Dear Parents by wuyunyi

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									Dear Parents



Extended Synopses 2010/11

At Dolphin we believe that parents and staff work as partners in the education of the child. With this in mind we have
collected together some details of the topics to be taught during the academic year 2010 for your perusal. We have
called these “extended synopses” as we have added suggestions for how parents may, if they wish, help to broaden the
child‟s educational experience. We hope you find it useful. It is not, of course, a “crammer‟s course” for parents!

We would remind you that all good teachers are flexible in their approach and adapt their lessons to the needs and
requirements of any given situation. Therefore these synopses are subject to change.




Veronica Gibbs


                                               ART - YEAR 4
Theme for the year: „Light and Dark‟


AUTUMN
Theme: „Symbols – Egyptian Hieroglyphs‟‟
Brief: Investigate and research the use of symbols in Egyptian hieroglyphs. Pupils will experiment and produce a
piece of authentic looking papyrus paper with their name drawn and painted on in hieroglyphs.

SPRING
Theme: „Shadow Puppets‟
Brief: design and make a shadow puppet for possible use in a drama production.
Pupils will research the history of shadow puppets from around the world, understand the conditions for an effective
production -casting shadows, experimenting with light etc., sketch and create silhouettes, transfer their design onto
card joining and attaching rods where necessary and then work in drama towards a possible shadow puppet
performance to an invited audience.


SUMMER
Theme: „Pattern Making to Music‟
Brief: Pupils will be introduced to artists and designers who have used music as a source of inspiration for their work.
They will be asked to create an image while listening to music and then to develop the composition into a collage. A
section from their collage will be incorporated into a design for a CD cover with use of ICT.

Focus For Assessment:
Presentation and quality of finished work.
Generation of suitable and imaginative ideas/uses of resources.
Acquisition and confident use of new skills.
Handling of new materials.
Understanding of key concepts covered.
General interest levels and perseverance.


Parents can broaden a child‟s experience by visiting galleries at home or abroad, by discussing three or four
works of art, craft or design in detail and perhaps by buying books on art, craft or design.


                                CLASSICAL STUDIES - YEAR 4

AUTUMN
Year 4 begins its study of Iron Age Britain in the Autumn term.

During the Autumn term the children will study ancient farming methods, the ir calendar and festivals, round houses,
warfare, and Iron Age hill forts. This study will be reinforced in the Autumn by a visit to the Iron Age Museum in
Andover and to Danebury Hillfort.

Parents who wish to augment their child's appreciation of the Iron Age world are encouraged to visit sites in various
parts of Britain and Ireland. Rosemary Sutcliff's rendition of the life of Cu Chulainn in The Hound of Ulster may be
good outside reading.


SPRING
In the Spring Term we bring the Romans to Britain with the invasions of Caesar and Claudius. This naturally leads to
a comparison of the methods, equipment and organisation of the Roman army with that of the Gauls and Britons. It
also provides an opportunity to learn about the extraordinary figure of Julius Caesar and the unlikely emperor
Claudius.
We discuss reasons for the Roman invasions and take story of the conquest to the Fosse Way boundary which,
literally, we reach when we visit the museum at Cirencester and the Roman villa at Chedworth and observe what a
huge impact the conquest made on daily life in Britain.


SUMMER
In preparation for the Dorset trip we shall look at the long history of Maiden Castle as a causeway camp, a hill fort, a
possible site of resistance to the Romans during the Roman invasion of the 1st century AD, and as a sacred site in late
Roman times. The children will also look at the geography of Dorset and the economic activities of the iron-age
peoples there. This study is capped by the Dorset trip during which the children visit Maiden Castle, stay at a
reconstructed Iron Age farm, see a Roman house site in Dorchester and also items from the Wheeler dig at Maiden
Castle in the Dorchester Museum.

The time is also spent on early Roman history, from the its foundation as a Monarchy
to the development of the Republic, including stories of the kings and legendary heroes such as Horatius and
Camillus.

Various outside readings can supplement the children's learning for the Roman period in Britain : Rosemary Sutcliff's
novels The Eagle of the Ninth, and The Silver Branch both show the interaction of Romans and Britons after the
conquest at two different periods of history. Caroline Lawrence's Roman Mystery series (The Thieves of Ostia being
the first in the series) would make good, fun reading for children to tackle on their own, and contain much accurate
information about the 1st century AD Roman life within them.


                         DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY - YEAR 4

Theme for the year: „Light and Dark‟
AUTUMN
Theme: „Masks‟

Brief: design and make a mask to include eyes that light up (light bulbs) controlled by a simple push switch.

Pupils will: sketch ideas, develop a final idea and then construct and decorate their mask and a simple circuit for the
electronic eyes.



SPRING/SUMMER
Theme: „Celtic Designs and Dyeing‟

Brief: produce a Celtic inspired design to be transferred onto a tie-dyed T-shirt.

Pupils will: research and produce five basic Celtic patterns, investigate how the Celts used dyes and dyeing me thods to
produce traditional effects, keep notes on experiments with dyes in graphic form, discuss the different methods of tie -
dyeing and make an informed choice when tie-dyeing a T-shirt, and then design a Celtic inspired pattern to be drawn
over this. If time there will be a fashion show of their work to an invited audience.

Focus For Assessment:

Handling and understanding of tools and materials.
Interesting sketches/clear designs/accurate plans
Adaptation of masterplan into a 3D product.
Ability to design and make a simple electric circuit.
Accuracy and quality of finished piece.
Understanding of key concepts covered.
General interest levels and perseverance.

Parents can help children by encouraging children to use the internet to discover more about The Celts.

