                                          interior lot;           varies progressively      9 ft one side, 5 ft   with min 1,000 sf
   7-R-1                            One            40%           30 ft       7000 sf                      nr
               Single Family                                                                  70 ft              from 15 ft to 25 ft with   other, total 15 ft;   open area to rear
                                                                                           corner lot                                                                                        nr
                                                                                                                 min 3 ft variations; 30    10 ft corner side      of main building
                                                                                                                         ft max              adjacent street       or in any "L" or
  10-R-1                            One            40%           30 ft       10000 sf        75 ft        nr                                                          "U" design

                                                                                              60 ft                                          5 ft both sides
                            One for each
                                                                                          interior lot;                                     interior lot; 10 ft                        300 sf for each
    R-2        Mdium Density 3,000 sf of           50%           30 ft       6000 sf                      nr               15 ft                                        10 ft
                                                                                              70 ft                                            corner side                                   du
                             land area
                                                                                           corner lot                                        adjacent street

                                                                                                                                             5 ft both sides
                            One for each
                                                                                                                                            interior lot; 10 ft                        250 sf for each
    R-3        High Density  2,000 sf of           60%           35 ft       7000 sf         75 ft        nr               15 ft                                        10 ft
                                                                                                                                               corner side                                   du
                             land area
                                                                                                                                             adjacent street

                Residential        Seven                                                                         Mobilehome space 5 ft to park's exterior property lines; 20
                                                                                                                                                                                Refer to footnote
     T         Mobile Home       spaces for         nr            nr        Park: 10 ac        nr         nr     ft. to exterior property line abutting street. Mobilehome 5 ft
                                                                                                                                                                                        2
                  Park           each acre                                                                                           to space boundary line.

                                14.5 - 21.8,
C-2 refer to      Central                                      50 ft/ 4                                                                       10 ft (refer to       10 ft (refer to
                                min. 33% of         nr                        7,000          60 ft        nr                nr                                                               nr
 footnote 3      Business                                      stories                                                                         footnote 4)           footnote 5)
                                 floor area
                                                              20 ft. min;
                                                 2.0 FAR
                 Old Town                                      45 ft/3
    OTC                          14.5 - 21.8    max 25%                       5,000          25 ft        nr                nr                      nr                  10 ft                nr
                Commercial                                     stories
                                               for resi use
                                                                 max
(1) Standard setbacks unless bordering a thoroughfare, major or collector street.
 (2) Mobilehome Parks. Family parks: 300 sf for each space up to 100 spaces and 200 sf for each space over 100. Adult parks: 200 sf for each mobilehome space. Travel trailer parks and
recreation vehicle parks. 100 sf for each travel trailer or recreation vehicle space.
 (3) C-2 zoning district with a land use designation of MU (Mixed Use).
 (4) No requirement unless the lot or parcel of land in the C-2 zone has a side lot line adjoining property in a residential zone then the side yard of the C-2 zoned property adjoining the
residential lot shall have a side yard of not less than 10 feet.
 (5) No requirement unless the lot or parcel of land in the C-2 zone has a rear lot line adjoining property in a residential zone then the rear yard of the C-2 zoned property adjoining the
residential lot shall have a rear yard of not less than 10 feet.
nr = no requirement


                                                                                          HOUSING - 98
The minimum lot size for new single-family homes in the 10-R-1 zone is 10,000 square
feet, 7-R-1 is 7,000 square feet, R-2 is 6,000 square feet, R-3 is 7,000 square feet, C-2
is 7,000 square feet, and OTC 5,000 square feet. The Residential Agriculture (R-A)
zone is a designation generally used for large-lot detached single family homes on
prominent bluffs, steep hillsides, or adjacent to farmland. Appropriate uses include light
agricultural activities, agricultural workers’ living quarters, and single family detached
dwellings. The R-A zone has a minimum lot size of 20,000 square feet. There is one
vacant parcel zoned R-A that is 29.75 acres in size. The T zone is a designation for
mobile home parks and requires a minimum of 10 acres.

The Medium Density Residential (R-2) zone requires a minimum land area of 3,000
square feet per unit and the High Density Residential (R-3) zone requires a minimum
land area of 2,000 square feet per unit.

The maximum densities permitted by the General Plan for the Very Low Density
Residential (R-A) is 2.2 dwelling units per acre, Low Density Residential (R-1) is 6.2
dwelling units per acre, Medium Density Residential (R-2) ranges from a minimum of
6.2 to a maximum of 14.5 dwelling units per acre, High Density Residential (R-3) ranges
from a minimum of 14.5 to a maximum of 21.8 dwelling units per acre. The Mixed
Use/Central Business (MU/C-2) and Old Town Commercial (OTC) allow a minimum
density of 14.5 dwelling units per acre to a maximum of 21.8 dwelling units per acre.

With the exception of the R-A, T, and OTC zones, minimum lot widths range from 60 to
75 feet. The R-A zone requires a minimum lot width of 100 feet and the OTC zone 25
feet. There is no minimum lot width for the T zone. In addition, there are no minimum lot
depths for any of the zones allowing residential uses.

Yard and setback requirements are not excessive and range from 5 feet to 20 feet.
Front setbacks in single family zones allows a progressive setback from 15 to 25 feet.
The MU/C-2 zone has no front yard setback and a 10 foot side and rear setback only if
the MU/C-2 parcel has a side or rear lot line adjoining residential property. The OTC
zone has no front or side yard setback, but has a 10 foot rear yard setback. Height limits
in residential zones (R-A, R-1, R-2, and R-3) allow two and three stories (maximum of
30 and 35 feet). Height limits in the MU/C-2 and OTC zones are four stories or 50 feet
and three stories or 45 feet, respectively.

With the exception of the R-A zone having no requirement, maximum lot coverage
ranges from 40 to 60 percent for residential zones (R-1, R-2, and R-3) which is more
than sufficient to accommodate the maximum densities permitted under the General
Plan. The MU/C-2 zone has no lot coverage restriction. The OTC has a 2.0 floor area
ratio (FAR) of which a maximum of 25 percent may be residential use.

Landscaped open area requires 300 square feet for each dwelling unit in the R-2 zone
and 250 square feet for each dwelling unit in the R-3 zone. There is no landscaped
open area requirement in the R-A, R-1, MU/C-2, or OTC zones.




                                   HOUSING - 99
The City’s residential parking requirements are summarized in Table 49.

                                         TABLE 49
                              RESIDENTIAL PARKING STANDARDS
Unit Type                                          Required Parking Spaces
Single Family Dwelling                             2 spaces within a garage or carport,
                                                      or any combination thereof

Duplexes and Multi-Family Dwellings
     Studio, Bachelor, or 1 Bedroom units          1.5 spaces per unit, 1 covered space/unit
     2 Bedroom units                               1.75 spaces per unit, 1 covered space/unit
     3 Bedroom units                               2 spaces per unit, 1 covered space/unit
     4 Bedroom units                               2 covered spaces per unit

Condominiums                                       2 spaces per unit within a garage or carport

Elderly and Handicapped
     Single Family Dwelling                        1 space within a garage or carport

     Duplexes and Multi-Family Dwellings
     Studio, Bachelor, or 1 Bedroom units          0.6 spaces per unit
     2 Bedroom units                               1 space per unit

Old Town Commercial
     Existing Residential Developments             No requirement
     New Residential Developments                  As specified above for dwelling unit type


Parking requirements in the City of Lompoc are normal for a city of its size: two spaces
per unit for single family dwellings, and one and one-half to two spaces for multi-family
dwellings depending on unit types and other project characteristics.

6.1.1.1     Planned Development

The Planned Development (PD) District (Lompoc City Code, Article 5, Sections 7700 –
7708) is intended to provide for the orderly development of land in conformance with the
Elements of the General Plan of the City but permitting a flexible design approach to the
development of a total community environment equal to or better than that resulting
from traditional lot-by-lot land use development.

Various land uses may be combined in a PD District including residential, commercial,
and light industrial parks, or any other use or combination of uses which can be made
appropriately a part of a planned development.




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With respect to residential development, PD Districts encourage residential
development at the upper end of the allowed density range within the applicable districts
by allowing developers to vary from the strict application of the development standards
of the base zoning districts. The flexibility provides for, and can promote the cluster
housing, zero lot lines, townhomes, and similar housing types that can be more difficult
to develop with typical setbacks, lot coverage, and parking.

6.1.1.2   Permitted Uses in Residential Zoning Districts

The Lompoc City Code designates permitted and non-permitted uses for all developable
use types in the City.

   °   Single family dwellings, detached, are permitted in the R-A, R-1, and R-2 zones.
       Single family dwellings, detached, are to be conditionally approved in the R-3
       zone to encourage multi-family dwellings in the high density residential zone.
       Single family dwellings, attached, are permitted in the R-2 and R-3 zones.

   °   Duplexes are not permitted in the R-A or R-1 zones, but are permitted in the R-2
       and R-3 zones.

   °   Triplexes and uses with more than two detached single family dwellings are to be
       conditionally approved in the R-2 zone, and are permitted in the R-3 zone.

   °   Apartments for three or more families are permitted in the R-3 zone.

   °   Group dwellings are permitted in the R-3 zone.

   °   Second residential units are permitted in the R-1 zone.

   °   Mobilehome parks, travel trailer parks, and recreational vehicle parks are only
       permitted in the T zone.

   °   Residential care providers are permitted in the R-1, R-2, and R-3 zones.




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                                                  Table 50
                                              City of Lompoc
                           Permitted and Conditionally Approved Residential Uses1
                                                                      Zoning District
Residential Type                                                                                         2               3
                                  R-A        R-1         R-2            R-3            T        MU/C-2            OTC
                                                                              4                 Refer to         Refer to
Single family dwellings            X          X           X          X (CUP )                  Footnote 2.      Footnote 3.
Duplexes or detached                                                                            Refer to         Refer to
                                                          X               X
single family dwellings                                                                        Footnote 2.      Footnote 3.

Triplexes and uses with
                                                                                                Refer to         Refer to
more than two detached                                X (CUP)             X
                                                                                               Footnote 2.      Footnote 3.
single family dwellings

               5                                                                                Refer to         Refer to
Apartments                                                                X
                                                                                               Footnote 2.      Footnote 3.
                       7
Group dwellings                               X           X               X
Travel Trailer Park
Recreational Vehicle                                                                   X
Park
Care of nonrelated
     6 or less persons                        X           X               X
     7 or more persons                    X (CUP) X (CUP)             X (CUP)
                   8
Mobilehomes                                   X                                        X
Agricultural workers'
living quarters, for
persons employed and
deriving the major                 X
portion of their income
from employment on the
premises
                                    9
Caretaker's residence             X                                                                 X

1
    Does not include CO, CC, General Commercial/C-2, or PCD zones or group quarters.
2
 Residential Uses in MU designated areas: May include one, two, and multiple family uses provided the residential use is
built with a 1.00 FAR with a minimum of 33% of floor area for residential use.
3
  Residential Uses in OTC zone: Mixed Use Developments allowed in the OTC zone, including residential and
office/retail/service components within the same structure. Residential must be located above the first floor and shall be built
with a 2.00 FAR with a maximum of 25% of floor area for residential. Single family and two family dwellings are prohibited
uses unless they meet the criteria of the Mixed Use Development. Multiple-family dwellings (three dwelling units but no
more than four dwelling units) conditionally permitted uses unless they meet the criteria of the Mixed Use Development.
4
    CUP Conditional Use Permit

5                                                                                      6
  Apartments: A multiple family dwelling, as herein defined (see dwelling, multi-family ), which is expressly for the purpose
of providing dwelling units for rent or lease. This definition excludes other types of multi-family dwellings such as stock
cooperatives and condominiums even if said stock cooperatives and condominiums provide dwelling units for rent or lease.

6
 Dwelling, multi-family: A building designed or used for occupancy by three (3) or more families, living independently of
each other.
7
    Group dwellings: Six or less, permitted by right; seven or more requires a conditional use permit.
8
    Mobilehomes in R-1 zone shall be on permanent foundations in accordance with Health and Safety Code, Section 18551.
9
    Caretaker's residence allowed as an accessory use.




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6.1.1.3     Conditional Use Permit Process

The Conditional Use Permit (CUP) process is described in the Lompoc City Code
(Article 1, Section 8880). Applications for use permits are reviewed by the Planning
Commission which then has the authority to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the
application. The total process of a CUP takes approximately six weeks to complete.

In granting a CUP, the Planning Commission must make all of the following findings:

1. The site of the proposed use is adequate in size and topography to accommodate
   the proposed use, and all yards, spaces, walls and fences, parking, loading, and
   landscaping are adequate to properly adjust such use with the land and uses in the
   vicinity.

2. The site for the proposed use relates to streets and highways adequate in width and
   pavement to carry the quantity and kind of traffic generated by the proposed use.

3. The proposed use will have no adverse effect upon abutting property from the
   permitted use.

4. The conditions stated in the decision are deemed necessary to protect the public
   health, safety, and general welfare. The conditions may include but are not limited
   to:

   a.   Regulations of use
   b.   Special yards, spaces, and buffers.
   c.   Surfacing of parking areas.
   d.   Requiring street, service road, or alley dedications and improvements or appropriate bonds.
   e.   Special fences, solid fences, and walls.
   f.   Regulation of points of vehicular ingress and egress.
   g.   Regulation of signs.
   h.   Landscaping plan designed by landscape architect, to be reviewed and approved by the City
        Planner.
   i.   Requiring maintenance of the grounds.
   j.   Regulation of noise, vibration, odors.
   k.   Regulation of hours for certain activities.
   l.   Time periods within which the proposed use or portions thereof shall be developed.
   m.   Duration of use or portions thereof.
   n.   Posting of a bond or bonds sufficient to guarantee the removal of any non-conforming
        structures or uses of the land upon the expiration of the period of the conditional use permit
   o.   Requiring the dedication of access rights.
   p.   And such other conditions as will make possible the development of the City in an orderly and
        efficient manner.

The Planning Commission may impose additional conditions on the following residential
uses which require a CUP, but only if the conditions serve to ensure that the appropriate
findings can be made: single family dwellings in R-3 zone, triplexes and uses in which
more than two detached single family dwellings in R-2 zone, and agricultural workers’
living quarters for persons employed and deriving the major portion of their income from
employment on the premises in the R-A zone.


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The CUP process does not act as a constraint to the development of affordable housing
because:

   °   a CUP is not required for multiple family uses such as duplexes, triplexes,
       apartments, and group dwellings in the R-3 zone;

   °   where a CUP is required it does not add significant time or delay to the
       approval of a project;

   °   the Planning Commission does not impose additional development standards
       through the CUP, but rather addresses the findings that are described in
       Chapter 50 of the Lompoc City Code; and,

   °   the City’s CUP application packet provides clear direction on submittal
       requirements and the process and standards for review.

6.1.1.4   Architectural Review (Design Review)

The Architectural Review [Design Review (DR)] process is described in the Lompoc City
Code (Chapter 50, Title 3, Chapter 2, Article 1, Sections 8825-8833). The purpose of
the architectural review is to determine a project’s compliance with provisions of the
technical codes and development policies of the City and consistency with the
established Architectural Review Guidelines. Additionally, architectural review is
intended to promote an aesthetically and environmentally pleasing and economically
viable community. Typically development projects in the mixed use and Old Town
Commercial areas would be subject to the architectural review process.

With the exceptions noted below, applications for architectural review are reviewed by
the City Planner. As noted above, the Architectural Review authority is limited to a
review of the project’s consistency with architectural guidelines and includes review of
the building elevations, site and landscaping plans, and signs. The Planning
Commission performs the architectural review on the following:

   °   on all major projects which are located on parcels or lots with frontage on
       Ocean Avenue, Central Avenue, and “H” Street north of Cypress Avenue;

   °   on major commercial and industrial projects on “A” Street north of Cypress
       Avenue;

   °   on all projects involving the designated landmarks and historical structures
       and places referred to in the 1988 City of Lompoc Cultural Resources Study;
       and

   °   on any application for architectural review, the City Planner may refer, with or
       without recommendation, the project directly to the Planning Commission for
       decision.


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In approving the architecture and design of a project, the City Planner and Planning
Commission will consider the following criteria:

   1. Protection of the quality of life of the residents of Lompoc by use of designs
      that preserve and enhance privacy and minimize detrimental conditions such
      as noise, glare, unattractive uses, and unsightly elements is required for all
      projects.

   2. Development of residential neighborhoods to preserve unity of character,
      unique features, and natural conditions to advance toward the goal of
      neighborhoods harmonious with others and of new residences compatible
      with existing homes and with the neighborhood are required for all projects
      subject to this Article.

   3. Protection and preservation of the following are encourage on all projects to
      the extent feasible:

       a.   views;
       b.   open space;
       c.   historically significant sites and structures; and
       d.   privately owned public art on private property.

The City Planner and Planning Commission have the authority to approve, conditionally
approve, or disapprove a project.

Other than single family homes in R- zones which are not part of a parcel map or
subdivision map, all applications for permits for the construction of any building,
structure, or sign in all zone districts, are required to be reviewed for consistency with
the architectural guidelines.

The Architectural Review process does not act as a constraint to the development of
affordable housing because:

   °   the Architectural Review is used to guide the development in the City of
       Lompoc; the guidelines are based on recognized principles of design,
       planning, and aesthetics, and they follow written policies that are published in
       the City’s “Architectural Review Guidelines” booklet;

   °   the architectural guidelines explain why the City requires architectural review
       and what the benefits are, and provide clear standards which will improve and
       quicken the architectural review process;

   °   the City encourages creative design and new ideas in the use of building
       materials, and innovative construction methods, provided what is proposed
       falls within the City’s guidelines;




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   °   a stated goal of architectural review is development that not only is well
       designed, but also fits in Lompoc, with projects that strike a balance between
       the developer’s preference and the public interest;

   °   projects which are acted upon by the City Planner are required by Lompoc
       City Code to be approved, conditionally approved, or disapproved within ten
       (10) working days of the date of receipt of a complete application;

   °   projects which are acted upon by the Planning Commission are required by
       Lompoc City Code to be approved, conditionally approved, or disapproved
       within thirty (30) working days of the date of receipt of a complete application
       and after consideration by the Planning Commission during a regularly
       scheduled meeting;

   °   Planning Commission meetings are held at least once a month for regularly
       scheduled meetings and more often as determined necessary;

   °   the City’s DR application packet provides clear direction on submittal
       requirements and on the process and standards for review; and,

   °   the Architectural Review Guidelines relating to all design and development
       within the City of Lompoc are on file in the office of the City Clerk and are
       available at the Community Development Department public counter.

In conclusion, the Architectural Review process does not add significant time or delay to
the approval of projects.

6.1.2 Mobilehome Park Standards

A mobilehome, defined by the National Mobile Home Construction Act of 1974, 42 USC
Section 5401 et seq.), is a permitted use in the R-1 zone. The mobilehome in the R-1
zone shall be on a permanent foundation in accordance with California Health and
Safety Code Section 18551.

The City also has a designated zone (T) for land for use as a mobilehome park and
mobilehome subdivision. The zone is also for travel trailer parks and recreational
vehicle parks. The T zone development standards for a mobilehome park include the
following:

  °    Each park shall have an area of not less than 10 acres.
  °    Allows seven (7) mobilehome park spaces per acre of land within the
       mobilehome park or subdivision.
  °    Each mobilehome space shall be located according to the following:
       ∼ minimum 20 feet from an exterior property line of the mobilehome park when
           the exterior property line abuts a public street;



                                   HOUSING - 106
       ∼ minimum 5 feet from any other portion of exterior property line of the
           mobilehome park; and,
       ∼ minimum 5 feet from mobilehome to its side lot or space boundary line
  °    Landscaped perimeter on sides of the mobilehome park or subdivision abutting a
       public street.
  °    Solid wall or fence six (6) feet high on all exterior boundary lines of the
       mobilehome park or subdivision abutting a public street.
  °    Thirty (30) foot wide internal streets, surfaced with 2-1/2 inches of asphalt on four
       (4) inches of base and rolled curbs four (4) inches in height.
  °    A minimum storage area equivalent to 100 square feet per mobilehome space for
       storage of boats, campers, camping trailers, utility trailers, and extra vehicles
       enclosed with a six (6) foot high chain link fence.
  °    Open space according to the following:
       ∼ Mobilehome park:
           • Family park – 300 square feet per mobilehome space up through 100
                spaces plus 200 square feet per mobilehome space beginning with the
                101 space.
           • Adult park – 200 square feet per mobilehome space
       ∼ Travel trailer parks and recreation vehcilce park - 100 square feet per travel
           trailer space or recreation vehicle space.
   °   On-site parking for the resident of the mobilehome in accordance with the
       residential parking standards included in Table 49 for multi-family dwellings.
  °    Guest parking at a ratio of one additional off-street parking space for each seven
       (7) mobilehome sites in the park.

6.1.3 Building Codes and Enforcement

The City has adopted the 2001 California Administrative Code as a standard for
development within the City. The California Administrative Code includes the California
Building Code, Uniform Mechanical Code, Uniform Plumbing Code, National Electric
Code, Uniform Housing Code, Uniform Code for the Abatement of Dangerous Buildings,
and Uniform Fire Code. This code has been adopted in order to prevent unsafe or
hazardous building conditions. In some instances the City’s Zoning Ordinance
supersedes the California Administrative Code, however, the changes are minor in
nature. As such, the City’s codes are normal and enforcement does not act as a
constraint to the construction or rehabilitation of housing.

A review of the City’s amendments to the uniform codes indicates they have no
substantial impact on the cost of residential development. Lompoc’s amendments to the
State Building Code standards are primarily procedural and administrative, such as the
appeals procedures, flood plain management process, and reroofing procedures.

6.1.4 On- and Off-Site Improvements

Lompoc is currently experiencing no capacity limitations with the City’s water,
wastewater, storm drain, and electric utility systems. Development regulations do,


                                   HOUSING - 107
however, require the extension of utilities in order to tie into the City systems, such as
the construction of a sewer trunk line to serve new development; the payment of
charges for installed improvements, such as the installation of electric transformers;
contributions to aid in the expansion of existing facilities and the construction of new
facilities necessitated by new development, such as a retention basin to accommodate
run-off produced by paving.

Currently, Lompoc Unified School District (LUSD) facilities are operating at capacity and
the fees charged for new construction are not sufficient to build additional new facilities
needed to accommodate projected enrollment increases. All other City-required
improvements are similar to those of surrounding communities, therefore, no other
inordinate constraints have been identified regarding the City’s utility infrastructure.

6.1.5 Fees and Exactions

Land development within the City is subject to fees imposed by the City to offset future
capital expenditures and to accommodate future development or defray the cost of
water treatment, street maintenance, environmental review, development review, permit
processing, field inspections, police protection, fire protection, and recreational
activities. The City departments which levy fees include: Public Works, Building,
Community Development, Police, Fire, and Parks and Recreation. Each type of capital
improvement fee that is levied by the City is imposed in relationship to an estimated
future capital expenditure and conforms to the stipulations of AB 1600 legislation. The
size of City permit processing fees collected varies. See Appendix D for detailed
information on the fees that apply to residential projects. In brief, the fees are assessed
on the basis of the following factors.

      Complexity of application review;
      The valuation of the land proposed for development;
      The number of acres proposed for development;
      The number of dwelling units;
      The valuation of proposed construction and improvements;
      Square footage of floor area; and
      The number of plumbing fixtures per unit.

Appendix E presents an overview of City fees for (1) an average 2,360 square foot
residence with an attached 414 square foot two-car garage and 107 square foot patio
on an infill lot and (2) a 14-unit apartment consisting of three buildings (total 15,878
square feet) with attached garages (5,066 square feet) on an infill lot. The fees listed in
Appendix E are an estimate as fees can vary considerably depending upon whether
improvements such as water and sewer lines, streets, curbs, gutters, and sidewalks
exist.

The following public improvements, if absent, are additional costs to the applicant: street
front curb and gutter $0.202 per lineal foot, sidewalk or cross gutters $0.059 per square
foot, driveway $0.078 per square foot, and street paving $0.037 per square foot.



                                   HOUSING - 108
In addition to the City, other agencies impose various fees. For example, the Lompoc
Unified School District levies a fee based on the square footage of new construction. In
addition, the California Department of Fish and Game requires a filing fee to defray the
cost of managing and protecting wildlife resources. The fees are collected by the City
when a “Notice of Determination” is filed with the County Clerk. The fees range from
$850.00 to $1,250.00.

6.1.6 Permit Processing Procedures

All processing time increases the cost of development. The residential development
review process normally begins with the filing of a preliminary map or site plan for
consideration by the Development Review Board and ends with issuance of the
Certificate of Occupancy. There are many steps which may be necessary before the
final development of a housing project can take place. These steps include: plan check,
architectural review, and other forms of approval. Each step requires some form of
administrative process and various amounts of time.

Processing time varies considerably from a few weeks to several months depending on
the complexity of the proposed project and its conformance with the General Plan and
Zoning Ordinance. Projects range from the development of a single unit on an existing
lot with appropriate zoning and land use designations to the annexation or subdivision
of land needing numerous improvements, zone changes, and an environmental impact
report (EIR). The City’s local processing times are further defined in Table 51.

                                            Table 51
                             Local Development Processing Timeframes
                    Item                       Approximate Length of Time to Public Hearing
Single Family Residence                                            2 weeks Building Permit
Duplexes or Two Single Family
                                                                     Architectural Review
Residences R-2 or R-3 Zoning Districts
Three or More Residential Units R-2                               Conditional Use Permit
Three or More Residential Units R-3                                Architectural Review
Four or More Residential Units R-3                                 Architectural Review
Conditional Use Permit                                        6 weeks to Planning Commission
                                                                2 weeks administrative review
Architectural Review
                                                              6 weeks to Planning Commission
Tentative Parcel Map                                          6 weeks to Planning Commission
Tentative Tract Map                                           6 weeks to Planning Commission
Variance                                                                   6 weeks
Zoning Amendment or Zone Change                                          12 weeks
                                                                       4 to 10 weeks
Environmental Documentation
                                                                    (Average 8 weeks)
General Plan Amendment                                                    12 weeks
Note: Timeframes indicated above are based on the date an application is deemed complete.
Final Map                                                                   8 weeks
Plan Check                                                               2 to 8 weeks



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Architectural Review is conducted by the City Planner or Planning Commission.
Conditional Use Permits and Tentative Maps are reviewed by the Planning
Commission. Variances, Zoning Amendments or Zone Changes, General Plan
Amendments are reviewed by both the Planning Commission and City Council.

The City does not have a separate architectural review board or environmental review
committee. These reviews are a function of the Planning Commission in the case of
conditional use permits, development plans, and tentative maps and of both the
Planning Commission and City Council in the case of variances, zoning amendments or
zone changes, and General Plan amendments. In an effort to provide complete
preliminary information on a project to an applicant, the City instituted the Development
Review Board (DRB) process in the mid-1980’s. The DRB is comprised of City staff
from the various City departments that have the responsibility for reviewing
development proposals, drafting Conditions of Approval, and enforcing City
requirements and regulations. The DRB meets regularly at least once or twice a month,
or more often on an as needed basis, as a result of project applications submitted to the
City or at the request of an applicant who wants to get an early indication of a project’s
requirements. Upon submittal of a preliminary site plan or a complete application
package for a discretionary permit, City staff will schedule the project within two weeks
of its submittal date. City staff will review the submittal and prepare verbal or written
comments and draft Conditions of Approval to exchange at the DRB meeting. The
availability of complete information from one DRB meeting allows an applicant an early
indication of potential issues and conditions and can save the applicant time and money
in the long term. The City regularly receives positive comments regarding its
development review process.

6.1.7 Housing for Persons with Disabilities

6.1.7.1   Procedures For Ensuring Reasonable Accommodations

The City is committed to addressing constraints imposed on individuals with disabilities
including improving accessibility and reducing architectural barriers in the public right-of-
way and public facilities. Improvements to streets and sidewalks, parks, and public
facilities have been completed and additional improvements are underway.
Approximately $69,820 in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds were
expended in 2002-2003 for ADA compliant sidewalk construction and curb cuts.
Improvements consisted of pedestrian ramps, new sidewalks, and new cross-gutters at
eleven locations in the low/mod census tract areas. Improvements in parks included the
installation of accessible fountains and resurfacing of concrete areas.

Improvements to public facilities include improvements to City Hall of approximately
$108,100 in CDBG funds, the public library, and community center. Improvements to
City Hall include remodeling the public counter area and public restrooms. These
improvements combined with existing accessibility accommodations including parking
for disabled persons, ramps and at-grade access into City Hall and electrically
controlled automatic entrance doors and wide open public areas allows disabled



                                   HOUSING - 110
persons access to City Hall for business purposed including obtaining zoning
information and building permits. Improvements to the public library and community
center include the installation of an ADA audio-visual emergency warning system that
will notify disabled patrons through alarms and flashing lights on exiting the building in
the event of an emergency.

The City makes every effort to accommodate disabled individuals at all public meetings.
On each City Council and Planning Commission agenda, the following notice is
included:

   In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special
   assistance to participate in this meeting including review of the agenda and
   related documents, please contact the City Clerk (805) 875-8241/Planning
   Division (805) 875-8273 at least 72 hours prior to the meeting. This will allow
   time for the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to the
   meeting.

When contacted regarding accessibility issues, City staff will provide for the participation
of disable individuals by supplying assisted listening devices, print enlargers, sign
language interpreters, and other necessary accommodations, as well as generally
providing for the physical mobility of all participants.

6.1.7.2   Zoning and Land Use

As part of the update of the City’s Housing Element, the City has reviewed all of its
zoning laws, policies, and practices for compliance with fair housing law. The City has
not identified zoning or other land use regulatory practices that could discriminate
against persons with disabilities and impede the availability of such housing for these
individuals.

  The parking standards contained in the City’s Zoning Ordinance allow a reduction in
  the number of parking spaces required for housing for persons with disabilities. The
  number of parking spaces required per housing unit for persons with disabilities is
  less than the number of parking spaces required for single family, multi-family, and
  condominium developments. This reduction also applies to housing for elderly
  persons. The City’s parking standards for residential uses are shown in Table 49.

   The City permits group homes with 6 or fewer residents in residential zoning districts
   (R-1, R-2, and R-3) including group homes that provide services on-site. Group
   homes with more than 6 residents, including said group homes that provide services
   on-site, require Planning Commission approval subject to a conditional use permit in
   residential zoning districts (R-1, R-2, and R-3).

   The City does not impose occupancy standards for the establishment or retrofitting
   of structures for residential use by persons with disabilities. If structural




                                   HOUSING - 111
   improvements are required for a group home, a building permit is required as is for
   any other occupancy type undergoing improvements.

   The City permits housing for special needs groups, including for individuals with
   disabilities, without regard to distances between such uses or the number of uses in
   any part of the City. The Land Use Element of the General Plan does not restrict the
   siting of special needs housing.

6.1.7.3   Permits and Processing

The City’s policy is to expedite the plan review and permit issuance for work that is fairly
minor and non-complex. Generally, permit requests for remodeling a home for access
by disabled persons is considered minor and the time frame for plan review can typically
range from over the counter to a few days.

The City does not impose special permit procedures or requirements that could impede
the retrofitting of homes for accessibility. The City’s requirements for building permits
and inspections are the same as for other residential projects and are fairly simple and
straightforward. City officials are not aware of any instances in which an applicant
experienced delays or rejection of a retrofitting proposal for accessibility to persons with
disabilities.

Requests for retrofitting homes for accessibility (i.e., ramp request) which involve
exterior improvements are viewed by the Planning Division as architectural features. In
many cases, the City’s Zoning Ordinance allows architectural features to encroach into
the standard required setbacks.

Requests for inspections of work for which permits have been issued usually require 24
hour notice, however, in some instances inspections can be accommodated the same
day the request comes into the office particularly if the request is received during the
morning hours.

The City has also actively removed constraints on the development of housing for
persons with disabilities. These actions are intended to keep the cost of housing for
persons with disabilities as low as possible. In conformance with State law, the City’s
Zoning Ordinance allows the care of six or less non-related persons by right in a
residential zoning district (R-1, R-2, and R-3). A conditional use permit is not required to
be obtained for the care of six or less non-related persons. This residential use is
intended to provide, create, and maintain a home environment which will be healthy and
physically safe for the care of the non-related individuals on a 24 hour basis. The City
has no requirement restricting the proximity of such homes to one another.