                                            DRAMA - YEAR 4

AUTUMN
Puppetry - an exploration of the medium and its use in a range of spiritual and secular contexts as culturally diverse
as Japanese Bunraku to the British seaside Punch and Judy. The students will create their own puppets, combining
with the Art department, and hopefully perform their shows to their peers. They may also have a go at creating
puppets out of any object, such as newspapers or pillows, and learning how to bring them to life.

Key learning objectives in the drama include: learning the following technical vocabulary: shadow puppet, glove
puppet, marionette, rod puppet and body puppet; they will have learning how to manipulate a variety of different types
of puppets; demonstrating an understanding of the Indonesian shadow puppet tradition; developing their voice
projection

 „Sweet Clara & Freedom Quilt‟            - a unit based on the story of a 12 year old black slave girl who is taken from
her mother to work on a plantation south of the Ohio River. The Underground Railroad helps her escape to freedom
in Canada. The picture book by Deborah Hopkinson and James Ransome provides an historically accurate picture of
slavery in the southern United States but it avoids images of brutality inappropriate for young children.
The students will consider the importance of respecting racial and cultural differences, develop their respect and
concern for others and explore gender roles.

Key learning objectives in the drama include:
Creating and sustaining a role with increasing confidence, and using role to explore a moral dilemma
Introduction to the use of the way visual signs, such as costume, gesture & positioning in space are used to create
meaning in drama
Sustaining tension and atmosphere through carefully controlled use of movement and voice
Presenting a possible resolution in the form of a short play, building on their introduction to script-writing the
previous year


SPRING
An Introduction to Shakespeare
This unit is an introduction to the stories and language of Shakespeare. Plays that may be explored include:
„Macbeth‟, „A Midsummer Night‟s Dream‟, and „Romeo & Juliet‟, „Taming of the Shrew‟, „King Lear‟ and „12 th
Night‟.
There are so many key moral ideas that we may tackle in Shakespeare‟s plays, for example: in „Macbeth‟, the qualities
of character we admire, qualities of leadership, and themes such as friendship, power and loyalty.

Key learning objectives in the drama include:
Developing their confidence and enjoyment when approaching a Shakespeare text
Deepening their ability to respond in role
Learning the following technical vocabulary: protagonist, various staging – proscenium, thrust and theatre in the round
Developing a clear understanding of the narrative and use as much of Shakespeare‟s language as possible



SUMMER
The Selfish Giant
The themes of selfishness and redemption are explored at the heart of Oscar Wilde‟s famous short story. We may also
draw on more contemporary texts such as the picture book, „Rose Meets Mr Wintergarten‟ by Bob Graham.

Key learning objectives in the drama include:
Exploring character and issues through a range of dramatic conventions including role-play; hot-seating; still image;
conscience alley
Creating and sustaining atmosphere through the use of sound and movement.
Learn to use monologue as a dramatic technique as a means of revealing character and point of view
Understand how meaning is modified by tone, pitch, volume, pace, resonance and timbre

The students will have the opportunity to watch a production.

Parents can offer their support this year by taking their children to the theatre regularly to watch productions
of Shakespeare and puppet shows. Visit „The Little Angel Theatre‟ in Islington, which produces puppet shows
throughout the year, and runs puppet workshops, which may be of interest during the holidays.


                                           ENGLISH - YEAR 4

AUTUMN
THEMES: The hero and the anti-hero
Poet/Author studied: Ted Hughes

SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Focus: paired work and group work
Group dramatisation of a scenario involving a hero. Pupils work in groups and are given a task to show.

POETRY
Study selected poems of Ted Hughes
Look at: Simile, Alliteration, Colour images, Light and shade, Hard and soft images/texture, Creation of character in
a poem, Use of descriptive sounds and sensual words, Free verse
Learn by heart Ted Hughes‟s poem “Esther‟s Tomcat”.
Look at poetic language and imagery in Ted Hughes‟s “The Iron Man”
Look at description of the space-bat-angle and write a descriptive poem using metal and jewel images, alliteration
and simile.
How to form kennings – noun or adjective hyphen verb/noun eg back-scratcher.
HANDWRITING AND PRESENTATION
Focus: Good presentation and cursive script at all times using a handwriting pen. Develop speed of writing.
Practise speed with dictation.
Indenting for paragraph and writing up to the margin for the rest.
Speech set out on a new line for each new speaker.
Ensure continuity of size and proportion of letters and spacing between words.

WRITING
Planned extended writing with more detail in the central sections.
Contrasting descriptions of the sea in two paragraphs . Revise paragraphs, one on the calm sea and one on a
stormy sea. Use of comma, phrases beginning with participles and use of simile.
Make game of the first chapter sequencing the events in the correct order. Write instructions for the rules and for
the squares that they land on.
Write e-mail or text message from the Iron Man written when he is buried about his feelings about being on earth
and what he thought about earth. Use events from the two chapters. Write from the point of view of the Iron Man.
Make a menu of metal food concoctions for the iron man using alliteration for effect. Follow a worksheet plan of
ideas and headers for starters main courses and desserts extending their vocabulary.
Write a kenning about a powerful creature or a hero.
Play scripts. Discuss format of play scripts looking at use of participles, brackets and adverbs for character
directions, scene setting and the use of a narrator. Take well known fairy tale and write out part of the story in a
group. Act out their playlet in their group.
Imaginative writing on the iron man coming to life at school. Use of strong names to describe characters. Begin by
writing a 4 point plan with at least 2 main events.
Write a summary of some of the chapters of the set book in the present tense.


SPELLING
Long vowel phonemes: ar air/are al/aw/au/or
Long „a‟; -ast –ask –ass
Common Homophones: to/two/too they‟re/their/there
Suffixes: -al –ary –ic –ship –hood –ness –ment
More dictionary work and alphabetical order (up to three letters)
Nouns and adjectives made into verbs by suffixes –ate –ify etc. investigate
More work on double consonants: ss ll ff tt
Silent –b comb climb plumb crumb etc.
Verb endings s-ed –ing

Revision of words with –ight
Spell correctly keywords for this term from National Literacy Strategy:

GRAMMAR AND PUNCTUATION
Re-read own writing to check for grammatical sense/coherence and accuracy (agreement) to identify errors and
suggest alternatives
Revise work on verbs and investigate verb tenses –past, present, future – and see how this relates to purpose and
structure of text – to understand the term „tense‟.
Identify the use of powerful verbs.
Identify adverbs and understand their functions in sentences
Sentence construction and punctuation
Practice using commas to mark grammatical boundaries eg clauses, phrases, speech.
Use of hyphen in kennings, splitting words at end of line

READING
One library lesson a week
The children keep their own reading record
Read set book aloud around the class for expression and fluency.
Discuss character, plot, setting, motivation, sentence structure, vocabulary, chapter titles etc. set book.
Write summary of some of the chapters in the present tense
Read books on the theme of heroes and anti-heros by Ted Hughes
Look at extracts of different texts to discuss significance of different punctuation marks to improve the expression and
emphasis of their reading.

TO PARENTS
Please encourage your child to visit the public library and to read books on heros and anti-heros. Please remember the
children are expected to read for 20 minutes every day. At this stage the children should be reading silently to
themselves and should not need to be heard reading except when advised by the teacher.

HOMEWORK
Homework will be given most weeks, which will comprise of either spellings, project work, comprehension, grammar
work or learning a poem. If none is given “no homework set” should be written.
On a weekly basis it should take a maximum of 30 minutes but a project may be set over a number of weeks.



SPRING
THEME: Animals
Set Book: The Midnight Fox by Betsy Byars

SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Focus: Introduction to formal debate on fox hunting.
Gain and maintain the interest and response of different audiences – using persuasive language.
Identify feature of language used for a specific purpose – to instruct, persuade, entertain.
Introduction to taking on different roles – chairman, spokesperson etc.

POETRY
Tiger, Tiger by Spike Milligan
Jolly Hunter Charles Causley
The Fox by Phoebe Hesketh contracted with Red Fox by Jill Townsend
Macavity the Mystery Cat TS Eliot


HANDWRITING AND PRESENTATION
Spellings and poetry copied accurately and neatly
Good presentation required at all times.
Use of handwriting or fountain pen in blue ink at all times.
Leave a space after a full stop and a comma.
Writing on the line.
Indenting for paragraph and writing up to the margin for the rest.
Speech set out on a new line for each new speaker.
Joined handwriting for all writing except where other special forms are required.
Extra handwriting pack for those who need extra help which is sent home to be completed.
Ensure continuity of size and proportion of letters and spacing between words.
Build up speed in writing.
Use a range of presentational skills eg for posters and title etc.

SPELLING
More long vowel phonemes ir/ur/er ire ure ere –ild –ind –old
Silent letters t w n h
Plural revision f-ves y-ies
Suffixes –sure –ture
Prefix al-
How vocabulary changes over time
Words indicating gender
Adding suffixes to create adjectives from nouns
Dictionary work and alphabetical ordering up to 5 letters
Keywords for the term from National Literacy Strategy

GRAMMAR AND PUNCTUATION
Revise and extend work on adjectives – adjectival phrases
Comparative and superlative of adjective and adverbs
Apostrophe for possession, rules for apostrophising singular and plural
Distinguish between apostrophe for contraction and possession.
Use of commas and connectives to separate clauses

READING
One library lesson a week
The children keep their own reading record book.
Read set book aloud around the class for expression and fluency.
Discuss character, plot, setting, motivation, sentence structure, vocabulary, chapter titles etc set book.
Write summary of some of the chapters in the present tense.
Read books on the theme of animals.
Look at extracts of different texts to discuss significance of different punctuation marks to improve the expression and
emphasis of their reading.

WRITING
Write an adventure story (dramatic events and ending) from the point of view of an animal that is being hunted. Use
of strong names for the characters and powerful verbs.
Dialogue between a child and an adult, to express the feelings of a child finding himself in a problem situation that
he has to solve. Use of lengthy speech to carry forward the story and to characterise. Use of adjectival/adverbial
phrases to describe activity/movement, emotions of speakers.
Construct a detailed fact-file of an imagined characte r. Then, using the information, write a description of going
into their bedroom and gradually realising what type of person they are from their diary, collections, old tickets,
posters, pets, toys etc.
Write a letter from Tom, the main character in the set book, in reply to his best pal Petie. Write in the manner of the
characters – including imagined news and TV headlines and stories, shared memories, telling of feelings at sight of the
back fox.

Write own descriptive poem about an elusive animal that you remember seeing before you vividly for a few
moments. In response to reading and discussing “The Fox” – P Hesketh. Use of participles, colour images and some
words or phrases from the poem in their own work.
Write a persuasive text (as a poster or as an argument), showing the difference between fact and opinion.
In groups/pairs skim and scan non-fiction texts with information on Foxes. Plan and design an information poster
(non chronological report) on one aspect eg dangers to foxes. Must have at least nine pieces of interesting/relevant
research information.

TO PARENTS
Please encourage your child to visit the public library and to read books on Animals from the Book List. Please
remember the children are expected to read for 20 minutes every day. At this stage the children should be reading
silently to themselves and should not need to be heard reading except when advised by the teacher. Please assist your
child with ideas for written homework/projects or with spellings but kindly refrain from doing the written work for
them.