The Planning Commission may approve residential care facilities for more than six
individuals in residential zoning districts (R-1, R-2, and R-3), subject to a conditional use
permit, after a noticed public hearing. This process allows for community input into the
approval process, and is no different than the approval process necessary for other



                                   HOUSING - 112
projects that require a conditional use permit. The City does not have standard
conditions of approval specifically for residential care facilities but has standard
conditions of approval for development in general. Examples of standard conditions for
development in general would be a requirement for the conditional use permit to be
reviewed and reconsidered by the Planning Commission at any time for the purpose of
imposing new conditions to mitigate a nuisance or to revoke the permit to abate a
nuisance, a requirement that the applicant make dedications of public right-of-way
(when adjacent to an unimproved street), and a requirement that the applicant conform
to all applicable development standards. The City will develop special conditions for
developments in general on a case-by-case basis.

6.1.7.4   Building Codes

The Building Division in the City of Lompoc reviews all proposed development for
compliance with accessibility requirements for persons with disabilities, and has not
adopted any amendments that could diminish the ability to accommodate persons with
disabilities. Representatives from the Building Division have indicated that each
proposed development that will be open to the public, including multi-family residential
developments, are subject to review for compliance with the California Administrative
Code, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and all other applicable regulations in
the state of California. Likewise, the City’s codes regarding State and ADA requirements
are normal and enforcement does not act as a constraint to the construction or
rehabilitation of housing for persons with disabilities.

6.2   Nongovernmental Constraints

There are a number of financial components involved in the development of housing.
These components include the cost of developable land, construction and site
improvement costs, sales and marketing, and financing and profit. Because these costs
respond to market forces, it is not possible for a local governmental body to control
them.

6.2.1 Cost of Developable Land

As of 2002, Lompoc has approximately 153 acres of vacant developable land zoned for
residential use within its boundaries. Although the cost of land and housing in Lompoc is
reasonable the impending shortage of land will become a constraint in the future. Much
of the surrounding vacant land available for annexation is currently prime agricultural
land under Williamson Act contracts. Therefore, it is not viewed as favorable land for
annexation. The City of Lompoc is currently processing an annexation application for
approximately 150 acres of property to the north of the present City Limit line and
Sphere of Influence. This area is designated as Urban Residential under the County of
Santa Barbara’s Comprehensive Plan. The project application under review includes
annexation, General Plan amendment, and zone change of the 150 acres to
accommodate 476 potential residential units that will include a mix of single family
residences on lots ranging from 7,000 square feet to one-half acres and multi-family



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residential units. This area would contribute to the potential land use resources for low-
and moderate-income housing opportunities.

Based on a recent study prepared by a land consultant for purposes of updating park
impact fees, the Citywide average fair market value of a typical acre of unsubdivided,
residentially zoned land within the City of Lompoc is $200,000 per acre. Depending on
the density of a project that could be developed on a particular site, this equates to
approximately $9,000 to $32,000 per dwelling unit.

6.2.2 Construction and Site Improvement Costs

Although the amount of building materials and labor can be estimated, the market costs
of these development inputs is unpredictable. The materials are a market-driven
commodity (e.g. lumber) which operates outside the direct influence of the local
governmental body. Transportation costs associated with the materials are also subject
to market forces. Lompoc’s distance from major metropolitan areas can also effect the
final cost of materials. Demolition and the subsequent disposal of existing structures
must also be figured into the cost of construction and rehabilitation. Due to Lompoc’s
relative small size, the labor force required for the construction of new housing units
may not be adequately supplied by the City’s population. This may require extended
commutes or the temporary lodging of skilled craftsmen or construction specialists,
once again adding to the contractor’s overhead.

6.2.3 Sales and Marketing

The sales and marketing approach which a developer pursues can have an effect on
the selling price of a housing unit. If a developer is concerned with a prompt return on
his/her investment, it may be necessary for advertisement and marketing to a broader
market.

6.2.4 Financing and Profit

Financing costs are dependent upon national economic trends and policy decisions.
Minor fluctuations in interest rates may add or save thousands of dollars to the buying
public on the cost of a home. These fluctuations can also save or add significantly to the
developer’s final costs. The same market forces that create an appealing market for
development create an appealing market for the home-buying public. Funds for new
construction and residential mortgages are available from banks, savings and loans,
and private mortgage lenders. In combination with readily available financing sources
and reasonably priced real estate, the Lompoc housing market creates no constraints to
homeownership.

The City has not uncovered any local constraints to the availability or cost of financing
for home purchases or rehabilitation that differ significantly from the availability or cost
of financing generally in California. Even in the City’s older neighborhoods, there are no




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barriers to obtaining financing for home purchase, improvement, or construction (other
than customary underwriting considerations by lenders).

7.0   EXISTING AND AVAILABLE IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

7.1   Federal Programs

7.1.1 HUD – Homeownership Opportunities for People Everywhere (HOPE)
Program

The purpose of the program is to provide homeownership opportunities to lower income
families and individuals by providing grantees with Federal assistance to initially acquire
and rehabilitate single family properties (owned by Federal, State and local
governments) at affordable prices. The program provides both planning and
implementation grants. Eligible activities include identification of eligible properties,
training to develop a homeownership program, administrative costs, architectural and
engineering work, property acquisition, rehabilitation costs, counseling and training of
eligible families, relocation costs of eligible families, temporary relocation costs of
homebuyers during rehabilitation, legal fees, and economic development activities that
promote economic self-sufficiency.

7.1.2 HUD – Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME)

The purpose of the Home Investment Partnership Act is to: expand the supply of
decent, affordable housing for low- and very low-income families with emphasis on
rental housing; build state and local capacity to carry out affordable housing programs;
and provide for coordinated assistance to participants in the development of affordable
low-income housing. Eligible activities for funding under HOME are rehabilitation, new
construction, acquisition, and tenant based rental assistance. There are matching fund
requirements of 25% for both new construction and for rehabilitation. HOME funds used
in conjunction with rental units must comply with the following requirements:

      90 percent of funds must be allocated to families whose income does not exceed
      60 percent of the Santa Barbara County median income;

      The remaining funds must be allocated to families whose income does not
      exceed 80 percent of the Santa Barbara County median income; and

      For properties with five or more HOME-assisted units, at least 20 percent of the
      units must go to very low-income families paying no more than 30 percent of their
      gross adjusted income on rent.

HOME funds used to facilitate homeownership must go entirely to: families earning less
than 80 percent of the Santa Barbara County median income; who are first time
homebuyers; and, who will utilize the unit as their principal residence.




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7.1.3 HUD – Section 8 Program

This program makes certificate and voucher funds available to local housing authorities
on a competitive allocation basis. Through this program, the Housing Authority provides
rental subsidy payments directly to private property owners on behalf of eligible tenants.
Section 8 assistance provides the difference between one-third of a household income
and the monthly cost of an apartment up to a certain standard price (set regionally and
according to the number of bedrooms).

7.1.4 HUD – Section 202 Program

The program provides funding to expand the supply of housing with supportive services
for elderly persons. The types of financing available are capital advances and project
rental assistance. The capital advances (bearing no interest) are used to finance the
development of units and are not required to be repaid as long as the housing units
remain available for occupancy by very low-income elderly persons for a period of at
least 40 years. Project rental assistance is available to cover the difference between
HUD-approved operating costs per unit and the amount the resident pays. Eligible
development methods are new construction, rehabilitation, and acquisition of housing
from the Resolution Trust Corporation. Occupancy of Section 202 housing is open to
very low-income elderly persons 62 years of age or older.

7.1.5 HUD – Section 811 Program

The program provides funding to expand the supply of specially designed housing with
supportive services for persons with disabilities. The types of financing available are
capital advances and project rental assistance. The capital advances (bearing no
interest) are used to finance the development of units and are not required to be repaid
as long as the housing units remain available for occupancy by very low-income
disabled persons for a period of at least 40 years. Project rental assistance is available
to cover the difference between HUD-approved operating cost per unit and 30 per cent
of the resident’s adjusted income. Eligible development methods are new construction,
rehabilitation, acquisition of housing for group homes, and acquisition of housing from
the Resolution Trust Corporation for group homes and independent living facilities.
Occupancy of Section 811 housing is open to very low-income persons with disabilities
who are at least 18 years old. A variety of housing options may be developed under this
program including:

      Group Homes – a single family residential structure for no more than eight
      persons with disabilities combining multiple bedrooms (single or double
      occupancy) with a kitchen, shared living areas, utility areas, and at least one
      bathroom for every four persons;

      Independent Living Facilities – a structure containing separate, self-contained
      units (each must have a kitchen and bath) for not more than 24 persons with




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      disabilities except for projects for persons with chronic mental illness which may
      not exceed 20 such persons; and

      Intermediate Care Facilities – a group home for persons with developmental
      disabilities that is licensed by the State Medicaid Agency and receives Title 19
      funds to cover the cost of services.

7.1.6 HUD – Shelter Plus Care Homeless Rental Housing Assistance Program

This program provides rental assistance, in concert with supportive services from other
Federal, State, and local sources, to homeless persons with disabilities. The assistance
is targeted primarily to homeless persons who are seriously mentally ill, have chronic
problems with alcohol or drugs, or both, or who have acquired immunodeficiency
syndrome and related diseases. The Shelter Plus Care Program provides rental
assistance including grants through three components: 1) homeless rental housing
assistance program (S+C/HRHA); 2) Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Program for
Single Room Occupancy Dwellings for Homeless Individuals (S+C/SRO); and 3)
Section 202 rental housing assistance (S+C/202). However, the most applicable
component for Lompoc’s homeless needs would be S+C/202. This program component
provides assistance in connection with rental assistance under Section 202 of the
Housing Act of 1959. Rental assistance is for a period of five years for housing in group
homes or independent living units.

7.1.7 HUD – Emergency Shelter Program

This program provides grants according to the formula used for Community
Development Block Grants (CDBG). Eligible activities include renovation, major
rehabilitation, or conversion of buildings for use as emergency shelters for the
homeless. With certain limitations, grantees may also spend funds on essential services
for the homeless, including homeless prevention efforts. In addition, grantees may
spend funds on operating costs such as maintenance, insurance, utilities, and
furnishings.

7.1.8 Community Development Block Grants (CDBG)

The program provides annual grants on a formula basis to entitled cities and counties to
develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living
environment, and by expanding economic opportunity, principally for low- and
moderate-income persons. Entitlement communities develop their own programs and
funding priorities. However, grantees must give maximum feasible priority to activities
which either benefit low- and moderate-income persons, or aid in the prevention or
elimination of slums and blight. In addition, activities may be carried out which the
community certifies are designed to meet other community development needs having a
particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to
the health or welfare of the community where other financial resources are not available
to meet such needs.



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Activities that can be carried out with block grant funds include the acquisition of real
property, relocation and demolition, rehabilitation of residential and nonresidential
structures, construction of public facilities and improvements, and the conversion of
schools for eligible purposes. In addition CDBG funds may be used to pay for public
services and activities relating to energy conservation.

7.2    State Programs

7.2.1 California Self-Help Housing Program (CSHHP)

This program assists low- and moderate-income families to build and rehabilitate their
homes with their own labor. The program provides grants to sponsor organizations to
provide technical assistance to participating families. Loans are also made to sponsor
organizations to assist with project development and construction. Interest on these
development assistance loans are waived when “rolled over” as mortgage assistance
for individual low-income homeowners. The program also makes rehabilitation and
mortgage assistance loans available to low-income homeowners. Repayment of
principal and interest on these loans is deferred until the property is sold or transferred,
or until the owner ceases full-time occupancy. Loans are forgiven after 20 years of full-
time occupancy.

7.2.2 Mobilehome Park Resident Ownership Program (MPROP)

This program assists low-income residents of mobilehome parks to purchase the
mobilehome parks in which they live in order to preserve housing affordability. The
program provides technical assistance to mobilehome park resident organizations and
various loans to: facilitate park purchase by a resident organization corporation; finance
park purchase by a resident organization corporation where loan benefits are
exclusively used to assure affordable housing costs for low-income park residents; and
assure housing affordability for low-income park residents when they purchase a
cooperative interest or condominium space.

7.2.3 Multifamily Housing Program (MHP)

This program assists in new construction, rehabilitation and preservation of permanent
and transitional rental housing for low-income households. This program provides low
interest loans to finance new construction, rehabilitation, or acquisition and rehabilitation
of permanent or transitional rental housing, and the conversion of nonresidential
structures to rental housing. Several programs administered under MHP include the
California Housing Rehabilitation Program – Owner Component and Rental Component
and the California Rental Housing Construction Program (RHCP).




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7.2.3.1 California Housing Rehabilitation Program – Owner Component

This program assists in the rehabilitation of substandard homes owned and occupied by
lower income households. The program provides low interest loans to finance
rehabilitation efforts required to bring a home into compliance with the California Health
and Safety Code including: repair of code violations; improvements to ensure
handicapped accessibility; room additions; and general property improvements.

7.2.3.2 California Housing Rehabilitation Program – Rental Component

This program provides loans to rehabilitate unreinforced masonry multi-family units or
substandard low-income rental housing to increase the ability of the structures to
withstand earthquakes. When these funds are used for the health and safety
rehabilitation of rental structures, all assisted-units must be occupied by low-income
persons. The rent for assisted units is restricted by a regulatory agreement. Eligible
activities include rehabilitation including seismic rehabilitation, code violation
rehabilitation, conversion from nonresidential to residential use, or reconstruction.
Eligible projects include single family or multi-family rental dwellings, residential hotels,
mixed residential and commercial buildings, mixed owner occupied and rental buildings,
group homes for persons in need of special services, congregate homes, and limited-
equity cooperatives.

7.2.3.3 California Rental Housing Construction Program (RHCP)

This program aids in the new construction of rental units affordable to low-income
households. The program provides low interest long-term loans for both construction
and permanent financing. Eligible activities include development and construction costs
associated with new rental housing units for low-income households. The number of
assisted units in each project must be at least 30 percent of the total number of units.
Projects also must have at least five rental or cooperative units on one or more sites,
i.e. a mobilehome park with five or more mobilehome units, or a residential hotel or
group home with five or more units. In addition, at least two-thirds of the assisted units
in a project must be for very low-income households. The rent for assisted units is
restricted by a regulatory agreement.

7.2.4 California Housing Finance Agency (CalHFA)

This program supports the needs of renters and first-time homebuyers by providing
financing and programs that create safe, decent and affordable housing opportunities
for individuals within specified income ranges. The CalHFA program includes a
homeownership program that provides below-market interest rate mortgage loans to
very low-to moderate income first-time homebuyers and a multifamily loan program that
provides financing for the acquisition, rehabilitation and preservation of existing rent
housing, as well as the new construction of rental housing targeted to low- and
moderate-income families and individuals.




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7.3    Local Programs

7.3.1 Density Bonus Ordinance

State law mandates that local governments shall grant a density bonus of at least 25
percent, and an additional incentive, or financially equivalent incentive(s), to a developer
of a housing development agreeing to build at least:

       20 percent of the units for lower-income households; or
       10 percent of the units for very low-income households; or
       50 percent of the units for senior citizens.

Every jurisdiction must adopt an implementing ordinance, including procedures for
assessing the means of compliance of applications for a density bonus. The ordinance
must specify the type of additional developer incentives which will be provided (unless
an additional incentive is found unnecessary to reach target affordability). The additional
developer incentives must include at least one of the following:

       Modified development standards;
       Permit mixed-use zoning within housing development;
       Allow other regulatory incentives which result in cost reductions; or
       Provide other incentives of equivalent financial value based upon the land cost
       per dwelling.

The density bonus makes residential development more economical, especially where
land costs are high. In effect, a density bonus allows local governments to create
greater land value in a project which can then be used to subsidize affordable housing.
Bonus units thereby incorporate lower-income households into substantially market rate
housing projects and can also make the conversion of higher-cost non-residential land
for new housing economically feasible.

The City of Lompoc adopted a density bonus affordable housing ordinance in 1997
which contains the elements identified above and, therefore, meets the requirements of
State law. To date, no one has applied for a density bonus under the current program.

7.3.2 Second Units

A second unit is an additional self-contained living unit, attached to the primary
residential unit on a single lot. It has cooking, eating, sleeping, and full sanitation
facilities. It is also known as a “granny flat”, “in-law unit”, or an “accessory dwelling.”
State law permits second units and establishes minimum standards for their
development. The City has adopted a second unit ordinance which is consistent with
State law.




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7.3.3 Inclusionary Zoning

Typically inclusionary zoning mandates that a percentage of private residential
development projects be affordable to low- and moderate-income households.
Inclusionary zoning is usually applied to projects of a certain minimum size, usually
between five and ten units. In addition, it is usually implemented in conjunction with an
in-lieu fee option. The average set-aside requirement is that ten percent of the
residential project be affordable to low-income households. In-lieu fees, where
permitted, range from $15,000/unit to as high as $100,000/unit.

In 1992, the City of Lompoc adopted a policy that requires all residential development of
ten units or more to provide ten percent of the units affordable to very low-, low-, and
median-income households. In 1997, this policy was amended to require that projects
located within the City’s Old Town Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 2 area
provide 15 percent of new housing affordable to low- and moderate-income households
with at least 40 percent of those units to be used by very low-income households.

The policy allows a project that is not in the City’s Old Town Redevelopment Project,
Amendment No. 2 area to provide the units off-site or pay an in-lieu fee if it is
determined to be infeasible to provide the units on-site. The policy further stipulates that
current market prices for housing may be taken into consideration in fulfilling a portion of
the affordability requirement. This is achieved when the median market price for
housing is less than the current maximum median income price. The Planning
Commission may find that median income housing opportunities are fulfilling a portion of
the requirement. In such cases, not less than 5 percent of the total units in the project
are to be affordable to very low-, low-, and median-income households.

Developers of residential developments in the City have met the affordability
requirements and have not opted for payment of an in-lieu fee, therefore, an in-lieu fee
has not yet been adopted.

7.3.4 Redevelopment Area Expansion

State law authorizes the use of redevelopment to make sites available for the
construction of new housing, to provide subsidies for affordable housing, and aid in the
preservation and upgrading of residential areas. In 1984 the City established a
redevelopment area, the Old Town Redevelopment Project, originally consisting of 80
acres of land and located in the “downtown” portion of the City of Lompoc. An existing
redevelopment area can be expanded or additional redevelopment project areas may
be established. In 1998, the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency expanded the Old Town
Redevelopment Project area (Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project, Amendment
No. 1) and added 920 acres of land bringing the area under the authority of the Lompoc
Redevelopment Agency to approximately 1,000 acres. In 2002, the Lompoc
Redevelopment Agency expanded the Old Town Redevelopment Project area a second
time (Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 2) adding 79.6 acres
of land to the area.



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The Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 2 area contains a
good mix of land uses, but is made up mostly of residential uses, including single family,
multi-family, and mobilehome units. These residential uses make up the largest land
uses in the Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 2 area,
comprising over 55 percent of the total land area (excluding streets). Moreover, there is
a vacant 26.31-acre parcel located in the Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project,
Amendment No. 2 area zoned for low density residential use.

There are a total of 99 residential units in the “pipeline” that are located in residentially
zoned districts in the Redevelopment Project area. Additionally, the General Plan has
designated portions of the Redevelopment Project area as mixed-use, oriented toward
pedestrian uses including commercial, office, civic, cultural, and recreational. As noted
in Table 40, approximately 4 acres of vacant mixed-use land within the redevelopment
area can accommodate mixed-use high density residential uses, with a potential for 81
dwelling units at the upper limits of the density range of 21.8 dwelling units per acre. An
additional 32.9 underdeveloped mixed-use land within the redevelopment area can
accommodate mixed-use high density residential uses, with a potential for 640 dwelling
units at the upper limits of the density range of 21.8 dwelling units per acre. These
areas would contribute to the potential land use resources for very low-, low- and
moderate-income housing opportunities.

The increased property tax revenue resulting from new private investment in the
redevelopment area goes to the redevelopment agency. These tax increment funds
must be used for public improvements in the redevelopment area and for affordable
housing development anywhere in the City. State law requires that at least 20 percent of
all property tax increments in a redevelopment area be set aside to subsidize new,
existing, or rehabilitated low- and moderate-income housing. As of 2002, the
redevelopment area generates approximately $105,000 annually from tax revenues for
the City’s Low- and Moderate-Income Housing Fund. The fund is available for a housing
project or program and for fiscal year 2001-2002 has been designated for the following
specific housing purposes:

       $22,000 for rehabilitation of a multi-family 3-unit apartment;

       $44,300 for rehabilitation of a multi-family 18-unit apartment;

       $33,597 for acquisition and rehabilitation of a multi-family 2-unit project; and

       $20,000 for financing for two single family dwellings for Habitat for Humanity.

Lompoc’s City Council adopted the Old Town Redevelopment Project Area (Project
Area) Implementation Plan for the fiscal year 2003-2008 on August 19, 2003. In
accordance with California Health and Safety Code Section 33490 (a) (1), an
implementation plan shall contain specific goals and objectives of the redevelopment
agency for the Project Area, specific programs, including potential projects, estimated
expenditures proposed to be made during the next five years, and an explanation of



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how the goals and objectives, programs, and expenditures will eliminate blight within the
Project Area. An implementation plan must also describe how the low- and moderate-
income housing fund will be utilized.

Table 52 which was extrapolated from the Implementation Plan, outlines the housing
production plan and estimated costs over the next five-year period using the low- and
moderate-income housing fund.

                                            Table 52
                                 Lompoc Redevelopment Agency
                                  Implementation Plan 2003-2008
                 FIVE-YEAR HOUSING PRODUCTION SCHEDULE AND COST ESTIMATES
                                                              Annual Housing Production Estimates
Income Level Program Name                      2003/04       2004/05       2005/06       2006/07    2007/08
                                                                             Units
              New Construction                    1             2             2             2          2
Low- and
              Major Rehabilitation                1             2             2             2          2
Moderate-
Income        Affordability Covenants and
                                                  1             2             2             2          2
                  First-Time Homebuyer
Very Low-     New Construction                    0             1             1             1          1
Income        Major Rehabilitation                1             1             1             1          1
                       Total                      4             8             8             8          8
                               Expenditures from Low- and Moderate-Income Housing Fund
              New Construction                 $50,000       $103,500     $107,123       $110,872   $114,752
Low- and      Major Rehabilitation             $30,000       $62,100       $64,274       $66,523    $68,851
Moderate-
Income        Affordability Covenants and
                                               $25,000       $51,750       $53,561       $55,436    $57,376
                  First-Time Homebuyer
Very Low-     New Construction                   $0          $77,625       $80,342       $83,154    $86,064
Income        Major Rehabilitation             $40,000       $41,400       $42,849       $44,349    $45,901
                       Total                  $145,000       $336,375     $348,148       $360,333   $372,945

Source: Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project Area Implementation Plan 2003-2008
                 Lompoc Redevelopment Agency


In addition to providing funds for housing programs, redevelopment law enables the City
to issue bonds and otherwise finance housing construction and to acquire land for new
housing. The Lompoc Redevelopment Agency also has eminent domain powers to
acquire sites including sites for housing, both within and outside of a project area.

Furthermore, State law requires that at least six percent of new or rehabilitated housing
in a redevelopment project must be affordable to very low-income households; another
nine percent must be affordable to moderate-income households.

8.0         EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES

Fair Housing Act information is published on posters and in a brochure that is made
available to the City by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The
brochure is published and is available in both English and Spanish. The posters and
brochures are prominently displayed in City Hall, the Lompoc Public Library, the


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Anderson Recreation Center, the Lompoc Valley Community Center, and the Legal Aid
Foundation Office. Additionally, whenever the Code Enforcement Officer responds to a
tenant- landlord complaint, the Code Enforcement Officer will make a field visit to the
property and during the inspection the Fair Housing Act brochure is given to the tenants
of the property.

The City of Lompoc contracts with the Legal Aid Foundation (LAF) to provide fair
housing services in the City. Contract services with LAF include educating the public in
fair housing practices and testing the local market to verify compliance with fair housing
laws regarding instances of discrimination based on race, religion, ethnicity, gender
preference, marital status, and size and makeup of family.

 The LAF maintains an office in Lompoc at 106 South C Street, Suite A, Lompoc, CA
93436, (805) 736-6582. LAF is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Thursday. LAF information is posted at the public counter in the Community
Development Department office at City Hall. The LAF office is located across the street
to the east of City Hall.

Legal Aid made two community presentations in the past 13 months, one for the general
public and one for landlords and property managers. An LAF attorney presented an
educational program in September of last year on the Lompoc Police Beat TV Program
on the local cable station. A second LAF attorney presented an educational program at
the North Santa Barbara County Rental Property Owners and Managers breakfast
meeting in May 2003 in the Lompoc Police Department conference room. The attorney
discussed Fair Housing rules and regulations, provided handouts, considered
hypothetical situations, and answered questions. Twenty-six people were in attendance.

The LAF conducted Fair Housing testing in June 2003 at five realty/apartment
management office sites in Lompoc. The testing involved trained volunteers to verify
compliance with the Federal Fair Housing law. The tests, so far, have shown that,
overall, no overt signs of discrimination were exhibited.

During the 2002-2003 fiscal year, in the course of its everyday operations, the Lompoc
office of LAF has interviewed, either by phone or in person, 139 clients who had
landlord/tenant issues. The majority of these cases involved evictions, the remainder of
these cases were concerned with lack of or improper repairs, disagreements regarding
amounts of refunds on security deposits and habitability issues, such as infestation,
leaky roofs, unsafe gas water heaters and furnaces, mold, mildew on walls and floors,
and non-functioning plumbing. Habitability is a frequent issue in the Unlawful Detainer
(Eviction) cases that come through the Lompoc office of the LAF.

In addition, residential projects in the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency Project Area are
required to submit a marketing plan illustrating how the developer of the project will
comply with fair housing opportunities.




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Also, application packets for single family and multi-family housing rehabilitation loans
contain a “Fair Lending Notice” notifying applicants of the fair housing discrimination act.
The “Fair Lending Notice” is required to be signed by the applicants of the rehabilitation
loan.

Lastly, local newspaper advertising for the City’s rehabilitation loans and the grant
process incorporate the fair lending logo.

9.0    ENERGY CONSERVATION IN HOUSING

The Government Code requirements (Section 65583) for housing elements require an
analysis of opportunities for energy conservation in regard to residential development.

With respect to housing, energy is consumed both during and after the construction
phase, both on-site and off-site. Examples of off-site energy consumption include:
increased demand at power generation facilities and increased petroleum consumption
associated with vehicular traffic (to and from the residence) both during and after
construction. The primary form of energy consumed during the construction phase is
petroleum energy used by earthmoving and construction equipment. The greatest
amount of energy consumed, however, is after construction in the use of natural gas
and electricity to heat, cool, light, and otherwise maintain the individual homes once
they are built.

Many opportunities exist for energy conservation in housing design. Structural
orientation, shape, exposure, patterns, windows, wall and roof characteristics, color,
texture, and reflective and absorptive surfaces are just a few of the relevant
considerations. Mechanical systems may be used to supplement these design
considerations when environmental considerations are severe enough to exceed the
capacity of the designed envelope to handle them. In other words, air conditioning
should not be used as a substitute for proper building design and construction.

Attached dwellings are more energy efficient per unit than are an equivalent number of
single family detached-units, due to the decreased wall and surface area being exposed
to heat loss during the winter and heat absorption during the summer. Besides dwelling
unit type, some energy-reducing measures are possible for Lompoc through better
design and more environmentally-sound project orientation. Such measures could also
include:

       The use of solar water heating systems.

       Insulation throughout a unit, including insulated glass and insulated hot water
       lines.

       Design and orientation of the structures. In Lompoc, heavy sun radiation loads
       will act most decisively on the roof and on the eastern and western exposures
       during the summer. Eastern and western walls are exposed to the sun for longer



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periods and with greater intensity than a south wall, which intercepts solar rays at
less direct angles. South exposures permit more significant heat gains during the
winter (low sun) and less during the summer (high sun). Openings in the east
and west walls are subject to direct radiation loads year-round. Thus, buildings in
Lompoc are generally best developed with the long axis on the structure and
major window openings facing south and reduced east/west exposure.

Where ideal orientation of the structure is not feasible, the use of overhangs,
movable external shading on windows (to deflect sunlight or allow it to enter),
and heat-reflective glass, particularly on east and west exposures, can moderate
seasonal increases in temperature. It should be noted that reflective and/or
absorbing glass is unnecessary on north to northwest-facing windows; and that
clear glass is best for south-facing windows.

The use of appropriate and well-placed landscaping and reduced paving areas to
moderate temperature and decrease wind velocity; for example, deciduous trees
located on the south and west provide shade during the summer, yet allow light
and heat to enter during the winter months.

The project designs which encourage walking and bicycle riding. For example,
mid-block bicycle and pedestrian easements are a design possibility.




                            HOUSING - 126
10.0   GLOSSARY

Above Moderate-Income Household – A household earning more than 120% of median
household income. The City uses the income limits which are determined by HUD and
provided to the City by HCD.

Accessible Housing – Units accessible and adaptable to the needs of the physically
disabled.

Affordable Housing – Units affordable to very low-, low-, or moderate-income families or
persons.

Attached Single Family Dwelling – A single family dwelling which is attached to another
single family dwelling along a common wall which runs along the shared property line.

CCD – Census County Division.

CDBG – Community Development Block Grant Program.

Detached Single Family Dwelling – A single family dwelling (with or without an attached
garage) which has open space on all four sides of the structure.

Dwelling Unit (DU) – A house, apartment, condominium, or mobilehome. See also
Housing Unit.

Family Household – Two or more persons living in the same household who are related
to each other by birth, marriage, or adoption.

FHA – Federal Housing Administration.

HCD – California Department of Housing and Community Development.

Household – One or more persons who occupy a housing unit.

Housing Affordability – The generally accepted measure for determining whether a
person can afford housing means no more than 25% - 33% of one’s household income
on housing costs, which includes principle and interest. For example, a beginning
school teacher earning $35,000 per year can afford to pay up to $875 per month for
housing. For the purposes of this Housing Element 30% of gross household income
available for housing costs is the threshold for affordability.

Housing “Affordable to Low- and Moderate-Income Households”

       For Sale Units. Housing units in conjunction with a particular project where very
       low-, low-, and median-income homeowners can reside without spending in
       excess of 30 percent of their gross monthly income on mortgage payments,



                                  HOUSING - 127
      homeowners association dues (where applicable), property taxes, insurance, and
      average monthly utility expenses.

      Rental Units. Housing units in conjunction with a particular project where very
      low-, low-, and median-income renters can reside without spending in excess of
      30 percent of their gross monthly income on rent payments and average monthly
      utility expenses.

Housing Market Area (HMA) – A geographical area which meets the social and
economic requirements of the community and provides its population with facilities such
that commuting to another housing market area in order to work or shop is elective.

Housing Unit – A house, apartment, condominium, mobilehome, group of rooms, or
single room that is occupied (or if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as separate living
quarters.

HUD – U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Inclusionary Zoning – A regulation that requires a minimum percentage of the units in
housing projects to be reserved for households of a certain income level (e.g. low- or
moderate-income).

Low-Income Households – Defined by California housing element law as households
earning 50-80% of median household income. The City uses the income limits
determined by HUD and provided to the City by HCD.

Median Household Income – The mid-point at which half of the County’s households
earn more and half earn less.

MFD – Multi-Family Dwelling.

MH – Mobilehome.

Moderate-Income Household – Defined by California housing element law as a
household earning 80-120% of median household income. The City uses the income
limits which are determined by HUD and provided to the City by HCD.

Multiple Family Housing Unit – Housing where two or more units are located in the
same structure on a single parcel.

Nonfamily Household – Two or more persons living in the same household who are not
related by birth, marriage, or adoption.

Persons per Household – The statistical average number of persons in a household.

RHNP – Regional Housing Needs Plan.



                                  HOUSING - 128
Separate living quarters – Quarters in which the occupants live and eat separately from
any other persons in the building and which have direct access from the outside of the
building or through a common hall.

Single Family Dwelling Unit (SFD) – A single dwelling unit located on a single parcel.