HOMEWORK
Homework will be given most weeks, which will comprise of either spellings, project work, comprehension, grammar
work or learning a poem. If none is given “no homework set” should be written in the child‟s homework diary.
On a weekly basis it should take a maximum of 30 minutes but a project may be set over a number of weeks.




SUMMER
THEME: Traditional Tales from Around the World (multicultural literature)

These include:
Anancy Spiderman Tales (as told by James Berry), Asian Folktales, Stories from “In the Beginning” (Creation
Stories from Around the World) ed. Hamilton and Moser.
Read “Three Indian Princesses” by Jamila Gavin,

Preparation for the Dorset trip
Introduction to the works/life of Thomas Hardy in preparation for the Dorset trip.
The Old Seat and The Deer or Domicilium by Thomas Hardy.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Focus Task: Research and retell a story from a different country
Choose material that is relevant to the topic and to the listeners
Show clear shape and organisation with an introduction and an ending
Recall important features of a talk
Respond others appropriately, taking into account what they say.

POETRY
“Gran, Can You Rap” by Jack Ousbey – learn verses from this poem.
“My Gran Visits England” by Grace Nichols
“A Nest Full of Stars” by James Berry
Dialect poems
Introduction to Haiku form
Tap out the rhythm and perform as a class
Use of syllables in poems, repetition in poetry
Creation of calm imagery and revision of narrative poetry
Poetry with a point!

Poems from „Over the Sea, Under the Moon‟, ed Grace Nichols and James Berry

Poets studied: John Agard, Grace Nichols and James Berry

HANDWRITING AND PRESENTATION
Spellings and poetry copied accurately and neatly
Good presentation required at all times.
Use of handwriting or fountain pen in blue ink at all times.
Leave a space after a full stop and a comma.
Writing on the line.
Indenting for paragraph and writing up to the margin for the rest.
Speech set out on a new line for each new speaker.
Joined handwriting for all writing except where other special forms are required.
Extra handwriting pack for those who need extra help which is sent home to be completed.
Ensure continuity of size and proportion of letters and spacing between words.
Build up speed in writing.
Use a range of presentational skills eg for newspaper reports, adverts etc.

SPELLING
More long vowel phonemes – oi/oy ow/ou ough/ow o as u
Consonant/vowel phonemes wa war wor wo swa
-ss-words eg missile –ff words eg suffer
Review silent letters
More apostrophe and contractions I‟d we‟ll etc.
Roots and Suffixes/Prefixes –ible –able –ive –sion
Know difference between its/it‟s
Spell correctly Keywords for this term from National Literacy Strategy
Use of dictionaries and thesaurus
Research and make a class collection of words that have come into the English language from other sources. Pupils
with other linguistic backgrounds are encouraged to make presentations to the class about their languages.
Dialect words that pupils are aware of, from their own dialects, or others, should be discussed and displayed.

GRAMMAR AND PUNCTUATION
Endings on words; which type of words can change their endings
Punctuation marks including – colon, dash, hyphen, semi-colon
Revise: speech marks, apostrophe, paragraphs
Changing a sentence – statement to question, positive to negative
Use of connectives to structure an argument – therefore, on the other hand, finally
Study differences in dialect between some traditional tales and Standard English.

READING
One library lesson a week
The children keep their own reading record book. They should now be able to recommend and review books for the
rest of the class.
Discuss character, plot, setting, motivation of characters in the stories we read.
Read books on the theme of multi-cultural stories and Literature from other lands.
Look at extracts of different texts to discuss significance of different punctuation marks to improve the expression and
emphasis of their reading.
Perform the Rap in groups or as a class, with an emphasis on rhythm.

WRITING
Description of different places, climate and landscapes – use of adjectival and adverbial phrases
Creation of character – feelings and motivation
Developing a story/narrative in the style of traditional tales /from traditional poetry – the unfolding of events and
ideas. Introduction – build up- conflict – climax – resolution. Rewrite a myth and update it for today‟s world.
Write a traditional tale as a book, using the archetypal characters and phrases of these stories. Illustrate.
Designing your own creation myth, based upon what you know about the world.
Non-Chronological Reports – choose a place somewhere in the world and write about it in a sequence of paragraphs,
based on information researched from the internet.
Introduce explanatory texts by writing an explanation of how a tiger catches its prey or how an item of clothing
is made somewhere in the world.
Newspaper report writing – discussion and inclusion of fact and opinion; a report based on a traditional tale (eg
Icarus to fly to Sun – is he off his head?)
Writing own poetry in different forms and rhythms, particularly sequences of haiku, or raps, developing
understanding of particular forms in response to the poetry studied.

TO PARENTS
Please encourage your child to visit the public library and to read books from the Book List. If your child is
researching a family tale, story, biography or a non-fiction topic using encyclopaedia or internet, please assist them
with ideas (kindly refrain from doing the work for them). Please remember the children are expected to read for 20
minutes every day. At this stage the children should be reading silently to themselves for pleasure and should not
need to be heard reading every day except when advised by the teacher.

HOMEWORK
Homework will be given most weeks, which will comprise of either spellings, project work, comprehension, grammar
work or learning a poem. On a weekly basis it should take a maximum of 30 minutes but a project may be set over a
number of weeks. If homework is not set “no homework set” should be written in the child‟s homework diary.


                                           FRENCH - YEAR 4
Our aim is to provide a coherent, logical, successful and motivating course for the young learners of French. Amongst
others we use the course „So you really want to learn French” which involves children in active learning.
We aim to emphasise the practicality of the material covered in both the oral and written aspect of each activity and
also to promote an awareness of the European and French-speaking world.

More reading and writing is involved. We also provide a broad introduction to French life and culture through
activities, games and other media. An important part of the course at this stage is the consolidation of previous
language acquisition which allows all children to complete any gaps in their knowledge and understanding.
When the children are ready we will provide them with the opportunity to take the Asset Language Certificates Grade
1 in all 4 skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening). This is a nationally recognised scheme which aims to track
language learning throughout one‟s lifetime.
We would like to ask parents to have a positive attitude towards foreign languages in general. Please encourage your
child by developing their awareness of foreign cultures and pointing out how these in turn influence our everyday
lives.

AUTUMN
TOPICS
The classroom
Personal identification

OBJECTIVES (both oral and written)
To be able to:

Ask for and name objects in the classroom
To talk about themselves

GRAMMAR POINTS
-  1st three persons of être and avoir
-  Masculine and feminine articles
-  Singular and plural


SPRING:
TOPICS
House and home
French breakfast

OBJECTIVES (oral and written)
To be able to:
Describe house
Ask politely for breakfast items

GRAMMAR POINTS
 Singular –er verbs
 Possessive adjectives


Where applicable we will hold a French breakfast to practise the vocabulary learnt in class


SUMMER

TOPICS
Daily routine
Telling the time

OBJECTIVES
To be able to:
Tell the time
Talk about daily routine


GRAMMAR POINTS
-  Reflexive verbs singular
-  Faire singular forms
-  Negatives

End of unit assessment.
                                       GEOGRAPHY - YEAR 4

Everything we do has a geographical slant. What we eat, where we go, what we wear, how we travel and where we
live are all influenced by geography.

Parents can help our children to become geographers by encouraging them to look carefully at the different
environments around them and to ask the following questions:

Where is this place?
What is it like?
Why is it here?
How did it get like this?
How has it changed?

During Year 4 the children follow a course which takes elements from the National Curriculum as well as studies that
have been developed by the Geography Department.

The work that is done in the classroom is supported by what the children see and do on the various trips that they
undertake throughout the year.


AUTUMN TERM
Farming

       The different types of farming.
       What happens on a farm.
       The role of farming in producing the food we eat.


SPRING TERM
Weather Around The World

       The components of the weather.
       How the weather is recorded.
       Identifying climatic zones.
       Analysis of the climate of different locations.
       How weather affects what people do.


SUMMER TERM
Investigating Coasts

       The rock cycle and the different types of rock – sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic.
       The properties of different rocks.
       Coastal erosion and deposition.
       Peoples use of the coastal zone.
       A study of the Dorset coast.
       Much of the work in this unit is based on the work done on the Dorset field trip.


                                           HISTORY - YEAR 4
Year Four spend two terms studying the Egyptians and the Summer term a culture from Meso- America, The Aztecs.

AUTUMN
They create a time line to place this period in history and to relate it to events they know about
They also study a map of the area to establish where they are going to be!
Their first topic is The Nile and its importance to all aspects of Egyptian life. We then look at houses, temples and
gods in detail. They choose one or two gods for individual research.
The story of Isis and Osiris.
Next the importance of the pharaoh, „famous pharoahs‟ and the regalia associated with the Pharoah.
Making a model of The Eye of Horus and an Ankh.
Trip to Ashmolean now or early in the Spring Term.
ICT Reasearching the gods(with directed sites)
  DVDs on The Pharoahs.
   Video on The Gift of The Nile


SPRING
Continue to study Egyptians
 Looking at Hieroglyphics and cartouches. Creating their own.
The discovery and importance of the Rosetta stone.
Making Egyptian costumes and jewellery after visit to museum (reference)
Important discovery of Lord Carnarvon, archeologists.
The wonders of the Tomb of Tuthankamun.
Mummification and tomb furniture.
Pyramids. Building a pyramid

ICT More research, again directed. Interactive BBC building a pyramid. DVD of Tuthankamun.

SUMMER TERM
Place Mesoamerica geographically and on the Time Line to see the difference.
Discuss why we were so long in finding America- Columbus etc.
Look at special farming around major city of Tenocticlan- chinampas.
Foods they ate and „gave‟ to us. A tasting session?
Housing for rich and poor.
City structure( pyramids again!)
Beliefs and gods.
The sacrifices.
The „end of the world‟ every 52 years.
Grow Aztec Foods
Aztec counting and their calendars.
Aztec Ball game.
The end of their empire due to the Spanish.


Over the course of this year hopefully the skill of keeping a note book for use in homework will have been acquired,
also the ability to use reference books and web sites and to write up their own work from the notes they have made.
Impress upon them that Press and Print is not a useful learning tool. The visit to the museum is in some ways a
learning experience in how to use a museum.
                                                YEAR 4 - ICT
AUTUMN
This year the children will continue to build upon the firm foundation of ICT skills covered in Year 3. They
understand the rules of how to use the ICT suite, where and how to save their work and how to work with a variety of
software packages. Please continue to reinforce this good practice at home. They are taught that they should not eat or
drink at the computer, they should leave the area they wish to find it and always have clean hands when using the
keyboard. They are also taught to save their work into their home directory and take care of CDs by handling them
correctly and storing them properly. This term the children spend part of each lesson on touch typing and we would
ask you to encourage your child to type at home without looking at the key board. Any software that they enjoy using
to improve their touch typing speed and accuracy would be excellent. At present we are using Tux Type 2‟ to good
effect. They will use subject specific software in their curriculum lessons on a regular basis to enhance their learning
The children will spend some time each ICT session on their touch typing skills

Making pictures with patterns. Using a paint program such as Dazzle and making repeating patterns and stamps by
copying part of a picture. Learning to flip and to rotate pictures. Making pictures out of dots and making symmetrical
patterns. This can be tied in with Maths work on symmetry. Assessment with a design of a fish tank.
Please encourage your child to experiment with a painting software at home and discuss line and rotational
symmetry in every day objects

Writing for different audiences. Using Word and inserting a picture from a painting software. Putting a heading and
writing about the picture in an appropriate font and size. Using Cut and paste to put things in the right order. Learning
to use spell checker. Looking at when you should use „find and replace‟ to correct work. Looking at newspaper and
magazine layout.