SSI – Supplemental Security Income

Very Low-Income Household – Defined by California housing element law as
households earning less than 50% of the median household income. The City uses the
income limits determined by HUD and provided to the City by HCD.




                                  HOUSING - 129
11.0   SOURCES

California Housing Partnership Corporation, 2002. Federally Assisted Multifamily
Housing Inventory and Risk Assessment, 2002.

City of Lompoc, 1984. Housing Element.

City of Lompoc, 1992, Housing Element.

City of Lompoc, 1997. Housing Element.

City of Lompoc, 1985. Overall Economic Development Plan 1985-1986.

City of Lompoc, 1989. General Plan Issue Papers.

City of Lompoc, 1989. Housing Assistance Plan Three Year 1988-1991.

City of Lompoc, 1990. Community Development Block Grant and Human Services
Program FY 90-91, 16th Year.

City of Lompoc, 1990. Overall Economic Development Plan Update 1990-91.

City of Lompoc, 1991. Community Development Block Grant and Human Services
Program FY 91-92, 17th Year.

City of Lompoc, 1991. Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For Fiscal Year Ended
June 30, 1991.

City of Lompoc, 1992a. Draft Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy 1992 –
1997.

City of Lompoc, 1992b, 1994, & 2002. Electric Meter Vacancy Rate Program.

City of Lompoc, 1995 & 2003. Planning Division, Telephone Survey, 1995 & 2003.

City of Lompoc, 2002. 2002-2003 Master Fee Schedule.

City of Lompoc, 2002. Report to City Council – Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment
Project, Amendment No. 1.

City of Lompoc, 2002. City of Lompoc FY 2001 Consolidated Annual Performance and
Evaluation Report (CAPER).

City of Lompoc, 2003. Planning Division, Building Permit Record Search, 1996 through
2003.




                                HOUSING - 130
Local Housing Element Assistance Project, 1989. Blueprint For Bay Area Housing.

Lompoc Valley Board of Realtors, Multiple Listing Service, 1985, 1990, 1991, 1994, and
2003.

Santa Barbara County-Cities Area Planning Council (APC) Census Affiliate Center,
1982. 1980 U.S. Census Santa Barbara County, Technical Report #3, Population and
Housing Characteristics, Summary Tape File 1.

Santa Barbara County-Cities Area Planning Council (APC), 1983. Forecast 82: Santa
Barbara County Regional Growth Forecast 1980 – 2000.

Santa Barbara County-Cities Area Planning Council (APC), 1987. City of Lompoc
Population, Employment, and Land Use Forecast.

Santa Barbara County-Cities Area Planning Council (APC), 1989. Forecast 89: Santa
Barbara County Regional Growth Forecast 1985 – 2005.

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 1992a. Regional Housing
Needs Plan.

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 1992b. Regional Review
Newsletter – Spring Edition.

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 1992c. Revised Growth
Forecast.

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 1994. Forecast 94: Santa
Barbara County Regional Growth Forecast 1990 – 2005.

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 2002. Regional Housing
Needs for Santa Barbara County.

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 2002. Santa Barbara
County Regional Growth Forecast 2000 – 2030.

Santa Barbara County Planning & Development Department, 1994. Farm Employee
Housing Study.

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development, 2003.
Planning Division, Telephone Survey, 2003

State of California, Department of Finance (DOF). Demographic Research Unit, E-5
Reports, 1990-1995.




                                 HOUSING - 131
State of California, Department of Finance (DOF), State Census Data Center, 1991.
1990 Census of Population and Housing, Summary Tape File 1 & 3.

State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), 1988.
Developing A Regional Housing Needs Plan.

State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), 1990.
State Density Bonus Law.

State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), 1991.
Loan and Grant Programs for the Division of Community Affairs.

State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), 1992.
Memo from Thomas B. Cook, dated May 1992.

State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD),
Housing Policy Development, 1998. The State of California’s Housing Markets 1990-
1997.

State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), 2002.
A Summary Report on California’s Programs to Address Homelessness.

State of California, Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information,
Labor Force & Unemployment Data, 2002.

UCSB Economic Forecast Project, Volume 5, May 2002. North Santa Barbara County
Economic Outlook 2002.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1970 Census of Population and
Housing Characteristics Santa Barbara, California Standard Metropolitan Statistical
Area.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1980 Summary of Population
and Housing Characteristics California.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1990 Summary of Population
and Housing Characteristics California.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, American FactFinder, U.S.
Census 2000. 2000 Summary of Population and Housing Characteristics, Summary
Files 1 & 3, Lompoc, California.

Wells Fargo Bank, 1992. Homebuyer’s Guide To Finding The Right Loan.




                                HOUSING - 132
12.0   ENDNOTES

1.     See Glossary for household income definitions. The City utilizes the most recent
       household income thresholds provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and
       Urban Development to determine the relative affordability of housing units.

2.     This housing affordability distribution was obtained from the Santa Barbara
       County Association of Governments, Regional Housing Needs Plan, December
       2002.

3.     State Department of Finance, 1990, 1991,1992, and 2002. E-5 Report.

4.     State Department of Finance, E-5 City/County Population and Housing Estimates
       for Individual Counties, May 12, 2003.

5.     Telephone conversation with Charles Chan; State Department of Health
       Services, Health Data and Statistics Branch; April 13, 1992.

6.     Santa Barbara County Association of Governments, Regional Growth Forecast
       2000 – 2030.

7.     Based on conversations on February 25, 2003 with VAFB Civilian Payroll
       Department, Military Personnel Department, and Army and Air Force Exchange
       Service Personnel Department 381 of 7,509 employees live in Lompoc.
       Information was not available for residences of employees of private contractors
       performing work at VAFB.

8.     UCSB Economic Forecast Project, Volume 5, May 2002. North Santa Barbara
       County Economic Outlook 2002.

9.     The largest group-quarters population in Lompoc are inmates in correctional
       institutions. The inmate population accounted for approximately 91 percent of all
       group-quarters occupants and totaled 3,137 according to the 1990 Census.

10.    The estimated number of renters living in overcrowded conditions was derived by
       taking the total number of overcrowded households (1,946) multiplying by the
       percentage of overcrowded households which are renter occupied (0.68) and
       then multiplying by average renter occupied household size (2.91).

11.    The 1980 household income distribution was obtained from the Regional
       Housing Needs Plan.

12.    The 1990 household income distribution was derived from 1990 Census income
       information for Santa Barbara County and the City of Lompoc using a
       methodology provided by the State Department of Housing and Community




                                  HOUSING - 133
      Development in Appendix 7 of Developing A Regional Housing Needs Plan, July
      1988.

13.   The 2000 household income distribution was derived from 2000 Census income
      information for Santa Barbara County and the City of Lompoc using a
      methodology provided to Santa Barbara County Association of Governments by
      the State Department of Housing and Community Development.

14.   The 2000 renter and owner household overpayment information was derived
      from 2000 Census income information for Santa Barbara County and the City of
      Lompoc using a methodology provided to Santa Barbara County Association of
      Governments by the State Department of Housing and Community Development.

15.   The “1990 Total Unit” column and the “2000 Total Unit” column summarize data
      obtained from the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census.

16.   The average annual percent change calculation assumes continued annual
      compounding for the twelve year period.

17.   Price information was provided by Wiser Property Management, Prudential
      Hunter Property Management, Lompoc Realty, Park Place Apartments,
      Ravenswood Apartments, and Kailani Village Apartments.

18.   The appropriateness of the 30 percent affordability threshold was verified through
      conversations with the State Department of Housing and Community
      Development (Gary Collord), Wells Fargo Bank (Matt Costello), First Valley Bank
      (Paulette Cappelen), and the California Association of Realtors Research
      Department (G.U. Krueger).

19.   FHA loans require a three percent down payment, and the maximum loan limit
      may not exceed $280,749. A two to three percent down payment is required on
      VA mortgages, and the maximum loan limit may not exceed $322,700.

20.   Income limits are established annually by HUD. These income limits are codified
      in California Health and Safety Code Sections 50079.5, 50105, and 50106 and
      are transmitted to the City by the State Department of Housing and Community
      Development.

21.   Conversation with Frank Thompson, Housing Consultant, August 2003.

22.   Conversation with Dave Young of the Social Security Administration in Santa
      Maria, May 2003.

23.   The 2000 Census annual household income poverty thresholds for single
      mothers with 1, 2, or 3 children were $11,250, $14,150, and $17,050,
      respectively.



                                 HOUSING - 134
24.   In 1987 the Federal government enacted the Stewart B. McKinney Act to study
      homelessness. The Act required counties and cities to submit a Comprehensive
      Homeless Assistance Plan (CHAP) to HUD in order to be eligible for funds
      authorized under the Act.

25.   In 2001, the State Legislature changed the mandatory revision date of the City’s
      Housing Element from December 31, 2003 to June 30, 2008. Consequently, the
      length of the Housing Element implementation period has been extended from
      five to seven and one-half years.

26.   Dwelling unit potential was calculated separately for each parcel.

27.   Potential additional dwelling unit capacity for each parcel was calculated on an
      analysis of current projects, existing properties, and a hypothetical project
      described in Section 5.1.2.1 of which the end result is to divide parcel acreage
      (i.e. total lot area less public improvements, setbacks and unbuildable acreage)
      by the minimum land area per dwelling unit requirement for the applicable zone
      and then subtracting the number of existing units.

      For example, a 0.23 acre R-3 parcel with one existing dwelling unit would have
      an additional dwelling unit capacity of 4 units.

      Calculation Methodology:

      p Current use acreage = 0.23 acres = 10,019 square feet
      p Minimum land area per dwelling unit in the R-3 zone = 2,000 square feet per
        dwelling units
      p Number of existing units = 1

      10,019 sq ft / (2,000 sq ft/unit) = 5.01 units allowed
      5 units allowed – 1 existing unit = 4 additional units




                                   HOUSING - 135
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      HOUSING - 136
                                  APPENDIX A
                       Housing Condition Survey Methodology

Overview

The initial housing condition survey was conducted in November, 1991. Surveyors
evaluated only external structural characteristics to assess housing condition. The
subsequent focused survey was conducted in August and September of 2003. Likewise,
only external structural characteristics were evaluated to asses the housing condition.

The areas included in the initial survey were selected by reviewing the dates of citywide
Subdivision Maps. Survey areas were initially determined by reviewing residential areas
subdivided prior to 1971. These residential areas included over 60 percent of the
housing units in the city and all the units constructed before 1971. Areas which were
excluded from the survey were subdivided after 1971 and were made up of units built
after 1972. These post-1972 units were generally considered in “A” condition (see
explanation below) by the City’s Building Department. Information from the 1980 and
1990 U.S. Census on factors such as lower-than-average household income, household
tenure, and household ethnicity were also considered prior to finalizing the survey area.
The survey area was divided into 31 sub-areas along Census Tract boundaries. The
subsequent focused survey conducted in August and September of 2003 was
performed on those Census Tracts that contained the housing units categorized in 1991
as Conditions C and D. A general less focused survey was conducted during this same
period of time on the housing units in the remaining census tracts.

Five surveyors collected the raw housing condition data on the initial survey. The
surveyors were assigned areas throughout the City. However, surveyors were not
assigned to evaluate areas in which they resided. Extensive discussions, photos
depicting each housing condition category, and a brief field session were utilized to
provide uniform application of the evaluation criteria by the surveyors. In addition, a
local building contractor was included in one orientation session to verify cost estimates
for typical housing repairs, so that surveyors could be more certain of what observable
rehabilitation needs would cost to repair.

Evaluation Criteria

Four evaluation criterion were used to determine the condition of single family dwellings
and multiple family dwellings and three evaluation criterion were used to describe
mobilehome condition.




                                  HOUSING - 137
The evaluation categories for single and multiple family dwellings were as follows:

      Condition “A” (satisfactory units or better)

      Condition “A” units were new or near new housing under construction and older
      housing which had been carefully maintained. This included all housing units in
      areas developed after 1980.

      Condition “B” (units needing minor rehabilitation)

      Condition “B” units were housing with apparent minor visible deficiencies where
      an expenditure of under $10,000 and regular ongoing maintenance would extend
      the useful life of the structure beyond a 40 year period. Visible characteristics
      typical of Condition “B” included weathered or deteriorating roof material,
      weathered areas requiring painting, and sagging or inoperable garage doors.
      These units had received some regular maintenance but showed early signs of
      physical deterioration.

      Condition “C” (units needing major rehabilitation)

      Condition “C” units were substandard housing where major deficiencies were
      apparent. These deficiencies included the absence of foundations, sagging roofs,
      weathered areas requiring replacement, and some structural failure in porches
      and steps. These were usually older structures (pre-building code) whose original
      construction was inadequate or structures which have had little or insufficient
      maintenance. Buildings in this condition, unless rehabilitated, could be beyond
      reasonable economic repair within a 3 to 10 year period. “C” condition housing
      would likely require a $10,000 to $40,000 expenditure and a program of sound
      maintenance to provide the building with an additional 40 year life.

      Condition “D” (units needing replacement)

      Condition “D” units were defined as dilapidated substandard housing which has
      deteriorated beyond reasonable economic repair. The term “reasonable
      economic repair” means a sum of money in excess of 50 percent of the “as is”
      value of the building which would be required to rehabilitate the dwelling to
      livable standards. These units were severely neglected and showed no recent
      signs of maintenance.

The mobilehome evaluation criteria differed from that used for stationary housing in that
units requiring minor and major rehabilitation were not distinguished. Consequently, the
condition of mobilehomes was evaluated using three criterion.




                                   HOUSING - 138
      Condition “A” – Satisfactory

      Condition “A” mobilehomes were new or newer homes and older homes which
      had been carefully maintained which showed no significant signs of exterior
      deterioration.

      Condition “B” – Needing Rehabilitation

      Condition “B” mobilehomes showed clear signs of physical deterioration
      including: peeling paint, weathering, and sagging steps or doors.

      Condition “C” – Needing Replacement

      Condition “C” mobilehomes were severely neglected homes where no signs of
      regular maintenance were observable.

Survey Method

Surveyors were provided data collection forms for each area they were assigned. The
percentage of units counted within each area varied. Areas were surveyed 100, 50, or
25 percent depending on the degree of housing variation. That is, a greater percentage
of housing units were counted in areas with a high degree of housing variation (in terms
of age and architectural style). Surveyors categorized and tallied all counted units in a
given area. Single family dwellings, multi-family dwellings, and mobilehome data was
categorized and tallied separately within each survey area.




                                  HOUSING - 139
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      HOUSING - 140
                                APPENDIX B
          UNDERDEVELOPED LAND RESOURCES - PARCEL BY PARCEL LIST
             MIXED USE (MU) GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION
                                                                                                           Potential
                                                                                                Existing
                                                                                                           Additional
      Street Address                      Lot Size                     Land Use/                Dwelling
                                 (acreage)    (square feet)
                                                                                                            Dwelling
           APN                                                         Year Built                Units
                                                                                                             Units
   331 N. G            Street                                       Vacant Warehouse
                                   0.21          9,100                                                         4
        85-021-01                                                         1958
   327 N. G            Street                                   American Industrial Supply
                                   0.31         13,650                                                         6
        85-021-02                                                           1962
   325 N. G            Street                                   American Industrial Supply
                                   0.20          8,750                                                         4
        85-021-03                                                           1973
   321 N. G            Street                                        U-Haul Rental Yard
                                   0.48         21,000                                                         10
        85-021-04                                                           1949
                                                               Rape Crisis Center/ Lompoc
   139 N. G            Street      0.20          8,750           Valley Board of Realtors                      4
        85-122-01                                                           1925
   133 N. G            Street                                   Chiropractic Health Center
                                   0.20          8,750                                                         4
        85-122-02                                                           1938
   129 N. G            Street                                 Hairtique HairStyling/Residence
                                   0.16          7,000                                             1           2
        85-122-03                                                           1930
   125 N. G            Street                                            Residence
                                   0.16          7,000                                             1           2
        85-122-04                                                           1940
   121 N. G            Street                                 Agriculture Commission Office
                                   0.16          7,000                                             1           2
        85-122-05                                                           1925
                                                                   Catherine Wilkerson's
   133 N. F            Street      0.16          7,000               Chiropractic Office                       3
        85-123-02                                                           1941
                                                                   Catherine Wilkerson's
   135 N.       F       Street     0.08          3,500               Chiropractic Office                       1
        85-123-16                                                           1941
   129 N.       F       Street                                         Speedy Towing
                                   0.20          8,750                                                         4
        85-123-03                                                          Parking
   125 N.       F       Street                                         Speedy Towing
                                   0.20          8,750                                                         4
        85-123-04                                                           1959
   117 N.        F      Street                                         Speedy Towing
                                   0.16          7,000                                                         3
         85-123-05                                                      Storage Yard
   117 N. F            Street
                                   0.16          7,000                   Parking                               3
         85-123-05
115-1/2 N. F           Street                                          Warehouse
                                   0.05          2,000                                                         1
         85-123-06                                                        1980
   115 N. F            Street                                           Residence
                                   0.11          5,000                                             1           1
         85-123-07                                                        1919
   119 N. E            Street                                           Residence
                                   0.16          7,000                                             2           1
         85-131-06                                                      1929/1938
117-1/2 N. E           Street                                           Residence
                                   0.06          2,600                                             1           0
         85-131-07                                                        1941
   117 N. E            Street                                           Residence
                                   0.10          4,400                                             1           1
         85-131-08                                                        1913
   118 N. G            Street                                       Professional Office
                                   0.16          7,000                                                         3
         85-123-11                                                      1925/1958
   122 N. G            Street                                           Residence
                                   0.20          8,750                                                         4
         85-123-12                                                        1941
   126 N. G            Street                                           Residence
                                   0.28         12,250                                             4           2
         85-123-13                                                        1936


                                               HOUSING - 141
130 N. G         Street                              Residence
                          0.48   21,000                                      2   8
     85-123-14                                          1941
212 E. Walnut    Avenue                                 Office
                          0.16    7,000                                          3
     85-123-15                                          1923
320 E. Walnut    Avenue                     Lompoc Automotive (Vacant)
                          0.16    7,000                                          3
     85-131-01                                          1963
133 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      1   2
     85-131-02                                          1918
131 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      1   2
     85-131-03                                          1903
127 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      2   1
     85-131-04                                          1935
123 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      2   1
     85-131-05                                          1937
124 N. F         Street                         Jeffers Muffler Shop
                          0.24   10,500                                          4
     85-131-15                                          1960
128 N. F         Street                              Residence
                          0.12    5,250                                      1   1
     85-131-16                                          1959
132 N. F         Street                              Residence
                          0.12    5,250                                      1   1
     85-131-17                                          1932
136 N. F         Street                              Residence
                          0.15    6,750                                      1   2
     85-131-18                                          1903
312 E. Walnut    Avenue                              Residence
                          0.09    3,750                                      1   0
     85-131-19                                          1938
                                             Essential Touch Massage
139 N. D         Street   0.16    7,000               Therapy                1   2
     85-132-01                                          1906
133 N. D         Street                             VIVA Office
                          0.15    6,646                                      1   2
     85-132-02                                          1923
131 N. D         Street                              Residence
                          0.14    5,961                                      1   2
     85-132-03                                          1929
127 N. D         Street                              Residence
                          0.11    4,893                                      1   1
     85-132-04                                          1903
119 N. D         Street                              Alano Club
                          0.16    7,000                                      1   2
     85-132-06                                          1913
115 N. D         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      3   0
     85-132-07                                          1958
123 N. D         Street                                 Office
                          0.24   10,500                                          4
     85-132-05                                         >1953
126 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      4   0
     85-132-15                                          1930
128 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      1   2
     85-132-16                                          1929
132 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      2   1
     85-132-17                                          1932
138 N. E         Street                              Residence
                          0.16    7,000                                      2   1
     85-132-18                                          1928
                                          Kings La-Z-Boy Gallery Furniture
116 N. E         Street   0.48   21,000                 Shop                 6   4
     85-132-19                                          1928
223 N. G         Street
                          0.16    7,000            Storage Yard                  3
     85-082-05
219 N. G         Street                             Residence
                          0.08    3,500                                      1   0
     85-082-06                                         1937
215 N. G         Street                             Residence
                          0.12    5,250                                      1   1
     85-082-07                                         1954
218 N. I         Street                          Zona Seca Office
                          0.16    7,000                                          3
     85-081-09                                         1949

                                 HOUSING - 142
                                                  St. James Missionary Baptist
   222 N. I           Street   0.24    10,500               Church                     4
        85-081-10                                            1931
   228 N. I           Street                              Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    2     1
        85-081-11                                            1990
                                                 Community Action Commission
    120 W. Chestnut   Avenue   0.40    17,500                Office                    8
         85-081-16                                           1973
    239 N. G          Street                              Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    4     0
         85-082-01                                           1951
    235 N. G          Street                              Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-082-02                                           1890
    231 N. G          Street
                               0.16     7,000             Storage Yard                 3
         85-082-03
    227 N. G          Street
                               0.24    10,500             Storage Yard                 4
         85-082-04
    211 N. G          Street
                               0.20     8,750               Parking                    4
         85-082-08
    119 E. Walnut     Avenue                           Wiser Realty Office
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-082-09                                            1923
    115 E. Walnut     Avenue
                               0.16     7,000               Parking                    3
         85-082-10
    209 E. Walnut     Avenue                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    2     1
         85-083-12                                            1911
    203 E. Walnut     Avenue                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-083-13                                            1890
    210 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-083-14                                            1920
    214 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-083-15                                            1890
    218 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.12     5,227                                    1     1
         85-083-16                                            1923
    220 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.12     5,227                                    1     1
         85-083-17                                            1913
    224 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-083-18                                            1920
    230 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.24    10,500                                    3     1
         85-083-19                                            1923
230/232 N. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.08     3,485                                    2     0
         85-083-20                                            1946
    200 E. Chestnut   Avenue                       Gospel Lighthouse Church
                               0.08     3,484                                          1
         85-083-23                                            1960
    113 S. F          Street                      Perry's Auto Parts & Garage
                               0.16     7,000                                          3
         85-163-08                                            1959
    115 S. F          Street                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-163-09                                            1947
    118 S. G          Street
                               0.16     7,000             Storage Yard                 3
         85-163-18
    112 S. G          Street                               Residence
                               0.16     7,000                                    1     2
         85-163-19                                           1925
          TOTAL                13.20   577,423                                   72   179




                                       HOUSING - 143
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      HOUSING - 144
                                 APPENDIX C
            UNDERDEVELOPED LAND RESOURCES - PARCEL BY PARCEL LIST
         OLD TOWN COMMERICAL (OTC) GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION
                                                                                                          Potential
                                                                                               Existing
                                                                                                          Additional
         Street Address                     Lot Size                     Land Use/             Dwelling
                                   (acreage)    (square feet)
                                                                                                           Dwelling
              APN                                                        Year Built             Units
                                                                                                            Units
   121 N. H               Street                                        Legal Offices
                                     0.16          7,000                                                      3
        85-121-03                                                          1952
   115    N. H            Street
                                     0.24         10,500               Lompoc Record                          4
           85-121-04
   135    N. H            Street                                    Walnut Plaza - mixed
                                     0.40         17,500                                                      8
           85-121-01                                                 commercial uses
   101    N. H            Street                                    Lilley Building - mixed
                                     0.16          7,000                                                      3
           85-121-05                                                   commercial uses
   105 W. Ocean           Avenue                                   Penelope's Tea & Gifts
                                     0.16          7,000                                                      3
        85-121-06                                                          1894
   109 W. Ocean           Avenue
                                     0.08          3,500                   Parking                            1
        85-121-07
   111 W. Ocean           Avenue
                                     0.08          3,500             Rollins Photography                      1
        85-121-08
113-115 W. Ocean          Avenue                                       The Antique Store
                                     0.16          7,000                                                      3
         85-121-09                                                            1897
   117 W. Ocean           Avenue                                     Rice Bowl Restaurant
                                     0.08          3,500                                                      2
        85-121-10                                                             1957
   119 W. Ocean           Avenue                                          Bar/Lounge
                                     0.08          3,500                                                      2
        85-121-11                                                             1893
                                                                  Lompoc Realty Co./Paulin's
   123 W. Ocean           Avenue     0.16          7,000                    Flooring                          3
        85-121-12                                                             1897
                                                                LOVARC Office/Lompoc Dance
   116    N. I            Street     0.32         14,000                     Studio                           6
           85-121-13                                                          1938
   124    N. I            Street                                    Office Building (Vacant)
                                     0.56         24,500                                                      12
           85-121-14                                                          1959
   120 W. Walnut          Avenue                                    Auto Repair Shop/Yard
                                     0.24         10,500                                                      4
        85-121-15                                                             1963
   119    E. Ocean        Avenue                                     Retail Plumbing Shop
                                     0.24         10,200                                                      4
           85-122-07                                                          1954
   117    E. Ocean        Avenue                                         Beauty Supply
                                     0.08          3,500                                                      1
           85-122-08                                                          1964
   115    E. Ocean        Avenue                                 A & B Sewing Machine Center
                                     0.08          3,500                                                      1
           85-122-09                                                          1964
   112    N. H            Street                                 Lompoc Theater/Retail Shops
                                     0.32         14,000                                                      6
           85-122-16                                                          1927
   122    N. H            Street
                                     0.48         21,000                   Parking                            10
           85-122-21
                                                                 Rapunsel's Hair/Residence/
   219    E. Ocean        Avenue     0.32         14,000              Vacant Building             1           5
           85-123-08                                                        1940
   203    E. Ocean        Avenue                                   Toyota Car Dealership
                                     0.32         14,000                                                      6
           85-123-09                                                        1946
   203    E. Ocean        Avenue                                   Toyota Car Dealership
                                     0.32         14,000                                                      6
           85-123-10                                                        1946
   122 W. Ocean           Avenue                                  Pacific Health & Fitness
                                     0.40         17,500                                                      8
        85-161-02                                                   Gym/Vacant Space



                                                 HOUSING - 145
                                               Used Auto Sales Lot/Trailer
239   N. H         Street    0.18    7,700             (Vacant)                     3
       85-081-01                                         1956
233   N. H         Street                          Residence/Duplex
                             0.14    6,300                                      2   1
       85-081-02                                         1945

                                             Mixed Commercial/ Retail/Office
205   N. H         Street    0.35   15,400                                          7
       85-081-07                                         1921
215   N. H         Street                           Bank of America
                             0.93   40,600                                          20
       85-081-15                                         1958
200   N. H         Street                     Santa Barbara Bank & Trust
                             0.64   28,000                                          13
       85-082-17                                         1973
234   N. H         Street                     Mural Society Workshop Site
                             0.56   24,500                                          12
       85-082-15                                         1947
321 W. Ocean       Avenue                            Lennie's Bar
                             0.16    7,000                                          3
     91-082-11                                           1963

                                               Martial Arts Studio/Collectors
                                             Galley West Frames/Better Beds
131   N. I         Street
                             0.40   17,500    & Furniture Warehouse/Vacant          8
                                                    Warehouse (Rear)

       91-083-02                                           1958
129   N. I         Street                            Knights of Pythias
                             0.24   10,500                                          4
       91-083-03                                           1962
119   N. I         Street
                             0.24   10,500                Parking                   4
       91-083-04
                                               Monique's Beauty Supply/
113   N. I         Street                    American Host Restaurant/ Last
                             0.24   10,500                                          4
                                                 Stop Hats & Boutique
       91-083-05                                        1962
205 W. Ocean       Avenue                          Owens Music Co.
                             0.16    7,000                                          3
     91-083-08                                          1959
314 W. Ocean       Avenue
                             0.16    7,000                Parking                   3
     91-102-03
304 W. Ocean       Avenue                          Jetty Restaurant
                             0.48   21,000                                          10
     91-102-21                                           1974
320 W. Ocean       Avenue                      Carpet One/Valley Flooring
                             0.32   14,000                                          6
     91-102-22                                           1947
214 W. Ocean       Avenue
                             0.08    3,500                Parking                   1
     91-103-02
208 W. Ocean       Avenue
                             0.24   10,500                Parking                   4
     91-103-03
204 W. Ocean       Avenue
                             0.16    7,000                Parking                   3
     91-103-04
200 W. Ocean       Avenue
                             0.16    7,000                Parking                   3
     91-103-05
111   S. I         Street                        Chamber of Commerce
                             0.16    7,000                                          3
       91-103-06                                        1890
137   S. I         Street
                             0.32   14,000                Parking                   6
       91-103-09
221 W. Ocean       Avenue
                             0.16    7,000                Parking                   3
     91-103-10
134   S. J         Street
                             0.12    5,258                Parking                   2
       91-103-11
130   S. J         Street
                             0.12    5,251                Parking                   2
       91-103-12
114   S.       J    Street
                             0.16    7,000          Warehouse (Vacant)              3
       91-103-16



                                    HOUSING - 146
   200 W. Ocean          Avenue
                                   0.32   14,000                Parking                    6
        91-103-20
          E. Ocean       Avenue                     First American Title Office/ Dr.
                                   0.32   14,000                                           6
           85-162-01                                     Marsh Ophthalmology
   108    E. Ocean       Avenue
                                   0.16    7,000                Parking                    3
           85-162-02
   112    E. Ocean       Avenue
                                   0.08    3,500                Parking                    1
           85-162-03
   114    E. Ocean       Avenue
                                   0.08    3,500                Parking                    1
           85-162-04
   116    E. Ocean       Avenue
                                   0.08    3,500                Parking                    1
           85-162-05
   118    E.     Ocean    Avenue                            Valley Homecare
                                   0.08    3,500                                           1
           85-162-06                                              1959
   122    E. Ocean       Avenue                              Elegant Carpet
                                   0.08    3,500                                           1
           85-162-07                                              1942
   124    E. Ocean       Avenue                           Taco Loco Restaurant
                                   0.08    3,500                                           1
           85-162-08                                              1959
   101    E. Cypress     Avenue
                                   0.32   14,000       Centennial Square Park              6
           85-162-15
   128    S. H           Street                         The Gas Co. Office
                                   0.16    7,000                                           3
           85-162-16                                            1932
   126    S. H           Street                           Retail (Vacant)
                                   0.08    3,500                                           1
           85-162-17                                            1974
   118    S. H           Street                       Blacksmith Steak House
                                   0.16    7,000                                           3
           85-162-20                                            1962
   114    S. H           Street                       Jasper's Cocktail Lounge
                                   0.12    5,250                                           2
           85-162-21                                            1964
   112    S. H           Street
                                   0.12    5,250                Parking                    2
           85-162-22
   200    E. Ocean       Avenue                         Taco Loco Restaurant
                                   0.24   10,500                                           4
           85-163-01                                            1967
   206    E. Ocean       Avenue                      Gracian Feed Pet & Western
                                   0.08    3,500                                           1
           85-163-02                                           Wear
   212    E. Ocean       Avenue                               Star Motel
                                   0.32   14,000                                       1   5
           85-163-05                                             1950
   222    E. Ocean       Avenue                      Hampton's Radiator Repair
                                   0.16    7,000                                           3
           85-163-07                                             1953
   208    E. Ocean       Avenue                     Motorcycles - Harley Davidson
                                   0.16    7,000                                           3
           85-163-20                                             1958
   123    N. H           Street                        Stillman's Dry Cleaners
                                   0.16    7,000                                           3
           85-121-17                                          1949/1957
   123    N. H           Street
                                   0.16    7,000                Parking                    3
           85-121-16

                                                   Second Time Around Thrift Store
110-112 W. Ocean         Avenue    0.16    7,000                                           3
         85-161-03                                            1937/1932
                                                      BMS Black Market Skate
   106 W. Ocean          Avenue    0.08    3,500       Shop/Oddfellows Lodge               1
        85-161-04                                                1962
          W. Ocean       Avenue                              Antique Mall
                                   0.09    4,000                                           1
           85-161-05                                             1905
                                                    Southside Coffee Co./Printed
105-107   S. H           Street    0.12    5,166           Matter Bookstore                2
           85-161-06                                             1905
                                                   Mike's Trains & Hobbies/ Vacant
109-111   S. H           Street    0.11    4,834             Retail Space                  2
           85-161-07                                             1897


                                          HOUSING - 147
113-115   S. H         Street                          Photo/Picture Studio
                                0.16     7,000                                             3
           85-161-08                                           1903
                                                    Haircuts Hair Salon/Hot Nail
   117    S. H         Street   0.08     3,500                 Salon                       1
           85-161-09                                           1961
   125    S. H         Street                         Lompoc Furniture Mart
                                0.16     7,000                                             3
           85-161-12                                           1905
   127    S. H         Street                          Modern Barber Shop
                                0.08     3,500                                             1
           85-161-13                                           1959
129-131   S. H         Street                             Retail Ceramics
                                0.16     7,000                                             3
           85-161-14                                         1958/1976
   137    S. H         Street
                                0.16     6,954                Parking                      3
           85-161-24
   139    S. H         Street                               Sleep Shop
                                0.16     7,046                                             3
           85-161-17                                           >1960
          W. Cypress   Avenue
                                0.24    10,500                Parking                      4
           85-161-18
   132    S. I         Street
                                0.16     7,000                Parking                      3
           85-161-19
   128    S. I         Street
                                0.08     3,500                Parking                      1
           85-161-20
          S. I         Street
                                0.32    14,000                Parking                      6
           85-161-21
   112    S. I         Street                           Sissy's Uptown Café
                                0.32    14,000                                             6
           85-161-23                                            1943
                                                  Go Bananas Custom Wood and
                                                  Fine Furniture/Oliveira's Fashion
                                0.48    21,000                                            10
301-307 W. Ocean       Avenue                          Floor & Carpet Clean
         91-082-09                                           1952/1953
   201 W. Ocean        Avenue                      Better Beds & Furniture Store
                                0.16     7,000                                             3
        91-083-07                                               1939
   213 W. Ocean        Avenue                       Mad Mack's Barbeque & Grill
                                0.24    10,500                                             4
        91-083-10                                               1937

                                                  Armero Electric Sales & Service
217-219 W. Ocean       Avenue   0.16     7,000                                             3
         91-083-11                                             1959
   223 W. Ocean        Avenue                           Bicycle Connection
                                0.16     7,000                                             3
        91-083-12                                              1965
            TOTAL               19.68   860,709                                       4   362




                                        HOUSING - 148
                                       APPENDIX D
                City Residential Development Fees – As of September 2003

The information provided below is included to assist in estimating City fees for
residential development and is updated regularly. Specific development proposals and
plans are needed to provide more precise cost information. Large residential
developments may have environmental impacts which require mitigation through
imposed conditions of approval and can involve additional financial expenditures to
achieve compliance. In addition, residential development fees are assessed by other
governmental agencies with authority outside the City’s jurisdiction (e.g., the Lompoc
Unified School District and the California State Department of Fish and Game).

PLANNING FEES
Architectural Review............................................................................................. $895.70
Conditional Use Permit...............................................................Actual Cost $500 deposit
Design Review (Site Plan
  / Building Plan) ...................................................................Actual Cost $500 deposit
Development Agreement............................................................Actual Cost $500 deposit
General Plan Amendment .......................................................Actual Cost $1,000 deposit
Lot Merger............................................................................................................ $647.65
Parcel Map .................................................................................Actual Cost $500 deposit
Subdivision Map......................................................................Actual Cost $1,000 deposit
Zone Change ..........................................................................Actual Cost $1,000 deposit
ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FEES
Negative Declaration .............................................................................................. $78.40
Environmental Impact Report..................................................Actual Cost $2,000 deposit
ENGINEERING FEES
Engineering Plan Check.................................................................................$271.40 / lot
Grading Permit ..............................................................Less than 50 cubic yards/$65.00
Traffic Impact Fee
- Single Family Dwelling .....................................................................................$161/unit
- Multi-Family Dwelling .......................................................................................$209/unit




                                                HOUSING - 149
REFUSE/RECYCLING FEES
Refuse Collection Containers
- Single Family Dwelling ............................................................................................ $145
- All Other Dwelling Types.................................... $235 for 350 gal/$330 for 440 gal each
WATER FEES
Retrofit Cost ............................................................................... $1,386 - $2,256 per unit,
                                                                                               depending on unit type
Water Meter Fee ...................... $79 for 5/8” meter/$115 for 1/2” meter/$167 for 1” meter
Water Connection ..................................................................$2,435 (for ¾” water meter)
Wastewater Connection ............................................................$261 (for ¾” water meter)
ELECTRIC FEES
Electric Meter Installation Fee
- Residential ..................................................................................................$130.10/unit
FIRE FEES
Subdivision Project Review .................................................................................... $38.35
Pre-plan Review ................................................................................................... $101.65
Plancheck/Field Test & Inspection
- Hotels and apartment houses (R-1 occupancies) ................................1-5 units/$101.65
                                                                              6-15 units/$126.90
                                                                            16-30 units/$140.05
                                                                            31-50 units/$152.45
                                                                            51-75 units/$177.75
                                                          (for more than 75 units, refer to City of Lompoc Master Fee Schedule)

Fire Protection Assessment Charge ............................... $0.0055 per gross building area
PARKLAND FEES
Single Family Dwellings
   - detached..............................................................................................$3,030 / unit
   - attached...............................................................................................$2,950 / unit
Duplexes, Triplexes, Four-plexes ...................................................................$2,900 / unit
Apartment Complexes (5 or more units).........................................................$2,690 / unit
Mobilehomes..................................................................................................$2,130 / unit




                                               HOUSING - 150
POLICE FEES
Police Station Impact Fee
- Single Family Dwellings ...................................................................................$143/unit
- Multi-Family Dwellings .....................................................................................$143/unit
BUILDING PERMIT FEES
Fees are based upon building valuation. To determine valuation the Building Division
utilizes valuation data compiled in Building Standards magazine in April 2001. The
valuation data represents average costs for most residential buildings.
Occupancy and Type of Construction                                Cost per Square Foot, Good Construction
Apartment Houses:
  Type I or II F.R. ................................................................................................ $107.10
  Type V – Masonry.............................................................................................. $87.00
  Type V – Wood Frame....................................................................................... $80.40
Dwellings:
  Type V – Masonry.............................................................................................. $95.50
  Type V – Wood Frame....................................................................................... $95.00
Private Garages:
   Wood Frame ...................................................................................................... $30.00
   Masonry ............................................................................................................. $30.00
   Open Carports ................................................................................................... $25.90
After valuation has been determined fees are levied according to the schedule below.
The source of this schedule is the California Administrative Code.

                   Total Valuation                                                      Fee
   $1 to $500                                               $23.50
   $501 to $2,000                                           $23.50 for the first $500 plus $3.05 for each
                                                            additional $100, or fraction thereof, to and
                                                            including $2,000.
   $2,001 to $25,000                                        $69.25 for the first $2,000 plus $14.00 for
                                                            each additional $1,000, or fraction thereof,
                                                            to and including $25,000.
   $25,001 to $50,000                                       $391.75 for the first $25,000 plus $10.10
                                                            for each additional $1,000, or fraction
                                                            thereof, to and including $50,000.
   $50,001 to $100,000                                      $643.75 for the first $50,000 plus $7.00 for
                                                            each additional $1,000, or fraction thereof,
                                                            to and including $100,000.
   $100,001 to $500,000                                     $993.75 for the first $100,000 plus $5.60
                                                            for each additional $1,000, or fraction
                                                            thereof, to and including $500,000.



                                                 HOUSING - 151
   $500,001 to $1,000,000                                 $3,233.75 for the first $500,000 plus $4.75
                                                          for each additional $1,000, or fraction
                                                          thereof, to and including $1,000,000.
   $1,000,001 and up                                      $5,608.75 for the first $1,000,000 plus
                                                          $3.65 for each additional $1,000, or fraction
                                                          thereof.

Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (SMIP) ................................valuation X $0.0001
(Per State of California, Department of Conservation, Resources Agency, Division of Mines and Geology for Strong-Motion
Instrumentation and Seismic Hazard Mapping Fee, Fee Schedule, Category 1 Construction (1 to 3 Story Residential), Method 1.)


Electrical Permit Fees, Mechanical Permit Fees, and Plumbing Permit Fees vary
according to number and type of fixtures, appliances, and equipment. However, the City
of Lompoc has adopted the permit fee schedules in the California Administrative Code.




                                               HOUSING - 152
                                                    APPENDIX E

                                           CITY OF LOMPOC
 DEVELOPMENT FEES FOR TYPICAL SINGLE-FAMILY AND MULTI-FAMILY HOMES1
                                                               Cost Per Unit
           Type of Fee                                       2
                                               Single-Family                 Multi-Family3
Building Permit                                  $1,767.21                   $11,289.70
Plan Check                                       $1,148.69                    $8,338.46
Police Station Fee                                $143.00                     $2,002.00
Traffic Signal Fee                                 161.00                     $2,926.00
Wastewater Fee                                    $261.00                      $861.00
Fire Fund                                          $15.85                       $88.95
Electric Meter                                    $130.10                     $1,734.60
Water Impact Fee                                 $2,435.00                    $8,035.00
Refuse Containers                                 $145.00                      $660.00
Retrofit Fee                                     $1,386.00                   $19,405.40
SMIP Fee                                           $23.80                      $166.02
Water Meter                                       $115.00                      $945.00
Park Impact Fee4
Electrical Permit                                 $220.24                     $1,497.70
Mechanical Permit                                 $91.55                       $900.40
Plumbing Permit                                   $238.20                     $1,602.50
Grading Permit (< 50 cu yds)                       $65.00                       $65.00
                                         5
Unit Fire Fee (Fire Dept. plan check fee)                                      $358.65
Totals                                                      $8,346.64                             $60,876.38

Per unit fee                                                $8,346.64                              $4,348.31
1
  In addition to City fees, developers of new residential construction are obligated to pay school fees at a rate of $1.84 per
square foot of conditioned space for single family dwellings and multi-family units.
2
  Single-family residence valued at $238,118 for purposes of building permit fees.
3
    Multi-family residence valued at $1,660,390 for purposes of building permit fees.
4
  Park Impact Fee is only applicable on residential subdivision developments; not applicable to infill lots. Park Impact Fees
for various residential uses are listed in Appendix D.
5
  Unit Fire Fee is only applicable for R-1 occupancies as defined in the Uniform Building Code which would include hotels
and apartment houses but not single family residences.




                                               HOUSING - 153
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      HOUSING - 154
                                    APPENDIX F
                       Analysis of Previous Housing Element

Introduction

State Guidelines require that each community evaluate previous Housing Elements in
terms of:

           Effectiveness of the element;
           Progress in implementation; and
           Appropriateness of proposed goals, objectives, and policies, given what has
           been learned.

Following is the City’s best effort to provide the State Department of Housing and
Community Development (HCD) with a “report card” meeting the above criteria. An
evaluation methodology was established to undertake this effort because the City does
not act alone in implementing its’ adopted Housing Elements. Other participants include:

           County of Santa Barbara – Housing Authority;
           Lompoc Housing Assistance Corporation (a nonprofit entity);
           Santa Barbara County Local Agency Formation Commission;
           Santa Barbara County, Planning and Development                    Department
           (Environmental Review and Bond Programs);
           U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; and
           State Department of Housing and Community Development.

While reviewing the 1997 Housing Element, we found that the goals are broad enough
to encompass a range of policies and objectives and have been found (through an
examination of their policies) to serve the interests of the state and city. Staff has
evaluated the 1997 Housing Element policies and objectives. Based on this evaluation,
adjustment of specific policies and objective items is deemed appropriate for the
update. These amendments are identified in the tables that follow.

Discussion of Policies and Objectives Relating to Goal 1

      Goal 1: Provide a choice of housing opportunities for all economic
      segments of the community.

The City of Lompoc has provided sufficient land to accommodate residential growth for
a variety of single family homes and multi-family units. The construction of housing units
has been low over the last ten years due to the recession. Additionally, the vacancy rate
has fluctuated between 2.3 percent and 4.1 percent which is relatively lower than the
standard 4.5 percent to 5.0 percent vacancy rate range. A 2.3 to 4.1 percent vacancy
rate indicates an imbalance between the supply and demand of housing in the City.
Regardless, this goal enabled the City to process housing projects to add 360 housing
units to its housing stock since 1990 and keep overall residential vacancy rates at 4.1



                                  HOUSING - 155
percent (according to the U.S. Census Bureau). The City currently has a number of
residential developments in various stages of the permitting and construction process
for both homeownership and rental for very low-, low-, moderate-, and above moderate-
income households. Development applications for approximately 663 single family units
and 366 multi-family units have either been approved for construction or are currently
being reviewed by the Community Development Department.

In 2001 the City adopted the Old Town Commercial District designed to provide
pedestrian-oriented commercial areas with a variety of street-front stores and offices
providing a depth of goods, services, and amenities, as well as residential opportunities
within and in close proximity to these areas. The Old Town Commercial District allows a
density range of between 14.5 and 21.8 dwelling units per acre to encourage housing
development options resulting in increased housing opportunities.

The City adopted a Mobilehome Rent Stabilization Ordinance in 1983 (amended in
1986, 1987, 1989, and 1991) which continues to be administered to assure affordable
housing options remain available within the community’s mobilehome parks.

The Santa Barbara County Housing Authority has also contributed to the range of
housing choice in Lompoc by managing and maintaining 220 rental housing units.

The City also tried to protect existing diversity and choice through housing rehabilitation.
The City has completed 59 housing rehabilitation projects since 1997 by utilizing both
State (CHFA) and federal (CDBG) housing programs.

                                      GOAL 1
      Provide a choice of housing opportunities for all economic segments of the
                                    community.
                    ANALYSIS OF POLICIES RELATING TO GOAL 1
                  1997 Policy                       Results                   Explanation
1.1     The City shall encourage        Production of 360 units        Goal accomplished.
        housing development which       since 1990 and 1,029 in
        provides varied housing         development process. Units     Recommend continue
        types, sizes, and tenure        range from large lot, single   policy.
        opportunities.                  family, for sale to high
                                        density multi-family rental.
1.2     The City shall encourage the    The General Plan and           Goal accomplished.
        dispersion of rental and        Zoning Map provide a range
        ownership housing units for     of sites for varied types of   Recommend continue
        very low- to moderate-income    housing.                       policy.
        households throughout the
        City.
1.3     The City shall assure that      The City requires that units   Goal accomplished.
        housing units are               constructed or rehabilitated
        preserved/reserved for very     with funds from City           Recommend continue
        low-, low-, and moderate-       programs (i.e., CDBG,          policy.
        income households in            Redevelopment Agency)
        publicly-assisted               record covenants to


                                       HOUSING - 156
      developments.                     preserve long-term
                                        affordability.
1.4   The City shall encourage the      The General Plan and           Goal accomplished.
      development of housing for        Zoning Map provides sites
      large families in multi-family    for medium and high density    Recommend continue
      residential areas.                development. City staff        policy.
                                        works with project
                                        proponents to encourage
                                        the production of three and
                                        four bedroom units.
1.5   The City shall develop            City staff administers low     No specific standard; staff
      incentives which expand           interest loan programs using   will continue efforts to
      housing opportunities for very    federal and state housing      expand housing
      low-income, low-income,           funds. Staff also works with   opportunities to this
      disabled, and/or senior           a community based non-         segment of the
      households.                       profit organization on         population.
                                        construction and
                                        rehabilitation projects to     Continue implementation.
                                        increase the affordable
                                        housing stock.
1.6   The City shall encourage the      There are approximately        Goal accomplished.
      development and                   900 mobilehomes located in
      maintenance of an adequate        parks throughout the City      Recommend continue
      supply of mobilehomes and         under State jurisdiction.      policy.
      manufactured housing to           However, the City adopted a
      provide opportunities for very    Mobilehome Rent
      low- to moderate-income           Stabilization Ordinance in
      housing.                          1983 which continues to be
                                        in effect.

                                        The City’s Zoning Ordinance
                                        includes a residential
                                        mobilehome park zoning
                                        district. Additionally, the
                                        City’s Zoning Ordinance
                                        allows mobilehomes to be
                                        installed by right in single
                                        family zone districts.
1.7   The City shall protect the        The City Subdivision           Goal accomplished.
      current supply of affordable      Ordinance permits
      rental housing by                 conversion to condominium      Recommend continue
      discouraging its conversion to    only when the vacancy rate     policy.
      condominium ownership.            is higher than 7.5% or when
                                        new rental housing is
                                        constructed to replace units
                                        to be converted.
1.8   The City shall work with the      City staff administers low     Goal accomplished.
      County Housing Authority          interest loan programs using
      and nonprofit housing groups      federal and state housing      Recommend continue
      to pursue affordable housing      funds. Staff also works with   policy.



                                       HOUSING - 157
      for the elderly, disabled, large    a community based non-
      families, female headed             profit organization on
      households, farm-workers,           construction and
      and the homeless.                   rehabilitation projects to
                                          increase the affordable
                                          housing stock for the
                                          elderly, disabled, large
                                          families, female headed
                                          households, farm-workers,
                                          and the homeless.
1.9  The City shall periodically          In 1996, the City conducted     Goal accomplished.
     evaluate its development             a permit streamlining review
     review process for ways to           and implemented several         Recommend continue
     facilitate the production of         changes to improve its          policy.
     new sources of affordable            development review
     housing, while maintaining a         process.
     commitment to sound
     planning and environmental
     protection.
1.10 The City shall continue to           Annexation opportunities for    It is likely the City can
     provide some residential             areas suitable for large lot    accomplish this goal in
     areas with large minimum lot         development did not occur       the planning period.
     sizes.                               during the planning period;
                                          staff is currently processing   Recommend continue
                                          an annexation and specific      policy.
                                          plan which will afford this
                                          opportunity.
1.11 With the exception of areas          Conditions of approval are      Progress has been made
     within the Old Town                  imposed on projects which       toward goal. Ordinance
     Redevelopment Project,               require compliance with this    for provision of off-site
     Amendment No. 2 area, in all         policy.                         housing can be
     residential developments of                                          developed during the
     ten units or more, at least          An in lieu fee ordinance has    planning period.
     10% of all the units shall be        been presented to the City
     affordable to low-, very low-,       Council; awaiting input from    Recommend continue
     and median-income                    interested parties.             policy.
     households. If it is
     determined to be infeasible to
     provide 10% of the units
     within the very low- to
     median-income category on-
     site, off-site provision of the
     units shall be acceptable or
     payment of an in-lieu fee
     shall be acceptable provided
     that the fee shall be applied
     to housing within the City

      Residential development
      projects within the Old Town
      Redevelopment Project,


                                         HOUSING - 158
     Amendment No. 2 area shall
     provide 15% of new housing
     affordable to low- and
     moderate-income households
     with at least 40% of those
     units to be used by very low-
     income households.
1.12 With the exception of housing       City has permitted reduction   Goal accomplished.
     within the Old Town                 of the affordable housing
     Redevelopment Project,              requirement when market        Recommend continue
     Amendment No. 2 area, in            conditions permit.             policy.
     implementing this Housing
     Element, the City shall take
     into consideration the current
     market prices for housing.
     When the median market
     price for housing, is less than
     the current maximum median
     income price, the Planning
     Commission may find that
     median income housing
     opportunities are fulfilling a
     portion of the requirements of
     Policy 1.11. In such cases,
     not less than 5 percent of the
     total units in the project shall
     be affordable to very low-,
     low-, and median-income
     households.
1.13 The City shall encourage the        In order to simplify the       Goal accomplished.
     development of custom-built         review process for custom
     homes.                              home development, the City     Recommend continue
                                         does not require               policy.
                                         architectural review for
                                         homes not associated with a
                                         tract.
1.14 The City shall monitor              The City has generally         Goal accomplished.
     previous commitments for            monitored previous
     very low-, low-, and                commitments for very low-,     Recommend continue
     moderate- income publicly           low-, and moderate-income      policy.
     assisted housing developed          publicly assisted housing.
     within the City.                    During this planning period
                                         the Community
                                         Development Department
                                         will seek accurate ways to
                                         monitor publicly assisted
                                         housing developed in the
                                         City.
1.15 The City shall continue to          City staff administers low     Goal accomplished.
     support efforts to promote          interest loan programs using



                                        HOUSING - 159
      equal opportunity in housing.    federal and state housing        Recommend continue
                                       funds. Staff also works with     policy.
                                       a community based non-
                                       profit organization on
                                       construction and
                                       rehabilitation projects to
                                       promote equal opportunity in
                                       housing.
1.16 The City shall continue to        The City employs an              Goal accomplished.
     support efforts to achieve an     Economic Development
     employment and housing            Coordinator to implement a       Recommend continue
     balance within communities        program to attract and retain    policy.
     throughout Santa Barbara          business. According to the
     County.                           Regional Housing Needs
                                       Plan adopted in December
                                       of 2002, the City’s
                                       jobs/housing balance is in
                                       an acceptable range.
1.17 The City shall support efforts    Staff has presented an in        It is likely the City can
     which facilitate                  lieu fee ordinance to the City   accomplish this goal in
     homeownership.                    Council. Fees generated by       the planning period.
                                       this program could be used,
                                       possibly in conjunction with     Recommend continue
                                       other grant funds, to fund a     policy.
                                       first time homebuyers
                                       assistance program.
1.18 The City shall work with the      The City has worked with         Goal accomplished.
     Lompoc Redevelopment              the Lompoc Redevelopment
     Agency, lending institutions,     Agency, the County Housing       Recommend continue
     private developers, the           Authority, and nonprofit         policy.
     County Housing Authority,         housing sponsors with
     and nonprofit housing             assistance in the
     sponsors, to make a good          acquisition, rehabilitation,
     faith effort to provide its       and/or construction of
     regional share of affordable      approximately 186 housing
     housing. To this end, the City    units affordable for very low-
     shall participate with the        low-, and moderate-income
     County in meeting housing         households.
     needs.
1.19 The City shall provide            City staff regularly provides    Goal accomplished.
     prospective private               assistance to project
     developers and nonprofit          proponents regarding the         Recommend continue
     sponsors with information         development review process       policy.
     and technical assistance          and regarding funds
     which expedites the filing of     available for affordable
     applications and the              housing projects.
     preparation of plans and
     studies in order to provide
     more affordable housing.




                                      HOUSING - 160
1.20 The City shall tier                Planning Division staff           Goal accomplished.
     environmental information          regularly utilizes previously
     whenever possible, to              prepared environmental            Recommend continue
     prevent duplicate studies and      review information as             policy.
     reduce the cost of                 allowed by CEQA to reduce
     environmental review.              costs and timeframes
                                        associated with
                                        environmental review.
1.21 Where feasible, the City shall     City staff administers low        Goal accomplished.
     facilitate the use of vacant       interest loan programs using
     and underdeveloped lands           federal and state housing         Recommend continue
     and the use of local, state,       funds. Staff also works with      policy.
     and federal monies to help in      a community based non-
     the development and                profit organization to identify
     rehabilitation of long-term        vacant and underdeveloped
     affordable housing.                lands for the construction
                                        and rehabilitation of projects
                                        to increase long-term
                                        affordable housing.
1.22 The City shall continue to         City staff administers low        Goal accomplished.
     pursue and allocate federal        interest loan programs using
     funds eligible for housing         federal and state housing         Recommend continue
     projects and social services       funds. Staff also works with      policy.
     which benefit very low-, low-      a community based non-
     and moderate-income                profit organization on
     persons and shall utilize at       construction and
     least 33 percent of these          rehabilitation projects with
     federal monies for the             social services to increase
     development and                    the affordable housing stock
     rehabilitation of affordable       that would benefit very low-,
     housing.                           low-, and moderate-income
                                        households.
1.23 The City annually shall review     General Plan annual reports       The Planning Division is
     progress on the provision of       were prepared regularly until     fully staffed and it is
     its regional fair share of         1999. Due to staff                anticipated that annual
     housing units to determine         shortages, annual reports         progress reviews will be
     the effectiveness of existing      were not prepared for 2000        conducted.
     policies and to make               and 2001.
     necessary changes.                                                   Recommend continue
                                                                          policy.
1.24 The City shall encourage a         The General Plan and              Goal accomplished.
     broad range of rental housing      Zoning Map provide a range
     opportunities.                     of sites for varied types of      Recommend continue
                                        housing.                          policy.
             1997 Objective                         Results                     Explanation
1A    From 1990 to 2001 the City        The General Plan and              Goal accomplished.
      has and shall continue to         Zoning Map provide a range
      pursue the following              of sites for varied types of      Recommend continue
      affordability distribution for    housing, with sufficient          policy incorporating 2002
      new residential development:      vacant and/or                     RHNA distribution.



                                       HOUSING - 161
                                           underdeveloped land
      Household Income Distribution (%)    available for 1,736 units.
      Very Low                27           This land has the potential
      Low                     14
      Moderate                20           to accommodate the
      Above Moderate          38           distribution as designated.
      Total                  100
1B    From 1990 to 2001 the City           The General Plan and           Goal accomplished.
      has and shall continue to take       Zoning Map provide a range
      steps necessary to                   of sites for varied types of   Recommend continue
      encourage the development            housing, with sufficient       policy incorporating 2002
      of 1,736 additional housing          vacant land available for      RHNA allocation.
      units affordable for very low        1,736 units.
      to above moderate income
      households distributed as
      follows:

      Household Income Distribution (%)
      Very Low               475
      Low                   249
      Moderate               347
      Above Moderate         665
      Total                1,736


Discussion of Policies and Objectives Relating to Goal 2

      Goal 2: Restore, protect and improve the condition of existing housing
      and neighborhoods.

The City provided assistance to homeowners and nonprofit organizations, including low
interest loans, to rehabilitate 155 residential units between 1990 and 2002. Of these, 59
housing units were rehabilitated during the period from 1997 to 2002. A combination of
CDBG, Redevelopment 20% set aside funds, and program income enabled the City to
provide assistance to most very low- and low-income households who applied.

In 1998, the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency expanded the Old Town Redevelopment
Project area (Old Town Lompoc Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 1) and added
920 acres of land bringing the area under the authority of the Lompoc Redevelopment
Agency to approximately 1,000 acres. In 2002, the Lompoc Redevelopment Agency
expanded the Old Town Redevelopment Project area a second time (Old Town Lompoc
Redevelopment Project, Amendment No. 2) adding 79.6 acres of land to the area. The
expanded area is made up mostly of residential uses, including single family, multi-
family, and mobilehome units. The Agency has been and continues to be active in
alleviating blight in the area through a variety of public improvements, new
developments, rehabilitation programs, housing assistance programs, and other
activities.

The Santa Barbara County Housing Authority has also worked to prevent blight in units
it manages in Lompoc. Over the past five years the Housing Authority has competed for
and obtained funds to complete public housing modernization and rehabilitation work


                                          HOUSING - 162
through the federal Comprehensive Improvement Assistance Program. Funds spent in
Lompoc have been used for replacing roof systems on housing units including new roof
trusses, roofing and ceilings, replacing windows and exterior doors, removal of wall
heaters and installation of forced air units, plumbing and electrical improvements, and
reroofing. Nearly all of the units managed by the Santa Barbara County Housing
Authority received some type of maintenance work during this planning period.

                                     GOAL 2
        Restore, protect and improve the condition of existing housing and
                                 neighborhoods.
                  ANALYSIS OF POLICIES RELATING TO GOAL 2
                1997 Policy                      Results                      Explanation
2.1   The City shall pursue           The City continues to use        Goal accomplished.
      funding for housing             state and federal funds to
      rehabilitation programs         operate a low interest loan      Recommend continue
      which encourage private and     program for rehabilitation of    policy.
      public capital participation,   existing housing stock.
      preserve the existing
      housing stock, and provide
      housing opportunities for
      very low- to median-income
      households.
2.2   The City shall encourage        The City works with              Goal accomplished.
      current homeowners to           rehabilitation loan recipients
      comply with Uniform Building    to assure that funds are         Recommend continue
      Code (UBC) requirements.        used to correct code             policy.
                                      violations.
2.3   The City shall protect          Applications for General         Goal accomplished.
      residential neighborhoods       Plan Amendments and Zone
      from encroachment by            Changes include                  Recommend continue
      adverse non-residential uses    consideration of potential       policy.
      and impacts associated with     land use incompatibilities.
      those non-residential uses.
2.4   The City shall prohibit land    Applications for General         Goal accomplished.
      uses within or adjacent to      Plan Amendments and Zone
      residential neighborhoods       Changes include                  Recommend continue
      when such land uses would       consideration of potential       policy.
      adversely affect the            land use incompatibilities.
      character of the
      neighborhood.
2.5   The City shall encourage the    The Zoning Ordinance             Goal accomplished.
      preservation of existing        allows retention and
      residential dwellings in non-   rehabilitation of dwellings in   Recommend continue
      residential zoned areas         non-residential areas.           policy.
      when all of the following
      conditions are met:
        dwellings have continually
      been used for residential
      purposes;



                                      HOUSING - 163
        dwellings have received
      regular maintenance and
      contain no serious defects
      which could result in health
      or safety hazards to
      residents; and
        dwellings can provide
      necessary amenities and a
      suitable living environment.
             1997 Objective                        Results                     Explanation
2A    From 1990 to 2001 the City       Data from 1991 through           Goal partially
      has and shall continue to        2001 indicate that financial     accomplished.
      seek financial assistance        assistance was awarded to
      necessary to rehabilitate at     low- and moderately low-         Recommend continue
      least 250 residential housing    income households to             policy.
      units owned by very low- and     rehabilitate 154 housing
      low-income households.           units.

                         Additional
      Household Income     Units
      Very Low             125
      Low                  125
      Moderate               0
      Above Moderate         0
      Total                250
2B    From 1990 to 2001 the City       From 1990 to 2001 60             Goal partially
      has and shall continue to        federally assisted residential   accomplished. Projects
      seek financial assistance        housing units occupied by        utilizing federal programs
      necessary to conserve at         low- and moderate-income         have successfully been
      least 127 assisted residential   households were conserved;       conserved through
      housing units occupied by        67 assisted residential          acquisition by local
      very low-, low-, and             housing units occupied by        nonprofit organizations.
      moderate-income                  moderate-income
      households.                      households through a             Recommend continue
                                       density bonus program were       policy.
                         Additional    converted to market rate
      Household Income     Units       units.
      Very Low              39
      Low                   88
      Moderate               0
      Above Moderate         0
      Total                127


Discussion of Policies Relating to Goal 3

      Goal 3: Locate and design housing so as to assure an attractive and high
      quality living environment.

The City’s architectural review standards, park and recreation facilities, museum, public
art programs, Civic Auditorium, future aquatic center, and festivals and events, all help
promote a quality environment. In 2002 the City embarked on construction of the Old
Town Pedestrian Enhancement Project, a public improvement project to restore the


                                       HOUSING - 164
downtown area. The project includes sidewalk removal and installation of colored
concrete pavers, tree removal and replanting, landscaping and plant refurbishment, and
the installation of pedestrian lights, trash receptacles, benches, bicycle racks, and
drinking fountains.

The City also ensures that low response time for police and fire protection service are
available throughout the entire community. Emergency ambulance service is available
throughout the community to provide prompt medical attention and transportation to the
downtown Lompoc hospital.

                                   GOAL 3
 Locate and design housing so as to assure an attractive and high quality living
                                environment.
                ANALYSIS OF POLICIES RELATING TO GOAL 3
                 1997 Policy                        Results                  Explanation
3.1   The City shall not               Affordable housing projects    Goal accomplished.
      compromise community             are subject to the same
      design standards, quality of     development and                Recommend continue
      life, aesthetics, and access     architectural standards        policy.
      to public services when          which govern other
      providing affordable housing.    development.
3.2   The City shall encourage a       The General Plan and           Goal accomplished.
      diversity of housing types to    Zoning Map provide a range
      maintain and increase            of sties for varied types of   Recommend continue
      opportunities for affordable     housing.                       policy.
      housing, provided that the
      design of the development is
      compatible with the
      surrounding uses.
3.3   The City shall utilize the       Applications for General       Goal accomplished.
      following criteria when          Plan Amendments and Zone
      evaluating sites for housing:    Changes include                Recommend continue
         access to adequate public     consideration of these         policy.
      services and facilities;         factors.
         compatibility with adjacent
      land uses;
         access to employment
      centers, neighborhood
      commercial facilities,
      schools, and recreational
      facilities; and
         avoidance of
      environmental hazards or
      sensitive resource areas.
3.4   The City shall encourage the     The City amended its Zoning    Goal accomplished.
      location of affordable           Ordinance in 2001 to permit
      housing in or near the Old       residential uses in the Old    Recommend continue
      Town area which supports         Town.                          policy.
      redevelopment goals and



                                       HOUSING - 165
      requirements.
3.5   The City shall create         City staff administers low     Goal accomplished.
      incentives to encourage the   interest loan programs using
      development of new housing    federal and state housing      Recommend continue
      units which replace           funds. Staff also works with   policy.
      demolished or dilapidated     a community based non-
      units in residential areas.   profit organization on
                                    rehabilitation and
                                    construction projects to
                                    replace demolished or
                                    dilapidated units in
                                    residential areas.