Please encourage your child to look at newspaper headings and at advertisements to study the layout of the piece, the
type of font used and the impact of text and pictures in the work. Spell checker should be enabled on your home PC
and the children encouraged to use it.

SPRING
The children will meet a large amount of subject specific software in their curriculum lessons as well as using their
word processing skills in all areas.

Please check that your child sits properly at the computer, that he is at the correct height and that he does not look at
his hands as he types. Please also encourage him to continue to search for relevant information on a safe site and to
maintain his e mail discipline from last year.

Part of each ICT lesson to be spent on touch typing

Collecting and presenting information. Using Junior Viewpoint and building on the work covered last year the
children will gather information about themselves and put it into the database. Designing the Questionnaire in an
attractive format and then producing graphs. Deciding which type of graph gives the best picture for that specific
topic. Link with the Maths lessons.

Introduction to branching databases and tree diagrams. Learning which how to create a branching database and
why you might need to create one. Learning which programs are branching database programs

Learning how to search a database including and /or searches and to evaluate information from a database.
Learning how to spot errors in a database possibly by using a line graph to identify where the error lies.

Learning about search filters and sorting (continued from Year 3).

Please draw your child‟s atte ntion to any graphs or charts either on the television or in magazines or
newspapers. They should be thinking about why that type of chart was used and the layout and presentation of
the results.
SUMMER
The children will meet a large amount of subject specific software in their curriculum lessons as well as using their
word processing skills in all areas.

Part of each ICT lesson to be spent on touch typing.

Controlling devices. Learning to devise instructions and sequences. Input and output devices. Repeat and wait
instructions and how to control outputs. Use of Flowel modelling software and practical models
Please draw your child‟s attention to controlling devices that they encounter in every day life such as traffic lights,
level crossings and barriers operated by card or ticket. They should understand that a program is only as good as its
writer. It cannot solve problems alone or make unexpected decisions,

Use of the school digital camera. Learning how to take pictures including appropriate composition and how to
download from the digital camera to the server via a card reader. Making changes to the photos on the computer.
Pasting into another application and using wrap around text.
Please encourage your child to look carefully at photos in all aspects of life and to experiment with their own
cameras.

Graphical modelling. This may be carried out by the maths department. Learning that painting software is not good
for maps but drawing software is better. Changing outline colour and using the „fill‟tool.. Putting layers behind or in
front of objects. Making a map of a classroom with drawing software and understanding how models allow you to try
out different ideas.

Please discuss modelling with your child. They might like to try making a graphical mode l of their own
bedroom.

                                     MATHEMATICS - YEAR 4

AUTUMN
Steps in problem solving.
Investigations.
Decimals and simple calculations.
The children will perform many simple calculations using decimals and any reinforcement that you can offer will be
very useful especially when giving change or in any other money problems
 Place value.
Children are always fascinated by very large numbers. Perhaps you could ask your child to read out any very large
numbers that you see.
Types of number. This topic will include prime numbers, square numbers, triangle numbers, cube numbers, factors
and multiples.
Angles. The children will learn the names of the angles and how to draw and measure them using a protractor.
Please ask your child to estimate the size of an angle in degrees.
Twenty-four hour clock.
Please ask your child to tell you the time using the twenty four hour clock and to do calculations with periods of time.
They also need to be able to convert from the 12 hour to the 24 hour clock.
Congruency.
Grouping data.
Barline graphs.

FOCUS FOR TERM
Presentation and written work
Use of a protractor
Use of a ruler for all diagrams and drawing lines on the lines in the book
Use of a sharp pencil

HOMEWORK
This will be set weekly and should take no more than 30 minutes. Please encourage them to set their work out neatly
with a title, margin and date for each piece of work. We do not ask them to start a new page for each piece but they
should draw a line under each piece of work before starting the next one.

SPRING
This term we focus on mental arithmetic skills as well as accuracy. Please continue to support your child as they learn
their multiplication tables and ask them simple mental arithmetic problems.

The topics this term will include:
Steps in problem solving.
Solving problems by making a list and prioritising information
If there is the opportunity to plan or organise information please ask your child to help.
Investigations.

Simple equivalence of fractions. The children need to understand that a half is equivalent to two quarters.
Long multiplication. The children will learn to multiply by 10 and its multiples and then take it one stage further and
also multiply by the unit. Practice with these is always useful.
Rules of divisibility. The children will learn the rules for 2,3,4,5,6,9 and 10. Please ask them about these rules.
Continued practice of arithmetic skills.
Line and rotational symmetry.
Reflection.

Perimeter, area and volume.
This work will tie in with the Dorset trip. Any practice at measuring and estimating the perimeters and areas of
everyday objects would be very useful.
Frequency diagrams and display of data.
Please draw your Childs attention to any display of data in the media

FOCUS FOR TERM:
Understanding of metric units.
Recall of all tables and ability to find fraction of a quantity.
Estimation and mental agility.