Discussion of Policies and Objectives Relating to Goal 4

       Goal 4: Maximize energy efficiency in existing and future residential
       development.

The City triennially adopts the latest version of the California Administrative Codes
including the California Building Code and California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency
Standards for residential and nonresidential buildings.

In addition, the City has a Utility Conservation Coordinator on its staff to conduct energy
audits and provide technical assistance to Lompoc residents interested in reducing their
household utility consumption. Approximately 422 energy audits are undertaken yearly
by our Utility Conservation Coordinator initiated either by a request from a homeowner
for an audit or by an inquiry about a utility bill.

The City also administers a low-income electric bill assistance program whereby City
electric customers meeting income guidelines are eligible to receive an annual rebate.
During 2002, the number of low-income rebates administered by the City averaged 105
per month.

The City implemented a program using financial incentives to encourage residents to
replace energy-inefficient equipment, such as appliances and lighting. Rebates, ranging
from $50 to $130, are awarded for toilets, clothes washers and clothes dryers,
dishwashers, and refrigerators. Using the rebate program, approximately 150 toilets
were retrofitted during the period of 1996 through 2002. Using the
rebate/buyback/conversion program, 301 energy inefficient appliances were disposed of
during 2001 and 2002. Using a subsidy program, 293 low- and moderate-income
households disposed of and received a new refrigerator, and 45 households disposed
of and received a free refrigerator during 2001 and 2002.

In addition, all City assisted rehabilitation projects are evaluated for incorporation of
energy conservation features. Commonly utilized energy conservation features include:
insulation installation, weatherstripping installation, and window replacement. Higher




                                    HOUSING - 166
funding assistance priority is given for energy conservation measures which provide
long-term cost savings rather than for measures which serve merely as amenities.

                                       GOAL 4
      Maximize energy efficiency in existing and future residential development.
                  ANALYSIS OF POLICIES RELATING TO GOAL 4
                1997 Policy                        Results                       Explanation
4.1   The City shall continue to       The City requires                 Goal accomplished.
      encourage the design and         compliance with California
      installation of energy           Building Code and California      Recommend continue policy.
      conservation, water              Title 24 Building Energy
      conservation, and solid          Efficiency Standards for
      waste reduction measures in      residential buildings. City
      all construction and             published a pamphlet titled
      rehabilitation projects.         “Water Conservation Begins
                                       At Home” for use by the
                                       public.

                                       The City has implemented a
                                       curbside commingled and
                                       greenwaste recycling
                                       program for all single family
                                       residential development and
                                       some multi-family
                                       developments to reduce
                                       solid waste. The City also
                                       has a household hazardous
                                       waste collection facility that
                                       is available by appointment.
4.2   The City shall provide           The City employs a Utility        Goal accomplished.
      financial and technical          Conservation Coordinator to
      assistance based upon the        conduct energy audits and         Recommend continue policy.
      availability of funding to       provide technical assistance
      property owners who desire       to Lompoc residents
      to improve energy and water      interested in reducing their
      efficiency of their housing      household utility
      units but are unable to afford   consumption. Low interest
      improvement costs.               residential rehabilitation loan
                                       program allows the scope of
                                       work to include conversions
                                       of energy inefficient
                                       appliances. City offers
                                       rebate programs for retrofits
                                       and electric bills.
4.3   The City shall encourage the     The orientation of the City’s     Goal accomplished.
      use of active and passive        street system is such that it
      solar energy in the design of    allows the majority of new        Recommend continue policy.
      all new construction projects.   residential buildings to have
                                       the potential to take
                                       advantage in the design


                                       HOUSING - 167
                                 phase of active and passive
                                 solar energy.
            1997 Objective                   Results                   Explanation
4A   Reduce 1990 per capita      According to utility          Goal accomplished.
     household utility           consumption records of
     consumption by 25 percent   residential uses, the per     Recommend continue policy
     by the year 2000.           capita household electric     at a reduction recommended
                                 consumption decreased by      by the City of Lompoc’s
                                 30 percent between 1990       Utilities Commission.
                                 and 2000.




                                 HOUSING - 168
                                     APPENDIX G
                             Public Participation Process

The California Government Code requires that local government make a diligent effort
to achieve public participation from all economic segments of the community in the
development of the Housing Element. During the preparation of the Housing Element
update, public input was actively encouraged.

On March 13, 2003, the City of Lompoc hosted a public workshop. The workshop was
intended to facilitate a discussion about such issues as housing types, locations,
impediments to new housing production, and desired growth areas. Using the City’s
utility billing mail-out system, approximately 14,000 notices of the public workshop were
sent to citizens, businesses, organizations, and property owners. The notice was printed
in both English and Spanish.

Approximately 50 people attended the workshop. A Spanish language interpreter was
present. Those in attendance included the Mayor, two City Council members, one
Planning Commissioner, the City’s Community Development Director, Principal Planner,
and Associate Planner. After an opening statement by the Mayor and a round of
introductions, the Community Development Director gave a brief overview of the
importance of the Housing Element and the process the Housing Element Update will
follow. Members of the public in attendance divided into three groups initially. The
Community Development Director, Principal Planner, and Associate Planner headed
each one of the three groups. Two of the groups were made up of Spanish speaking
individuals. These two groups merged to form one larger group for purposes of
convenience for the Spanish language interpreter.

Issues discussed by those in attendance included: need for more housing, preference
for homeownership opportunities, housing prices and the need for affordable single
family homes regardless of whether the homes are detached or attached, more
opportunities for “sweat equity” housing programs, financial assistance for first-time
homebuyers, financial assistance to fix up older homes, jobs-housing balance, senior
housing, in-fill housing, and development of vacant land to the south of the existing City
limits.

On August 11, 2003, the City of Lompoc Planning Commission reviewed and
subsequently continued the Housing Element Update to allow Community Development
Department staff to address the comments received by the Planning Commissioners
and the State of California’s Department of Housing and Community Development
(HCD). The Planning Commission public meeting was noticed to interested parties and
local developers, placed in the Lompoc Record, and posted at City Hall. No comments
were received from the pubic.

On August 26, 2003, comments were received from HCD. As a result of the comments
received by HCD, as well as comments made by the Planning Commission, the draft
update to the Housing Element was revised.



                                  HOUSING - 169
On October 13, 2003, the Planning Commission held a second public hearing to take
public input and to review and comment on the revised update to the Housing Element.

On November 18, 2003, the City Council of the City of Lompoc at a duly noticed public
hearing adopted the revised Housing Element update.

Prior to each public meeting, drafts of the Housing Element were available for review at
City Hall and the public library.

Finally, following adoption of the City’s Housing Element, a copy of the adopted Housing
Element was submitted to the State of California, Department of Housing and
Community Development on November 19, 2003 for certification.

The City’s Housing Element was found to be in compliance with State housing law on
February 19, 2004.




                                  HOUSING - 170
                         APPENDIX H
City Council Resolution No. 5134 (03) Adopting Housing Element




                      HOUSING - 171
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      HOUSING - 172
                            APPENDIX I
Department of Housing and Community Development Compliance Letter
                      Dated February 19, 2004




                        HOUSING - 175
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      HOUSING - 176
                        PARKS & RECREATION

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES

GOALS / POLICIES

Authority

Government Code Section 65302(a) (GC) requirements for general
plans list "recreation" as one of the topics that needs to be
addressed in the Land Use Element. Requirements for the Open Space
Element (GC Section 65560(b)) list "parks and recreation" among the
uses to which open space land can be devoted.

Goal 1         Provide parkland and recreational facilities which
               are convenient to all neighborhoods and meet the
               needs of a diverse population.

Policy 1.1     The City shall provide park facilities which respond
               to the needs of a diverse population using the
               following standards:

               Neighborhood Parks - 2 acres per 1000 persons
               Community Parks - 5 acres per 1000 persons
               Regional Parks - 5 acres per 1000 persons.

Policy 1.2     The City shall provide adequate park sites
               throughout the City, especially in the northwest and
               northeast portions of the City, as well as other
               future growth areas.

Policy 1.3     The City shall develop Neighborhood Parks in
               currently-developed areas of the City (e.g. high
               density housing areas), where there is a shortage of
               parks.

Policy 1.4     Privately-owned recreation amenities and open space
               provided in developments shall be usable for
               organized recreational purposes.

Policy 1.5     The City shall encourage establishment of off-road
               bicycling/hiking/equestrian trails extending to
               Santa Ynez River Park, La Purisima Mission, State
               Burton Mesa Chaparral Preserve, Allan Hancock
               College site, Ocean Beach Park, and along the Santa
               Ynez River.

Policy 1.6     The City shall maximize opportunities for joint
               recreation use of public facilities and lands

                        PARKS & RECREATION - 1
             administered by other public agencies.


Policy 1.7   The City shall encourage Santa Barbara County to
             improve and expand the parks in the Lompoc Valley
             and surrounding area, including Ocean Beach Park,
             Miguelito Park, and Jalama Beach Park.

Goal 2       Provide a diversity of recreation programs      and
             facilities to meet the needs of all citizens.

Policy 2.1   The City shall continue and, where possible, expand
             recreation programs for children, teens, adults,
             seniors, and disabled persons.

Policy 2.2   The City shall make lands or facilities owned by the
             City available to community and non-profit groups
             for activities which meet existing recreation needs
             and involve voluntary participation on the part of
             community residents in the design, development, or
             ongoing maintenance activities at existing and
             future park and recreation sites.

Policy 2.3   The City shall encourage collaborative efforts among
             private recreation groups to develop and maintain
             multi-use park and recreation facilities which serve
             a wide range of users.

Goal 3       All park and recreation facilities shall be well
             designed, developed, and maintained, as well as
             serve to enhance the positive aspects of the
             neighborhood.

Policy 3.1   The City shall encourage developments adjacent to
             parks or open space to provide direct access to, and
             common open space contiguous with, such areas.

Policy 3.2   The City shall improve and rehabilitate existing
             parks as needed and as funds become available.

Goal 4       The costs of providing parks and recreation
             facilities and programs shall be equitably shared by
             new development and current users.

Policy 4.1   The City shall require all residential, commercial,
             and industrial developments to contribute toward
             acquisition and/or improvement of parks and
             recreation facilities.

Policy 4.2   The recreation program offered by the Parks and

                     PARKS & RECREATION - 2
               Recreation Department should be financially self-
               supporting.



Policy 4.3     The City shall pursue various private, local, state,
               and federal sources of funding for acquisition,
               development, and maintenance of park and recreation
               facilities.

Policy 4.4     The City shall encourage the development of private
               commercial recreational facilities.

Policy 4.5     Provided that sufficient resources are available,
               the City shall enable children and adults to
               participate in recreation programs regardless of
               their ability to pay.


IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Measure 1 The City will pursue acquisition and/or development of
               additional park and recreation sites as described in
               the attached Proposed Park and Recreation Sites
               list. The list shall be comprised of sites which
               help meet the current and projected deficiencies of
               various types of park and recreation facilities.
               Acquisition and/or development possibilities shall
               be periodically reviewed in order to direct staff to
               respond to new opportunities and changing community
               concerns.[Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 4.3, and 4.4]

Measure 2 The Parks and Recreation Department shall prepare and
               maintain site plans and maintenance schedules for
               all park sites.     Site plans shall include the
               identification of necessary capital improvements,
               landscaping, use areas, and facilities. The site
               plans for the park system should also address the
               following: group camping, creekside systems, trails
               for pedestrians/joggers/bicyclists/disabled persons,
               floral   display   gardens,   habitat    restoration
               projects, community gardens, skateboarding, etc.
               [Policies 1.1]

Measure 3 The City shall prepare and implement a trails master plan
               for the City using flood control channels,
               easements, dedications, right-of-ways, open space,
               etc. in conjunction with other government and non-
               profit agencies.[Policies 1.1, and 1.5]

                          PARKS & RECREATION - 3
Measure 4 The Lompoc Redevelopment Agency may acquire and develop
               park and recreation facilities inside Redevelopment
               Agency Project Areas. [Policy 1.3]

Measure 5 The City shall amend the Subdivision Ordinance to require
               the Parks and Recreation Department to review all
               subdivision maps through the Development Review
               Board process. [Policy 3.1]

Measure 6 The City shall amend the Subdivision Ordinance to assure
               that open space areas credited in the amenity
               formula for "Planned Developments" are usable for
               organized recreational purposes or meet minimum
               usable dimensions (i.e. 30 feet). [Policy 1.4]

Measure 7 The   City should negotiate comprehensive joint use
                agreements with the Lompoc Unified School District
                and the Allan Hancock Joint Community College
                District. [Policy 1.6]

Measure 8 The City should investigate negotiating limited joint use
               agreements with the US Air Force, United States
               Penitentiary, and Federal Correctional Institution
               to allow increased use of their respective
               recreation facilities by organized sports leagues.
               [Policy 1.6]

Measure 9 The City should investigate negotiating a limited joint-
               use agreement with the State Parks and Recreation
               Department for greater use of the La Purisima State
               Historical Park in conjunction with City recreation
               programs (e.g. summer or weekend day camps, arts and
               crafts classes, and special outings). [Policy 1.6]

Measure 10      The City should investigate negotiating joint use
                agreements with private organizations to establish
                limited public access to their respective facilities
                in order to expand public recreation opportunities.
                [Policies 1.6, 2.2, and 4.4]

Measure 11      The City shall encourage the County to define a
                responsible   financial   role  in   meeting   the
                recreational program needs of all unincorporated
                area residents in the Lompoc Valley. [Policies 1.7
                and 2.1]

Measure 12      The Parks and Recreation Department should provide
                recreation and social activities for all age groups
                including teens and seniors through establishment of

                        PARKS & RECREATION - 4
             a multi-use community recreation complex. [Policy
             2.1]

Measure 13   City facilities and land may be rented or leased for
             recreational purposes, so long as such facilities
             will be available for public use when not being
             actively used for their rented or leased activity.
             [Policy 2.2]


Measure 14   The Parks and Recreation Department shall integrate
             park and recreation facility planning with programs
             to enhance neighborhoods.

Measure 15   The City Parks and Recreation Department shall make
             improvements and additions to the existing park and
             recreation facilities as listed and prioritized in
             the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). [Policies 1.1,
             and 3.3]

Measure 16   The City shall explore the development of private
             commercial recreation facilities including an
             athletic field(s), golf course, and festival
             grounds. [Policy 4.4]

Measure 17   City shall amend the Development Impact Fee
             ordinance (AB 1600) to include provisions for
             funding regional parks and special recreation
             facilities (e.g. municipal pool, civic auditorium);
             and for contribution of funds by developers as
             allowed by law. [Policy 4.1]

Measure 18   The Parks and Recreation Commission shall establish
             and maintain a self-supporting user-fee schedule for
             recreation programs. [Policy 4.2]

Measure 19   The City shall pursue funding sources to maintain a
             Recreation   Scholarship   Fund  to   receive   and
             distribute funds from public and private sources to
             enable low-income children to participate in
             recreation programs. [Policy 2.1 and 4.5]

Measure 20   The Parks and Recreation Department shall establish
             a program to enable low-income persons to exchange
             community service credits for participation in
             recreation programs. [Policy 2.1 and 4.5]

Measure 21   The City shall seek and/or provide funding for the
             construction of recreational trails as identified in

                     PARKS & RECREATION - 5
             the Bikeway Routes map of the Circulation Element.
             [Policy 4.3]

Measure 22   The City shall continuously explore the need for
             accessibility improvements at existing recreation
             facilities and within recreation programs in order
             to allocate funds as they become available to ensure
             compliance with ADA requirements.




                     PARKS & RECREATION - 6
                 Proposed Park and Recreation Sites

Site #         APN             Location           Approximate      Proposed
                                                  Acreage          Facility
                                                                   Type*

   1     93-111-18    West Olive Ave at                30 ac          C
                      Bodger Rd.
   2     93-070-39    600 North "V" St                 18 ac           N

   3     93-070-62    West Central Ave at              28 ac          C
                      Bailey Rd.                   (wetlands
                                                  portion 10 ac)
   4     95-040-11    Portion of USP site              70 ac          S
   5     95-070-06    Spaceport Museum site           169 ac          C


   6     95-070-05    Portion of Allan                 20 ac          C
                      Hancock College site
   7     97-270-33,   Portion of La Purisima           3 ac           M
               -34    Highlands site
   8     Various      West of "A" St./                100 ac          C
                      McLaughlin Road
   9     N/A          Portion of CalTrans             177 ac          R
                      ROW (Bluff Park in S.Y
                      River Plan)
   10    87-011-17    Southwest corner of              7 ac           C
                      Central Ave. & "A" St.
   11    99-140-85,   Hwy. 246/River Park              18 ac          R
               -86    Rd.
   12    83-060-13    Portion of CalTrans                103 ac       R
                      ROW
   13    99-140-90    East Ocean Ave/7th St.           18 ac          C

   14    85-110-01,   North "A" St between             8 ac           C
               -04    Chestnut & Walnut
               -11    Avenues
   15    89-330-47    West Barton at "L" St.           5 ac           N
   16    Various      East/West Channel              11.48 ac         S
                      Parkway


*Note:   M = Mini-Park

                         PARKS & RECREATION - 7
N   =   Neighborhood Park
C   =   Community Park
R   =   Regional Park
S   =   Special Use Community Recreation Facility




                 PARKS & RECREATION - 8
                     PUBLIC SERVICES ELEMENT

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES
GOALS / POLICIES

Authority

The Public Services Element addresses provision of municipal
services to City residents.    The following paragraphs provide
description of the areas covered in the Public Services Element.

The City's electrical system is addressed in the General Plan
pursuant to the following sections of the Government Code (GC).
Requirements for the Circulation Element include discussion of
"public utilities and facilities.... correlated with the land use
element" (GC Section 65302(b)).

Section 65302(g) of the Government Code requires discussion of
measures to protect the community from unreasonable risks
associated with the effects of several hazards, including "wild
land and urban fires".

The City's library facilities and service are addressed in the
General Plan pursuant to the following sections of the Government
Code. Requirements for the Land Use Element include discussion of
"public buildings and grounds" (GC Section 65302(a)).          The
Circulation   Element   must   discuss   "public   utilities   and
facilities....correlated with the land use element" (GC Section
65302(b)). The Government Code also allows the City to "address
any other subjects, which in the judgement of the legislative body
relate to the [City's] physical development" (GC Section 65303).

Government Code Section 65302(a) requires discussion of the use of
land for various uses including "public buildings" which may
include police facilities. The general plan may also address any
other subjects which, in the judgement of the legislative body,
relate to the physical development of the city (GC Section 65303).

The City's public buildings and facilities are addressed in the
General Plan pursuant to the following sections of the Government
Code. Requirements for the Land Use Element include discussion of
"public buildings and grounds" (GC Section 65302(a)).         The
Circulation   Element   must   discuss  "public   utilities   and
facilities....correlated with the land use element" (GC Section
65302(b)).

Schools are addressed in the General Plan pursuant to the
requirements for the Land Use Element. Section 65302(a) of the
Government Code requires discussion of the distribution, location,

                        PUBLIC SERVICES - 1
and extent of the land uses, including "education" and "public
buildings and grounds".

The City's sewer system is addressed in the General Plan pursuant
to the following sections of the Government Code. Requirements for
the Land Use Element include discussion of "liquid waste disposal
facilities, and other categories of public....uses of land" (GC
Section 65302(a)). The Circulation Element must discuss "public
utilities and facilities....correlated with the land use element"
(GC Section 65302(b)). Under Conservation Element requirements,
discussion may be provided on "prevention and control of the
pollution of....water (GC Section 65302(d)).

The City's solid waste disposal system is addressed in the General
Plan pursuant to the following sections of the Government Code.
Requirements for the Land Use Element include discussion of solid
waste disposal facilities, and other categories of public uses of
land (GC Section 65302(a)). The Circulation Element must discuss
"public utilities and facilities....correlated with the land use
element" (GC Section 65302(b)).


The City's storm drainage system is addressed in the General Plan
pursuant to the following sections of the Government Code.
Requirements for the Circulation Element include discussion of
"public utilities and facilities.... correlated with the land use
element" (GC Section 65302(b)).     Requirements for the Safety
Element include discussion of measures to protect the community
from unreasonable risks associated with the effects of several
hazards, including flooding (GC Section 65302(g)).

The City's water system is addressed in the General Plan pursuant
to the following sections of the Government Code. Requirements for
the Circulation Element include discussion of "public utilities and
facilities.... correlated with the land use element" (GC Section
65302(b)). The Land Use Element must discuss public uses of land
(GC Section 65302(a)).


Goal 1       Provide economical and dependable electrical service.

Policy 1.1   The City shall make improvements to the electrical
             system to maintain system capability, reliability, and
             affordability.

Policy 1.2   The City shall assure that sufficient capacity is
             available in the electrical system prior to approval
             of new development projects.


                         PUBLIC SERVICES - 2
Policy 1.3   The City shall assure that all improvements to the
             electrical system necessitated by new development
             projects are proportionately financed by the project
             sponsor.


Goal 2       Provide attractive streets and neighborhoods           by
             undergrounding utility distribution lines.

Policy 2.1   The City shall require undergrounding of existing
             overhead utility distribution lines in association
             with new developments and for major remodeling
             projects.

Policy 2.2   The City shall encourage PG&E to relocate or under-
             ground all transmission and distribution lines within
             the City, except those servicing the Lompoc Electrical
             Receiving Station.

Goal 3       Maximize the    conservation      of   electrical   energy
             resources.

Policy 3.1   The City shall encourage the use of solar energy, both
             active and passive, in the orientation and design of
             all new construction projects.

Policy 3.2   The City shall ensure that routes and facilities for
             pipelines   and  utility   transmission   lines   are
             compatible with surrounding existing and planned land
             uses.

Goal 4       Minimize loss of life, and reduce injuries due to
             fires and medical emergencies.

Policy 4.1   The Fire Department shall strive to provide on scene
             response within five minutes to all emergency
             incidents within the City.

Policy 4.2   The City shall provide basic life support emergency
             medical services at Level 1 - Emergency Medical
             Technician EMT-D as defined by Title - 22 California
             Code of Regulations (CCR) and Santa Barbara County
             Department of Health Care Services.

Policy 4.3   The City shall encourage public education regarding
             fire prevention, safety and first aid medical
             procedures.

Goal 5       Minimize property damage due to fires.

                         PUBLIC SERVICES - 3
Policy 5.1   The Fire Department shall strive to provide on scene
             response within five minutes at 90 percent of all
             structural fires within the City.

Policy 5.2   The City shall continue to participate in an automatic
             aid agreement with Santa Barbara County and in mutual
             aid agreements with Vandenberg Air Force Base and the
             State of California.
Policy 5.3   The Fire Department shall review all development
             projects for fire safety requirements.

Goal 6       Provide high quality library facilities and services.

Policy 6.1   The City shall assist the Library Board of Trustees in
             making improvements to the City of Lompoc library
             system and expansion of the facilities to maintain the
             system's quality and capacity.

Policy 6.2   The City shall assist the Library Board of Trustees in
              providing sufficient capacity in the City of Lompoc
             library system prior to approval of new development
             projects.

Policy 6.3   The City shall cooperate with the Library Board of
             Trustees to ensure that improvements to the City of
             Lompoc library system necessitated by new development
             within the City are proportionately financed by the
             project sponsor.

Policy 6.4   The City shall continue to assist the Library Board of
             Trustees in upgrading and maintaining the currency of
             the collection of materials and electronic resources.

Policy 6.5   The City shall continue to work with the County of
             Santa Barbara and the Library Board of Trustees in
             providing regional library facilities and services
             which serve all segments of the population.

Goal 7       Ensure a high level of public safety to the community.

Policy 7.1   The Police Department shall seek to maintain a three-
             minute average response time for all emergency service
             calls within the City limits.

Policy 7.2   The Police Department will undertake special efforts
             to deal with high crime rates in key areas, including
             commercial, industrial, and higher density residential
             areas.


                         PUBLIC SERVICES - 4
Policy 7.3    The Police Department shall coordinate with other law
              enforcement agencies to assure communication and shall
              participate in mutual aid agreements to provide
              personnel and resources when required.

Policy 7.4    The Police Department shall foster and maintain a
              partnership with the community and deliver its
              services in a community-based manner.



Goal 8        Develop   continuing   systems     for   the   prevention   of
              crime.

Policy 8.1    The Police Department will work with citizens and
              community organizations to develop crime prevention
              programs addressing issues such as substance abuse and
              illegal gang-related activities.

Policy 8.2    The Police Department shall review development pro-
              jects for prevention of crime, vandalism, and traffic
              problems.

Goal 9        Provide safe, attractive, and efficiently-designed
              facilities to serve public needs.

Policy 9.1    The City shall strive to provide safe, attractive, and
              efficiently-designed facilities for public and quasi-
              public organizations.

Policy 9.2    The City shall continue to prepare a five-year Capital
              Improvements Program for public buildings and
              facilities.

Policy 9.3    The City shall ensure that all public buildings and
              facilities meet the access needs of physically-
              challenged individuals.

Policy 9.4    The City shall collect development fees at a
              sufficient level to finance those public building and
              facility needs created and/or contributed by new
              development.

Goal 10       Ensure the provision of adequate and high quality
              public educational facilities.

Policy 10.1   The City, in cooperation with Allan Hancock Joint
              Community College District, shall support development
              and operation of a permanent community college campus
              in the City.
                           PUBLIC SERVICES - 5
Policy 10.2   The City shall encourage Lompoc Unified School
              District and Allan Hancock Joint Community College
              District to maintain consistency with the City's
              architectural, sidewalk, landscaping, and site design
              requirements   in   the   design,    remodeling,   or
              construction of new facilities.

Policy 10.3   The City shall assist Lompoc Unified School District
              to ensure mitigation of impacts upon school facilities
              from new development within the City.


Policy 10.4   The City shall cooperate with Lompoc Unified School
              District to obtain funds from other sources to provide
              high quality public educational facilities.

Goal 11       Maximize the integration of school facilities within
              the fabric of the community.

Policy 11.1   The City shall assist the Lompoc Unified School
              District to identify suitable future uses for any
              school sites determined to be no longer suitable by
              the District.

Policy 11.2   When new residential developments have a significant
              impact on school facilities, the City shall take steps
              to assure that developers coordinate with the Lompoc
              Unified School District to provide timely and proper
              submittal of required development impact fees. [Final
              EIR Schools Mitigation Measure 1]

Goal 12       Provide economical and dependable sewer service and
              treatment.

Policy 12.1   The City shall make improvements to the sewer system
              to maintain system capability and reliability.

Policy 12.2   The City shall assure that sufficient capacity is
              available in the Lompoc Regional Wastewater Treatment
              Plant prior to approval of new development projects.

Policy 12.3   The City shall assure that all improvements to the
              sewer system necessitated by the approval of new
              projects are proportionately financed by the project
              sponsor.

Policy 12.4   The City shall promote beneficial uses of wastewater
              biosolids and effluent.

                          PUBLIC SERVICES - 6
Goal 13       Protect and improve      water     quality   in   the   Lompoc
              Groundwater Basin.

Policy 13.1   The City shall encourage public and private wastewater
              dischargers to minimize contamination of the Lompoc
              groundwater basin.

Goal 14       Provide an economical and environmentally-safe solid
              waste collection and disposal system.

Policy 14.1   The City shall continue to provide a solid waste
              collection system which meets the needs of the
              community.


Policy 14.2   The City shall assure that sufficient capacity is
              available in the landfill prior to approval of new
              development projects.

Policy 14.3   The City shall    assure that all improvements to the
              solid   waste     collection   and   disposal   system
              necessitated by    new development are proportionately
              financed by the   project sponsor.

Policy 14.4   The City shall establish user fees for the landfill
              which adequately fund costs to operate the landfill
              and prepare the landfill for eventual closure.

Goal 15       Maximize the life of the landfill.

Policy 15.1   The City shall continue to encourage efforts to
              reduce, recycle, and compost as many materials as
              possible.

Policy 15.2   The City shall reduce waste entering the landfill by
              25 percent by 1995 and by 50 percent by 2000, relative
              to waste received at the landfill in 1990.

Policy 15.3   The City shall prioritize waste reduction techniques
              as the preferred method to maximize the life of the
              landfill.   If   waste   reduction  techniques   are
              insufficient, the City may investigate options for
              expansion of the landfill area.

Goal 16       Provide an     attractive,       clean,   and     litter-free
              community.

Policy 16.1   The City shall continue to provide a modern collection

                           PUBLIC SERVICES - 7
              system to   reduce   litter       to   the   maximum   extent
              possible.

Goal 17       Provide storm drains which minimize street flooding.

Policy 17.1   The City shall ensure the storm drain system has
              adequate capacity to minimize street flooding from the
              design standard storm, and where feasible, shall
              expand the capacity of the system to control storm
              flows.

Policy 17.2   The City shall require new developments to: minimize
              the amount of off-site drainage by retaining
              stormwaters for on-site percolation, provide adequate
              drainage facilities for remaining off-site flows,
              maintain natural drainage channels, and avoid
              alteration of off-site drainage courses.


Goal 18       Provide economical and dependable water service.

Policy 18.1   The City shall make improvements to the water supply
              system to maintain system capability and reliability.

Policy 18.2   The City shall assure that sufficient capacity and
              quality is available in the Lompoc Water Treatment
              Plant and system prior to approval of new development
              projects.

Policy 18.3   The City shall assure that all improvements to the
              water supply system necessitated by the approval of
              new projects are proportionately financed by the
              project sponsor.

Goal 19       Maximize the conservation of water.

Policy 19.1   The City shall promote the conservation of water by
              all customers.

IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Measure 1     The City shall periodically review the long-range
              needs of the electrical system including the following
              issues:

              E Desired level of reliability for the electrical
                system. [Policies 1.1 and 1.2]

              E Maintenance of power lines and related equipment.

                          PUBLIC SERVICES - 8
              [Policy 1.1]

            E Elimination of inaccessible power lines. [Policy
              1.1]

            E Procurement of adequate sources      of   electrical
              power. [Policies 1.1 and 1.2]

            E Preparation of an engineering model of the electri-
              cal system to identify needed improvements.
              [Policies 1.1 and 1.2]

            E Maintenance of an accurate electrical system map.
              [Policies 1.1 and 1.2]

            E Provision for the logical and economic extension of
              the   electrical   system  to   new   developments.
              [Policies 1.2 and 1.3]

Measure 2   The City shall prepare a schedule and financial plan
            to underground all existing utility distribution
            lines. [Policy 2.1]
Measure 3   The City shall amend the City Code to require instal-
            lation of automatic fire protection systems in all
            new buildings that exceed fire protection and on scene
            response capabilities of the Fire Department. [Policy
            6.3]

Measure 4   The City shall review the City Code regulations for
            fire sprinklers for additional requirements. [Policy
            5.3]

Measure 5   The City shall assist the Library Board of Trustees in
            preparing a facility plan for the main library, which
            includes consideration of an additional entrance to
            existing parking area. [Policy 6.3 & 6.5]

Measure 6   The City will strive to increase funding levels for
            the library to meet the average funding levels for
            City of Lompoc library facilities on a statewide
            basis. [Policy 6.1 & 6.4]

Measure 7   The City shall explore amendment of the Development
            Impact Fee ordinance to fund improvements to City of
            Lompoc library system which are necessitated by new
            development. [Policy 6.2 & 6.3]

Measure 8   The Police Department shall develop traffic safety
            recommendations and programs based upon State-wide
                        PUBLIC SERVICES - 9
             Integrated Traffic Reporting System data, and citizen
             and school district requests.    [Policies 7.3, 8.1,
             8.2]

Measure 9    The Police Department shall utilize a Community
             Oriented Policing and Problem Solving (COPPS) philoso-
             phy involving citizens, community organizations, city
             departments, and criminal justice agencies. Issues
             such as crime, drug or gang-related activities, and
             other identified problems relating to public safety
             will be targeted by this philosophy. [Policies 7.4,
             8.1, 8.2,]

Measure 10   The City shall prepare a facility plan for a multi-use
             community center. [Policy 9.1]

Measure 11   The City shall update the facility plan for the Civic
             Center. [Policy 9.2]

Measure 12   The City shall implement the facility plan for the
             Civic Auditorium. [Policy 9.2]




                        PUBLIC SERVICES - 10
Measure 13   The City shall schedule improvements to public
             buildings necessary to meet the needs of physically-
             challenged individuals, in accordance with the
             requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
             [Policy 9.3]

Measure 14   The City shall gather information from other cities
             regarding the display and financing of public art.
             [Policy 9.5]

Measure 15   The City shall prepare and implement a master plan for
             the Lompoc Airport. [Policy 9.1]

Measure 16   The City shall seek to negotiate comprehensive joint
             use agreements with the Lompoc Unified School District
             and the Allan Hancock Joint Community College
             District. [Policy 11.3]

Measure 17   The City shall identify proposed school sites on the
             Land Use Element Map necessary to accommodate
             anticipated student enrollment generated by new City
             development after consultation with the Lompoc Unified
             School District and Santa Barbara County.