HOMEWORK
This will be set weekly and should take no more than 30 minutes. Please encourage them to set their work out neatly
with a title, margin and date for each piece of work. We do not ask them to start a new page for each piece but they
should draw a line under each piece of work before starting the next one


SUMMER
The children will need to continue their practice of the multiplication tables and mental arithmetic. If y ou travel
abroad with them this summer, please ask them to do calculations that involve converting currency and distances.

The topics will include:
Further practice at appropriate methods of problem solving.
Investigations.
Using a calculator.
Simple formulae and algebraic notation.
Reinforcement of arithmetic skills.
Any practice at the four rules of number is always useful.
Metric units.
The children will learn to convert from one metric unit to another and they need considerable practice in this.
Consolidation of work on area and perimeter from Dorset trip.
Construction of squares and triangles.
The children will learn to use mathematical instruments such compasses to accurately construct shapes. This will help
to improve their hand-eye coordination.
Probability.
Please discuss the chances of any given event occurring with your child.
Mode and median.

Focus for term: Ability to explain an idea so that the teacher or one person can understand them. Ability to work in
a team or group, being equally involved and valuing the contribution of other team members.

HOMEWORK
This will be set weekly and should take no more than 30 minutes. Please encourage them to set their work out neatly
with a title, margin and date for each piece of work. We do not ask them to start a new page for each piece but they
should draw a line under each piece of work before starting the next one.
                                             MUSIC - YEAR 4

1. SINGING
It is our aim that all children should sing regularly within the school and participate fully in end-of-term concerts and
other musical productions. Please encourage your child to listen to music and to sing! SINGING IS OUR
NATURAL INSTRUMENT.
Year Four will be covering:
 Song cycles
 Four part rounds and Canonic singing
 Simple Two part singing
 Broadening context of songs e.g. Negro Spirituals
 Material for end-of-term concerts

2. RECORDER
Please listen to your child play and encourage them as far as possible. If they learn an instrument, please support them
in their practice!
 Establishing slurs more fully
 Melodies to regularly include E and D
 Introduce F# and C#
 Simple two part pieces or rounds
 Greater emphasis on tone production
 Playing to recorded music
 Introduce high E (E‟) and the concept of split thumb position

3. MUSIC APPRECIATION
Please take your child to as many concerts as possible and encourage them to listen to a wide range of music.
Attending live music performances is very beneficial as are discussions about music with friends and family.
 Introducing chronology in music
 Looking at orchestral forces from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern eras
 Introducing film music more fully
 Music and Dance
 Looking at Ballet e.g. Romeo and Juliet
 Dance used in musical e.g. West Side Story
 Pop music as a dance medium

4. THEORY
The aim is to incorporate musical theory in practical lessons rather than be a dry and remote academic exercise.
 Greater understanding of dynamics e.g. p, mf, f, cresc., dim.
 Understanding simple time signatures e.g. 2/4 3/4 4/4
 What constitutes a chord
 Introducing major and minor
 Dotted rhythms
 Analysis, looking at the elements of music.

5. COMPOSITION
Includes:
 Playing chords on tuned percussion as a basic framework
 Developing the idea of building harmony, melody and a rhythm accompaniment
 Graphic/Rhythmic/Stave notation
 Using music software
 Pentatonic composition
 Composing a fanfare.


                              PHYSICAL EDUCATION - YEAR 4
AUTUMN
SOCCER
Warm up routines, technical practices. Individual skills. Ball familiarity. Running with the ball. Passing and
receiving, shooting, basic heading, tackling. Goal keeping. General laws of soccer.

NETBALL/BASKETBALL
Warm up and skills practices, unit skills, fun games, relay competitions and small sided games. Ball handling
familiarity. Passing, receiving, dribbling, rebounding and shooting. Basic defence and attack. General laws of the
games.

GYMNASTICS
Travelling: using different parts of the body, thinking about high, medium – low movements.
Achieving variety using body shape emphasis.
Jumping and landing.
Jumping and rolling.

Balance:
Travelling in and out of balance.
Headstands.
Handstands.

Travelling and balance:
Using speed emphasis.
Using space emphasis.
Working in pairs and small groups creating simple routines.

SWIMMING
Basic introduction to three main strokes: front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke. Stamina building and speed work.
Emphasis on having fun but being safe in the water.

DANCE
Looking at famous ballets such as “Coppelia”. Use storyline and music to create own dances concentrating on body
shape and simple ballet technique.

SPRING
NETBALL

Consolidation of throwing, catching, defending, dodging, attacking and marking. Concentrating on small sided and
full sided games.

HOCKEY
Passing on the move, shooting and defending skills. Aiming to develop more sophisticated dribbling skills, better use
of opportunities and enhanced ball control. Encouraging the children to run off the ball to space. Development of
small sided and full sided games.

RUGBY
Concentrating on developing and improving the following rugby skills: passing and receiving, tackling and beating
opponents, unit skills to include three man scrummage, ruck and maul, starts and re-starts. Aiming to build up to 9-a-
side games of mini-rugby.




FITNESS
Understanding the concept of physical fitness whilst developing and adopting sensible training habits. These include
adequately warming up and cooling down. Simple fitness circuits.
Concentrating on improving individual fitness levels through the main elements of fitness: suppleness, stamina, speed
and endurance.

Activities included fitness circuits, aerobics, speed runs and cross country running in school and around Hurst. Fitness
testing at the beginning and end of term.

GYM/DANCE
Gymnastic skills - forwards roll, backwards roll, shoulder stand, br idge, headstand, headstand forwards roll.
Movement and rhythm through aerobics.


SPRING
SWIMMING
First Half of Term
Practice development and consolidation of swimming stroke techniques to
develop confidence. Swimming on the back and front with children working in
ability groups.

Second Half of Term
Introduction to survival and rescue skills
Concentrating on teaching survival swimming techniques. Activities include safe entry
into shallow and deep water; treading water; swimming under water and collecting objects
from the pool bottom; rescue techniques using objects to throw and reach; removing
clothing in the water; efficient techniques for distance swimming; understanding the
nature of hazards in and around the water; what to do and how to get help in an emergency
situation.

ATHLETICS
Development of basic throwing actions and introduction of the difference between
throwing for accuracy and throwing for distance. Introduction of basic jumping for
distance and jumping for height. Standing broad jump and light jump techniques leading
on to an introduction to the more formal recognised athletics jumping events.

ROUNDERS/CRICKET
Introduction of game rules. Improvement of hitting, bowling and fielding skills. Proper match play.

TENNIS
Forehand and backhand practices. Introduction of competitive play. Mini games using the service box. Scoring a
tennis match. Some serving and volleying.


                                             SCIENCE - YEAR 4

AUTUMN
Homework: As appropriate

Introduce the circuit board.
Making circuit diagrams.
Rheostat, resistance, parallel and series circuits, switches.
Conductors and insulators.
Truth tables.
Relationship between electricity and magnetism.
Making a magnet.
Making a compass.
Electromagnets.
Safety in the home.
Use of electricity in the home - survey.

This topic will require adult supervision at all times if experiments are to be repeated and investigated at home. There
are many circuit and magnetic type investigations available in good retail shops. The children should be able to set up
a circuit that turns a bulb on and off. Once they have accomplished this series circuit, they are then asked to add more
than one bulb only to find that the bulbs decrease in brightness. They are then challenged to produce a circuit with
two or more bulbs that have the SAME brightness as the first challenge. They then learn that setting up a circuit in
parallel will provide all the components with the same amount of electricity. Other components are then introduced
such as buzzers, motors and rheostats. This theory is reinforced in future CDT lessons where they add working
circuits to a model.

Magnets are made in two ways: stroking a steel needle with a magnet and placing a soft iron nail inside a coil in a
circuit. The children could research the history of magnets at home. Moving soft iron nails inside a coil is shown to
produce a movement in a compass, this leads on to the explanation of the production of electricity at the power station,
a visit they make later on in the Summer term.

The children are asked to survey their own electrical use at home, which they will be plotting graphically at school.
They are made aware that the fuel used at the power station is in the majority fossil fuels and that these are non
renewable. Alternative renewable resources are mentioned eg solar, water, wind but as we live in Reading we are
generally reliant on coal.

The children research the lives of eminent scientists. They are given names such as Faraday, Ohm, Volta, Gilbert,
Galvani, Davy, Franklin all of whom played their part in discovering elements of electricity and magnetism. The
children are encouraged to present their research to the class.



SPRING

FOOD - NUTRITION IN HUMANS
The topic includes:

The mammalian alimentary canal
Digestion
The need for a healthy, balanced diet plus exercise
Dental care
Taste tests
The safe handling of food
Simple structure of the heart and lungs - the importance of the rib-cage as protection
The function of the blood
The children watch a set of videos from the programme HEALTHE that uses life-size models to explain the digestive,
circulatory and respiratory system. A healthy diet, sensible exercise, plus simple first aid is promoted.

Diabetes and asthma is discussed plus a gentle warning about the effects of smoking.

In the lesson teeth types are discussed and the need to brush teeth daily and visit the dentist regularly to avoid tooth
decay.

The diet of young children is a very popular topic at present considering that many children are now over weight due
to too much convenience, snacks and fast food and insufficient exercise. Since the habits of diet are developed in the
early years it is essential that both school and home educate the children in the need for a balanced diet ie one that
regularly contains protein, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins, water and fat.

In school the children learn these major groups and begin to identify which foods belong to these groups by looking at
the content of their lunch boxes. This classification could continue at home, the children could make a list of food for
a day or even a week to investigate their own diet. When available the children see a set of cow‟s lungs and heart to
see the relationship between the two organs plus their physical appearance. Butchers are willing to sell sets of offal if
you wish to repeat this at home but rubber gloves should be worn at all times to avoid blood contamination plus it
must be disposed of carefully as you would raw meat. Practical investigations of blood are no longer allowed due to
the danger of cross-contamination. Thus the children see slides and videos to explain its structure and function and
are given safety rules for the playground in that only an adult deals with cuts and grazes.


SUMMER
The Place of the Earth in the Solar System
Rotation of the earth around the sun - day and night, the seasons.
Rotation of the moon around the earth - the phases of the moon.
Solar and lunar eclipses.
Differences between a planet and a star.
Simple differences in the surface of the planets in the solar system.


Visit: Mobile Planetarium visits school

If you are lucky enough to travel to the southern hemisphere then please ask your child(ren) to observe the moon, its
phases, where it rises in the sky, the length of daylight, the season in comparison to England plus the stars. If you are
well south e.g. South Africa or Australia the stars will be completely different to England.
Photographs showing shadows, possibly the height of the sun would be invaluable.
On the Equator the moon will look very different, plus the absence of twilight should be obvious.
The Sky at Night programmes are full of up to date information but would need recording as they are always so late.
The Science Museum covers this topic comprehensively and is well worth a visit
Do not give the Kennedy Space Centre a miss if you are in Florida- just to stand next to the Saturn 5 rocket is
enthralling for its sheer size.

Time
The children visit the Royal Observatory at Greenwich and the end of the term.
Throughout the term the History of Time is considered and investigated.
The story of the quest for the measurement of Longitude is researched through an excellent factual film.

								
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