Measure 18   The City shall notify the Lompoc Unified School
             District when the City receives a development
             application for an area identified with a proposed
             school designation to determine whether there is
             property acquisition interest.    If no interest is
             expressed, the City shall delete the proposed school
             site designation from the Land Use Element Map
             following the issuance of applicable certificates of
             occupancy.

Measure 19   The Utility Department shall update the Wastewater
             Management Plan. [Policies 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, and 12.4]

Measure 20   The City shall establish a program to promote the uses
             of wastewater biosolids. Potential uses include:

             E Composting; and

             E Application to land areas by spreading, spraying
               or injection. [Policies 12.1 and 12.4]




                        PUBLIC SERVICES - 11
Measure 21   The City shall establish a program to promote the use
             of reclaimed effluent. Potential uses include:

             E Irrigation of landscaping and fodder, seed, and
               flower crops;

             E Industrial cooling;

             E Dust control and compaction at construction sites
               and the landfill; and

             E Recharge of the groundwater basin. [Policies 12.2
               and 12.4]

Measure 22   The Zoning Ordinance shall be amended to require that
             public notice be given to all property owners within
             1000 feet of the landfill boundary for any development
             permits requested for the landfill. [Policy 15.3]

Measure 23   The City shall amend the Subdivision Ordinance to
             require that land divisions approved within 2000 feet
             of the landfill boundary shall be conditioned to
             require a notification in the deed of the landfill's
             proximity to the property. [Policy 15.3]

Measure 24   The City shall investigate the acquisition of
             properties or easements to ensure that adequate buffer
             zones to mitigate the environmental effects of
             landfill operations. [Policy 15.3]

Measure 25   The City shall ensure that a 200 foot buffer is
             maintained between the active working areas of the
             landfill and all adjacent land uses. [Policy 15.3]

Measure 26   The City shall pursue establishment of a drop-off
             facility which is available to the public for
             recyclable materials. [Policy 15.1 and 15.2]

Measure 27   The City shall provide recycling service to all City
             residents. [Policy 15.1 and 15.2]

Measure 28   The City shall pursue establishment of a composting
             facility. [Policy 15.1 and 15.2]

Measure 29   The City shall update the Storm Drainage Master Plan.
             [Policy 17.1]

Measure 30   The City shall consider amendment of the Development
             Impact Fees Ordinance as a funding source for storm

                        PUBLIC SERVICES - 12
drain infrastructure. [Policy 17.1]




           PUBLIC SERVICES - 13
Measure 31   The Utility Department shall update the Water System
             Management Plan. [Policies 18.1, 18.2, & 19.1]

Measure 32   The Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) shall be amended to
             show improvements which provide adequate water
             pressure in University Drive between Cambridge Drive
             and C Street for fire protection purposes. [Policy
             18.1]

Measure 33   The City shall seek to establish emergency inter-tie
             agreements with Mission Hills CSD, Vandenberg Village
             CSD, and Vandenberg AFB in case of emergency water
             shortages.    Such agreements would be invoked to
             satisfy short-term emergency water needs of either
             party. [Policy 18.2]

[Notes: The following policies are implemented through the current
City Codes and procedures: Policies 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 5.1, 5.2,
5.3, 6.1, 6.2 8.1, 9.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6., 11.1, 11.2,
11.5, 12.2, 12.3 13.3, 14.1, 15.3, 16.3, 17.1,19.1 and 19.3]




                        PUBLIC SERVICES - 14
                          URBAN DESIGN

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES


GOALS / POLICIES


Authority

Consideration of urban design issues in the general plan is
provided under the Land Use Element requirements which direct
attention to open space uses such as agriculture, natural
resources, and the enjoyment of scenic beauty (GC Section
65302(a)). Urban design considerations may also include areas of
outstanding beauty, historic, and cultural value under the Open
Space Element requirements (GC Section 65560). The Government Code
(GC) also allows the City to "address any other subjects, which in
the judgement of the legislative body relate to the [City's]
physical development" (GC Section 65303).



Goal 1         Protect and enhance the natural      features   and
               landmarks of the Lompoc Valley.

Policy 1.1     The City shall define, protect, and link urban fea-
               tures, rural features, and open space areas in the
               Lompoc Valley including those identified on the
               Urban Design Features map.

Policy 1.2     The City shall protect ridgelines and hillsides
               which lie in view corridors, including those
               ridgelines identified on the Scenic Ridgelines and
               Roads map.

Policy 1.3     The City shall protect and enhance the views along
               the scenic roads noted on the Scenic Ridgelines and
               Roads map.

Policy 1.4     The City shall create a visual edge to maintain
               awareness of the community's setting in the Lompoc
               Valley by establishing and maintaining open space
               buffers along the western and eastern portions of
               the Urban Limit Line.




                          URBAN DESIGN - 1
Goal 2       Protect and enhance the "small town" character of
             the Old Town.

Policy 2.1   The City shall support the historical character,
             scale, and architecture of the Old Town area.

Policy 2.2   The City shall ensure that all development in the
             Old Town area is designed in a manner that
             maintains, encourages, and enhances pedestrian
             activity between various uses and activities. This
             includes the design of buildings, street corridors,
             plazas, and pedestrian spaces.

Policy 2.3   The   City  shall   provide  for   sufficient  and
             conveniently-located public parking to allow the
             Old Town area to function as a pedestrian-oriented
             business district without on-site parking.

Policy 2.4   The City shall ensure that parking lots in the Old
             Town area are located and designed to avoid
             breaking the continuity of building facades.

Policy 2.5   The City shall encourage existing commercial
             facilities   to  improve   their   appearance   and
             condition, and ensure that all new development
             contributes toward an overall positive and cohesive
             visual identity.

Goal 3       Protect and enhance the positive        identity   of
             Lompoc's residential neighborhoods.

Policy 3.1   The City shall protect and enhance the positive
             identity of residential neighborhoods.

Policy 3.2   The City shall require        infill development to
             respect the scale and         character of existing
             neighborhoods.

Policy 3.3   The City shall encourage the protection of
             structures and neighborhoods which possess locally-
             significant   architectural   styles  or   historic
             values. Infill development in such areas shall be
             architecturally    compatible    with   surrounding
             structures.

Policy 3.4   The City shall encourage and support the efforts of
             homeowner and neighborhood associations to improve
             the visual appearance of residential neighborhoods.



                        URBAN DESIGN - 2
Goal 4         Protect and enhance the visual qualities                    of
               Lompoc's urban streetscapes and public places.

Policy 4.1     The City shall support efforts to improve                  the
               appearance of expressways and arterials.

Policy 4.2     The City shall promote cleanliness and regular
               maintenance of all neighborhoods and public places.

Policy 4.3     The City shall encourage signage which enhances the
               visual qualities of the urban streetscape.

Policy 4.4     The City shall continue to encourage provision of
               art in public places.

Policy 4.5     The City shall encourage the owners and/or
               operators of land uses and activities which are
               unsightly to clean up the affected area or to use
               landscaping and other design measures to soften or
               screen the area.

Policy 4.6     The City shall encourage the development of the
               urban forest along streetscapes and in public
               places.

Policy 4.7     The City shall encourage the provision of open
               space in all public places.

Goal 5         Ensure high-quality design and development.

Policy 5.1     The City shall ensure that all public and private
               improvements or development projects are consistent
               with the architectural, landscaping, and site
               design requirements.

Policy 5.2     The City shall periodically review and update its
               architectural, landscaping, and site plan review
               process, as well as any associated guidelines.

IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Measure 1      The Beautification Commission shall establish
               policies and programs to define and enhance the
               entryways into the City in cooperation with
               Caltrans, Santa Barbara County, and the affected
               property owners. [Policies 1.1, 1.3, and 4.1]


Measure 2      The   City   shall   amend      the   Zoning   Ordinance   to

                            URBAN DESIGN - 3
            require new homeowner associations to maintain and
            preserve natural habitats within their respective
            developments.[Policy 1.1]
Measure 3   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
            require buffer areas between new developments and
            bordering land planned by the City for agriculture.
            [Policies 1.1, 1.4, and 1.6]

Measure 4   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to retain
            ridgelines identified in the Scenic Ridgelines and
            Roads map in the "Open Space District".[Policy 1.2]

Measure 5   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
            establish standards for development in hillside
            areas. These shall address issues such as design,
            allowable uses, developable areas, safety concerns,
            parcel   sizes,   grading,   landscaping,    visual
            resources, open space, drainage, infrastructure
            requirements, and evacuation plans. [Policies 1.1
            and 1.2]

Measure 6   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to add an
            overlay zone for scenic corridors which regulates
            development activities within a defined buffer
            along designated scenic roads.    The overlay zone
            may address issues such as removal of mature
            vegetation, grading activities, allowable uses
            (e.g. signs, walkways, roadway access). [Policies
            1.3 and 4.1]

Measure 7   The City shall periodically review and update the
            architectural, landscape, and site plan review
            guidelines. Architectural review requirements shall
            be added for rehabilitations of, or additions to
            existing buildings, and for projects located along
            designated scenic roads. [Policies 1.3, 2.1, 2.2,
            3.1, 3.2, 5.1, and 5.2]

Measure 8   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to: 1)
            add a design overlay zone in the Old Town area; and
            2)   establish    design    guidelines     for  the
            architectural appearance, site function, pedestrian
            enhancement,   protection    and    development  of
            structures   within   the   overlay    zone.    All
            development within the overlay zone must conform
            with the guidelines. [Policies 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and
            2.4]

Measure 9   The   City   shall   amend      the   Zoning   Ordinance   to

                         URBAN DESIGN - 4
             establish design guidelines for the Southside Old
             Town (generally the 200-400 blocks of South "G" and
             "H" Streets and 200-300 blocks of South "I" and "J"
             Streets) to preserve historic structures, encourage
             rehabilitation, and ensure that new construction
             and   rehabilitation   are  compatible   with   the
             surrounding historic structures.
Measure 10   The City shall explore methods for providing
             sufficient off-site parking in the Old Town area.
             [Policies 2.2 and 2.3]

Measure 11   The City shall amend the City Code to increase the
             maintenance standards for commercial and industrial
             facilities. [Policy 2.5]

Measure 12   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             include minimum standards for the percentage of the
             required open space areas (exclusive of natural
             habitat)   of  developments   which   need  to   be
             landscaped in order to minimize storm runoff.
             [Policies 2.5 and 3.1]

Measure 13   The City shall review the street-naming and street-
             numbering policy for future developments. [Policy
             3.1]

Measure 14   The City shall designate the Italian Stone Pines on
             South H Street as a heritage grove. [Policy 1.1]

Measure 15   The City shall explore the establishment          of
             landscape maintenance districts. [Policy 4.1]

Measure 16   The City shall establish a citywide street tree
             median and parkstrip planting program, if funding
             is available.   Landscaped areas shall be located
             and designed to maintain vehicular and pedestrian
             safety, to beautify the roadways, and to maintain
             traffic-flow efficiency. [Policy 4.1]

Measure 17   The City shall use landscaping to screen unsightly
             land uses or activities on City-owned land.
             [Policies 4.1, 4.2, and 4.5]

Measure 18   The City shall review the Sign      Ordinance,   and
             update as necessary. [Policy 4.3]

Measure 19   The   Planning    Commission   and   Beautification
             Commission   shall   review  existing   Engineering
             Division standards for consistency with the
             policies of the Urban Design Element. [Policies

                        URBAN DESIGN - 5
             2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 4.1, and 5.1]

Measure 20   The City shall identify boundaries of the Old Town
             area and include those boundaries on the Zoning
             Map.


Measure 21   The City shall condition approval of individual
             development proposals to be consistent with Land
             Use Element Policies 5.11 and 5.12. [Final EIR
             Urban Design Mitigation Measures 1a and 1b]

Measure 22   The City shall condition approval of individual
             development proposals to assure that development
             shall preserve important view corridors, where
             feasible,   by  identifying   and   preserving   the
             attributes of the view corridor that characterize
             its significance (e.g. framing elements and presence
             or absence of impinging details) as seen from
             roadways, pedestrian paths or other public vantage
             points to avoid view obstruction. Buildings shall
             be sited so as to minimize view obstruction from
             sensitive vantage points.    This measure shall be
             accomplished through amendment of the zoning
             ordinance to include standards for view protection
             as indicated in this measure. [Final EIR Urban
             Design Mitigation Measures 2a]

Measure 23   The City shall amend the zoning ordinance so that
             the following glare reduction measures are applied
             when reviewing new development on a parcel specific
             basis:

             Utilize trees or other forms of vegetation to screen
             and visually soften parking areas.     This measure
             would reduce the amount of glare generated from
             painted and chrome automobile surfaces and prevent
             expanses of stationary and moving automobiles;

             Require use of hooded lights on focused-beam lamps
             for nighttime illumination in parking areas,
             shipping and receiving docks and within industrial
             developments.   These lights direct the light beam
             towards the ground, which if a dark pavement, will
             not   reflect  light   and   cause  spillage  into
             neighboring areas; and

             Require use of materials which reduce or diminish

                        URBAN DESIGN - 6
               glare for windows in new developments. [Final EIR
               Urban Design Mitigation Measures 3a]

Measure 24     The City shall continue to review development
               proposals on a project-specific basis with added
               attention to avoidance to degradation of objects or
               aesthetic and/or historical significance.       New
               development shall be subject to design review as
               part of the City's project approval process. [Final
               EIR Urban Design Mitigation Measures 4a]

Measure 25     The City staff shall coordinate planning, design,
               and maintenance of roadway medians, parkstrips, and
               open space areas with the parks and Recreation
               Department through the Development Review Board
               process.



[Notes: The following policies are implemented through the current
City Codes and procedures: Policies 3.3, 4.5. 4.6, and 4.7]




                         URBAN DESIGN - 7
                       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES


GOALS/POLICIES

Authority

The Resource Management Element addresses mineral, cultural,
biological and water resources. The following paragraphs describe
the areas covered in the Resource Management Element.

Mineral resources are noted in several sections of the Government
Code (GC) as a topic to be addressed in the General Plan. The
Conservation   Element   (Section  65302(d))   must   discuss   the
conservation, development, and utilization of mineral, rock, sand,
and gravel resources, while the managed production of mineral
deposits is listed as one of the uses for open space lands (Section
65560(b)(2)). The Land Use Element must designate land for natural
resources (Section 65302(a)). The Public Resources Code (Section
2762(a)) requires mineral resource management policies to be
incorporated into the general plan.

Biological resources, as a component of the more-encompassing term
natural resources, is addressed in several sections of the
Government Code requirements for the General Plan.       Discussion
regarding the conservation of natural resources, including rivers,
forests, fisheries, and wildlife is required by Section 65302(d).
Open space land can be used "for the preservation of natural
resources including, but not limited to, areas required for the
preservation of plant and animal life, including habitat for fish
and wildlife species; areas required for ecologic and other
scientific study purposes; rivers, streams, bays and estuaries; and
coastal beaches, lake shores, banks of rivers and streams, and
watershed lands" (GC Section 65560(b)). Designation of land for
natural resources is required by Section 65302(a).

Cultural resources, including archeological, historical, and
architectural features need to be addressed in the General Plan in
order to fulfill the requirements for the Open Space Element (GC
Section 65560(b)). Areas of historic and cultural value, as well
as areas needed for the scientific study of natural resources are
allowable uses of open space lands in the General Plan.


Water resources are included in the General Plan to fulfill
requirements for the Conservation Element (GC Section 65302(d)
"[which   must  address] the   conservation, development,  and

                       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 1
utilization of natural resources including water.    The Conservation
Element may also address:

     Prevention and control of the pollution of streams and other
     waters;

     Regulation of the use of land in stream channels and other
     areas required for the accomplishment of the conservation
     plan;

     Prevention, control, and correction of the erosion of soils,
     beaches, and shores; and

     Protection of water sheds ..."

In addition, the Open Space Element (GC Section 65560) has
requirements for the discussion of rivers, streams, banks of rivers
and streams, watershed lands, areas required for recharge of ground
water basins, and areas required for protection of water quality.

Consideration of air quality as a resource in the General Plan is
provided since several of the mandatory elements have effects on
air quality and emission sources:

     The Land Use Element governs the location and intensity of
     stationary commercial and industrial emission sources;

     The Circulation Element addresses the location and extent of
     highways used by automobiles and mobile sources;

     The   Conservation  Element   requires      discussion   of   the
     conservation of natural resources, and

     The Open Space Element address use of open space lands for the
     enhancement of air quality.

The Government Code also allows the City to "address any other
subjects, which in the judgement of the legislative body relate to
the [City's] physical development" (GC Section 65303).

Goal 1         Protect access to and availability of mineral
               resources, while maintaining protection of the
               surrounding environment.

Policy 1.1     The   City   shall   designate   areas   containing
               significant mineral resources, including those
               areas designated MRZ-2 by the State of California
               pursuant to the Surface Mining and Reclamation Act,
               as Open Space.

                       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 2
Policy 1.2   The City may permit mineral resource extraction and
             processing activities in open space areas provided
             that: 1) all adverse environmental effects are
             avoided or minimized and 2) the visual qualities of
             the Lompoc Valley are not impaired.

Goal 2       Protect natural habitats in recognition of their
             biological, educational, and scientific values.

Policy 2.1   The City shall ensure that the biologically
             significant areas identified on the Biologically
             Significant Areas map are preserved.

Policy 2.2   The City shall protect the valuable natural
             resources of the Santa Ynez River and tributaries
             which serve as flood channels, wildlife habitats,
             critical links in Lompoc's water supply, and
             components of the City's urban form. Watercourses
             shall be retained in a natural state, rather than
             be concrete-lined or placed underground, so long as
             proper flood protection is provided.

Policy 2.3   The City shall encourage the restoration and
             management of natural habitats for wildlife
             enhancement and public enjoyment.

Policy 2.4   The   City    shall   encourage   the    provision,
             maintenance, and protection of direct public access
             to publicly-owned watercourses and shall integrate
             watercourses with non-motorized trails and other
             open space.

Policy 2.5   The City shall ensure that the biologically-
             significant habitats identified on the Resource
             Management map are preserved.

Goal 3       Protect cultural resources in recognition of their
             aesthetic, educational, cultural, and scientific
             values.

Policy 3.1   The City shall promote rehabilitation of residences
             and structures with historic or architectural
             value.

Policy 3.2   The City shall encourage property owners of
             historic structures or places to request Federal,
             state, county, or City landmark status.


                     RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 3
Policy 3.3   The City shall use the Archeological Sensitivity
             Zones map to determine the type and extent of
             archeological resource evaluation necessary for
             development projects.

Policy 3.4   The City shall protect significant archeological
             resources for the enjoyment and edification of
             future generations.




                    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 4
Policy 3.5    The City shall support efforts by public and non-
              profit organizations to acquire properties adjacent
              to the Mission Vieja de la Purisima site and La
              Purisima Mission State Historical Park in order to
              facilitate protection of these resources.

Policy 3.6    The City   shall   continue   support   of   the   Lompoc
              Museum.

Policy 3.7    The City shall continue to encourage local
              organizations   (e.g.  Lompoc   Valley   Historical
              Society) to place plaques at historic places and to
              provide displays, programs, and events that
              highlight Lompoc's historic heritage.

Policy 3.8    As required by CEQA, the City shall continue
              cultural resource investigations as part of the
              environmental review for all development projects.
              [Final EIR Cultural Resources Mitigation Measure
              1a]

Policy 3.9    The City of Lompoc shall use the "California
              Comprehensive Heritage Resources Management Plan"
              guidelines and standards for administering cultural
              resource investigations.       The plan provides
              guidance with respect to:

              Research design criteria;

              Evaluation of cultural resources using the three-
              phased methodology noted in Section 6.2 of the
              Cultural Resources Study;
              Archiving cultural resource materials; and

              Professional qualifications for cultural resource
              investigators, including individuals qualified for
              membership   in   the   Society    of   Professional
              Archeologists.   [Final   EIR   Cultural   Resources
              Mitigation Measure 1b]

Policy 3.10   The City shall use local specialists in the
              management of the area's cultural resources. This
              position could be used on a part-time basis to
              assist the City with project reviews, surveys for
              in-house projects, evaluation of cultural resource
              reports, and to provide advice on a variety of
              cultural resource matters.       In addition, the
              assistance and advice of local Chumash Indian
              Native   American   specialists,    Lompoc   Museum
              Associates and staff, Lompoc Valley Historical
              Society, Lompoc Advisory Landmark Committee, and
              other heritage-minded organizations and individuals
              shall be solicited as needed. [Final EIR Cultural

                      RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 5
              Resources Mitigation Measure 1c]

Policy 3.11   The City shall support efforts by public and non-
                   profit organizations to acquire properties
                   adjacent to the Mission Vieja de la Purisima
                   site and La Purisima Mission State Historical
                   Park in order to facilitate protection of
                   archaeological resources. [Final EIR Cultural
                   Resources Mitigation Measure 1h]

Goal 4        Provide a sufficient      supply   of   water   to   meet
              projected demand.

Policy 4.1    The City shall develop reliable and cost-effective
              supplemental water supplies to reduce dependence
              upon the Lompoc groundwater basin.

Policy 4.2    The City shall utilize newly-developed water
              supplies primarily to offset existing groundwater
              demand and secondarily to serve new development.

Policy 4.3    The City shall encourage water conservation to the
              maximum extent possible in order to efficiently
              utilize existing water supplies and minimize the
              need for supplemental water sources.

Policy 4.4    The City shall protect water rights on the Santa
              Ynez River which are vital to sustain riparian
              habitats as well as water quality and supply in the
              Lompoc groundwater basin.

Policy 4.5    The City shall assure that any decisions affecting
              supplemental water sources protect Lompoc Valley
              agricultural and flower seed industries.

Policy 4.6    The City shall encourage the efficient use of water
              resources for agricultural irrigation, including
              the use of reclaimed water.

Policy 4.7    The City shall participate with local, regional,
              state,   and   federal   agencies   in   monitoring
              groundwater supply, quality and developing recharge
              facilities.

Goal 5        Minimize overdraft of the Lompoc groundwater basin.

Policy 5.1    The City shall continue to require new development
              to offset new water demand with savings from
              existing water users, as long as savings are
              available.

Policy 5.2    The City shall work to ensure the long-term
              sustainability of the existing groundwater supply.


                      RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 6
Policy 5.3   The   City  shall   continue   to  promote   water
             conservation throughout the Lompoc Valley.

Policy 5.4   The City shall continue to encourage the design and
             installation   of   energy   conservation,    water
             conservation, and solid waste reduction measures in
             all construction and rehabilitation projects.

Policy 5.5   The City shall provide financial and technical
             assistance (based upon the availability of funding)
             to property owners who desire to improve energy and
             water efficiency of their housing units but are
             unable to afford improvement costs.

Goal 6       Protect and improve water quality in the Lompoc
             groundwater basin.

Policy 6.1   The City shall encourage governmental agencies and
             Lompoc Valley farmers to minimize contamination of
             the Lompoc groundwater basin.

Policy 6.2   The City shall ensure that new development does not
             adversely affect water quality during and after
             construction.

Goal 7       Improve air quality in the Lompoc Valley.

Policy 7.1   The City shall participate in regional air quality
             planning programs to attain federal and state air
             quality standards.

Policy 7.2   The City shall encourage federal, state, and local
             agencies to require local emission offsets and best
             available air pollution control technology on
             emission sources affecting the Lompoc Valley.

Policy 7.3   The City shall encourage the Air Pollution Control
             District (APCD) to: 1) enforce air quality rules
             and regulations in a uniform manner and 2) maintain
             air quality monitoring stations in the Lompoc
             Valley.

Policy 7.4   The City shall consult with the APCD during the
             review of any development project which may emit
             air pollutants or is in the vicinity of a source of
             air pollutants.

Policy 7.5   The City shall minimize air quality impacts
             resulting from construction activities regulated by
             the City.

Policy 7.6   The City shall encourage the agricultural industry
                     RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 7
               to minimize the emission of pollutants resulting
               from agricultural activities.
Goal 8         Minimize emissions from vehicles.

Policy 8.1     The City shall require development projects     to
               minimize vehicle-related air quality impacts.

Policy 8.2     The City shall discourage auto-dependent facilities
               which cause excessive emissions from idling
               vehicles.

Policy 8.3     The City shall minimize air quality impacts
               resulting from operation of the Lompoc Airport.


IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Measure 1      The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
               protect   mineral   deposits  and   restricts   the
               encroachment of incompatible land uses.     Mineral
               resource extraction may be allowed within these
               areas contingent upon approval of a conditional use
               permit. [Policy 1.1]

Measure 2      The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
               require that any divisions of land which involves
               mineral resource areas shall include notices on the
               property titles which identify the presence of
               mineral resources and possibility of mineral
               extraction operations in the area. [Policies 1.1
               and 1.2]

Measure 3      The City shall amend the Subdivision Ordinance to
               require that developments proposed within 1000 feet
               of abandoned oil and gas wells be conditioned to:
               1) identify the precise locations of the wells and
               2) ensure that the wells have been abandoned in
               accordance with current State Division of Oil and
               Gas regulations. [Policies 1.1 and 1.2]


Measure 4      The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
               specify that the discretionary review of surface
               mining proposals shall be undertaken in conformance
               with the requirements of the Surface Mining and
               Reclamation Act. This review shall include plans
               for the mining operation and for reclamation of the
               site. [Policy 1.2]


                       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 8
Measure 5    The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             provide discretionary review of oil drilling or
             production proposals.   This review shall include
             plans for oil and gas drilling and production as
             well as abandonment of the site. [Policy 1.2]
Measure 6    The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to add an
             environmentally-sensitive resource overlay zone in
             order    to    protect   environmentally-sensitive
             resources,    including   biologically-significant
             habitats. [Policies 2.1 and 2.2]

Measure 7    The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to ensure
             that permitted activities in the environmentally-
             sensitive resource overlay zone will not damage
             biologically significant habitats.        Where no
             feasible alternative locations exist for the
             activity, replacement habitat shall be required at
             a 1:1 ratio of any biologically significant habitat
             located within the overlay zone which is damaged or
             disturbed by development. [Policy 2.1]

Measure 8    The City shall amend the City Environmental
             Guidelines to maintain consistency with the
             California  Environmental Quality  Act  and
             Guidelines.

Measure 9    The City shall amend the Grading Ordinance to
             require temporary fencing to be installed at the
             edge of biologically significant habitats prior to
             construction. [Policy 2.1]

Measure 10   The City shall amend the Grading and/or Subdivision
             Ordinance to: minimize soil erosion, water quality
             degradation, and volume of surface water runoff
             during and after construction; and to maximize on-
             site percolation of stormwaters.[Policies 2.1 and
             2.2]

Measure 11   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require a conditional use permit for livestock
             grazing in the environmentally-sensitive resource
             overlay zone to reduce damage to biologically-
             significant   habitats   resulting  from  grazing
             activities. [Policies 2.1 and 2.2]

Measure 12   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require native plant buffers along stream and
             riparian habitat to protect riparian vegetation,
             provide continuous wildlife habitat, retain bank

                     RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 9
             stability, and reduce erosion and sedimentation.
             [Policies 2.1 and 2.3]

Measure 13   The City shall amend the City Code to restrict off-
             road motorized vehicle use in biologically-
             significant habitats to avoid fire hazards, topsoil
             erosion, noise, and habitat damage. [Policies 2.1
             and 2.2]
Measure 14   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require   the  preparation   of   maintenance   and
             management plans for natural habitats affected by
             development. [Policy 2.2, and 2.3]

Measure 15   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require landscape plans for projects adjacent to
             natural habitats to use local native vegetation
             which is compatible with the natural habitat.
             [Policy 2.2]

Measure 16   The City shall seek funding from federal, state,
             and local agencies as well as private organizations
             for habitat restoration projects. [Policy 2.3]

Measure 17   The City shall conduct a comprehensive survey of
             all pre-World War II structures, architecturally
             significant buildings, and ethnic places.       The
             identified structures and places shall be evaluated
             to determine historic, architectural, or ethnic
             significance. [Policies 3.2, and 3.3]

Measure 18   The City shall review the Landmark Ordinance and
             update,   as  necessary,   to   provide   increased
             protection to landmark structures by requiring
             public notice prior to any demolition or major
             rehabilitation.   This requirement shall apply to
             the more recent of the following lists of
             structures: 1) Table 4 of the Cultural Resources
             Study or 2) the results of the comprehensive survey
             (see Measure 17).

Measure 19   The City shall review zoning designations in the
             Southside Old Town Neighborhood (generally the 200-
             400 blocks of South "G" and "H" Streets and 200-300
             of South "I" and "J" Streets) for changes which
             would enhance protection of existing historic
             structures and neighborhoods. [Policy 3.2]

Measure 20   The City shall publicize applicability of the State
             Historic Building Code in repair, alteration, and

                    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 10
additions to historic structures   [Policy 3.2]




       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 11
Measure 21   The City shall establish a program of financial
             incentives to encourage the rehabilitation of
             buildings which are eligible to be or have been
             designated City landmarks.    The program shall
             include:

             Allocation of Community Development Block Grant
             rehabilitation funds toward historic structures;

             Encouraging local lending institutions to establish
             a special loan program for historic neighborhoods
             and structures. Such a program will assist local
             lending institutions in meeting their obligations
             under the Community Reinvestment Act;

             Publicizing and pursuing financial incentives for
             historic structures which are available under State
             legislation, and

             Amending the City Code to waive or reduce building
             permit fees for historic structures which undergo
             rehabilitation in accordance with the design
             guidelines for historic structures. [Policy 3.1].


Measure 22   The City shall publicize and provide information to
             property owners of historic structures or places
             regarding the benefits of Federal, state, county,
             or City landmark status. [Policy 3.2]

Measure 23   The   City   shall  prepare   cultural   resources
             guidelines to assist in the review of development
             proposals which affect cultural resources and to
             ensure   protection  of   cultural  resources   in
             accordance with Federal and State requirements.
             The guidelines shall address application of the
             Archeological Sensitivity Zones map to development
             projects. [Policies 3.3 and 3.4]

Measure 24   The   City   shall  maintain   records   of  known
             archeological sites and provide the Building
             Official with a listing of affected parcels. Prior
             to issuance of building or demolition permits on
             these parcels, a Phase 2 or Phase 3 Cultural
             Resources Evaluation shall be required. [Policies
             3.3 and 3.4]

Measure 25   The   City   shall   amend   the   Zoning   Ordinance   to

                     RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 12
             protect    environmentally-sensitive    resources,
             including archeological resources. [Policy 3.4]

Measure 26   The City shall inventory all trees on City property
             and designate as City Landmarks any trees with
             historic or cultural significance.

Measure 27   The archaeological sensitivity map shall be used
             for determining the type of archaeological resource
             evaluation in high and low sensitivity zones as
             noted   below.  [Final   EIR   Cultural   Resources
             Mitigation Measure 1d]

             High Sensitivity Zone:     All projects (including
             general   plan   amendments,        zone   changes,
             annexations,   subdivision   maps,   parcel   maps)
             involving parcels 10,000 square feet or more in
             size, shall be required to have a Phase 1 study.
             The study shall examine the entire parcel.
             Subsequent Phase 2 and 3 studies shall be required
             if archaeological resources are identified in the
             Phase 1 study. If the project area, or a portion
              thereof, was previously surveyed at acceptable
             standards, the previous Phase 1 study can be used
             to satisfy this requirement for the surveyed area.
             [Final EIR Cultural Resources Mitigation Measure
             1e]

             Low Sensitivity Zone:     All projects (including
             general   plan   amendments,        zone   changes,
             annexations,   subdivision   maps,   parcel   maps)
             involving parcels 20 or more acres in size shall be
             required to have a Phase 1 study. The coverage of
             the Phase 1 study, the need for subsequent studies,
             and use of previous studies shall be as noted
             above. [Final EIR Cultural Resources Mitigation
             Measure 1f]

             Known Archeological Sites: The Community Services
             Department maintain records of known archeological
             sites. Prior to issuance of building permits for
             new construction or additions in areas of known
             archeological sites, a Phase 2 or 3 study, as
             necessary, shall be required. This procedure will
             fulfill CEQA requirements for protection of known
             archeological sites. [Final EIR Cultural Resources
             Mitigation Measure 1g]

Measure 28   The City shall pursue administrative, governmental,

                    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 13
and legal channels to protect the City's water
rights on the Santa Ynez River. (Cross Reference:
Biological Resources) [Policies 4.1 and 4.4]




       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 14
Measure 29   The City shall participate in the preparation of a
             Groundwater   Resources   Management  Plan   which
             addresses the use of groundwater in the Lompoc
             Valley by all major users. [Policy 4.8]

Measure 30   The City shall review its Urban Water Management
             Plan every five years and update it as necessary to
             ensure the ongoing effectiveness of the City's
             water conservation efforts and satisfaction of the
             City's supplemental water needs. [Policies 4.3 and
             5.1 - 5.5]

Measure 31   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to add an
             environmentally-sensitive resource overlay zone in
             order    to    protect   environmentally-sensitive
             resources, including groundwater recharge areas.
             [Policies 6.1, 6.3]

Measure 32   The City shall explore development of supplemental
             and cost-effective water options. [Policy 4.1]

Measure 33   The City shall amend the Grading and/or Subdivision
             Ordinance to: minimize soil erosion, water quality
             degradation, and volume of surface water runoff
             during and after construction; and to maximize on-
             site percolation of stormwaters. (Cross References:
             PF&S-Storm Drainage, Biological Resources, and
             Flooding) [Policy 4.4]

Measure 34   The City shall expand its water conservation Public
             Information Program for commercial businesses to
             further reduce water demand. [Policies 4.3, 5.3,
             5.4, and 5.5]

Measure 35   The City shall expand its Leak Detection Program to
             include annual system-wide leak detection surveys
             in order to improve water delivery efficiency and
             conserve existing water supplies. [Policy 5.2 and
             5.4]

Measure 36   The City shall explore methods to export salt from
             the Lompoc groundwater basin in order to improve
             water quality. [Policy 5.2]

Measure 37   The City shall provide xeriscape display gardens as
             part of landscaping at public facilities, and
             encourage their use throughout the City. (Cross
             References: Urban Design and PF&S-Public Buildings)
             [Policy 5.2 and 5.4]


                    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 15
Measure 38   The City shall evaluate and monitor the effects of
             the development of different parks and recreation
             facilities on water quantity and quality as more
             details about the specific land uses and fertilizer
             management practices are developed. [Final EIR
             Water Resources Mitigation Measure 4]

Measure 39   The City shall periodically review and update its
             standardized conditions of approval to reduce the
             construction and operational air quality impacts
             resulting   from  discretionary  and  ministerial
             projects. [Policy 7.1]

Measure 40   The City shall institute referral procedures to
             ensure that applicants for new stationary sources
             of air pollution are notified of APCD rules and
             regulations early in the project review process.
             [Policy 7.2]

Measure 41   The City shall work with APCD to develop guidelines
             for assessing and mitigating project-related air
             quality    impacts    pursuant     to    California
             Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). [Policy 7.3]

Measure 42   The City shall continue the conversion of city-
             operated fleet vehicles and equipment to low-
             emitting fuels. [Policy 8.1]

Measure 43   Pursuant to Congestion Management Program goals,
             the City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to
             require   large    commercial,   industrial,   and
             institutional developments to provide enhancements
             for: 1) users of alternative transportation modes;
             and 2) on-site services to reduce the need for
             offsite travel by employees. [Policy 8.1 and 8.2]

Measure 44   The City shall review and if necessary amend the
             Zoning Ordinance to discourage new drive-through
             facilities. [Policy 8.2]

Measure 45   The City shall condition approval of individual
             development proposals on implementation of the
             following dust abatement program. The components
             of a dust abatement program shall include the
             following dust control measures:

             Sprinkle   all   construction  areas  with   water
             (recycled when possible) at least twice a day,
             during   excavation   and  other  ground-preparing
             operations, to reduce fugitive dust emissions.

                    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 16
             Wetting could reduce particulate (dust) emissions
             by up to 50 percent;

             Construction sites shall be watered and all
             equipment cleaned in the morning and evening to
             reduce particulate and dust emissions;

             Cover stockpiles of sand, soil, and similar
             materials, or surround them with windbreaks. This
             measure would substantially reduce wind erosion of
             stockpiled   materials   during    demolition   and
             construction, reducing the potential of the project
             to contribute to excessive suspended particulate
             (dust) concentrations when the wind exceeds 10
             miles per hour;

             Cover trucks hauling dirt and debris to reduce
             spillage onto paved surfaces or have adequate
             freeboard to prevent spillage;

             Post signs that limit vehicle speeds on unpaved
             roads and over disturbed soils to 10 miles per hour
             during construction;

             Soil binders shall be spread on construction sites,
             on unpaved roads, and on parking areas; ground
             cover shall be reestablished through seeding and
             watering;

             Sweep up dirt and debris spilled onto paved
             surfaces immediately to reduce resuspension of
             particulate matter through vehicle movement over
             those surfaces; and

             Require the construction contractor to designate a
             person or persons to oversee the implementation of
             a comprehensive dust control program and to
             increase watering, as necessary.   [Final EIR Air
             Quality Mitigation Measure 1a]

Measure 46   The City shall condition approval of individual
             projects upon implementation of the following
             mitigation measures:

             Activity management techniques shall be employed by
             reducing the number of pieces of equipment used
             simultaneously; increasing the distance between the
             emission sources, reducing or changing the hours of
             construction; scheduling activity during off-peak
             hours (when feasible); and requiring a phased-

                    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 17
schedule for construction activities to even out
emission peaks. [Final EIR Air Quality Mitigation
Measure 2a];




       RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 18
               Emissions from construction equipment shall be
               reduced   to  the   maximum  extent   feasible   by
               substituting clean-burning fuels for diesel fuel
               used in these equipment, by ensuring proper
               maintenance of these equipment, or by installing an
               engine timing retard in these equipment.[Final EIR
               Air Quality Mitigation Measure 2b]; and

               Require that construction of large projects be
               timed    to   avoid   significant    periods   of
               overlap.[Final EIR Air Quality Mitigation Measure
               2c]

Measure 47     The City shall monitor the California Environmental
               Protection    Agency   Department    of    Pesticide
               Regulation investigations and other studies and
               shall work with responsible agencies to take
               necessary steps to reduce the potential for spray
               drift impacts from application of chemicals in
               areas adjacent to residences, schools and non-
               target   food   crops.  [Final   EIR   Air   Quality
               Mitigation Measure 6]



[Notes: The following policies are implemented through the current
City Codes and procedures: Policies 3.6, 3.7, 3.8 4.1, 4.2, 4.3,
4.5, 4.6, 4.8, 5.1, 5.5, 5.2, 5.3, 5.5. 7.2, and 7.6,]




                      RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 19
                              NOISE

                   GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES
GOALS / POLICIES

Authority

The Government Code (Section 65302(f)) (GC) requires the
preparation and adoption of "a Noise Element which shall identify
and appraise noise problems in the community....       The noise
contours shall be used as a guide for establishing a pattern of
land uses in the Land Use Element that minimizes the exposure of
community residents to excessive noise."

Goal 1         Minimize the amount of noise to which the community
               is currently exposed.

Policy 1.1     The City shall require each land use to maintain
               noise levels at their property line in compliance
               with City standards.

Policy 1.2     The City shall place a priority upon control of
               noise at the noise source.

Policy 1.3     The City shall periodically update the Noise
               Ordinance to minimize noise exposure within the
               City.   The Noise Ordinance update and acoustical
               studies shall use the Community Noise Equivalent
               Level (CNEL) methodology for quantification of
               noise exposure.

Policy 1.4     The City shall encourage Vandenberg AFB to utilize
               flight patterns which are the least disturbing to
               residential areas of the City.

Policy 1.5     The City shall coordinate with Federal, State, and
               local agencies to minimize noise exposure within
               the City.

Policy 1.6     The City shall use noise reduction as one criterion
               in equipment purchasing policies.

Goal 2         Minimize   noise   problems   created   by   future
               development.

Policy 2.1     The City shall use the noise standards presented in
               table entitled "Interior and Exterior Noise
               Standards" in determining land use designations and
               maximum    noise   levels    allowable   for    new

                             NOISE - 1
                 developments.


                Interior and Exterior Noise Standards


        LAND USE CATEGORIES                       CNEL

  CATEGORIES            USES                   INTERIOR1   EXTERIOR2
Residential        Single Family, Duplex,         453         604
                   Multiple Family, Mobile
                   Home
Commercial &       Retail, Restaurant             55           65
Industrial         Motel                          45           604
                   Professional Offices,          45           65
                   Movie Theater, Auditorium
                   Manufacturing, Utilities,      65           75
                   Warehousing, Agriculture
Community          Hospital, School, Nursing      45           65
Facility           Home, Church, Library,
                   Civic Offices, Parks
Open Space         Passive Outdoor                --          604
                   Recreation
Notes

1.   Interior areas exclude bathrooms, closets, and corridors.
2.   Exterior areas are limited to the following:
        Private yards or patios of residential uses;
        Restaurant patios;
        Motel recreation areas;
        Office, theater, or hospital patios or assembly areas;
        School playgrounds;
        Nursing home, library, or civic office assembly areas; and
        Park picnic areas.
3.   If achievement of the interior noise standards requires that
     windows and doors remain closed, air conditioning or mechanical
     ventilation is required.
4.   In areas affected by aircraft noise, the standard is 65 CNEL
     with the stipulation that the noise level exclusive of the
     aircraft-generated noise cannot exceed 60 CNEL.

Application of Standards

In situations of overlapping Noise Standards, the quieter standard

                                 NOISE - 2
shall apply unless it can be found that the circumstances of the
project allow for a less conservative interpretation based on the
specific type of use, the benefits of the project, and the ability
to mitigate the noise impacts.

Noise levels may not exceed 75 CNEL at any noise sensitive land
uses.




                             NOISE - 3
Policy 2.2     The City shall require acoustical studies for new
               development projects in areas where noise levels
               are anticipated by the City to be within five CNEL
               of the noise standard or greater than the noise
               standard for the proposed land use(s) under
               existing or future conditions. Noise attenuation
               features recommended by acoustical studies shall
               be incorporated into the project.

Policy 2.3    The City shall minimize noise exposure in the
              vicinity of the Lompoc Airport by maintaining
              consistency with the Santa Barbara County Airport
              Land Use Plan, as amended.
IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

Measure 1      The City shall amend the Noise Ordinance to include
               the following provisions:

               Establish noise limits which cannot be exceeded at
               the property line; [Policies 1.1 and 1.2]

               Require   an  acoustical   study   to   demonstrate
               compliance with Noise Standards prior to approval
               of: new commercial or industrial projects near
               existing residential areas and new residential
               developments within the 60 CNEL contour of existing
               stationary noise sources; [Policy 2.1]

               Require development projects in areas having noise
               levels which exceed the Noise Standards for the
               proposed land use to add noise attenuation measures
               during the development review process to meet the
               Noise Standards.   These attenuation measures may
               include: landscaped-sound buffers, berms, setbacks
               or open space, building design or orientation,
               prohibiting window openings, door openings, or
               bedrooms on the sides of residential units facing
               noise sources which exceed the Noise Standards,
               enhanced wall or roof insulation, placement of air
               conditioning units in locations which minimize
               noise exposure, or other measures; [Policy 2.2]

               Require noise insulation of multi-family units
               constructed within the 60 dBA CNEL contour.;
               [Policy 2.2]

               Add provisions which restrict noise from landscape
               maintenance   devices,  auto   alarms,  stationary
               sources, and the hours of operation of noise
               sources. Expand provisions restricting radios in

                             NOISE - 4
               parks   and  other   non-residential    areas;   and
               [Policies 1.2 and 1.3]

               Establish guidelines for conducting acoustical
               studies, monitoring noise sources, and providing
               noise attenuation. [Policy 2.3]

Measure 2 The City should investigate noise impacts from stationary
               sources in response to noise complaints and then
               enforce existing noise standards if City noise
               standards are being exceeded. [Policies 1.4 and
               1.6]

Measure 3 The City shall amend the projected noise contours for the
               Lompoc Airport as more current information becomes
               available. [Policy 2.4]

Measure 4 The City shall amend the noise ordinance to includes
               these measures:

               For construction near sensitive receptors, require
               that noisy construction activities be scheduled for
               periods, such as between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. on
               weekdays and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, when
               loud noises would have the least impact on adjacent
               residents or other sensitive receptors; [Final EIR
               Noise Mitigation Measure 1a]

               Develop a construction schedule that minimizes
               potential cumulative construction noise impacts and
               accommodates particularly noise-sensitive periods
               for nearby land uses (e.g., for schools, churches,
               etc); [Final EIR Noise Mitigation Measure 1b]

               Where feasible, require use of caissons instead of
               driven piles to reduce the intensity level and
               duration of noise impacts; [Final EIR Noise
               Mitigation Measure 1c]

               Where feasible, construct temporary, solid noise
               barriers between source and sensitive receptor(s)
               to reduce off-site propagation of construction
               noise.   This measure could reduce construction
               noise by up to five decibels; and [Final EIR Noise
               Mitigation Measure 1d]

               Require internal combustion engines used for
               construction purposes to be equipped with a
               properly operating muffler of a type recommended by
               the manufacturer. Also, require impact tools to be
               shielded per manufacturer's specifications. [Final

                             NOISE - 5
EIR Noise Mitigation Measure 1e]




             NOISE - 6
Measure 5 The ultimate noise contours at the design capacity of
               existing and proposed roadways shall be used for
               preliminary planning purposes and refined when
               detailed   site-specific   acoustic   reports  are
               prepared for new developments.    Until that time,
               the following table shall serve as a general
               planning guide to determine the potential "worst
               case" future noise levels and shall be used to
               determine required setback distances. [Final EIR
               Noise Mitigation Measure 2]


DESIGN NOISE LEVELS ADJACENT TO PLANNED ROADWAYS
    Roadway          Lanea      Designb    CNELc   Distance to
Classification    Geometrics   Capacity    @ 100    Contours (Ft.)d
                                           feet    70dBA 65dBA 60dBA
     Expressway       4D        30,000     67.0     66   134   .285
 Major Arterial       4D        30,000     64.3     47    90    189
 Minor Arterial       4U        20,000     62.5    R/W    69    146
 Minor Arterial       2D        12,500     59.1    R/W    42    87
 Minor Arterial       2U        10,000     58.1    R/W   35     75
   \Collector


a.    D=Divided U=Undivided.
b.    The ultimate daily design capacity shown in terms of vehicles
       per day.
c.    CNEL values are at 100 feet from all roadway centerlines (see
       Appendix F for assumptions).
d.    All distances are measured from the centerline. R/W means
      that the CNEL contour falls within the right-of-way.


[Notes: The following policies are implemented through the current
City Codes and procedures: Policies 1.4, 1.5, 1.7 and 2.3.]




                               NOISE - 7
                               SAFETY

                     GOALS / POLICIES / MEASURES

GOALS AND POLICIES

Authority

Government Code Section 65302(g) states that the general plan shall
provide for the protection of the community from unreasonable
risks. The Safety Element, by addressing the issues of hazardous
materials, flooding, emergency preparedness, wildland fires, and
seismic/soils acts to satisfy this requirement. The general plan
may also address any other elements or address other subjects
which, in the judgement of the legislative body, relate to the
physical development of the city (GC Section 65303).

Government Code (Section 65302(a)) mandates that the General Plan
"shall identify areas covered by the plan which are subject to
flooding."    Other sections of the Government Code require
discussion of the unreasonable risks associated with dam failures
and flooding (Section 665302(g)), require discussion of open space
areas needed for safety due to hazardous conditions such as flood
plains (Section 65560), and suggest discussion of flood control
(Section 65302(d)).

With respect to preparing for wildland fires the Government Code
(Section 65302 (g)) states that: the general plan shall include the
following elements: "A safety element for the protection of the
community from any unreasonable risks associated with the effects
of...wildland...fires. It shall also address evacuation routes,
peakload water supply requirements, and minimum road widths and
clearances around structures, as those items relate to identified
fire...hazards."   Later sections of the Government Code require
discussion of open space areas required for safety purposes due to
hazardous conditions, such as high fire risks (Section 65560).

The Government Code also states (Section 65302(g)) that the general
plan shall include "A safety element for the protection of the
community from any unreasonable risks associated with the effects
of seismically-induced surface rupture, ground shaking, ground
failure, tsunami, seiche, and dam failure; slope instability
leading to mudslides and landslides; subsidence, liquefaction,...
and other geologic hazards known to the legislative body... The
safety element shall include mapping of known seismic and other
geologic hazards.     It shall also address evacuation routes,
peakload water supply requirements, and minimum road widths and
clearances around structures, as those items relate to identified
geologic hazards."

                              SAFETY - 1
Goal 1       Prevent injury, death, social, and economic disruption
             resulting from an extraordinary emergency.

Policy 1.1   The City shall increase public awareness of emergency
             preparedness.

Policy 1.2   The City shall continue to improve response by City
             departments,   public  utilities,  media,  volunteer
             organizations, businesses, and the medical community
             during emergency conditions.

Policy 1.3   The City shall strive to ensure that all critical
             facilities remain operational during and after a
             disaster (e.g. earthquake, flood).

Policy 1.4   The City shall avoid placement of critical facilities
             in hazardous areas as identified on the hazard maps:

             Floodway or Floodway Fringe (Flood Hazard Areas map);

             Slope or Liquefaction Hazard Areas (Geologic and Soils
             Hazard Areas map); and

             High or Moderate Wildland Fire Areas (Wildland Fire
             Hazard Areas map).

Goal 2       Protect the community from loss of life and property
             resulting from flooding while maintaining protection of
             natural resources located in flood hazard areas.

Policy 2.1   The City shall designate     floodways, as shown on the
             Flood Hazard Areas Map,      for open space land uses.
             Developments which impair    the ability of the floodway
             to convey floods shall be    prohibited.

Policy 2.2   The City may permit development within the floodway
             fringe provided that: building setback requirements
             from the Santa Ynez River and other streams are met and
             finished floor elevations are at least one foot above
             the 100-year flood elevations.

Policy 2.3   The City shall ensure that all new developments will
             not compound the potential for flooding.

Policy 2.4   The City shall continue to coordinate with the Santa
             Barbara County Flood Control and Water Conservation

                             SAFETY - 2
             District in mitigating flooding impacts resulting from
             new developments and the Federal Emergency Management
             Agency and USDA Soil Conservation Service in flood
             protection activities.


Policy 2.5   The City shall continue programs to increase public
             awareness of flooding hazards and procedures to
             minimize injury and property damage before, during, and
             after a flooding event.

Policy 2.6   The City shall preclude new developments           from
             compounding the potential for flooding.

Goal 3       Ensure adequate fire protection in wildland fire hazard
             areas while maintaining protection of biologically
             sensitive habitats.

Policy 3.1   The City shall use the Wildland Fire Hazard map in
             determining the suitability and design of development
             in wildland fire hazard areas.

Policy 3.2   The City shall work with governmental agencies,
             landowners, and the public to minimize wildland fire
             risks by managing fuel and vegetation in wildland fire
             hazard areas, while protecting biologically sensitive
             habitats.

Policy 3.3   The City shall restrict activities in wildland fire
             hazard areas which increase the danger of wildland
             fires.

Goal 4       Minimize risks associated with seismic activity.

Policy 4.1   The City shall not permit placement of critical
             facilities as identified in the Emergency Preparedness
             Element in areas prone to slope instability or
             liquefaction during an earthquake.

Policy 4.2   The City shall continue to identify all existing
             seismicly vulnerable buildings and require that they be
             reinforced to minimize risk of personal injury during
             an earthquake.

Policy 4.3   The City shall ensure that all new development is
             constructed in accordance with current seismic safety
             design standards.

Policy 4.4   The City shall continue programs to increase public

                             SAFETY - 3
             awareness of: seismic hazards and procedures to
             minimize injury and property damage before, during, and
             after an earthquake.

Goal 5       Minimize injury and property damage resulting from
             landslides and mass earth movements.

Policy 5.1   The City may permit development on hillsides only where
             it can be demonstrated that geologic conditions are
             sound for construction purposes.
Goal 6       Protect the community through the safe and efficient
             production, use, storage, dispensing, use, handling,
             transport, and disposal of hazardous materials.

Policy 6.1   The City shall promote waste minimization, recycling,
             and safe management of hazardous wastes.

Policy 6.2   The City shall encourage the safe and economical use,
             collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of
             hazardous materials generated by businesses and
             households.

Policy 6.3   The City shall site hazardous materials facilities in
             areas that ensure the protection of public health,
             safety, and the environment.

Policy 6.4   The City shall ensure that adequate protection of
             public health and safety is provided to new
             developments which are located in the vicinity of
             existing hazardous materials facilities.

Policy 6.5   Open space buffers shall be provided between hazardous
             materials routes and residential areas.

Policy 6.6   The use, storage, and handling of hazardous materials
             by businesses and industries within the project area is
             done in compliance with applicable City policies as
             well as any State and local laws, guidelines, and
             regulations. [Final EIR Hazardous Materials Mitigation
             Measure 3a]

Policy 6.7   Residents within one quarter mile of new hazardous
             materials handling facilities shall be notified
             immediately   by   the    City   emergency  response
             organizations of any accidental occurrences such as
             spills, leakages, or eruptions which may affect the
             health, safety and welfare of the public. [Final EIR
             Hazardous Materials Mitigation Measure 3b]

IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES


                             SAFETY - 4
Measure 1 The City shall establish an emergency warning system.
            [Policy 1.2]

Measure 2 The City shall improve its communication network with
            operators of hazardous facilities which have the
            potential for injury to local residents (e.g. PG&E,
            Unocal, Southern California Gas Company, Southern
            Pacific Railroad). [Policy 1.2]



Measure 3 The City shall establish emergency response plans for
            protection of municipal resources (i.e. procedures for
            off-site storage of duplicate vital records, protection
            of computers and other electronic equipment from
            electrical surges) [Policy 1.2]

Measure 4 The City shall establish a program allowing citizens with
            life-support equipment or other disabilities to
            register with the City or volunteer organizations to
            allow prompt attention during emergency conditions.
            [Policy 1.2]

Measure 5 The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to require all
            publicly-owned critical facilities (Attachment A) to
            provide and maintain emergency electrical generating
            capability. [Policy 1.3]

Measure 6 The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to incorporate
            specific standards for siting, designing, and reviewing
            critical facilities. [Policy 1.4]

Measure 7 For event-specific risks brought to the City=s attention,
            the   City   shall   develop   event-specific    plans,
            procedures, or programs to manage the risk and maximize
            public safety.

Measure 8 The City shall update the Multi-Hazard Functional Plan as
            necessary to reflect new information which affects the
            safety of Lompoc residents.

Measure 9 The City shall amend the Zoning Map to show all floodway
            areas, as identified on the Hazard Management Map, for
            "Open Space" or zones which are compatible with
            floodway hazards. [Policies 2.1, and 2.2]

Measure 10   The City shall amend the Flood Plain Management
             Ordinance in order: 1) to maintain consistency with
             revisions of Federal and state requirements; 2) to

                             SAFETY - 5
             establish a regulatory floodway; 3) to regulate grading
             and filling activities which diminish the carrying
             capacity of the floodway fringe; and 4) to establish
             building setbacks from the Santa Ynez River and other
             watercourses. [Policies 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3]

Measure 11   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance and Resolu-
             tions Numbers 2399(74) and 2418(74) to reflect the
             current roles and responsibilities of the Planning
             Commission and City departments in maintaining flood
             hazard information, reviewing development plans, and
             submitting periodic reports on flood plain management
             measures. [Policies 2.3 and 1.2]


Measure 12   The City shall acquire flood control and conservation
             easements along watercourses; either through dedication
             at the time of development or purchase, subject to the
             availability of funds. [Policy 2.3]

Measure 13   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to restrict
             densities in wildland fire risk areas and to establish
             standards for development. [Policy 3.1]

Measure 14   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to establish
             minimum distance between buildings in wildland fire
             risk areas to be not less than 60 feet, unless the
             following conditions are met: 1) properly built access
             roads; 2) availability of an adequate water supply; 3)
             the use of materials and construction which is of
             greater fire resistance than standard requirements; 4)
             strict adherence to clearance requirements; and 5)
             construction and maintenance of fuel breaks.       Such
             reduction in minimum spacing requirements may be
             cumulative but may not be less than otherwise specified
             in the Zoning Ordinance. [Policy 3.1]

Measure 15   The City shall amend the Lompoc City Code to set more
             restrictive construction requirements for residences
             and structures in wildland fire hazard areas.      The
             amendments should be worded to exempt existing
             buildings or structures from the above provisions when
             alterations, repairs, or replacements are made which
             amount to less than 120 square feet. [Policy 3.1]

Measure 16   The City shall amend the Fire Protection Ordinance to
             allow the Fire Chief to require developments located in
             areas beyond the five minute response time to meet more
             stringent construction code requirements to provide
             necessary fire protection. [Policy 3.1]

                             SAFETY - 6
Measure 17   The City shall amend the Subdivision Ordinance to
             establish maximum lengths of dead-end roads.        The
             maximum lengths shall not exceed 350 feet for parcels
             containing less than 0.5 acre; 800 feet for parcels
             containing 0.5 acre to 0.9 acre; 1,320 feet for parcels
             containing 1.0 acre to 4.9 acres; and 2,940 feet for
             parcels containing 5.0 to 19.9 acres. [Policy 3.1]

Measure 18   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to require
             fuel breaks, maintained by the property owners, around
             developments in wildland fire hazard areas . Mosaic
             fuel breaks may be as narrow as one hundred feet if
             additional    fire-resistive     infrastructure    and
             construction measures are provided. [Policies 3.1 and
             3.2]


Measure 19   The City shall amend the Fire Protection Ordinance to
             require the following in wildland fire hazard areas:
             property owners shall maintain proper vegetation
             clearances around their structures (per Public
             Resources   Code    Section   4291),   and    homeowner
             associations shall maintain fuel breaks associated with
             their respective developments. [Policies 3.1 and 3.2]

Measure 20   The City shall require and review landscape plans for
             all projects in wildland fire hazard areas for
             consistency with fire-resistant and drought-tolerant
             landscaping concepts. The Fire Department and/or Urban
             Forester shall provide public information brochures on
             fire-resistant landscaping. [Policies 3.1 and 3.2]

Measure 21   The City shall coordinate with Santa Barbara County in
             wildland fire protection and planning activities.
             [Policies 3.1 and 3.2]

Measure 22   The City shall inventory all critical facilities and
             develop a schedule and procedures for strengthening any
             City-regulated critical facilities found to be below
             current seismic safety standards.      The City shall
             notify operators of non City-regulated critical
             facilities to verify compliance with adequate seismic
             safety standards. If the City determines that City-
             owned facilities need seismic retrofitting, the City
             shall investigate applying for funding under the
             Earthquake Safety and Public Buildings Rehabilitation
             Bond Act of 1990. [Policy 1.2]

Measure 23   The   City   shall   amend    the   Zoning   Ordinance   to

                              SAFETY - 7
incorporate specific standards for siting, designing,
and reviewing critical facilities.     These standards
shall address issues such as: requiring detailed site
studies for ground shaking characteristics and
liquefaction potential prior to the development of
critical facilities, restricting critical facilities
from being located in the area of potential
liquefaction, and ensuring access to and functioning of
critical facilities following an earthquake. [Policy
4.1]




                SAFETY - 8
Measure 24   The City shall require the following in the slope
             hazard areas as delineated on the Geologic and Soils
             Hazards map:

             As a part of the environmental review process,
             preliminary engineering geologic report shall be
             prepared   under   City   direction    which   includes
             recommendations for remedial measures to ensure the
             stability of natural and manufactured slopes within the
             area affected by the development. The report shall be
             prepared by a Certified Engineering Geologist, licensed
             in the State of California;

             Prior to the approval of construction permits, the
             applicant shall submit a final engineering geologic
             report of the graded site addressing the stability of
             natural and manufactured slopes based on conditions as
             actually encountered during grading. The report shall
             be prepared by a Certified Engineering Geologist,
             licensed in the State of California, and shall include
             an as-graded geologic map; and

             The City shall require the following for areas with 20%
             slopes or greater:

             Stability of slopes shall be addressed by a Registered
              Soils Engineer as a part of the routine soils
             investigations required by the City. [Policies 4.4 and
             5.1]

Measure 25   The City shall require the liquefaction potential to be
             evaluated by a Registered Soils Engineer for all
             developments within the liquefaction hazard areas as
             shown on the Geologic & Soils Hazards map.[Policy 4.4]

Measure 26   The City shall require the liquefaction potential to be
             evaluated by a Registered Soils Engineer for all
             critical facilities and major structures (reinforced
             concrete or steel frame, two-stories or more in height)
             located on the floor of the Lompoc Valley. [Policies
             4.1 and 4.4]

Measure 27   The City shall require that all existing critical
             facilities, except those regulated for safety purposes
             by Federal or state agencies, are strengthened to
             assure they remain operational during and after a
             disaster (e.g. earthquake, flood). [Policy 1.2]




                             SAFETY - 9
Measure 28   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to require
             developers proposing structures on or adjacent to steep
             slopes to: 1) Develop and implement hillside drainage
             plans to reduce the risk of further movement by
             existing landslides; 2) Site new structures away from
             steep hillsides and the toes of existing landslide
             surfaces, reducing the potential for damage from
             landslide movement or burial; and     3) Perform site-
             specific slope stability investigations and analyses by
             a Registered Geotechnical Engineer. [Final EIR
             Seismic/Soils Mitigation Measure 2a]

Measure 29   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to regulate
             the use and storage of hazardous materials or wastes in
             association with home occupation use permits. [Policy
             6.2]

Measure 30   The City shall amend the Zoning and Subdivision
             Ordinances to be consistent with the County Hazardous
             Waste Management Plan, (HWMP) as amended. This may
             include establishing siting criteria, a hazardous waste
             facility and residuals repository overlay designation,
             conditional use permit classifications, application
             requirements,   project   review   requirements,    and
             standards for assessing the suitability of a particular
             project, site, and access routes. [Policies 6.2, 6.4,
             and 6.5]

Measure 31   The City shall participate with the County of Santa
             Barbara in the preparation of guidelines to identify
             and implement risk management strategies for the
             transportation of hazardous materials within the
             County. [Policy 6.2]

Measure 32   The City shall amend the Zoning Map to designate Open
             Space buffer areas for safety purposes, if necessary,
             along routes of pipelines carrying hazardous materials.

Measure 33   The City shall provide information to the public about
             proper disposal of household hazardous wastes and use
             of non-hazardous alternatives to minimize public
             exposure and enhance public safety. [Policies 6.1 and
             6.2]

Measure 34   Hazardous materials transportation routes shall be
             identified on the Circulation Element Truck Route Map.




                             SAFETY - 10
Measure 35   At every potentially contaminated location to be
             developed within the City, the project applicant shall
             have the site inspected by a Registered Environmental
             Assessor (i.e. a professional environmental scientist
             or engineer registered as an REA in California) for the
             presence of hazardous materials and wastes.

             The investigations shall take the form of environmental
             audits, and shall include, at minimum, site inspections
             for hazardous materials, examination of historic
             records, and reviews of public agency records. Reports
             detailing the results of the inspections shall be
             submitted to the City for review. The report preparer
             shall either certify that the site is free of hazards
             or recommend preparation of a site mitigation plan.

             The City shall make certain that inspection reports are
             on file prior to project approval and prior to any
             excavation or construction.    Acceptance of the site
             inspection report shall allow the proposed development
             to proceed to the permitting stage.     All activities
             under this measure shall be performed in conformance
             with the policies and procedures presented in the Santa
             Barbara County Hazardous Waste Management Plan. [Final
             EIR Hazardous Materials Mitigation Measure 1a]

Measure 36   In the event that the site inspections of Measure 35
             locate chemical contamination, underground storage
             tanks, abandoned drums, or other hazardous materials or
             wastes at a parcel, the inspection report preparer
             shall so notify the City and other agencies, as
             applicable, potentially including the state Department
             of Toxic Substances Control, the Regional Water Quality
             Control Board, and/or the County Health Services
             Department.   The City would also notify the proper
             agencies, as required by law. Under the direction of
             the appropriate agencies, a site remediation plan shall
             be prepared by the project applicant, in accordance
             with applicable regulations.

             The plan would (1) specify measures to be taken to
             protect workers and the public from exposure to
             potential site hazards and (2) certify that the
             proposed remediation measures would clean up the
             wastes, dispose the wastes, and protect public health
             in   accordance   with   federal,  State,   and   local
             requirements.    Permitting or work in the areas of
             potential hazard shall not proceed until the site
             remediation plan is on file with the City.
             If a parcel is found to be contaminated to a level that
             prohibits the proposed use, the potential for reduction

                             SAFETY - 11
             of the hazard shall be evaluated. Site remediation is
             theoretically capable of removing hazards to levels
             sufficiently low to allow any use at the site.       In
             practice, both the technical feasibility of the
             remediation and its cost (financial feasibility) shall
             be evaluated in order to determine the overall
             feasibility of locating a specific use on a specific
             site. In some cases, it may be found that a site may be
             appropriate for any use; in other cases, as site may
             require restriction to industrial use or a use that
             involves complete paving and covering of the parcel.

             In accordance with OSHA requirements, any activity
             performed at a contaminated site shall be preceded by
             preparation of a separate site health and safety plan
             (prepared by the project applicant and filed with the
             City) for the protection of workers and the public.
             All reports, plans, and other documentation shall be
             added to the administrative record.     All activities
             under this mitigation shall be done in conformance with
             policies and procedures presented in Santa Barbara
             County Hazardous Waste Management Plan. [Final EIR
             Hazardous Materials Mitigation Measure 1b]

Measure 37   The City shall amend the Zoning Ordinance to require
             buffer areas utilizing protective measures such as
             berms shall be provided for future development along
             Purisima Road. Also, for each specific project that
             would generate hazardous waste, the City shall require
             as a condition of building permit and/or business
             license approval that the project sponsor prepare a
             hazardous material transportation program.          The
             transportation program shall identify the location of
             the new facility or use and designate either
             (1) specific routes to be used for transport of
             hazardous materials and wastes to and from the
             facility, or (2) specific routes to be avoided during
             transport of hazardous materials and wastes to and from
             the facility.   Routes would be selected to minimize
             proximity to sensitive receptors to the greatest
             practical degree.       Passage through residential
             neighborhoods shall be minimized, and parking of waste
             haulers on residential streets shall be prohibited.
             The City shall review and approve the applicant's
             hazardous material transportation program or, working
             with the applicant, modify it to the satisfaction of
             both parties.       [Final EIR Hazardous Materials
             Mitigation Measure 5]

[Notes: The following policies are implemented through current City
Codes and procedures: Policies 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 3.2, 4.5 6.1,

                             SAFETY - 12
and 6.2]




           SAFETY - 13
             Critical Facilities and Infrastructure

Publicly-Owned Facilities                    Location

Public Safety Facilities
Police Station                        107 Civic Center Plaza
Fire Station No. 1                    115 South G Street
Fire Station No. 2                    1100 North D Street

High Occupancy Facilities
Lompoc District Hospital              508 East Hickory Avenue
Lompoc Convalescent Home              216 North Third Street

Schools1
Arthur Hapgood Elementary             324 South A Street
Clarence Ruth Elementary              501 North W Street
La Canada Elementary                  620 West North Avenue
La Honda Elementary                   1213 North A Street
Leonora Fillmore Elementary           1211 East Pine Avenue
Miguelito Elementary                  1600 West Olive Avenue
Lompoc Middle School                  203 South L Street
Lompoc High School                    515 West College Avenue
El Camino School                      320 North H Street

Medical Facilities
Lompoc District Hospital              508 East Hickory Avenue
Lompoc Medi Center                    1307 North H Street
SB County Health Care Services        301 North R Street

Assembly Facilities2
Lompoc Library                        501   East North Avenue
Lompoc Civic Auditorium               203   South L Street
Lompoc City Hall                      100   Civic Center Plaza
Veterans Memorial Building            100   East Locust Avenue

Utilities\Communication Facilities
Wastewater Treatment Plant            2501 West Central Avenue
Water Treatment Plant                 501 East North Avenue
Lompoc City Corporate Yard            1300 West Laurel Avenue
City Electrical Receiving Station     1100 North D Street
PG & E Substation                     315 East Chestnut Street
PG & E Substation (Proposed)          1701 Industrial Way
GTE                                   205 West Pine Avenue
Comcast Cable                         700 North H Street

Transportation Facilities
Lompoc City Airport                   1801   North H Street
Lompoc City Bus Yard                  1300   West Laurel Avenue
Highway 1 Bridge                      1600   North H Street
Highway 246 Bridge                    2000   East Ocean Avenue


                              SAFETY - 14
       Critical Facilities and Infrastructure (Continued)


Detention Facilities
United States Penitentiary            3901 Klein Boulevard
Federal Correctional Institution      3600 Guard Road
Lompoc City Jail                      107 Civic Center Plaza

Privately-Owned Facilities                  Location

High Occupancy Facilities
Franciscan Manor                      1420 West North Avenue

Schools1
La Purisima Catholic School           219 West Olive Avenue

Assembly Facilities2
Internat'l Chemical Workers Hall      514 South I Street
Johns Manville Club                   415 East Chestnut Avenue
Knights of Columbus Hall              532 East Chestnut Avenue
Elks Lodge                            905 East Ocean Avenue
Moose Lodge No. 1036                  1601 East Laurel Avenue


1
     School facilities with less than 50 students are not listed.
2
     Religious facilities are not listed.




                              SAFETY - 15
                     SOCIO-ECONOMICS APPENDIX


1.0   INTRODUCTION

Local government's role in community development is heavily
influenced by existing and projected demographic and economic
conditions. The information within this appendix is provided to
support policies and assumptions within the General Plan which
relate to future City infrastructure and resource needs within the
Study Area.

Socio-economic information is provided by Federal, state, and local
agencies. At the Federal level, the Department of Commerce, Bureau
of the Census is responsible for conducting a decennial census of
population and housing. Census data is available for the Lompoc
Valley Census County Division, which is the Lompoc Valley (includ-
ing Vandenberg AFB) and rural areas extending from the Hollister
Ranch on the east to Highway 135 on the north.       Census County
Divisions (CCDs) are subdivided into cities and Census Designated
Places (CDPs). Within the Lompoc Valley CCD, these include the
City of Lompoc and the Mission Hills CDP, Vandenberg Village CDP,
and Vandenberg AFB CDP. Further refinements are provided by Census
Tracts. The City is divided into nine tracts, which are further
broken into block groups and blocks. Most socio-economic data used
in the general plan is aggregated at either the CCD level, which is
co-terminus with the Lompoc Valley Housing Market Area designated
by SBCAG; or the City level and the unincorporated area of the
Lompoc Valley (which is the remainder of the Lompoc Valley CCD).

State agencies which provide socio-economic information include the
State Department of Finance and the State Employment Development
Department. The State Department of Finance's (DOF) Demographic
Research Unit is responsible for the distribution of information
from the US Census to local agencies. DOF also prepares annual
population estimates for the City based on annual housing construc-
tion and school enrollment information from the City.

The State Employment Development Department (EDD) oversees the
dissemination of statewide employment information.     It monitors
employment levels on a monthly basis and estimates unemployment for
each county.

At the local level, the Santa Barbara County Association of
Governments (SBCAG) has been designated by DOF to serve as the
affiliate census center for Santa Barbara County. As such, SBCAG
serves as the conduit for government and public access to census
data at the local level. SBCAG also periodically prepares regional

                         SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 1
growth   forecasts   of   population,   housing,   and   employment   (e.g
Forecast 94) and disseminates this information to local agencies.
2.0   DESCRIPTION OF EXISTING CONDITIONS

2.1   Demographic Trends and Projections

Population Trends and Projections

City Population Trends

Lompoc was primarily an agricultural community from its incorpora-
tion in 1888 up until the establishment of Camp Cooke as an army
training base during World War II. The conversion of Camp Cooke to
Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in 1958 and its establishment as a
missile base led to a building boom and rapid population increases
during the late 1950s and early 1960's (see Table 1). The effects
of military programs at VAFB continued in the late 1970s through
the mid 1980s with the Space Shuttle and the M-X Missile testing
program providing the impetus for continued population growth.1
During the late 1980s, employment growth generated by oil
exploration projects and research and development companies in the
Santa Barbara-Goleta area coupled with lower housing costs in
Lompoc, spurred population growth.       During the early 1990s,
employment reductions within the South Coast of the county have
slowed population growth within Lompoc.

A significant subset of the City's total population is its prison
population which comprises the largest group quarter population in
                                               2
the City and one of the largest in the County. The City's recent
prison and non-prison population trends are provided in Table 2.
Three federal prison facilities are located within the City. They
include the Federal Correction Institution (FCI), the United States
Penitentiary (USP), and Federal Prison Camp.        Although these
facilities are located within the City, they are relatively self-
sufficient.   That is, they do not rely on the City for many
municipal services which are provided to the non-prison population
(e.g. fire, police, water, wastewater, and solid waste collection).
 The prison population includes inmates as well as some employees
and employee family members who reside at these facilities. As of
1995, the prison population comprised approximately seven percent
of the total City population and has remained relatively constant
(as a proportion of the total City population) since 1980.




                            SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 2
                                 Table 1
                    City of Lompoc Population Trends
                               1890 - 1995


        Year               Total Population          Annual Growth Rate
        1890                        1,015                       ---
        1900                          972                     -0.43
        1910                        1,482                      4.31
        1920                        1,876                      2.39
        1930                        2,845                      4.25
        1940                        3,379                      1.74
        1950                        5,520                      5.03
        1960                     14,415                       10.07
        1965                     24,102                       10.83
        1970                     25,284                        0.96
        1975                      24,237                      -0.84
        1980                     26,267                        1.62
        1985                     29,103                        2.07
        1990                     37,649                        5.28
        1995                     41,100                        1.77

Source: US Census and State Department of Finance.


                                Table 2
                Prison and Non-Prison Population Trends
                              1980 - 1995


                             1980            1985     1990            1995

 Total City                 26,267          29,103   37,649       41,100
 Population

 Non-Prison Popula-         25,003          27,361   35,162       38,114
 tion                        (94%)           (94%)    (93%)        (93%)

                               SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 3
 Prison Population3           1,601       1,742        2,487       2,986
                               (6%)        (6%)         (7%)        (7%)

Source:     U.S. Census for 1980 and 1990 and the State Department of Finance,
            Demographic Research Unit for 1985 and 1995.

Regional Population Trends

Table 3 compares the City's growth with the growth of the Lompoc
Valley and the County. The majority of Lompoc Valley residents
live within the City and the proportion of Lompoc Valley residents
living within City limits has increased by approximately 13 percent
since 1960.   This table also shows that the City of Lompoc has
historically made up approximately eight to ten percent of the
total county population and that the number of county residents
living in the City of Lompoc has proportionally increased since
1985.


                                 Table 3
                   City and Regional Population Trends
                               1960 - 1990

 Year     Lompoc    Lompoc     Lompoc    Lompoc City     S.B.     Lompoc City
           City     Uninc.     Valley      as % of      County      as % of
                                Total       Lompoc                S.B. County
                                            Valley
  1960    14,415     13,819     28,234       51.0%      168,962      8.5%

  1970    25,284     22,445     47,729       52.9%      264,324      9.6%

  1975    24,237     19,650     43,887       55.2%      280,600      8.6%

  1980    26,267     18,471     44,738       58.5%      298,694      8.8%

  1985    29,103     20,597     49,700       58.6%      332,720      8.7%

  1990    37,649     20,827     58,476       64.4%      369,608      10.2%


Source:     US Census, State Department of Finance, and Santa Barbara County
            Association of Governments.


Figure 1 provides a comparison of the Lompoc Valley population
distribution in 1980 and 1990. It shows that Vandenberg AFB and
Vandenberg Village continue to represent the second and third
largest population centers within the Valley.      The figure also
shows that the number of Lompoc Valley residents living outside the
City has decreased proportionately in all areas of the Valley.


                               SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 4
                     Source: 1980 and 1990 U.S. Census

Population Projections

According to the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments'
latest forecast, the City's population is projected to increase to
approximately 48,000 by 2015 and the Lompoc Valley population is
projected to grow to approximately 74,400 by 2015 (see Table 4).
The annual population growth rate is expected to be higher for the
City than unincorporated areas of the Lompoc Valley until 2005.
After 2005 growth rates in the unincorporated areas of the Lompoc
Valley are expected to exceed the City's rate of growth.       The
projected annual growth rate for the City from 1990 to 2015 is
expected to be less than one percent. The rate of projected annual
growth through 2015 is low when compared to the City's historic
annual growth rate of 3.59 percent between 1890 and 1995.




                         SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 5
                                Table 4
            Lompoc Valley Population Projection 1990 - 2015


    Year          1990        1995        2000         2005      2010      2015


City of Lom-     37,649     41,88514     44,208       46,560    47,868    48,026
    poc
   Annual
Growth Rate        ---        2.16%       1.09%        1.04%     0.56%     0.07%

Unincorpora-     20,827      22,110      23,227       24,288    25,306    26,359
    ted
    Area
   Annual          ---        1.20%       0.99%        0.90%     0.82%     0.81%
Growth Rate

   Lompoc        58,476      63,995      67,435       70,848    73,174    74,385
   Valley
   Annual
Growth Rate        ---        1.82%       1.05%        0.99%     0.65%    0.33%

 Source: Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), 1994.


 Household Trends and Projections

 Household Population Trends

 Between 1970 and 1995 the City's population grew by approximately
 15,800 or 63 percent. The vast majority of this growth (approxi-
 mately 89 percent) occurred in the City's household population. The
 City's household population includes all persons who live in
                                          5
 houses, apartments, and mobile homes.        The City's household
 population has comprised between 92 and 96 percent of the total
 City population since 1980.     While the proportion of the City
 population residing in households has remained relatively stable
 since 1970, average household size has fluctuated (see Table 5).
 During the past twenty-five years average household size has ranged
 from a low of 2.47 persons per household in 1985 to a high of 3.18
 in 1970.6




                                SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 6
                             Table 5
              City of Lompoc Average Household Size
                           1970 - 19957


                        1970      1980       1985       1990       1995

 City Population      25,284     26,267     29,103     37,649    41,100
 Household Popula-    24,090     24,951     27,361     35,162    38,139
 tion
 Number of House-       7,564     9,380     11,078     12,504    13,749
 holds
 Persons / House-        3.18       2.66      2.47       2.81       2.77
 hold

Source:   U.S. Census for 1970, 1980 and 1990 and the State Dept. of Finance,
          Demographic Research Unit for 1985 and 1995.


The Lompoc Valley's household population is projected to increase
by approximately 14,400 or 26 percent between 1990 and 2015 (see
Table 6). The City's household population is projected to increase
by 9,163 between 1990 and 2015 while the household population
within the unincorporated areas of the Lompoc Valley is projected
to grow by 5,255 during the same 25 year period.

The average household size within the Lompoc Valley is also
expected to increase (see Table 6). Average household sizes in the
Lompoc Valley are expected to reach 3.0 during the late 1990s.
Between 1990 and 2015 Lompoc Valley average household size is
expected to increase from 2.87 to 3.09 persons per household. The
City's average household size increased between 1980 and 1990 after
decreasing sharply between 1960 and 1970.     In 1990, the City's
average household size was approximately 2.81 persons.          The
increase in household size between 1980 and 1990 was evidenced by
an increase in the number of households with four or more occupants
(see Figure 2).    Between 1980 and 1990 the proportion of all
households within the City with four or more occupants increased by
four percent (from 2,439 to 3,750 households).       This trend is
expected to continue with the average City household size reaching
2.98 by 2015. Household sizes in the unincorporated areas of the
Lompoc Valley have historically been larger than the City. This
trend is also expected to continue. The average household size
within unincorporated areas of the Lompoc Valley is over 3.00 and
is expected to increase to 3.29 by 2015.




                           SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 7
                               Table 6
               Household and Group Quarter Projections
                             1990 - 2015

                                                                           % Change
                                                                          1990-2015
        Year           1990      1995     2000      2005   2010   2015

   CITY OF LOMPOC

                       37,64     41,-     44,-      46,-   47,-   48,-     27.6%
  Total Population       9       8858      208       560    868    026

   Group Quarters                3,309                                     47.1%
     Population        2,580              3,493 3,678 3,782 3,794

Household Population   35,06 38,576       40,-      42,-   44,-   44,-     26.1%
                         9                 716       882    086    232
  Total Households     12,50 13,195 13,83 14,46 14,82 14,82                18.6%
                         4            2     9     5     5
 Average Household     2.81       2.92    2.94             2.97    2.98
       Size                                         2.96                     6.0%

UNINCORPORATED AREA

                       20,82 22,110       23,-      24,-   25,-   26,-     26.6%
  Total Population       7                226        288   306    359

   Group Quarters                   836                                    37.1%
     Population         747               874       910    957    1,024

Household Population   20,08 21,274 22,35 23,37            24,-   25,33    26.2%
                         0            2     8               349     5
  Total Households               6,768                                     15.2%
                       6,683              7,000 7,232 7,464 7,696
 Average Household                 3.14
       Size            3.00               3.19      3.23   3.26   3.29       9.7%

   LOMPOC VALLEY                                                           27.2%

                       58,47 63,995 67,43 70,84 73,17 74,38
  Total Population       6            5     8     4     5

   Group Quarters                4,145                                     44.8%
     P   l ti          3 327              4 367 4 588 4 739 4 818
                              SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 8
       Population       3,327           4,367 4,588 4,739 4,818
 Household Population   55,14 59,851 63,06 66,25 68,43 69,56           26.1%
                          9            7     9     5     7
    Total Households    19,18 19,963 20,83 21,70 22,28 22,52           17.4%
                          7            2     1     9     1
   Average Household             2.99
         Size           2.87            3.03      3.05   3.07   3.09    7.7%


Source: SBCAG, 1994.




                            SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 9
The distribution of household types has changed very little since 1980.
 The majority of households in Lompoc are family households (two or more
related persons). In fact, family households comprise approximately 70
percent of all households in the City (see Figure 3). The second most
common household type are one-person households which make up 22 percent
of all households. The remaining households are non-family households
(two or more unrelated persons) and account for 6 percent of all
households.




                        SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 10
Age Distribution

The Lompoc Valley population in 1990 was primarily composed of young
adults aged 25 - 34 and young children aged 0 - 9 (see Table 7). In
2015 the composition of the Valley's population is expected to be
significantly older. Larger population groups include individuals aged
over 50 and individuals aged 15 - 24. Young children aged 0 - 9 appear
to continue to comprise a substantial portion of the population.
However, fewer individuals aged 25 - 44 are expected.


                                 Table 7
                    Age Distribution of the Household
               Population in Lompoc Census County Division

                     1990                             2015
 Age Cohorts
                    Total              %           Total       %

    0 - 4               5773         10.47          7621     10.95
    5 - 9               5591         10.14          6121      8.80
   10 - 14              3953          7.17          5204      7.48
   15 - 19              3227          5.85          5188      7.46
   20 - 24              3591          6.51          5521      7.94
   25 - 29              5773         10.47          4871      7.00
   30 - 34              6317         11.45          4521      6.50
   35 - 39              4408          7.99          3287      4.72
   40 - 44              3227          5.85          2954      4.25
   45 - 49              2317          4.20          3121      4.49
   50 - 54              2226          4.04          5071      7.29

                            SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 11
   55 - 59                   2317        4.20          5221    7.50
   60 - 64                   1929        3.50          3521    5.06
   65 - 69                   1864        3.38          2504    3.60
   70 - 74                   1227        2.22          1788    2.57
     75 +                    1409        2.55          3053    4.39
                           55,149       99.99        69,567   100.00

Source: U.S. Census, 1990 and SBCAG, 1994.




Ethnic Composition

Ethnic composition of Lompoc's population has become increasingly
diverse since 1980 (see Figure 5). The non-white population is growing
rapidly and comprises a greater proportion of the City's total popula-
tion than it did in 1980. Between 1980 and 1990 the number of non-white
Lompoc residents increased by approximately 92 percent (from 7,733 to
14,851). During the same ten-year period the proportion of the City
population which is non-white grew by 10 percent (from 29 percent in
1980 to 39 percent in 1990). The Hispanic population experienced the
largest proportional increase of any ethnic group.        The Hispanic
population increased from 18 to 27 percent of the total City population
 between 1980 and 1990.




                              SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 12
                       Source: U.S. Census, 1990.


2.2   Economic Trends and Projections

Employment Trends and Projections

Between 1980 and 1990 there was an approximately 44 percent increase in
the amount of local jobs available (see Table 8). During the same time
period the City's total non-prison population grew by approximately 43
percent.




                         SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 13
                                     Table 8
                         Lompoc Valley Employment Trends9

                                  1980             1985              1990   1980-1990
                          Jobs       %     Jobs       %      Jobs       %     Change

EMPLOYMENT SECTOR

Agriculture               444      3.0      704     3.5    1,233      5.8        789
Mining*                     0      0.0        0     0.0       60      0.3         60
Construction              389      2.6      620     3.0    1,114      5.3        725
Manufacturing           2,645     17.9    6,345    31.1    4,185     19.8      1,540
Transportation            408      2.8      495     2.4      483      2.2         75
Wholesale Trade           270      1.8      288     1.4      333      1.6         63
Retail Trade            1,664     11.3    2,780    13.6    2,949     13.9      1,285
Financial, Insurance,
& Real Estate             560      3.8      370     1.8      592      2.8         32
Services                3,093     21.0    4,641    22.7    5,833     27.5      2,740
Government              5,283     35.8    4,176    20.5    4,399     20.8       -884

TOTAL
                     14,756      100.0   20,419   100.0   21,181    100.0      6,425

* Note:   Employment at diatomaceous earth processing facilities is
          classified by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes
          under the Manufacturing sector rather than the Mining sector.

Source: APC/SBCAG Forecast 1985, 1989, 1994.


Lompoc Valley employment opportunities are projected to increase to
approximately 28,000 by 2015 as noted in Table 9. The most significant
increase (approximately 2,500 jobs) is expected in the services sector.
 The retail trade and government sectors are also expected to account
for a large proportion of the anticipated job growth in the Lompoc
Valley (approximately 1,700 and 1,150 jobs respectively).    The mining
sector, which includes jobs associated primarily with oil development,
is anticipated to experience no additional growth by 2015.          The
remaining six employment sectors are expected to see modest increases
ranging from approximately 100 to 500 new jobs by 2015.




                                 SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 14
                                            Table 9
                             Lompoc Valley Employment Projections10
                                          1990 - 2015

  Employment Sector           1990      1995       2000       2005     2010     2015    1990 - 2-
                                %         %          %          %        %        %        015*


     Agriculture              1,233     1,245      1,424     1,540    1,639    1,727        494
                               5.8%      5.8%       6.0%      6.1%     6.1%     6.2%

        Mining**                 60        54         56        58       59       60          0
                               0.3%      0.3%       0.2%      0.2%     0.2%     0.2%

    Construction              1,114        952     1,154     1,267    1,360    1,456        342
                               5.3%      4.4%       4.9%      5.0%     5.1%     5.2%

    Manufacturing             4,185     3,898      4,060     4,220    4,340    4,430        245
                               19.8%    18.1%      17.1%     16.6%    16.2%    15.8%

   Transportation               483       486        522       554      576      594        111
                               2.3%      2.3%       2.2%      2.2%     2.1%     2.1%

   Wholesale Trade              333       418        436       448      456      464        131
                               1.6%      1.9%       1.8%      1.8%     1.7%      1.7%

    Retail Trade              2,949     3,244      3,900     4,250    4,500    4,688      1,739
                               13.9%     15.0%     16.4%     16.7%    16.8%    16.7%

Finance, Ins., & Real           592       646        672       696      720      736        144
        Estate                 2.8%      3.0%       2.8%      2.7%     2.7%     2.6%

        Services              5,833     6,230      6,748     7,308    7,840    8,330      2,497
                               27.5%    28.9%      28.4%     28.8%    29.2%    29.7%

       Government             4,399     4,406    4,758 20-   5,048    5,325    5,550      1,151
                               20.8%    20.4%       .1%      19.9%    19.9%    19.8%

         Total               21,181    21,579     23,730     25,389   26,815   28,035     6,854




   *     Note:          Anticipated employment growth for each employment sector from 1990 to
                        2015.

   ** Note:             Employment at diatomaceous earth processing facilities is classified by
                        Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes under the Manufacturing
                        sector rather than the Mining sector.

   Source: SBCAG, 1994.




   Workers per Household

   The ratio of workers per household increased steadily between 1980
   and 1985 within the Lompoc Valley (see Table 10). Since 1985, the
   number workers per household has decreased significantly for the
   unincorporated portions of the Lompoc Valley and continued to rise
   within City. This number of workers per household is expected to
   rise for both the City and unincorporated portions of the Lompoc
   Valley through 2015 (see Table 11).




                                       SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 15
                                                   Table 10
                                        Workers Per Household Trends
                                                 1980 - 1990

                       Jurisdiction                     1980          1985      1990

                      City of Lompoc                    1.11          1.13      1.18


               Unincorporated Area of                   1.00          1.15      0.96
                    Lompoc Valley


Source: APC/SBCAG Forecast 1989 and 1994.

                                              Table 11
                                 Workers Per Household Projections
                                            1990 - 2015

       Jurisdiction              1990       1995     2000      2005      2010   2015

      City of Lompoc             1.18       1.24     1.28      1.32      1.34   1.36

  Unincorporated Area            0.96       0.96     0.97      0.98      0.99   1.00

      Lompoc Valley              1.10       1.15     1.18      1.22      1.24   1.26


Source: SBCAG, 1994.

2.3     Jobs Housing Balance

Commuter Patterns

Jobs Housing Balance refers to the ratio of housing and employment
opportunities within a community. Jobs housing balance information can
be ascertained by analyzing commuter information from the 1990 Census.
 Commuter patterns affecting the City of Lompoc were analyzed by SBCAG
in a 1995 Jobs Housing Study. City of Lompoc residents work within the
City of Lompoc, within the Lompoc Valley, and outside the Lompoc Valley
Area. The employment destinations of workers who reside in the City of
Lompoc are listed in Table 12.       The majority of City of Lompoc
residents (approximately 52 percent) commute to jobs within the City of
Lompoc.

The City of Lompoc also serves as a destination for approximately 6,700
workers who reside outside the City.      The residence locations for
workers employed within the City of Lompoc are listed in Table 13.
Most of the individuals who work within the City of Lompoc (approxi-
mately 55 percent) also reside in the City. In addition, approximately
26 percent of the workers employed within the City of Lompoc reside in
the Lompoc Valley (i.e., VAFB, Mission Hills, Vandenberg Village, and
other unincorporated areas of the Lompoc Valley).




                                              SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 16
                                             Table 12
                                     City of Lompoc Residents
                                      Employment Destinations
                                               1990

             Place of Work              Workers Commuting From   Percentage
                                            City of Lompoc          (%)

City of Lompoc                                  8,098               52.3

City of Santa Barbara                           1,346               8.7

City of Santa Maria                               826               5.3

City of Buellton                                  443               2.9

City of Solvang                                   389               2.5

City of Carpinteria                                28               0.2

VAFB                                              599               3.9

Isla Vista                                        372               2.4

Mission Hills &                                    17               0.2
Vandenberg Village

Santa Ynez                                         63               0.4

Other SB County                                 2,937               18.9
Unincorporated Areas*

City Ventura                                       67               0.4

City of San Luis Obispo                           102               0.7

Other Areas outside                               189               1.2
SB County

                             Total              15,476             100.0


 * Note: Includes Orcutt and Goleta.

 Source: SBCAG, 1995.




                                      SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 17
                                            Table 13
                                     City of Lompoc Workers
                                       Residence Locations
                                              1990

        Place of Residence             Workers Commuting To   Percentage
                                          City of Lompoc         (%)

City of Lompoc                                8,098              54.8

City of Santa Barbara                           134              0.9

City of Santa Maria                             999              6.8

City of Buellton                                 49              0.3

City of Solvang                                  46              0.3

City of Guadalupe                                29              0.2

City of Carpinteria                               8              0.1

VAFB                                           1,296             8.8

Isla Vista                                       14              0.1

Mission Hills &                                2,266             15.3
Vandenberg Village

Santa Ynez                                       26              0.2

Other SB County                                1,805             12.2
Unincorporated Areas*

                             Total            14,770            100.0


 Source: SBCAG, 1995.

 Sources

 Santa Barbara County - Cities Area Planning Council. 1987. City of
 Lompoc Population, Employment And Land Use Forecast
 Santa Barbara County - Cities Area Planning Council, 1989. Santa
 Barbara County Regional Growth Forecast (Forecast 89).
 Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. 1993. 1990 Census
 Analysis Of Journey To Work Information Santa Barbara County.

 Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. 1994. Regional Growth
 Forecast 94 (Forecast 94).

 Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. 1995. Jobs Housing
 Study.




                                     SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 18
Endnotes




           SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 19
1.        The Space Shuttle and M-X Missile test launch programs were
          discontinued at VAFB during the late 1980s for budgetary reasons.

2. The group quarter population includes the prison inmates, employees,
     and employee family members that reside at the prison facilities
     as well group home residents (e.g. frail elderly, developmentally
     disabled, and homeless living in shelters).       All persons not
     living in households are classified by the U.S. Census Bureau as
     living in group quarters.

3.        Prison population information was obtained by the State Department
          of Finance prior to 1986 and has been obtained since 1986 by the
          City's planning staff each January directly from the USP and FCI.

4.        There is a 785 person discrepancy between SBCAG's 1995 population
          projection estimate (41,885) and the State Department of Finance's
          1995 estimate for the City of Lompoc (41,100).


5.        The U.S. Census Bureau uses two primary population categories:
          households and group quarters.     A household includes all the
          persons who occupy a housing unit. A housing unit is a house, an
          apartment, a mobile home, a group of rooms, or a single room that
          is occupied (or if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as separate
          living quarters. The occupants may be a single family, one person
          living alone, two or more families living together, or any other
          group of related or unrelated persons who share living
          arrangements.

6.        Average household sizes were determined by dividing the total
          household population by the total number of households. These
          household sizes have not been adjusted to account for vacant
          housing units.

7.        Average household size information was obtained by dividing the
          City's total household population by the total number of existing
          housing units. The household size estimates do not account for
          vacant housing units or seasonal occupancy fluctuations.

8.        There is a 785 person discrepancy between SBCAG's 1995 population
          projection estimate (41,885) and the State Department of Finance's
          1995 estimate for the City of Lompoc (41,100).


     9.     This table includes estimates for only wage and salary
            workers. Self employed workers are not included within this
            table or in employment projections provided by SBCAG.
            However, estimates are available from the 1980 and 1990
            Census. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were 896
                             SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 20
      self employed workers (approximately 5.7 percent of all
      workers) in the Lompoc Valley during 1980 and 1,464 self
      employed workers (approximately 6.9 percent of all workers)
      during 1990.

10.   Lompoc Valley employment projections include Vandenberg Air
      Force Base.




                      SOCIO-ECONOMICS - 21